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Full text of "Exhibitors Herald World"

Book 



Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 




Packard Campus 
for Audio Visual Conservation 
www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www . I oc . g o v/rr/reco rd 



I 



1 



Industry Wins Court O K for Credit System 

EX H I B ITO RS 

RALD 







[AHOLD LLOYD «'™ 

Welcome Danger 



Produced by HAROLD LLOYD Corp 

99 A PARAMOUNT 

New Show World Hit! 




fll Q7 Mo I Entered as second-class matter, August 20, 1917, at the Post G/fice at Chicago, III, under the act of March $, 1879. Published Ortohpr T 
^ ' • rw * ' weekly b» Quigley Publishing Co., at 407 South Dearborn St., C ^ago. Subscription, $3.00 a year. S-noie copies, 25 cents. v ""-"- ^ ' 



9P« 



SIX MONTHS 
TEST!! 

Tone-O-Graph 
Has Been Running 
Six Months 
in a 

Broadway Theatre 
Without a 
Breakdown ! 



THE FOOL PROOF 




NOW READY 

to 

DELIVER 

The Disc 
Reproducer 

with the 
Natural Tone 



SOME of the 



SERVICE 

MANY CONTRACTS 



SIGNED 



by Leading 



SHUBERT THEATRE 

BROADWAY, BROOKLYN, N. Y 

ELECTRA THEATRE 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 



NORMANDY THEATRE 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 



RITZ THEATRE 

BRONX, NEW YORK CITY 



BANDBOX THEATRE 

BRONX, NEW YORK CITY 




Independent Exhibitors 



OPERA HOUSE 

GIRARDSVILLE, PA. 



TYPE 1 MD 

$ 1800 



For Theatres 
Seating 
up to 800 



EASY TERMS 



DOUBLE CHANNEL AMPLIFICATION 
LATEST TYPE PICK-UP 



PALACE THEATRE 

BRADLEY BEACH, N. J. 



ARCADE THEATRE 

BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 



NEW 3RD AVE. THEATRE 

THIRD AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



EMPIRE THEATRE 

NINTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



Special Speakers 
Special Gear Drive 



Variable Speed 
Motors with Control 
Box Enabling to 
Run Silent or 
Talking 



TYPE 2 MD 

'2500 



For Theatres 

Seating 
up to 2000 



EASY TERMS 



SOUND ON FILM INSTALLATION GUARANTEED IN 45 DAYS 

We have a special introductory proposition for the first exhibitor in each city who installs TONE-O-GRAPH 

Wire us about it TODAY 



North American Sound & Talking Picture Equipment 

Corporation 

729 Seventh Avenue Telephone Bryant 6686 New York City, N. Y. 

RESPONSIBLE DISTRIBUTORS WIRE FOR OUR PROPOSITION 



TALKIN g| 
SINGINC 
DANCINC 
LAUGH HIT 




THE STAGE STARS! 

j 

THE PHONOGRAPH FAVORITES! 
THE HEAD MEN! . . 

theT WO BLACK CROWS 
MOHAN and MACK 

EVELYN BRENT 

IN 

_ "Why Bring That Up ?** 

<* 

•I The New Show World gives your box office record another shot upward! 
GREEN ^ 44^/^ g r j n g That Up?" has passed every preview test with flying colors. It's in 
the bag! <J Story by the popular Octavus Roy Cohen. Directed by George Abbott. 

PARAMOUNT ZZXZtZ 





ILLED LIKE FEATURES 

JIo* Ansele* ^S3g£ Sunday Sj^nrt^j 




By WHITNEY WILLIAMS 

BILLED in many th 
equally with the fea 
ture, Christie Talking 
assuming an enviable place in the 
world of dialogue productions. 
Bresented in the form of playlets, 
they are more than merely "come- 
dies," in the sense that the word 
generally implies; they are, in- 
deed, complete integers of enter- 
tainment, short reels of action 
that vie for interest with the 
longer subjects. 

The lines are particularly effec- 
tive, and reminiscent, too, of the 
speech utterea by those brave 
del 
m< 
an | 
th. 





Louise Fazenda clowns enoug 
to carry the picture by herself, 
but imkmd. byvrc(|^Hoi 
howl B^ewjis e'^Hu 

over 

■^Wro 

Willis Steell is credited with the 
story, Alfred A. Cohn wrote the 
adaptation and William Watson 
directed. 

Of those comedies mtali.ll Bm{£ 
been filmed recently, fi'aro Nell, 
starring Louise Fn -nulla, Trtfl 
doubtless elicit the most response. 
To the title, "Faro Nell," is ap- 
pended also the subtitle, "Or in 
Old Californy," and in a word it is 
a clever burlesque on the pictures 
that were made when the industry 
was a mere babe in swaddling 
clothes — a travesty on those early 
western thrillers that held pop- 
eyed a udiences s pellbound when 
the^i lllii III Willi' w n nimby our Nell. 

"The Sleeping PorchJ ppooonto 
TT"r|iiiilll| d flriffit l] {\gttm In a com- 
edy role and relates the tale of a 
sick man who has been ordered 
by his physician to pass the 
night on his sleeping porch — and 
of little wine, bound and deter- 
mined that Raymond shall abide 
by the doctor's orders, despite the 
fact that the temperature is far 
below zero and that the porch is 
being rapidly covered with snow. 
F rom Octavu s Roy Cohen's pen 
TuTHr^i^all-negro yarn 
£he Lady Fare 
a 



aim yvuu 11 an 
'headed by Rob- 
erta Hyson and Leroy Broomfield. 
Spencer Williams and Zack Wil- 
liams complete the list of princi- 
pals. Eurora Greeley & Cotton 
Club Chorus offer as fast and furi- 
ous a dance as even the most ar- 
dent terpsichore fan might desire. 



STI 

<G PLAYS 





"FARO NELL". Star- 
ring Louise Fazenda. With 
Jack Luden and big cast. 
A hilarious travesty o|n 
western melodrama. 

"THE SLEEPING 
PORCH'*. Starring 
Raymond Griffith, the 
"whispering bass". A new- 
lywed mix-up with a five- 
alarm finish. 

"THE LADY FARE". 

Al Christie's Sun Tan 
Revue. Hotter than hot. 
Music, dances. By Octavus 
Roy Cohen. All -colored 
cast. 



PARAMOUNT 

NEW SHOW WORLD IN SHORTS 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 




Presented by 

CARL 
LAEMMLE 




T TNIVERSAL'S New Talking 
^ Newsreel has hit the country like 
a flash from the sky. 

We knew it would! 

And now you know it. 

Universal's Talking Reporter is a 
success right from the word GO ! 

His talk on the latest news of the day 
made patrons in First Run Houses 
sit up with surprise and amazement. 

Because — For the first time they 
heard a talking newsreel give them 
up-to-the-minute news. 

News fresh and new, of all the world, 
told in running-fire sequences, just as 
the pictorial events were flashed on 
the screen. 

If you haven't already got it, hot foot 
it to the nearest Universal Exchange. 



Produced under the supervision of 
SAM B. JACOBSON 



2-a week 



On Disc. 



NEWSPAPERS 
IN 

NEWSREEL 
COMBINE 



The Evening World 

(New York, N. Y.) 
The Philadelphia Inquirer 
The Chicago Daily News 
San Francisco Chronicle 
Los Angeles Times 
The Indianapolis News 
The Seattle Star 
The Dallas Dispatch 
The Commercial Appeal 

(Memphis, Tenn.) 
The Houston Chronicle 
The Portland News 
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 
The World-Herald 
(Omaha, Neb.) 
The Montana Standard 

(Butte, Mont.) 
The Salt Lake Tribune 
The Daily Missoulian 
The Billings Gazette 
Charlotte News 
The Oklahoma News 
Kansas City Journal-Post 
Minneapolis Morning Tribune 
The Evening Star 

(Washington, D. C.) 
The Cleveland News 
The Detroit News 
The Atlanta Journal 
San Antonio Express 
The San Antonio News 
Arkansas Democrat 

(Little Rock, Ark.) 
Ft. Worth Star-Telegram 
El Paso Evening Post 
The Spokane Press 
Boston Traveler 
New Haven Evening Register 
The Knickerbocker Press. 

(Albany, N. Y.) 
Albany Evening News 
Buffalo Evening News 
Rochester Times-Union 
The San Diego Sun 
Phoenix Evening Gazette 
The St. Louis Post Dispatch 
The Times-Star 

(Cincinnati, Ohio) 
The Milwaukee Journal 
The Toledo Blade 
Jacksonville Journal 
The Richmond News-Leader 
The Toronto Star 
The Vancouver Sun 



UNIVERSAL TALKING NEWSREEL 



Member Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, Inc. — \vu, ,. Hays, President 



asg g. One Hundred 



/TV it LIFE-SAVER FOR YOU 



Last week, in this paper, we gave the names of our 

FIRST ONE HUNDRED TIFFANY -STAHL FRANCHISE HOLDERS 

This week, on the opposite page, we present the 

SECOND ONE HUNDRED 

Below, on this page, you will find the names of the FIRST ONE HUNDRED, re-published, so that every showman can 
appreciate the constructive work being done for independent exhibitors. 

The Theatre Owners whose names we are using are unanimous in regarding THE TIFFANY-STAHL FRANCHISE as a LIFE- 
SAVER for themselves and every independent. 



THE FIRST ONE HUNDRED 



J. R. Elicott, Lakeland Theatre, Dassel, 
Minn. 

VV. M. Miller, Lib Theatre, Cloquet, 
Minn. 

R. C. Harper, Blackstone Theatre, New 
Rockford, N. Dak. 

W. W. Oram, Red Eagle Theatre, Eagle 
Bend, Minn. 

W. E. Dickson, Aristo Theatre, Lemmon. 
S. Dak. 

B. Berger, Orpheum or Strand Theatre. 
Grand Falls, N. Dak. and Strand Theatre. 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 

Don L. Tracy, Grand Theatre, Carring- 
ton, N. Dak. 

J. C. Snyder, Grand Theatre, Willeston. 
N. Dak. 

Charles F. Vondra, Rainbow Theatre. 
Mahnomen, Minn. 

E. R. Schulte. Savoy Theatre, New 
Prague, Minn. 

L. E. Dawson, Gem Theatre, Shakopee. 
Minn. 

Charles Perrizo, Grand Theatre, Grand 
Rapids, Minn. 

B. Berger, Elko Theatre. Bemidji. Minn. 
John DeMarce, Viking Theatre, Benson, 

Minn. 

Z. J. Terry, Bijou Theatre. Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Ottan Raths. Tdeal Theatre. South St. 
Paul, Minn. 

C. E. Williams, Victoria Theatre and 
Park Theatre, Omaha, Nebr. 

H. F. Higgins, Princess Theatre, St. 
Marys, Kan. 

A. R. Cantwell, Cantwell Theatre, 
Marveline, Mo. 




C. H. Burkey, Summit Theatre. Kansas- 
City, Mo. 

W. A. Rogers, Columbian Theatre, 
Warnego, Kan. 

H. M. Dryer, Savoy Theatre, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

O. A. Lee, Iola Theatre, Minneapolis. 
Minn. 

E. C. Eslin, Ioni Theatre, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Louis Stahl, Wellston Theatre, St. Louis. 
Mo. 

James T. Lawson, Grand Theatre, Mt. 
Olive, HI. 

R. E. Wilson, Palace Theatre, Staples, 
Minn. 

E. A. Schlueter, Community Theatre, 
Arlington, Minn. 

Frederick Wayt, Strand Theatre, New- 
ton, la. 

T. Garretti, Casino Theatre. Meleber, la. 
Thomas Barnett, Royal Theatre, Danville, 
Ind. 

A. C. Miller, Lake or Sourwine Theatre, 
Brazil, Ind. 

Joe Brokaw, Opera House, Angola, Ind. 

Charles R. Metzger, Mecca Theatre and 
Two Johns Theatre, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Charles M. Walker, Irving Theatre, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Harry Markun, Belmont, Talbot and 
Sheldon Theatres, Indianapolis, Ind. 

C. H. Spearman, Gem Theatre, Edmond^ 
Okla. 

O. A. Weickert, Lux Theatre, Perkam, 
Minn. 

W. E. Lyon, Broadway Theatre, Crosby, 
Minn. 

M.Mittenberg, Opera House, Ely. Minn. 
H. F. Aukrum, Gem Theatre, Balaton, 
Minn. 

Fred Wahrenberg, Virginia, Melba, 
Michigan and Cinderalla Theatres, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

C. W. Thompson, Majestic Theatre. 
Plymouth, Wise; Climax Theatre and 
Rainbow Theatre, Milwaukee. Wise. 

T. J. Bogerville, Rialto Theatre, Thorp. 
Wise. 

H. G. Stathmund, Jr., H. S. and Odeon 
Theatres, Chandler, Okla. 

C. C. Dunsmore, Capital Theatre, 
Marshalltown, la. 



Alex S. Moore, Hilltop of Capitol The 
atre, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

R. C. Woldman. Palace Theatre, St 
Louis, Mo. 

Robert Stempel, Strand Theatre, St 
Charles, Mo. 

W. Zimmerman, New Warrenton Theatre 
Warrenton, Mo. 

William Fishoff, Caroline Theatre, Dur 
ham, N. C. 

H. P. Vonderschmith. Strand or Arc 
Theatre, Crawfordsville. Ind. and Granada 
Theatre, Green Castle. Ind, and Indiana 
Theatre, Bloomington, Tnd. 

Alfred G. Wertin, Wertin Theatre, AI 
bany, Minn. 

D. E. Weckman, Royal Theatre 
Nazareth, Pa. 

David S. Nelson. King Bee Theatre. St 
Louis, Mo. 

J. L. Scharley, Keith's Theatre, Baltimore, 
Md. 

O. C. Jehr, Peerless or Shenandoah The 
atre, St. Louis, Mo. and Family or Ameri 
can Theatre, St. Louis, Mo. 

Louis W. Vick, Ashland Theatre, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

A. C. Gortatowsky, Albany and Liberty 
Theatres, Albany, Ga. 

F. H. Young, Masonic Theatre, New 
Washington, Ind. 

Fred Kort, Strand Theatre, Knightstown. 
Ind. 

I. E. Robison, Empire Theatre, Sellers 
burg, Ind. 

James J. Bode.n, Grand or Garden The- 
atre, South Milwaukee, Wise. 

H. N. Turner, Family Theatre. Pine City, 
Minn. 

G. N. Turner, Family Theatre, North 
Branch, Minn. 

Charles E. Lyons, Moveum Theatre, 
Aitkins, Minn. 

H. Thorpe, Peoples Theatre, Crosby, 
Minn. 

W. P. Lowell, Lowell Theatre. Canton. 
S. Dak. 

L. J. Langois, Alamo Theatre, New 
Roads. La. 

Chris Efthen, Star Theatre, St. Louis. 

Louis J. Menges, State Theatre. East St. 
Louis, III. 

Ben Flaks and Morris Flaks, New Lin- 
coln Theatre, Baltimore, Md. 



Howard Armstrong, Dream Theatre, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Robert Shen, Lakeville Theatre, Lakeville, 
Minn. 

A. W. Buckley, New Topic Theatre, Fair- 
fax, Minn. 

E. E. Holmquist. New Broadway Theatre, 
Centerville, S. Dak. 

Frank Miller, Whiteway Theatre, Marlow, 
Okla. 

J. M. Anderson, Princess Theatre, Boone, 
la. 

H. Hierstciner, Family Theatre, Des 
Moines, la. 

H. Perelman, Lehigh Theatre and West 
Alleghany Theatre. Philadelphia, Pa. 

B. Shindler, Opera House, Dover, Del. 
H. Steinberg. Madison Theatre, Madison, 

111. 

Edward Brunell, Metropole Theatre, Chi- 
cago, III. 

M. Rubin, Uptown Theatre, Michigan 
City, Ind. 

G. Glenn Fleser, Liberty Theatre, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

G. Macpherson, Vox Theatre, Klamath 
Falls, Ore. 

H. T. Reynolds, Family Theatre, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

0. E. Varneau. Wealthy Theatre, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

W. H. Arthur. Garden Theatre, Marshall, 
Mich. 

C. F. Seers, Otsego Theatre, Otsego, 
Mich. 

E. C. Oatley, Star Theatre, Rockford. 
Mich. 

E. L. Dale, Park Theatre, Newaygo. 
Mich. 

H. C. Collier, Strand Theatre, Lowell. 
Mich. 

N. L. McCarty. Galewood Theatre, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

Ben E. Murphy, Heights Theatre. 
Muskegon Heights, Mich. 

1. W. Maple, Cozy Theatre, Bethany. Mo 
Edward Smith, Cozy Theatre, Minne- 
apolis. Minn. 

L. E. Maple. Maple Theatre. Alhanv. Mo 
H. E. Wester. Lyric Theatre, LeSuemcr 

Center. Minn. 

A. B. Momand. Deireck Theatre. Maud 

Okla. 



Vill Your Name Appear Here 



T I FF/3 NY 

7 2 9 c^EVE N T M iQVE. 



c/°T f\ H L 



Franchise Holders 



MR. INDEPENDENT EXHIBITOR 



A. B. Momand, 



Leo Posel, 

Eli Resnick, 
Frances Peart, 
Joseph Brodie, 
Charles Trifon, 
James C. Ritter, 
J. E. Stocker, 
Joseph Roszkoski, 
William A. Lencht, Jr., 

A. E. Munio, 

D. J. Larsay, 
J. C. Arnold, 
Julius Overmoe, 
C. H. Tolan, 
W. H. Godross, 
Glen D. Thompson, 
Terrio M. Thompson, 
W. B. Quire, 

S. H. Sayma, 
Harry Fleischman, 
Harry Tinkel, 
C. E. Herman, 
Julius Goodman, 

E. A. Crane, 

B. J. Cooney, 

F. N. Kenney, 
J. A. Phillips, 

G. L. Wilier, 
Herman A. Bird, 
J. Rubin, 

J. C. Chervanka, 

A. Ruttenberg, 

C. A. Ferry, 

B. K. Fischer, 

D. C. Scott, 
Fred. Coch, 

A. M. Herman, 
O. Wesley, 
Sam D. Bois, 
G. W. Kendall, 
Circuit Theatres, Inc., 
Shorewood Theatres, Inc 
Lew Upchurch, 
A. W. Becker, 
J. E. Dovis, 
Harold A. Hill, 
Hyma Lubothe, 
Walter J. Tennigel, 



Rialto or Liberty, Alva, Okla.; Key or 
Rex, Wewoka, Okla.; State or 
Liberty, Seminole, Okla.; Savoy or 
Odeon, Shawnee, Okla.; Rialto or 
Rex, Clinton. Okla.; Circle, Okla- 
homa City. Okla.; Liberty, Hart- 
sern, Okla. 

Lyric, Philadelphia, and Lyric, Chester, 
Pa. 

Grant, Philadelphia. 

Colonial or Peart, Gillispie, 111. 

Brodie, Baltimore. 

New Gulf, Goose Creek, Tex. 

Rivoli, Detroit. 

Myrtle, Detroit. 

Fulton, Detroit. 

Savoy, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Munroe, Rolla, N. D. 

Grand, Wallock, Minn. 

Arna, Rolette, N. D. 

Gem, Hillsboro, N. D. 

Delchar, Mayville, N. D. 

Strand, Warren, Minn. 

Thompson, Holdton, Okla. 

Thompson. Wilson, Okla. 

Star, Kanawna, la. 

Lyda. Grand Island, Nebr. 

Brighton, Pittsburgh. 

Arcade or Colonial, Pittsburgh 

New Carnegie, Carnegie, Pa. 

Astor, Baltimore. 

Park, Tampa, Fla. 

Drake, Willard and Vista, Chicago; 

Maywood, East Hammond, Ind. 
Star, Watseka, 111. 
Palace, Freeport, Tex. 
Our, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Rivoli, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Burton, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Fairmont, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Oliver, Detroit, Mich. 
Granada, Alhambra, Calif. 
Alamo, Milwaukee. 
Royal, Le Mars, la. 
Grand, Remsen, la. 
Rivoli. West Point, Nebr. 
Wilsonville, Wilsonville, HI. 
Dos Palos, Dos Palos, Calif. 
Arc, Delphia, Ind. 
New Cudahy, Cudahy, Wise. 
, Shorewood, Shorewood, Wise. 
Grand, Walters, Okla. 
Becker and Casole, Philadelphia. 
Majestic, Hattiesburg, Miss- 
Hollywood, Chicago. 
Austin, Chicago. 
Pekin, Pekin, HI. 



L. B. Brown, 
H. T. Hodge, 



J. O'Heron, 
L. C. Nurmine, 
P. V. Williams, 
F. Zimmerman, 
R. C. Garbade, 
V. Rawls, 
Charles E. Gucker, 
W. E. Thore, 
Ed. Brickley, 
H. Boei, 
Charles D. Silke, 
E. S. Cumming, 
L. R. Stacy, 
R. S. Nedry, 
N. C. Riggs, 
Ferrin & Josslyn, 
W. H. Gilmer, 
John J. Campbell, 

B. B. Holdridge, 
W. A. Collin, 
H. I. Davis, 
Charles H. George, 
Sol Best, 

M. Hartsman, 
John E. Niches, 
J. L. Geedy, 
Frank Forrest, 
Abe Sandow, 
Charles Perrizo, 

P. C. Larson, 
Henry A. Wiecks, 
Roy C. Berry, 
A. H. Records, 

C. H. Sartorius, 
Sam Sinker, 
W. E. Miller, 
C. C. Griffin, 
M. Atlas, 
Ralph Aversa, 
Ed. C. Curdtz, 
J. F. Barry, 

A. Goffinet, 
M. Spayne, 
W. F. Maginnio, 
L. L. Dunbar, 
E. L. Schubeck, 
Hi Muesley, 
W. J. Wooten, 
Sy Hololi, 



Regal, Gatesville, Tex. 

Palace, Bellinger, Tex.; Grand, Mid- 
land,, Tex.; Queen, Merkel, Tex.; 
Palace and Lyric, Odessa, Tex.; 
Queen, Winters, Tex.; Alcove, 
Stamford, Tex. 

Isis, Lockney, Tex. 

Grand, Kenedy, Tex. 

Roxy, Munday, Tex. 

Palace, San Marcos, Tex. 

Palace, Shiner, Tex. 

Mutual, Hawlin, Tex. 

Dawn, Hartford City, Ind. 

Colonial, Alma, Kan. 

Idle Hour, Olivia, Minn. 

Majestic, Stillwater, Minn. 

State, Eureka, S. D. 

Miles Standish, Minneapolis. 

Mascot, Mobridge, S. D. 

Lyric, Little Falls, Minn. 

Metropolitan, Owatonna, Minn. 

Liberty, Moutorville, Minn. 

Palace, Royalton, Minn. 

Wonderland, Minneapolis. 

State, Shenandoah, la. 

Regal, Elvins, Mo. 

Gem. Alton, III. 

Capital, Port Angeles, Wash. 

Mabel, Chicago. 

Lawhdale, Chicago. 

Dawn, Detroit. 

Palace, Montpelier, Ind. 

Forrest, Booneville, Ind. 

Pico, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Lyceum, Deer River, Minn., and Lyric, 

Cosslake, Minn. 
Grand, Jordan, Minn. 
State, Belle Plaine, Minn. 
Campus, Norman, Okla. 
Empress, Deshler, Nebr., and Majestic, 

Hebron, Nebr. 
Capital, Heartley, la. 
Majestic, Bridgeton, N. J. 
Idle Hour, Festus, Mo. 
New Piedmont, Oakland, Calif. 
Capital, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Hippodrome, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Majestic, Greenville, S. C. 
Vernon, Chicago. 
Goffinet, Rittman, O. 
Dayton. Akron, O. 
Tivoli, Lorain, O. 
Cliff Queen, Dallas, Tex. 
Palace, El Compo, Tex. 
Pastime, Clarendon, Tex. 
Olympia, Canyon, Tex. 
American, Bonham, Tex. 



NextWeek? Watch For Out Ad/ 




PRODUCTION/ I N C. A 

NEW YORK CITY Jj 




very one 

A NATURAL 

7 Big 

Specials 

and 

7 reasons 
WHY 



t) BIG STARS with estab- 
lished reputations on stage 
and screen, 

2) FAMOUS STAGE PLAYS 

that have scored outstanding 
successes, enhanced in entertain- 
ment value by the technic of the 
talkirtg screen, 

3) EXCELLENT CASTS 

thoroughly schooled in dialogue. 



N OTED WRITERS 

who know the requirements of dia- 
logue pictures. 



SKILLED DIRECTORS 

and supervisors who have mastered 
the most advanced methods of 
sound and dialogue. 



6) PERFECT SOUND 

recording and synchronization. 



(?) 



7) BOX-OFFICE RECORDS 

of the first BIG SEVEN — records 
that speak for themselves. 




ANN HARDING 

HER PRIVATE AFFAIR 

F ?ar A " I 



And the Next Sure Winner 

OH YEAH! 

with ROBERT ARMSTRONG 

and JAMES GLEASON .... /rom the 
Saturday Evening Post story "No Brakes" by 
A. W. Somerville. Directed by Tay Qarnett* 



And Still Other Great Ones 
Coming From 



LUCK 



with MORTON DOWNEY 
and BETTY LAWFORD 

Directed by Kenneth Webb, 
vised by Robert Kane. 



3* 



PATH E 



ALL MUSIC 



ALL SOUND ♦ ALL DIALOGUE 



10 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 



1929 



Now you can get 

VICTOR QUALITY 

(VICTOR PICT-UR-MUSIC) 

OVERTURE, TRAILER AND EXIT RECORD SERVICE 

for 

33/s R. P. M. TURNTABLES 

Large and small theatres may now share in the acknowledged superior 
quality of Victor-recorded records for overture, trailer and exit music, for 
reproduction on33V3 R.P.M. turntables. 

There are four selections on each record. Price $5.00 per record, F.O.B. 
Camden, Newjersey. Check with order or C.O.D. Order by number only. 

104 SELECTIONS IN PRODUCTION 

With 4 Selections on 1 Record 



OEi- 



OE2 



-A Part 1 
A Part 2- 
B Part 1 

B Part 2- 
-A Part 1- 
A Part 2- 



B Part 1- 
B Part 2- 
OE3— A Part 1- 
A Part 2- 
B Part 1- 
B Part 2- 



NOW READY FOR DELIVERY 

No order accepted for /ess than 7 each of the following : 

-OVERTURE— DANCE OF THE HOURS— (Ponchinelli) Classical— 4 min. 
-OVERTURE— DEEP NIGHT (Vallee— Henderson) Pop.Symphonic— 3y4min. 
-EXIT —SWEET SUE— JUST YOU— (Baer— 

Campbell — Whitney) Fox Trot — 2% min. 
-EXIT —SAUCY— (Kaufman) One Step— 3% min. 

-OVERTURE— SYMPHONY NO. 4 (Tschaikowsky) Classical— 4Vt min. 
-OVERTURE— IF I HAD YOU— (Schapiro— Campbell- 
Connelly) Pop. Symphony — 3% min. 



OE4- 



A Part 1- 
A Part 2- 
B Part 1- 
B Part 2- 



EXIT —TIGER RAG— (La Rocca) 

-EXIT —RADIUM DANCE— (Schwartz) 

-OVERTURE MARTHA— (Flotow) 
-OVERTURE— RIDERS OF THE FLAG (Sousa) 
EXIT —OUCH— (Kaufman) 

EXIT —ME AND THE MAN IN THE MOON 

(Monaco) 

-OVERTURE— MIGNON— (Thomas) 
-OVERTURE— GOLDEN JUBILEE— (Sousa) 
EXIT —HERE WE GO— (Kaufman) 

EXIT —HIGH UPON THE HILL TOP (Baer- 

Campbell-Whitney) 



Rag — 2% min. 
One Step — 3% min. 
Classical — 4% min. 
March — 3V2 min. 
One Step — 2% min. 

Fox Trot — 2% min. 
Classical — 4 min. 
March — 3% min. 
One Step — 3% min. 

Fox Trot — 2% min. 



ADDRESS: 



VICTOR DIVISION 

RCA PHOTOPHONE, INC 



411 FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK CITY 




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AMERICA'S 

Favorite 
COMEDIAN 
TALKS and SINGS 



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in this comedy triumph 
of the talking screen. 

OUNG people will learn fromWill 
_ Rogers of the perils of Pans. 
Boys and girls will get wise to the 
world -Will Rogers tells the tacts 
abont Paris life and love -and tells 
them with a laugh. 
Prepare the youngsters for the snap- 
piest picture of the year. 



9 




WILLIAM 
FOX 

presents 



WILL 
ROGERS 



111 



They Had To 





SEE PARIS 

FOX MOVIETONE 
All Talking Comedy Drama 



WITH 



Owen Davis, Jr. 

Handsome, a corking actor with all the sparkle and pep of youth. 
He speaks with perfection the lines written by his famous father. 

Marguerite Churchill 

Despite her youth, she came to Hollywood with an amazing stringof 
successes on the legitimate stage behind her. Already, co-eds and 
high school girls have made her their favorite. 

Irene Rich 

One of the screen's best dramatic and charactcractresses. Her screen 
voice is perfection itself. 



Fifi Dorsay 



Keep your eye on this bundle of pulchritude. She's got these, them 
and those — and you'll see a lot of her in this picture. What a hit 
she'll be with Flaming Youth! 

Adapted from the novel by Homer Croy 

Dialog by Owen Davis Scenario by Sonya Levien 

Directed by 




FRANK BORZAGE 




MEANS 



Happiness in Every 
Box Office 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



II 




ON January 1, the 1930 edition of 
The Motion Picture ALMANAC, 
which has proved so indispensable to 
all branches of the motion picture in- 
dustry, and the public, will be issued 
by Exhibitors Herald -World. 

^HERE will be new departments 
of importance to the trade and to 
the public. The 1930 edition of The 
Motion Picture ALMANAC is now in 
preparation for its world-wide readers. 



-With ERICH VON S TROHEIM - BETTY COMPSON - 




, , dramatic „ f ,, ?. """Win* 
i. u <* sterling. „e rf Uat,0 " s «nd tj' 

„° •» and" „7 Stro„ eim ^ 

"umbers ]L s ' n Sing „7Nia. 
/ Son is T de tai/ „ and Packed 

have and n ever y ev£?- dent at- 



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f, ° n s to tu w ord r,f 

Crs sol! ^nfeat/l S ° n ° Art- 
ff eSi e r nd,d Product * hat of. 
?^ ge to Z Uo «*s its 

dent and J„' ex ecuti Ve .' ndll stry 

f tr,but ^ 0 s ; c . ces ^"i iSSS* e * 

^ ta ^« as The Great &L and «>- 





iptures Broadway 

ALD DOUGLAS- n RV , , - - - ^ _ _ „ 

^ MARGIE (BABE; KANE- DIRECTED BY JAMES CRUZE~ 



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HENRY D.MEYER 
NAT CORDISH 
PRESENT 
^he JAMES CRUZEiNC. 
PRODUCTION 



DISTRIBUTED BY 



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GEORCKWCTKS executive VICE PRESIDENT 

BY ARRANGEMENT WITH 

MA MY H.THOMAS SAMUEL ZIERLER 









supp lY 




Warner Bros. 
Hollywood Studios 






High-powered, headline short length features. 
With the biggest stars and the most stars. Drawn 
from every phase of show business. Timely — 
Snappy — Live-wire. Super-entertainment made 
with the same care as our full length produc- 
tions. An amazing array of VITAPHONE VARIE- 
that satisfy that insistent demand for variety. 



Warner Bros. 
New York Studios 




Backed by the combined resources 
of three great studios. A triple guar- 
antee of quality that VITAPHONE 
VARIETIES alone can give you. 




I 






'"Vitaplione" is the registered trade-mark of the 
Vitaphone Corporation designating its products 



THAT DEMAND FOR VAR| ETy 



RED HOT FROM CURRENT BROADWAY HITS! 
STARS IN RECENT VITAPHONE VARIETIES! 








IRENE FRANKLIN 

now playing in Arthur Ham- 
merstein's Broadway success 
"Sweet Adeline" 



BERT LAHR 

Comedian of "Hold Every 
thing", now in its second 
year on Broadway. 



FRED ALLEN 

comedian of "The Little 
Show", now at the Music 
Box. 



RUTH ETTING 

hit of Ziegfeld's "Whoopee", 
now at the New Amsterdam 
Theatre. 



CHARLES HACKETT 

famous tenor now with the 
Chicago Grand Opera 
Company. 



FRED KEATING 

famous magician in Murray 
Anderson's Almanac, Erlan- 
ger Theatre. 




HORACE HEIDT 

and his Californians, now in 
his fourth week, Palace 
Theatre. 




JOHN T. MURRAY 

famous screen and stage 
star, featured by Ziegfeld. 




HARRY CONLEY 

and company — Shubert's 
musical comedy hit "Broad- 
way Nights" now at the 44th 
St. Theatre. 




SIDNEY TOLER 

of David Belasco's new hit 
"It's A Wise Child", now at 
the Belasco Theatre. 




200 COMING FROM NEW YORK 
2 00 COMING FROM HOLLYWOOD 





THE 




CAJRELE// 



More exhibitors 




mchjumi 

IJMTHELMESS 



IN 



Young Nowheres 

Film Daily says editorially "different, delightfully 
. refreshing . . .without 

8*"*"^ . bunk and without 

111* frills. One of the 

forerunners of 
what the un- 
adulterated 
talking pic- 
ture is des- 
tined to 



uade more money 
th "Fast Life" than 
any drama this 
year. With Doug. 
Fairbanks, Jr., 
Lore tta Young, 
C h e s t e r 
M or r i s . 



Gilt A? 



the 



had 
exceec 



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» tbs - r van i*° vd ,f 



r Soon- , 




with Doug. Fairbanks, Jr. 
and Loretta Young. Jam- 
ming the Brooklyn and 
N.Y. Strands this week. 
"Worth seeing. Com- 
pact and intense." 
— Herald Tribune. 
"Doug. Fairbanks, Jr. 
takes another step to 
stardom." Eve. World. 
"Join the crowd at 
the Strand, you won't 
regret it." — American. 
"More dramatic than 
lots of modern movies." 
Neil's. 



FIRST NATIONAL 
and VITAPHONE 
STEPPING FAST- 
ER AND SURER 
IN THE TALKIE 
WORLD THAN 
ANY OTHER 
COMPANY IN 
THE INDUSTRY! 





The 
Independent 
Film Trade 
Paper 



EXHIBITORS 

HERALD 
WORLD 



Home 
Office: 
407 So. Dearborn St. 
Chicago 



IN THIS ISSUE 



CREDIT, ARBITRATION 

Industry Wins Important Victory in Deci- 
sion of Federal Judge That Credit Committee 
System Is Legal — Jurist Warns Against At- 
tempts to Extend Scope of Antitrust Law — 
Arbitration Board is Named in Indiana But 
Metzger Calls it "Outlaw." 



HERALD-WORLD GOLF 

Third Annual Herald-World Film Tourna- 
ment on Coast Breaks All Records — Entry 
List Is Limited to 200 but Many More Seek to 
Compete — Johnny Mescall for Second Time 
Wins Herald-World Trophy for Low Gross- 
Fifty Prizes Are Awarded. 



COMPLETE INDEX TO CONTENTS 



NEWS 

Two hundred religious and civic organizations name represen- 
tative to tell producers on West Coast what women want in 
pictures. 

Indiana exhibitors' association decides to return to arbitration — 
Bandit at McVickers theatre, Chicago, is killed by assistant 
manager. 

Payment of $100,000 in lump sum to musicians cancels final year 
of contract — Weber called to St. Louis to help settle strike. 

M P T O A officials hope to see music tax abolished by time of 
national convention at Memphis, October 29-31 — Fox buys 64 
houses in Midland chain. 



FEATURES 

The Voice of the Industry (Letters from Readers) 60 

Motion Picture Finance 26 

Service Talks 44 

Los Angeles by Douglas Hodges 38 

Broadway 20 

Sound Pictures 33 

Pictorial Section 27 

Sound Act Releases 42 



DEPARTMENTS 



The Studio 38 

Short Features 41 

Music and Talent. 49 

The Theatre 45 

Classified Advertising 59 

Quick Reference Picture Chart 54 

What the Picture Did for Me 61 

New Pictures 60 

Chicago Personalities by J. F 66 



ADVERTISEMENTS 

FILM, SOUND AND EQUIPMENT— Paramount, North Ameri- 
can Sound and Talking Picture Equipment Corporation, East- 
man Kodak, M G M, Fox, Universal, Tiffany-Stahl, Pathe, RCA 
Photophone, Sono-Art, World Wide Pictures, Warner Brothers. 
First National, Western Electric, Mellaphone Corporation, Weber 
Machine Corporation, Automatic Ticket Register. 

MUSIC AND TALENT— Witmark and Son, DeSylva, Brown and 
Henderson, Roy Sedley, Louis Adrian, Leonard Salvo, Anita La 
Perrie, Doris Roche, Benny Ross, Brooks Costumes, Ted Meyn. 



CHICAGO 

407 South Dearborn St. Telephone Harrison 0036-37-38 

Cable Address : Quigpubco 
EDWIN S. CLIFFORD, General Manager 
JAY M. SHRECK, Managing Editor 
GEORGE CLIFFORD, Business Manager 
ERNEST A. ROVELSTAD, News Editor 
HOLLYWOOD 

1603 North Cahuenga St. Telephone Gladstone 2118-2119 
DOUGLAS HODGES 
West Coast Manager 



EDITORIAL 
AND 
ADVERTISING 
OFFICES 



565 Fifth Avenue 



NEW YORK 

Telephone Wickersham 2366-2367 



PETER VISCHER, New York Editor 
JAMES BEECROFT, New York Advertising Manager 

LONDON 
THE BIOSCOPE 
Faraday House 
8-10 Charing Cross Rd., W. C. 2 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: United States and its possessions, Canada and all countries of the Americas S3. 00 per year; Great Britain and its colonies £.1 per year. 

Other foreign countries S5.00 per year. Single copies 25 cents. Advertising rate cards and Audit Bureau of Circulations statements furnished upon application. 

The HERAiLD-WORLD assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts. No manuscripts are returned unless authors so request. 



18 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS 

H E RALD 
WORLD 

Martin J. Quigley, Publisher & Editor 

Incorporating Exhibitors Herald, founded in 1915; Moving Pic- 
ture World, founded in 1907; Motography, founded in 1909; and 
The Film Index, founded in 1909 

Published Every Wednesday by 

Quigley Publishing Company 
Publication Office: 407 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 

Martin J. Quigley, President 
Edwin S. Clifford, Secretary George Clifford, Asst. Treasurer 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
Copyright, 1929, by Quigley Publishing Company 

All editorial and business correspondence 
should be addressed to the Chicago office 

Other publications: Better Theatres, devoted to construction, equipment and 
operation of theatres; published every fourth week in conjunction with Exhibitors 
Herald- World; The Motion Picture Almanac, Pictures and Personalities, pub- 
lished annually; The Chicagoan and Polo, Class publications. 



Vol. 97, No. 1 October 5, 1929 



Reproduction — Again 

REPORTS from various points throughout the country 
testifying to the lack of an uniformly high standard of 
reproduction in the theatres continue to accumulate. In 
some cases the devices which have heen installed appear 
to be inadecjuate; in other instances, possibly because of 
the absence of proper servicing facilities, individual per- 
formance; are of varying quality in reproduction and there 
is a wide range of quality between one show and the next. 

Directly traceable to this condition is the expression fre- 
quently encountered among the public to the effect that 
sound pictures may be all right in the long run but that 
they will have to sound a great deal better before they can 
take the place of good silent pictures. 

If production executives in California and distribution 
executives in New York could personally observe the kind 
of reproduction that is now being given at various places 
they would receive some unpleasant surprises. They 
would, in fact, be prepared for the outright failure of sev- 
eral of their pictures which they are now counting upon 
to be successes. We presume to say that these pictures 
will be failures because of the obvious fact that when an 
audible picture is given poor or indifferent reproduction it 
goes to the public under a handicap which no innate merit, 
however great, can overcome. 

The question of attaining at the earliest possible date an 
uniformly high standard of reproduction in all theatres 
which may attempt to exhibit sound pictures is as impor- 
tant as any issue now facing the industry. And. indeed, 
there are reasons for urging that this question is the most 
important, because the industry's very existence depends 
upon the widespread acceptance and popularity of audible 
pictures* during the coming theatrical season. The greatest 
single influence working against this acceptance and popu- 
larity is poor reproduction. 

Circuit Managers 

THE successful operation of a great chain of theatres 
probably depends more upon the element of personnel 
than upon anything else. We do not mean headquarters 
and home office personnel but the personnel made up of 
the men in the field, the individual managers scattered 
throughout the country who are the corporation's contact 



point with its local property and with that property's 
local public. 

It is acknowledged by every competent observer that 
the exhibitor-owner has certain natural advantages over 
the salaried manager. The chain theatre has, of course, 
its special advantages. The surprising thing to us is that 
in several instances the great circuits accept the natural 
advantages of their position and let the matter rest there, 
with little or no effort to bring to their aid many of the 
advantages of the exhibitor-owner which may be had 
merely through the application of a few principles of 
sound business management and a little commonsense. 
The commonsense angle comes in mostly on the point of 
conducting the circuit generally as a modern, human and 
humane business institution and not as an autocratic 
regime reminiscent of the days and customs of the 
feudal lords. 

Great circuits may be put together by buying theatre 
properties but great circuits can never be successfully op- 
erated if the local manager is to be made into a timorous 
clerk, worried, fretful, insecure in his position and robbed 
of every opportunity for the use of his individual initia- 
tive and enterprise by unreasonable and uncalled for home 
office dictation. 

An upstanding local manager, given as much latitude in 
his operations as results justify and enabled through the 
delegation of authority and responsibility to become a fac- 
tor in the local community, is a great asset to a theatre 
circuit corporation; so great, in fact, that many keen 
analysts believe that without this type of local manager 
circuits will be compelled to disintegrate as quickly as 
they can be put together. 

Mr. Robert Lieber 

THE passing of Mr. Robert Lieber removes from the 
scene of the industry a fine personality who for many 
years has been widely held in affectionate esteem. 

Mr. Lieber was a pioneer of the industry and from the 
early days was a leading figure in motion picture affairs in 
Indianapolis. He became a national figure in the industry 
with his election to the presidency of First National. In 
his long tenure of this office he established for himself a 
reputation for fair dealing which now remains as a fitting 
tribute to his memory. 

On various occasions in the affairs of First National 
seemingly irreconcilable differences among executives and 
among franchise holders developed. It was the usual prac- 
tice to leave these differences to "Bob" Lieber and let him 
decide the issue. Regardless of the outcome there is no 
record of any contestant questioning the decision of "Bob'' 
Lieber. 

A fine, friendly and dependable man was Robert Lieber. 
His passing is a distinct loss to the business and to his 
thousands of friends throughout the amusement world. 

\ N exhibitor correspondent, who expressed the wish to 
x \ remain in the background, recently told us of the 
pained feeling which overcame him as he lately read a 
published article of a near-expei-t on motion picture mat- 
ters whose argument was pretty much to the end that the 
talking motion picture is the bunk. 

This exhibitor admits a few very uncomfortable mo- 
ments as he perused this article, meanwhile recollecting, 
as he expressed it, that he had mortgaged the homestead 
to buy sound equipment. 

The world probably will never be rid of false prophets. 
But a more enlightened mankind ought pretty soon to 
commence to inquire more carefully into the authority, 
if any, of those who undertake prophetic pronouncements. 

Anyone who differs, positively and enthusiastically, with 
this near-expert will find himself in a vast and very in- 
telligent company. If he is wrong he will not be lone- 
some in his error. 

—MARTIN J. QUIGLEY. 



October 5, 1929 EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 19 

Trade Wins Federal Court OK 
For Credit Committee System 



Rules to Save Contracts from 
Fraudulent Sales Found Legal 

Judge Warns Against Attempting to Extend Anti-Trust 
Laws Beyond Their Natural Scope 

By PETER VISCHER 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1. — The film industry scored a notable victory in its de- 
fense of the suits brought by the Government under the Sherman Anti-Trust 
Law here when Federal Judge T. J. Thatcher dismissed one of the two com- 
plaints pending. The victory brought considerable rejoicing and raised hopes 
that the industry's victory over the Government will be complete. 

To explain the matter briefly, it ought to be pointed out that the Government 
brought two suits against the industry. The first is known as the "First Na- 
tional Suit" and constituted an attack on the rules of the Credit Committees of 
the Film Boards of Trade. The second is known, simply as a matter of con- 
venience to differentiate it against the other, as the "Paramount Suit" and is an 
attack on the standard contract and the arbitration system. 



Germans Opposed to 
Barring of American 
Audiens: Thomson 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1. — P. L. Thomson, 
public relations director of Western Elec- 
tric, and M. Arthur Dent, of British Inter- 
national Pictures, gave interesting sidelights 
on the progress of sound pictures abroad 
in addressing the meeting of the Associated 
Motion Picture Advertisers at the Hotel 
Paramount, New York, on Thursday, Sep- 
tember 26. 

Thomson opened his remarks with com- 
ments on the International Advertising 
Conference at Berlin at which he was a 
delegate. He stated that German color and 
poster work was very fine but that in typog- 
raphy and advertising the Germans had a 
lot to learn and they looked to their Ameri- 
can friends for helpful suggestions. 

Enthusiastic Over Progress 

He expressed enthusiasm over the prog- 
ress of sound pictures in various European 
countries and declared that they should 
prove a potent vehicle for carrying the 
English language to the ends of the earth 
and make it the universal tongue of the 
world. According to Thomson the clos- 
ing out of American sound pictures in Ger- 
many was extremely unpopular with the 
people. He stated that sound production 
was progressing very well in England and 
that France was just getting started. It 
was his belief that England would be able 
to compete with us in the making of audible 
pictures. 

Dent Doubts Universality 

Dent, expressing the views of a British 
producer, agreed with Thomson in that 
the English language would be advanced 
through the medium of sound films but he 
did not agree that it would have the ulti- 
mate effect as mentioned by Thomson. 
In fact he decried hopes that such a thing- 
would take place in the thought that it was 
not in the world's interest that it be An- 
glicized. 

Herrin Council Votes 
Sunday Shows; Fixes 
Annual License Fee 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HERRIN, ILL., Oct. 1.— The city coun- 
cil of Herrin has adopted an ordinance 
which will permit the operation of theatres 
on Sunday. The ordinance carried by a 
5 to 3 vote and the first Sunday show will 
be held at the Hippodrome October 6. 

The ordinance legalizes the presenting 
of shows each day of the year, the licenses 
expiring on the last day of the city's fiscal 
year. 

The council established a license fee 
which is based on seating capacity. Thea- 
tres seating 500 persons or less $75, those 
seating over 500 and under 1,000 $200, over 
1,000 and under 1,500 $300, 1,500 and over 
$450. The figures are for annual license. 



Fire Closes Rialto 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

CHARLOTTE, Oct. 1.— The Rialto thea- 
tre at Greer, S. C, is closed on account of 
a fire which damaged the projection room 
and front of the building last Thursday 
night. The house is operated by C. A. 
Herlong. 



Both suits are against the leading motion 
picture producers and against 32 boards of 
trade, charging that they were operating 
in violation of the Sherman Anti-Trust Law. 
If successful in either suit, the government 
would have forced far-reaching changes in 
the motion picture industry. 

Credit Rules Held Legal 

The suit dismissed by Judge Thatcher 
was the socalled "First National Suit." He 
ruled that the credit committees and their 
rules, formulated by distributors to protect 
contracts against the fraudulent sale or 
transfer of theatres are legal. 

The system upheld is that adopted by the 
industry several years ago to govern the 
sale of motion picture houses whose owners 
were under contract to buy pictures at the 
time of the sale. The seller cannot be 
forced to complete his contract, and the 
buyer is under no obligation to assume it. 
Since 4,000 or more of the 20,000 motion 
picture theatres in the country change hands 
every year, the loss due to uncompleted 
contracts was considerable. It was esti- 
mated at $4,000,000 annually by the defense. 

So the distributors agreed to demand se- 
curity not exceeding $1,000 as a condition 
of entering into a new contract with the 
purchaser of the theatre, in case their Credit 
Committee decided that the transfer was 
made by the previous owner to avoid com- 
pleting his contract, or in case the new 



Give Benefit Show For 
Idle Theatre Employes 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

CINCINNATI, Oct. l.—The Stage 
and Screen Scribes of America, Inc., 
an organization composed of local 
exhibitors, theatre managers, drama- 
tic and photoplay editors and allied 
professions, will not hold a midnight 
frolic this year. Instead, they will 
give a benefit performance, with 
some of the very best theatrical tal- 
ent available, the proceeds to be 
turned over to theatre employes who 
have been idle because of legitimate 
houses being dark, due to strike of 
stagehands. 



owner refuses to furnish credit informa- 
tion. 

This system, which the film industry 
hailed as a solution to the problem, was 
asserted to be a violation of the Sherman 
Anti-Trust Act by United States Attorney 
Turtle when the case was tried last March. 
The defense was represented by Edwin P. 
Grosvenor of the firm of Cadwalader, Wick- 
ersham & Taft, No. 76 William street. The 
defendants distribute 60 per cent of all the 
films made in the United States. 

It was pointed out by Grosvenor that the 
agreement did not concern prices and that 
the defendants were at all times in active 
competition with each other throughout the 
country. 

"In this case all the badges of unreason- 
able restraint are lacking," Judge Thacher 
said in his decision. "There is no suppres- 
sion of competition, ho'r any attempt to 
monopolize. No one has complained except 
the government. No injury to individual 
traders or to the public is disclosed. 

Says Both Have Benefited 

"On the contrary, serious abuses have 
been eliminated, and both exhibitors and 
distributors have been benefited. 

"The most serious complaint is that de- 
posits in small amounts have been required 
from bonafide purchasers of motion picture 
theatres for security in performing new 
contracts in case the new owner wishes to 
make new contracts without assuming the 
old, and this requirement has been used to 
induce the new owner to assume and car^ 
out the uncompleted contracts of the former 
owner. 

"The defendants' agreement to demand 
security was fully justified by their common 
interest in preserving the integrity of con- 
tractual obligations owing to them." 

Warns of Over-Restriction 

After pointing out that the distributors 
were doubly justified by the fact that many 
small motion picture owners are financially 
irresponsible, the court closed with a warn- 
ing against trying to extend the anti-trust 
laws beyond their natural scope, pointing 
out that "to extend a statute ... in a situa- 
tion so equivocal and so lacking in substance 
would be to cast doubt upon the serious 
purpose with which it was framed" — a 
quotation from a recent decision of the 
United States supreme court. 



20 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



Orchestras 

THAT the silent picture still has ardent 
admirers is obvious enough after a 
visit to the Capitol to see William Haines 
in "Speedway." This picture, which hasn't 
as much as a single word of monolog, let 
alone dialog, is packing 'em in. Quite in- 
cidentally, it is grand entertainment. 

In presenting a picture like "Speedway" 
it seems to me that the Capitol is failing 
to make use of its magnificent facilities for 
public entertainment. 
It's this way: 

The Capitol has one of the best or- 
chestras in the country. Many of the pa- 
trons of this theatre find their pictures 
doubly entertaining because of the excel- 
lent music. But when the picture starts, 
though it has no talk at all, the orchestra 
files out and the electricity goes on. 

Not even the leaders of the sound move- 
ment, and I'm one of the noisiest sound 
boosters in the parade, would claim that the 
electrical reproduction of an orchestra is as 
good as the orchestra itself. Therefore, 
why not give the patrons the best results 
available? 

In fact, using the orchestra under such 
circumstances might be a spur for a better 
quality of reproduction in all theatres. 



Boy Makes Good 

THE new picture at the Roxy, a de- 
lightful affair with the rather unromantic 
title of "Married in Hollywood," is largely 
the work of Harlan Thompson, one-time 
reporter on the New York World and a 
wellknown figure in the theatrical world 
along Broadway. Thompson did a series 
of musical comedies beginning with "Little 
Jessie James" that was thoroughly pleasing. 

When Harlan Thompson went to Holly- 
wood there were more than a few in New 
York who expected that this young man 
would deliver something worth having 
pretty soon. Now, under the wing of the 
astute Winfield Sheehan, he will well bear 
watching. Keep your eye on him. 

In "Married in Hollywood," he had the 
advantage of a score by Oscar Straus, who 
wrote the world-famous "Chocolate Sol- 
dier," and a cast with J. Harold Murray, 
Norma Terris, Walter Catlett and Tom 
Patricola, all favorites of the New York 
stage. 

* * * 
Christie Comedies 

CHARLES CHRISTIE told me last 
week that certain of his stars, having 
had featured roles in some of the best full 
length talking pictures of the year, rather 
turned up their noses when he suggested 
that they play in Christie Comedies. 

Charlie saw their point and invited them 
to perform, not in comedies, no! Never! — 
but in Christie Talking Plays. What if 
they were only two-reelers. The players 
lost, in their own estimation, none of their 
glamour. They were still players and not 
comedians. And the Christie Talking Plays 
are about the funniest comedies we have seen 
in some time. When you get a chance see 
Louise Fazenda in "Faro Nell, or In Old 
California." 

PETER VISCHER 




BROADWAY is soon to be shaken by the explosion of M G M's "Dynamite," pre- 
pared by Cecil B. DeMille. The story of '"Dynamite" was written by Jeanie 
MacPherson and Conrad Nagel, Kay Johnson and Julia Fay have the leading roles- 
Others in the cast are Charles Bickford, Tyler Brooke, Ernest Hilliard, Muriel Mac- 
Cormac, Leslie Fenton and Barton Hepburn. The picture had its premiere at the 
Carthay Circle, Los Angeles, and will soon open on Broadway. 




Conrad Nagel mixing the "Dynamite." 

MM 



9» 




The explosion. 




The rescue corps. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



21 



200 Players Vie for 50 Prizes 
In Herald- World Golf Tourney 

Mescall Again Wins Low Gross 
Trophy; Webb Low Net Victor 

Entries in Third Annual Contest Shatter All Records for 
Motion Picture Links Competitions 



50 PRIZES AWARDED 
IN HERALD-WORLD 
GOLF TOURNEY 



ACTORS— 

First Low Gross, Al Jolson Cup. 

Second Low Gross, Dave Rose Trunk. 

First Low Net, Cutter-Brady Lamp. 

Second Low Net, Security Trust & Savings 
Golf Bag. 

Third Low Net, Mathess Flask. 
PRODUCERS AND EXECUTIVES— 

First Low Gross, Joseph Schenck Cocktail 
Shaker. 

Second Low Gross, Jack Warner Flask. 

First Net, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Loving Cup. 

Second Net, Roosevelt Hotel Loving Cup. 

DIRECTORS— 
First Gross, Douglas Fairbanks Platter. 
Second Gross, Hollywood Stadium Set of 
Irons. 

First Net, Radio-Keith-Orpheum Irons. 
Second Net, The Brown Derby Silver Cup. 
TECHNICAL— 

First Gross, George Weeks and Sono-Art Golf 
Shoes. 

Second Gross, William Seiter Silver Pitcher. 
First Net, Fox Golf Bag. 

Second Net, Howard Motor (Buick) Motor 
Clock. 

WRITERS— 

First Gross, Royal Typewriter. 

Second Gross, Al Christie Silver Dish. 

First Net, Tec Art Cigarette Case. 

Second Net, Montmartre Silver Cup. 
EXHIBITORS AND EXCHANGEMEN— 

First Gross, West Coast Cocktail Shaker. 

First Net, McClosckey Stop Score Watch. 

SPECIAL PRIZES 

Birdies, Souchet & Shafer Ornament. 
Low Gross First Nine, Henry's Restaurant Golf 
Bag. 

Low Gross Second Nine, Schwab's Golf Sweater. 
Low Net First Nine, Colonel Golf Balls, one 
dozen. 

Low Net Second Nine, Dyas' Golf Balls (doz.) 
First Putting, Raffe Rug Co. Silver Dish. 
Second Putting, David Torrence Putter. 
Best Low Gross Over 18 Handicap, Sedlacek 

Sterling Cup. 
Best Net Over 18 Handicap, Alexander & Oviatt 

Sweater and Stockings. 
Worst Score on No. 13 Hole, Nick Stuart Silver 

Loving Cup. 
Worst Score on No. 6 Hole, Three Grayco 

Shirts. 

Booby Putting Prize, Huntly Gordon Putter. 

Longest Drive in Driving Contest, Robert Arm- 
strong Brassie. 

Three Best Drives in Contest, Alan Hale Driver 
and Brassie. 

Booby Prize, Innes Golf Shoes. 

Actors' Booby Prize, Raw Ham Shoulder Do- 
nated by Neal Burns. 

Man with Largest Family Living, Gallon of Ice 
Cream. 

Loudest Stockings, Hollywood Plaza Hotel Balls 
(doz.) 

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD Silver Lov- 
ing Cup for Grand Low Gross. EXHIBITORS 
HERALD-WORLD Gold Medal for Winner 
of Loving Cup. 

First National Silver Statuette for Low Net. 

HERALD-WORLD Gold Medal for Winner of 
Statuette. 



By DOUGLAS HODGES ' 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— The Herald- World's third annual golf tourna- 
ment was a sensational success. At the sound of the gong Sunday morning, 
200 players had been entered to play for the 50 prizes that had been put up 
by merchants, studios and stars. 

John J. Mescall again won the low gross prize which was awarded by the 
Herald- World. A gold medal accompanied the loving cup. Roy Webb won 
a leg on the First National statuette offered for low net. 

Mescall did a 73 with a 2 handicap on the Lakeside Course. It was the 
best score he had ever turned in on that course, which is regarded as a very 
tough 18 holes. 



The entry was the biggest that had ever 
turned out for a motion picture golf tourna- 
ment. Entries were closed at 2 o'clock, when 
200 players had gone out. Others arrived 
later but were not permitted to compete. The 
heaviest entry in previous years was 150, 
in 1927. 

Burns Wins Jolson Cup 

T. Roy Barnes officiated at the close of the 
tournament, when the prizes were awarded. 
The biggest prize, aside from the Herald- 
World trophy, was the Al Jolson cup. It was 
awarded to Neal Burns for low gross in the 
actor's division. George Marshall won the 
Joseph Schenck cocktail shaker for low gross 
in the producer's division, and Jack Warner 
won the Louis B. Mayer cup for low net in 
the same division. Others to win were: 

Grand low gross, John Mescall, 73-2-71 ; 
grand low net, James Tinling, 92-24-68. 

Actor's division, first low gross, Neal Burns, 
80; second low gross, Conway Tearle, 80; 
first low net, Ed Kennedy, 73 ; Richard Arlen, 
73 ; Harold Goodwin, 73. 

Producers and executives' division, first low 
gross, George Marshall, 79; second low gross, 
Mike Farley, 82; first low net, Jack Warner, 
86-16-70. Second low net, Wesley Smith, 73. 

Director's division, first low gross, Kenneth 
Hawks, 76; second low gross, Leo McCarety, 



83; first low net, James Tinling; second low 
net, Robert McGowan, 86-16-70. 

Mescall Birdie Champ Too 
Technical division, first low gross, Gene 
Hornbostel, 84; second low gross, Chuck 
Lewis, 88; first low net, William Fox, all 
96-22-74; second low net, Charles Dunning, 
90-16-74. 

Writers division, first low gross, Roy Webb, 
77 ; second low gross, James Ruggerio, 81 ; 
first low net, Richard Fantl, 86-16-70; second 
low net, George Todd, 71. 

Exhibitors division, first low gross Don 
Knapp, 82; first low net, Lou Rosenberg, 
83-10-73. 

Special prizes — most birdies, John Mescall, 
3 ; low gross first prize putting, Earl Douglas, 
36; second prize putting, Otis Hoyt, 36; best 
gross over 18 handicap, James Tinling, 
92-24-68; best net over 18 handicap, Raoul 
Walsh, 93-24-69; worst score (13th hole), W. 
Fitzgerald; worst score (6th hole), Fred Lang- 
ton ; longest drive, George Marshall, 735 ; 
longest individual drive, William Davidson, 
251; booby prize, Frank Richardson; second 
booby prize, Wallace McDonald. 



This Committee Made 
Tourney Record Success 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. l.—The fol- 
lowing committee earned the credit 
for the success of the HERALD- 
WORLD'S third annual golf tourna- 
ment, with the greatest assortment of 
prizes ever awarded in a film tourney 
and a record entry list that was 
limited to 200 players though many 
more sought to compete. The com- 
mittee : 

Brandon Hurst, chairman. 

George Marshall, treasurer. 

Jack Boland. 

Douglas Hodges, HERALD- 
WORLD representative. 
Howard Strickling. 
Milt Howe. 
Gilbert E. Wright. 
Huntly Gordon. 
Alfred A. Cohn. 
A. H. Painter. 



35 Pathe Golfers in 

Culver City Contest 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— In the first an- 
nual golf tournament of the Culver City 
studio, which was staged last Sunday, more 
than 35 Pathe employes took part in the 
contest, staged at Fox Hills country club. 

Among those entered were: Alan Hale, 
Johnny Mescall, William Boyd, Robert 
Armstrong, Gregory La Cava, Edward H. 
Griffith, Howard Higgin, William Sistrom, 
George Berthelon, Harvey Leavitt, Roy 
Johnson, Edmund Lowe, Donn McElwaine, 
William H. Thomas, Kenneth Alexander, 
Elmer Tambert, Paul Gangelin, Ralph 
Block, Jack Jungmeyer, John Krafft, Phil 
Gersdorf, Ted Dickson, Erie Hampton, Ed- 
ward Jewell, Arthur Miller and many 
others. 



El Dorado Rialto Theatre 
Opens with <( Street Girl" 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
EL DORADO, ARK., Oct. l.—The new 
Rialto opened last Monday night with 
Radio's "Street Girl." The new house was 
built at a cost of nearly $300,000 and is 
claimed to be the most elaborate theatre in 
south Arkansas. \ 



±~ EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 

Women Name Studio Representative 
On What's Wanted in Films 

Mrs. Thomas G. Winter Is Appointed at Meeting of Leaders of Industry 
with 200 Clubs'' Delegates from 21 States 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1. — Last week the tycoons of the motion picture in- 
dustry were the objects of feminine regard. Women representatives 
of 200 religious and civic organizations from 21 states and the District 
of Columbia gathered in Loew's Lexington theatre here and at the Hotel 
Montclair to gaze upon and listen to Albert Warner, David Sarnoff, Adolph 
Zukor, Nicholas Schenck, J. E. Otterson, Will Hays and others. 



HPHE women conferred three days with 
-1 the leaders of the motion picture busi- 
ness. The objects were: (1) "To have a 
direct representative of organized women in 
the motion picture industry." (2) "To in- 
terpret to the makers of motion pictures 
the feeling and wishes of womanhood in 
regard to the medium's development to its 
highest usefulness." 

Will Be Represented in Hollywood 

A committee of nine women selected Mrs. 
Thomas G. Winter as their representative. 
Mrs. Winter will have her headquarters in 
Hollywood and will be associated with 
Colonel Jason S. Joy, director of studio 
relations for the Hays organization. She, 
it is understood, will interpret to the indus- 
try what women want in pictures. 

The conference opened at 9 a.m., Septem- 
ber 24, at Loew's Lexington theatre. H. J. 
Yates, president of Consolidated Film In- 
dustries, spoke on "From the Camera to the 
Exchange." He was followed by John 
Hammell of Paramount on "The Physical 
Distribution of Motion Pictures." S. R. 
Kent, of the same organization, compared 
the distribution of pictures to the distribu- 
tion of any other product. At luncheon at 
the Hotel Montclair, Robert Cochrane, vice- 
president of Universal, and Gabriel Hess, 
of the Hays office, discussed the standard 
exhibition contract. E. E. Bucher of R C A 
Photophonc told how light is transformed 
into sound. Roxy performed, too, with 
"Putting on the Show." 

Many Subjects Discussed 

Afternoons were spent in visiting theatres, 
studios, laboratories and exchanges about 
town. Mornings were spent in lectures and 
discussion by wellknown men in the indus- 



try. Among the matters taken up were the 
story for the sound picture, the American 
picture abroad, the short subject, the sound 
news reel, the story of Vitaphone, the func- 
tion and object of motion picture publicity, 
censorship, arbitration and the method of 
making pictures (illustrated with animated 
cartoons). 

Among the officials introduced by Will 
Hays (who did quite a bit of "strong" talk- 
ing) were E. W. Hammons, J. E. Otterson, 
Albert Warner, Nick Schenck, Adolph 
Zukor, David Sarnoff, Hiram Brown, 
George Weeks, Harry Buckley and Harry 
Warner. 

Will Hays was toastmaster. The Hays 
office managed the conference. 

Mortimer Wormser Named 
Columbia Comptroller 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Mortimer Worm- 
ser, formerly comptroller of the Bluebird 
Photoplays, Inc., a subsidiary of Universal 
Film exchange, has been named comp- 
troller of Columbia. He has been con- 
nected with the motion picture business 
since 1915. 

Daughter of J. C. Flinn 

Of Pathe Is Married 

(Special to the Herald-World ) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Marjorie Thayer 
Flinn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John C. 
Flinn, was married to E. Louis Scarborough 
in Yonkers, September 20. The bride's 
father is vicepresident of Pathe. 



October 5, 1929 

Weber to St. Louis, 
Expects Compromise 
In Labor Situation 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

ST. LOUIS, Oct. 1.— Joseph Weber of 
New York City, international president of 
the musicians union has been summoned to 
St. Louis to aid in a settlement of the 
strike of the musicians at the Ambassador, 
Grand Central and Missouri theatres oper- 
ated by Skouras Brothers, the twenty-three 
neighborhood and suburban houses of the 
St. Louis Amusement Company and about 
fifty independently operated in St. Louis 
and its suburbs. 

It is believed in St. Louis motion picture 
circles that an early settlement of the strike 
is at hand. A compromise agreement is 
expected. 

At a conference held at the Ambassador 
building offices of Skouras Brothers on 
September 28 a spirit of close harmony was 
manifest and it now appears there are but 
a few minor tangles remaining to be un- 
raveled. Weber has been called to pick 
up these stray ends and solve the music 
problem for St. Louis. 

John P. Nick, international vice-president 
of the stage hands and projectionists union, 
has been active in attempting to settle the 
musicians strike. Several days ago he an- 
nounced that unless the walkout is ended 
by October 5 the stage hands and machine 
operators union will strike in sympathy. 
He wants to avoid such an eventuality if 
possible to do so. 

Columbia's "Flight" 
Smashes All Records 
For Cohan's Theatre 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Despite the fact 
that the Sunday previous Jack Holt and 
Ralph Graves made a personal appearance 
at the George M. Cohan theatre in connec- 
tion with the showing of "Flight," the 
Columbia air epic, all box office records 
were broken at that theatre this past 
Sunday. 

In order to take care of the Saturday 
evening business it was necessary to stage 
midnight performances. The run was 
scheduled to two performances per day but 
it was also necessary that a third perform- 
ance be staged at 5:30. 

For the first time in several years it was 
necessary to use a second ticket office. This 
office has been hidden by decorations and 
the theatregoers had practically forgotten 
about its existance. 

W B-F N -Stanley Club 

Holds First Inaugural 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Another mile- 
stone in the history of the Warner-First 
National-Stanley Club will be reached 
Thursday when it' will hold its first 
inaugural meeting and dance in the Butter- 
fly room of the Hotel Pennsylvania. In- 
auguration of officers and dancing will be 
the featured events. 

Klein Gets Judgment 

Against Cinesonore Co. 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— An order direct- 
ing Judgment in favor of the Edward L. 
Klein Corporation against Cinesonore Co. 
Inc., manufacturers of Traveltone Talking- 
Picture Equipment, in the amount of $150,- 
000.00 with costs, was signed by Mr. Justice 
Cotillo of the Supreme Court of New York 
on September 23. 



Manager Kills One Thief, 3 Theatres 

Lose $1,300 as Bandits Hold Field Day 

Bandits held a field day in Chicago theatres within eight hours of Sunday eve- 
ning and Monday morning. Gross receipts from four houses were $5,288, but this 
sum was reduced to $1,288 when the manager of a prominent Loop house sent 
three slugs into the brain of a bandit whom he had trapped. 

The bandit killed had tried to rob McVicker's theatre, a long-run B & K house. 
While many hundreds were viewing the performance, he shoved a revolver against 
Bernard Cobb, assistant manager, who was about to enter his office, where Miss 
Doris Cahill, cashier, and Ralph B. Kennedy, treasurer, were waiting with $4,000 
in receipts. Obtaining the money, the thief left the office through an outer office, 
where the door had been precautiously equippd with two knobs, one a fake. The 
door he had just gone through was equipped with a peephole. While the bandit 
was delayed by the fake doorknob, Cobb fired a revolver at him through the 
peephole. 

It is said that the bandit was the same who had successfully robbed the Chicago 
theatre a year ago, when Cobb was on duty there. 

Two robbers early Monday morning forced Clarence Balder, assistant manager 
of the new Music Box, to hand over $71 in his office desk, then take them to the 
home of Benjamin Lasker, the manager, where they seized $957 and escaped. The 
Music Box is operated by Jacob Lasker & Sons. 

Early Sunday evening the Harvard theatre was robbed of $60, and the Grove of 
$200. In each case the bandit was said to be identical with the robber of McVick- 
er's. 

Two soldiers from Fort Snelling, Minn., were taken into custody last week by 
military authorities, charged with having perpetrated several recent robberies. 
It is said that they confessed to having been the bandits who robbed the Chicago 
theatre several weeks ago. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



21 



Two Units Use Same Set 
in Sono Art Film 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. l.—An inno- 
vation in talking pictures is being 
used by Sono Art in the filming of 
"Blaze O' Glory." According to 
George Weeks, as soon as Dowling 
and his company finish a scene and 
leave the set, another company speak- 
ing Spanish, move in and re-enact the 
same scene on the same set. 

The plan is for Eddie Dowling, 
who is starring in the picture, to 
work in the daytime and the Spanish 
company to work at night. Jose Bohr 
has the lead in the Spanish version. 



Arbitration Revived in Indiana; 
Metzger Calls Board "Outlaw" 

Motion Picture Trade Is Setting Pace for All Industries, Says 
Honorary President of American Association — 73,652 
Disputes Settled in Five Years 

[By Special Correspondent of the Herald-World] 

INDIANAPOLIS, Oct. 1. — Arbitration has been resumed in Indiana under 
a board named by Paul Q. Richey, president of the Indianapolis Chamber of 
Commerce, but this board does not represent the Indiana organization, accord- 
ing to Charles R. Metzger, general manager, who calls it an "outlaw." 

Representatives of the Associated Theatre Owners of Indiana, composed of 
the leading exhibitors of the state, and representatives of the producers held 
a meeting here recently and the exhibitors apparently forgot their previous 
arbitration difficulties, for they decided to use this method to arbitrate disputes. 



Sound in Small Town 
To Be Discussed at 
Tri-State Meeting 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
MEMPHIS, Oct. 1.— Sound in the small 
towns will be the main topic of discussion 
at the Tri-State M P T O, which is to be 
held in Memphis October 13-14. This or- 
ganization, which is composed of exhibitors 
from Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee 
is headed by M. A. Lightman, newly elected 
president of the M P T O A. 

Sound in the small towns will be dis- 
cussed from every angle and the Tri-State 
body will try and determine whether or 
not the small owner can afford, in the long- 
run, to buy the cheaper sound devices, what 
part of his income he can afford to spend 
for film rental and how often he can afford 
to change his programs, in view of the in- 
creased costs of operation. They will also try 
to establish whether or not an exhibitor will 
be able to show a different sound picture 
every night as they have done with silent 
films. 

A Sunday of previews staged by Memphis 
film exchanges at Loew's Strand theatre, 
and a Monday of addresses, round table dis- 
cussions and election of officers, concluding 
with the annual banquet and dance at Hotel 
Chisca will be, roughly, the outline of the 
Tri-State program. 

J. F. Norman, England, Ark., veteran sec- 
retary, is working with Lightman as pro- 
gram chairman. Assisting him are the 
three state vice presidents, R. X. Williams, 
Jr., Oxford, Miss.; W. F. Ruffin, Coving- 
ton, Tenn., and John A. Collins, Paragould, 
Ark., as well as H. D. Wharton, Warren, 
Ark.; M. J. Pruniski, North Little Rock; 
T. W. Sharp, Little Rock, and M. S. Mc- 
Cord, Camden. 

Columbia Names Brunet 
Branch Operation Head 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— H. P. Brunet has 
been added to the Columbia Home Office 
executives as manager of the exchange 
operation. He will have complete charge 
of the physical operation of the Columbia 
exchanges. Brunet takes over the work 
formerly handled by Clarence McKain, who 
is now abroad for the company. 

Gain Leaves P F L After 
Ten Years' Association 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— J. J. Gain, re- 
cently assigned special post of director of 
physical operation between the Paramount 
Long Island and West Coast studio, has 
resigned from Paramount. He has served 10 
years with the company. 



The exhibitors as an organization with- 
drew August 2 from the arbitration board. 

Board Members Named 

Members of the arbitration board repre- 
senting the exhibitors are Earl Coble, Red- 
key; A. J. Kalberer, Lyric theatre, Indian- 
apolis; R. E. Harold, Rushville; Raleigh 
Sipe, Knightstown, and R. Bansbach, Oak- 
land City. 

Those on the board representing the pro- 
ducers are Charles Reagan, Paramount; 
Harry R. Graham, Pathe; Charles Penrod, 
RKO; Floyd Brown, First National, and 
George Landis, Fox Films. At the meeting, 
attorneys for the Indiana organization pre- 
sented its claims for arbitration. 

Block Booking Was Factor 

Since the disagreement in August, Charles 
J. Pettijohn, chief of counsel for the Film 
Boards of Trade, has been attempting to 
bring about a new agreement to settle dis- 
putes. At the time of the disagreement, he 
asserted, the grievances of some of the ex- 
hibitors were about "fifty-fifty," half wrong 
and half right. 

At the time of withdrawal from arbitra- 
tion, some of the exhibitors asserted they 
were fighting practices of the producers' 
association in forcing block booking. 

Film Trade Sets Pace, 
Says Arbitration Head 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— The motion pic- 
ture trade is setting a standard for all in- 
dustries in arbitration, "relieving our Amer- 
ican courts from the flood of unnecessary 
litigation which clogs them today," said 
Charles L. Bernheimer, chairman of the 
Committee of Arbitration of the Chamber 
of Commerce of the State of New York, in 
a review of arbitration, just made public. 

Bernheimer, who has held this post 18 
years and is honorary president of the 
American Arbitration Association. re- 
counted the history of arbitration in the 



film industry the last five years and empha- 
sized that in that period 73,652 disputes 
involving sums totaling $17,724,380 were set- 
tled without litigation. He pointed out that 
in 1928 there were 23,859 disputes involving 
$6,503,474 settled by the Film Boards with- 
out a single recourse to a court. 

"If other industries could line up their 
membership in favor of arbitration and get 
them to co-operate as . the motion picture 
industry has done," he said in part, "elimi- 
nation of waste, accompanied by peace and 
good fellowship, would rapidly follow in its 
wake. 

10,500,000 Film Deliveries 

"I understand that there are 10,500,000 de- 
liveries of film, under written contract, each 
year in the United States. For the small 
theatre owner to have to depend on litiga- 
tion to enforce delivery of currently popular 
films would be little short of suicidal. 

"I understand that changing conditions, 
due to the advent of sound, have been used 
as an excuse to attack arbitration in the 
motion picture industry. This is unfortu- 
nate. 

Warns Against Deviation 

"From my study of the change which ar- 
bitration has effected in the position of the 
motion picture theatre owner, especially 
from the standpoint of securing swift de- 
cision where he has a grievance, I can warn 
the whole industry that any basic deviation 
from the principles now obtaining would be 
a step backward toward the age of confu- 
sions and wastefulness. 

"However, I cannot urge too strongly in 
favor of having arbitration, of whatever sort 
or nature it be, take place only under the 
auspices of a recognized institution of high 
standing — one which would insure a correct 
and orderly handling of the case. Not alone 
would this help minimize the dangers and 
pitfalls which exist in loosely conducted 
arbitrations, but it would also help make the 
losing party in the arbitration less likely to 
find fault with the award." 



Rossheim Resigns from Stanley Company; 

Continues as Warner Brothers Director 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1. — Irving D. Rossheim today stepped out of the presidency 
of the Stanley Company of America. He also resigned his position on the board 
of directors. He will continue, however, as a director of Warner Brothers. 

H. M. Warner, chairman of the board of Stanley and president of Warners, 
praised the splendid service rendered by Rossheim during his ten years with' the 
Stanley Company. During that period Rossheim contributed much to its construc- 
tive policies, he said, and leaves at a time when it is in excellent condition. 

Rossheim came to the Stanley Company in 1919 as comptroller and was subse- 
quently elected treasurer. He became its president in January, 1928, and was 
reelected in April, 1929. During his administration, he was active in the consolida- 
tion of the interests of Warner Brothers, First National and Stanley. 



24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



Bait Crocodiles with Hippopotami to 
Qet Shots for "Trader Horn" 

Elephants Great Engineers, Says New York Sun Reporter, Home from 
Africa Ahead of M G M Company — Pygmies Interesting 

By DOUGLAS FOX 

N r EW YORK, Oct. 1. — Endless patience and more than the usual amount 
of perspiration have gone and are going into the filming of "Trader 
Horn" in the heart of the Dark Continent, the Herald-World was 
told today. 



WE were talking to John W. McClain, 
youthful reporter for the New York 
Sun, who has just returned from Africa 
where he spent six months with W. S. Van 
Dyke, M G M director, on location in the 
jungle, on mountains, on the banks of pre- 
cipitous rivers, filming the classic story of 
the man who, in the old days, was known 
to his friends as Zambesi Jack. 

$1,200 a Day to Move Safari 
The crash of rhinoceri plowing through 
the scrub, the bellowing of crocodiles, the 
howling of hyenas, the roaring of lions and 
the many other sounds of animal and native 
life in the jungle and on the veldt are being 
recorded for the ears of metropolitan audi- 
ences in this first professional sound pic- 
ture to be made in Africa under difficulties 
which seemed, for a time, insurmountable. 

"We went by steamer to Mombasa," Mc- 
Clain said "and by rail to Nairobi where all 
the big game hunters fit out their expedi- 
tions. Nairobi is the headquarters for most 
of the expeditions in the Kenya and Tan- 
ganyika countries. From Nairobi we went 
on safari to Murchison Falls, between Lakes 
Victoria and Albert, the sources of the Nile. 
Our 32 cars burned more than 600 gallons 
of gas a day. It cost us $1,200 a day to 
move our safari. 

Photographing Pygmies 
"Some of our most interesting experiences 
were with the pygmies some distance west 
of Murchison Falls. We got to a pygmy 
village and explained our peaceful intention, 
invited the chief of the village to summon 
more of his kind so we could make some 
pictures. A pygmy beat a drum made out 
of a solid block of wood. Perhaps the sound 
was relayed through the jungle. At all 
events it was not long before the little 
people appeared in considerable numbers. 

"We found out later that they talked in 
a definite code by means of the tomtom. 
We were in need of fresh vegetables. No 
one left the village. The drummer, or what- 
ever they called him, just sat down to his 
hollow instrument and started tapping out 
a message. The next day we were showered 
with quantities of fresh vegetables. 

The Natives Get the Word 
"News of our coming preceded us wher- 
ever we went. Fairly soon we were able 
to converse with the natives. While all had 
their own dialects, all also sooke what is 
called Swahili — a combination of French 
and native dialect. 

"Some of our most beautiful shots were 
of Murchison Falls. There the river, which 
is fairly wide, converges to 15 feet and, 
with tremendous velocity, shoots over a cliff 
for more than 400 feet. It's a magnificent 
spectacle. We caught and pictured croco- 
diles at the base of the falls by baiting our 



traps with dead hippopotami. We found 
that the crocodiles there seldom attacked 
humans. They stuck to the rapids at the 
foot of the falls and fed on fish stunned by 
their 400-foot trip from top to bottom. The 
crocs got very fat and never gave us any 
trouble. 

Build Three-Mile Trail in Two Days 

"We had to build a trail from our camp 
three miles to the falls. We carried five 
cameras, reflectors, sound equipment and a 
lot of other material. The British Govern- 
ment said that it would take a small army 
two months to build a trail. We did it with 
five men in two days. We made good use 
of elephant trails on our way up the 
mountain. These animals are great engi- 
neers, chose just the right places to go, up- 
root trees and shove aside rocks. They are 
great believers in comfortable roads and are 
willing to work a bit to make them so. 
It probably isn't work for them, anyway. 

"Which reminds me that we got some 
very good elephant pictures. Van Dyke is 
doing pretty good work. Miss Edwina 
Booth is great. She's doing a remarkable 
job in acting without a sun helmet — some- 
thing which the British declare is suicidal. 
Not a Case of Illness 

"When I left there had not been a single 
case of sickness in the whole safari. The 
doctor made us take five grains of quinine 
every night and that kept away the fever. 
In some places, though, the mosquitoes 
were so thick that we had to go to bed 
under our netting with sundown. 

"It is not uncommon to find beautiful 
roads with not a wheel mark on them. The 
natives, it seems, work out their taxes to 
the Government in roadbuilding. I've driven 
for 25 miles along a perfect red gravel high- 
way without seeing the track of a single 
other vehicle. Which, considering the con- 
dition of the road, indicated that no traffic 
had used it for at least two weeks. 

Wireless Proves Real Help 

"Only yesterday I got a message from 
an amateur wireless operator in Clifton, 
New Jersey. He had been in communica- 
tion with our outfit at Rhino camp, and re- 
ported that Trader Horn had just arrived 
and that all was well on location. By means 
of this wireless in the camp we were able 
to keep in constant touch with our base 
at Nairobi. 

"I'd like to have stayed on indefinitely, 
but was recalled by the Sun." 

McClain accompanied the M G M expedi- 
tion on a six months' leave of absence from 
his paper. While he was in Africa he sent 
reports of progress to M G M headquarters 
in New York and wrote a weekly diary 
(which got there a month late) for the New 
York Times. 1 



Oregon Exhibitors Form 
An Allied States Group; 
Elect Frank Blight Head 

Hanson and Steffes Address Meet- 
ings — Franchise Plan Wins 
New Endorsements 

Exhibitor endorsement was given the Al- 
lied States and Tiffany-Stahl franchise plan 
last week in several localities where the 
franchise was presented for the first time, 
and in addition to the success of these meet- 
ings Allied States grew to the extent of 
one more member when independent Ore- 
gon theatremen formed an organization at 
a convention in Salem, to be called the 
Allied Exhibitors' Association. 

Frank Blight of the Blight theatre, Sa- 
lem, was chosen president; Walter Tebbets, 
Oriental, Portland, vice-president; and G. E. 
Jackson, Circle, Portland, secretary and 
treasurer. The organization will keep close 
watch on legislation affecting the film busi- 
ness, it was stated. Oscar Hanson, general 
sales manager of Tiffany-Stahl, and Al 
Steffes, director of Allied States, both of 
whom were present, were elected honorary 
members. 

New strength to the Allied organization 
was also seen in the listing as added counsel 
last week, the following: 

Harry A. Huffman and Judge Thurmon of Denver, 
Anthony P. Jim and Fred Herrington of Pittsburgh, 
Nathan Yamins and Ernest H. Horstman of Massa- 
chusetts, Steve Bauer and Henry A. Staab of Mil- 
waukee, A. B. Momand of Shawnee, Okla., and Homer 
Holmgren of Salt Lake City. 

In Portland, Ore., Hanson told a meeting 
of exhibitors that in his opinion "the Tif- 
fany-Stahl franchise alone will determine 
the future of the independent exhibitor. 
Since leaving the East," he said, "Mr. 
Steffes and I have addressed meeting in 
the Middle West and West, and nowhere 
have we encountered anything but enthusi- 
astic expressions regarding the franchise." 
He and Steffes left Portland for San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles meetings. 

The franchise was also endorsed last week 
by the board of the Southeastern Theatre 
Owners' Association, meeting in Atlanta. 
The endorsement resolution was introduced 
by Roy. E. Martin. Directors attending 
were George E. Ricker, president and chair- 
man; O. C. Lam, vice-president; Love B. 
Harrell, secretary and treasurer; Walter J. 
Brackin and E. F. Boyd. 

Tiffany-Stahl's Canadian organization 
held a meeting for the explanation of the 
franchise in Montreal last week, under the 
direction of Carl J. Goe, assistant general 
sales manager, and Phil Hazza, general sales 
manager for Canada. 

Extradition Barred by 

France in Theft Case 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW BEDFORD, MASS., Oct. 1.— Vic- 
tor Murgler, who is wanted here in the 
theft of $32,000 in a theatre deal, is still at 
large in Paris. Local police have returned 
from France without him. Murgler opposed 
extradition and a delay of at least three 
months in hearing the cases in the French 
courts resulted in the return of the New 
Bedford authorities. Whether they will 
again go to Paris for him is a matter of 
doubt, police say. 

Start New Fast Trains 

From Chicago to N. Y. 

Two railroad companies, the New York 
Central and Pennsylvania Lines, started 
new fast trains between Chicago and New 
York September 29. The new trains pulled 
out of their terminals at 2 p. m. and at the 
same time in New York their sister trains 
departed for the West. 



Fox Acquires 64 Midland Theatres in 

Missouri, Kansas, Iowa in $4,000,000 Deal 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
KANSAS CITY, Oct. 1. — The transferring of the Midland Theatre and Realty 
Company in Missouri, Kansas and Iowa to Fox West Coast Theatres, Inc., was 
announced here this week in a $4,000,000 theatre deal. The deal involved 64 thea- 
tres, eight of which are neighborhood theatres in Kansas City. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



25 



Charities Share in 
Lieber's Will; Many 
Film Folk at Rites 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

INDIANAPOLIS, Oct. 1.— Three In- 
dianapolis charitable and civic organiza- 
tions will share in the estate of the late 
Robert Lieber, former president of First 
National Pictures. The will has been filed 
for probate. The personal property is 
valued at $100,000 and no value is set on 
the real estate. Five thousand dollars 
was given to the Art Association of Indian- 
apolis "in memory of his deceased brother, 
Carl H. Lieber." The Indianapolis Founda- 
tion and the Altenheim, home for old, re- 
ceived $1,000 each. The widow, Mrs. Clara 
Louise Lieber was named executrix and 
was bequeathed the remainder of the 
estate. The will was dated June 11, this 
year. 

Funeral services were held at the resi- 
dence and were attended by many promi- 
nent in the motion picture industry. Three 
local theatres, the Indiana, Circle and Ohio, 
members of the Skouras-Publix group, 
were closed until 6 o'clock in the evening, 
in memory of the pioneer executive in the 
film distribution field. Large floral wreaths 
bearing appropriate inscriptions decorated 
the box office of each theatre. 

Two local friends of Lieber delivered the 
funeral addresses. Each oaid tribute to his 
executive ability, his integrity and his 
loyalty both to business associates and 
his friends and family. 

Among those who attended the funeral 
were: Ned Depinet, general sales manager 
of First National; Mrs. Depinet; Richard 
A. Rowland, Sam Spring, Spyros Skouras, 
all of New York; M. L. Finkelstein of Min- 
nesota; E. Mandelbaum of Cleveland, and 
a group connected with the film distribution 
industry in Chicago and New York. 

R K O Selling Franchises 
At Price Assuring Each 
A Profit, Says Schnitzer 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— "We are selling our 
franchises at prices which will enable us to 
make a profit," J. I. Schnitzer, president of 
R K O Distributing Corporation, said today, 
"always bearing in mind that it is equally es- 
sential for the exhibitor to make a profit." 

In explaining his stand on the franchise 
question Schnitzer continued: "Its original 
purpose was to afford a medium of enabling 
the small exhibitor throughout the country to 
assure himself of worthwhile sound pictures 
at an equitable price. We never have 
swerved from this purpose. 

"Some exhibitors have approached the fran- 
chise with the idea that they could name their 
own price. This, of course, was never the 
intention of the plan. No business transaction 
is satisfactory unless both parties thereto can 
make a profit. We are bearing that in mind. 
Many franchises have been sold and many 
more will be sold before the season is over. 
I predict that, in future seasons, an R K O 
franchise will be numbered among the most 
valuable assets of any theatre." 



M G M Arranges to Make 
One Vilma Banky Film 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer will star Vilma Banky in one picture 
after making arrangements with Samuel 
Goldwyn, according to announcement from 
the company. The story prepared for Miss 
Banky is "They Knew What They 
Wanted." William Seastrom will direct. 



MPTOA Heads See Music Tax 
Dropped by Convention Time 

Mergers of Publishing Companies with Producers Called Factor — 
General Exposition of Sound Equipment Planned 
for Memphis Meeting October 29-31 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1. — Complete relief from the music tax, or at least a ma- 
terial reduction of the assessment, will be reported to the exhibitors attending 
the MPTOA convention at Memphis, October 29-31, if the hopes of the or- 
ganization leaders are borne out, hopes based on recent developments. 

M. J. O'Toole, secretary of the MPTOA, pointed out today that in addition 
to the continued activity of the organization a new avenue to virtual abolishment 
of the music tax is paved by the recent amalgamations which have brought sev- 
eral outstanding music publishing concerns under control of producing com- 
panies, or into affiliation with them, one result of the rapid development of 
sound. 



A general exposition of sound equipment 
will be a feature of the convention, and 
President M. A. Lightman of the M P T O A 
has arranged with the management of the 
Peabody hotel, convention headquarters, 
for ample space to accommodate the ex- 
hibits. One entire session of the conven- 
tion itself has been set aside for addresses 
by experts on sound. 

From Canada comes the report that a 
goodly delegation will be at Memphis. 
Harry Alexander is president of the Cana- 
dian M P T O following the death of John 
C. Brady of Toronto. 

New Angle to Labor Situation 

A subject to be taken up at the conven- 
tion is the labor situation. The MPTOA 
in a statement predicts that the tenseness 
of that problem will be relieved by the 
sound attachment projection instrument, a 
new projector with the sound elements 
built into the equipment, with the manu- 
facturers able to provide skilled men all 
of the time to operate it. Thus important 
changes in theatre management are seen 
in the offing, and MPTOA officials ex- 
pect the convention to present new ideas 
in that connection. 

Of the music tax, O'Toole said: 

"We have set the machinery in motion 
to accomplish virtual abolition of the tax 
and hope to be able to report at our Tenth 
Annual Convention that exhibitors will be 
relieved of this tax or at least some sub- 
stantial arrangement made which will ma- 
terially reduce it. The new owners of the 
music companies, being in many instances 
exhibitors themselves in conjunction with 
their producing and distributing interest, 
will no doubt see the wisdom of taking 
all or nearly all of this burden off theatre 
owners, or at least go as far as their busi- 
ness position in the premises will permit. 
Sees Huge Savings 

"This will save exhibitors generally hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars in taxes a 
year, which we always believed were un- 
fairly levied." 

The music tax controversy has been a 



long and tedious one for theatre owners. 
Efforts were made at different sessions of 
Congress so to change the patent laws as 
to afford a proper measure of relief, but 
this led to complications of different kinds 
with no advantageous changes in the laws. 

Alexander Lining Up 
Canadian Delegation 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
OTTAWA, Oct. 1.— Harry Alexander, 
pioneer exhibitor of Toronto, who suc- 
ceeded to the presidency of the M P T O 
of Canada following the death of John C. 
Brady of Toronto, independent leader,_ is 
arranging for a goodly Canadian represen- 
tation at the MPTOA convention. 

The Canadian M P T O has been reor- 
ganized with the following officers: Presi- 
dent, Harry Alexander; vice president, M. 
Gebertig; treasurer, A. Polakoff; secrtary, 
J. Alexander; director, S. Ulster, H. King, 
S. Firestone, G. Lester and L. Feigan, all 
of Toronto. 



Selig Reviews Four 

T-S Franchise Films 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— A. L. Selig, direc- 
tor of advertising and publicity for Tiffany- 
Stahl, is at the West Coast Studios of his 
organization on important business. Selig 
previewed the first four of the Tiffany- 
Stahl fall releases under the new franchise 
plan, and wired New York that he was 
more than enthusiastic over them. His chief 
purpose in going to the Coast was to confer 
with Grant L. Cook, executive vice presi- 
dent of Tiffany-Stahl. 



P F L Signs Flippen 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Jay C. Flippen, 
blackface comedian, has been signed by 
Paramount for short subjects. He. will be 
directed by Monte Brice in a "Personality 
and Sketch Revue." 



Six Companies Report 5, 755 Adjustments 
With 1,200 Houses in Small Theatre Aid 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1. — Returns from six of the twelve companies which recently 
pledged themselves to aid the small exhibitor indicate that 5,755 adjustments have 
already been made with upwards of 1,200 theatres. Conferences between commit- 
tees of exhibitors and producers last July resulted in instructions issued to the 
branch managers of twelve major producing companies to make extensive readjust- 
ments wherever the circumstances warranted. The twelve companies were: 
Columbia, Educational, First National, Fox, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Paramount, 
Pathe, RKO, Tiffany-Stahl, United Artists, Universal and Warner Brothers. 

Returns from the remaining six companies should be available next week, it was 
said here today. 



26 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 




MOTION PICTURE FINANCE 



Impressive Strength Is Shown 

By LAURENCE STERN 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1. — In a week of persistent heavy liquidation in the 
stock market the motion picture issues have displayed the most im- 
pressive strength of the year. This appears to be due to the fact — 
pointed out in these columns weeks ago, but just now receiving general recog- 
nition — that the industry is definitely in a period of expanding prosperity and 
that the various merger plans now being negotiated hold promise of still 
greater earnings. 

IMPORTANT market appreciation could 
■*■ hardly be expected in a period of con- 
spicuous speculative readjustment, and yet 
Fox Film stood up without even fractional 
loss after attaining a new high for the year 
on heavy buying. Paramount likewise estab- 
lished a new liiij.li and retained a small net 
gain. 



that this will probably lead to an important 
reorganization of the radio branch of the 
company's business. 



Warner Rrothers, on the other hand, has 
been declining raising a question as to the 
success of the negotiations looking toward 
merging this company with Paramount. 
A series of admissions and denials has sur- 
rounded the plan with confusion, but it is 
nevertheless regarded as near consumma- 
tion. The action of the respective stocks 
seems to indicate that there has been some 
disagreement as to the terms of exchange. 
It is rumored that Technicolor, Inc., which 
is booked into 1931, may eventually be 
brought into this combination. 

One of the most interesting items of the 
week is the report, heard in authoritative 
quarters, that Shubcrt Theatres and Pathe 
Exchange will merge under the name Gen- 
eral Amusement Company. Shubert's last 
report was disappointing, partly due to the 
competition of Broadway sound films. 



$18,060,000 Is Listed 
As Capitalization of 
Fox New England Chain 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

BOSTON, Oct. 1.— Fox New England 
Theatres, Inc., has filed its first statement 
of condition since the taking over of the 
Poli chain by Fox interests. It reveals for 
the first time that the capitalization of the 
Fox New England company is $18,060,000 
and that the real estate held by the com- 
pany is valued at $22,598,985. Mortgages 
are placed at $1,133,529, deposits on leases 
at $5,108, reserves, $145,082; surplus, $4,792,- 
790, profit and loss, $160,718. The 100,000 
no par shares are valued at $1,000,000. 

Value of furniture and fixtures is $846,- 
746, vehicles, $1,350; accounts receivable, 
$866,178; cash, $437,093; accruals and de- 
ferred charges $546,835. The statement 
covers the period from October 28 last to 
July 5 of the current year. 



Robbers Force Safe to 



Fox Film, which is expected to earn $12 
a share this year, probably will soon make 
formal announcement of it's enlarged cor- 
porate setup. The recent strength in Radio- 
Keith-Orpheum shares is understood to re- 
flect gradual improvement in the company's 
earnings. The decline in Radio, the parent 
organization, is due to the development of a 
very unfavorable competitive situation in 
the manufacture and sale of radio receiving 
sets. The writer is in a position to say 



Escape with $700 Cash 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

BEMIDJI, MINN., Oct. 1.— Safe blowers 
forced the doors of the Elko theatre and 
opened the safe, containing $700 cash, the 
receipts of a Saturday and Sunday perform- 
ance. Benny Berger, owner of the Elko, 
was in Bemidji the night of the robbery. 
He said all loss was completely covered by 
34insurance. 



At the New York 
Theatres 



NEW FILMS 

R1VOLI — "Three Live Ghosts," a United Artists 
talker with Joan Bennett, Rohert Montgomery, 
Charles McNaughton, Claude Allister, directed by 
Thornton Freeland. Opened Sept. 28. 

COLONY — "Skin Deep," Warners' all talker with 
Monte Blue, Betty Compson, and Alice Day, 
directed by Ray Enright. Opened Sept. 28. 

CAMEO — "Afghanistan," Silent Soviet Travelogue. 
Opened Sept. 28. 

FILM GUILD CINEMA— "Growth of the Soil," 
silent Norwegian film based on novel by Knut 
Hamsun. Opened Sept. 28. 

CENTRAL — ."Young Nowheres," First National 
talker with Richard Barthelmess, Marion Nixon, 
Bert Roach, Anders Randolph, Jocelyn Lee and 
Raymond Turner, directed by Frank Lloyd. Opened 
Oct. 1. 

WARNERS — "Disraeli," Warner Brothers all talker 
with George Arliss, Mrs. Arliss, David Torrence, 
Joan Bennett, Doris Lloyd, Anthony Bushell and 
Michael Visaroff, directed by Alfred E. Green. 
Opened Oct. 2. 

GAIETY — "Sunny Side Up," Fox all talker with 
Charles Farrell and Janet Gaynor. Opened Oct. 3. 

STRAND — "Hard to Get," First National all talker 
with Dorothy Mackaill. Opened Sept. 28. 

HELD OVER AND REVIVED 

CRITERION— "The Four Feathers," Paramount. 

Opened June 12. 
GLOBE— "Street Girl," Radio all talker. Opened 

July 30. 

ASTOR— "Hollywood Revue," M G M all talker. 

Opened August 14. 
EMBASSY— "Hallelujah," M G M all talker. Opened 

August 20. 

RIALTO— "Bulldog Drummond," United Artists all 

talker, p.p. Opened at Apollo May 2. 
WINTER GARDEN— "Gold Diggers of Broadway," 

Warners all talker. Opened August 30. 
SELWYN — "The Great Gabbo," James Cruze all 

talker. Opened Sept. 12. 
GEORGE M. COHAN— "Flight," Columbia all talker. 

Opened Sept. 13. 
ROXY — "Married in Hollywood," Fox opera. Opened 

Sept. 20. 

55TH STREET— "A Royal Scandal," German silent. 

Opened Sept. 21. 
CAPITOL. — "Madame X," M G M all talker, first 

time p.p. Opened April 24 at the Sam Harris. 
r tt TLE CARNEGIE— "The Passion of Joan of Arc," 

Societe Generale des Films. Opened Sept. 28. 

(Played at this theatre for a month last winter. 

Return engagement by request.) 



Domestic Films in Poland 
Alone Are Free from Tax 

(Washington Bureau of the Herald-World) 

WASHINGTON, Oct. 1.— According to a 
decision of the Polish Government, cinemas 
exhibiting only domestically produced films, 
will be free of entertainment tax. Up to 
now the taxes paid by such cinemas 
amounted to 5 per cent of the gross 
receipts. 



Pathe Signs 2 Circuits 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— The Hoffman 
Circuit in Connecticut and the Kallett in 
New York, have signed for Pathe's Silver 
Jubilee Season product. 



SECURITIES PRICE RANGE 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 



American Seating 

Brunswick-Balke-Colkndcr 

Consolidated Film 

Do. pfd 

Eastman Kodak 

Do. rts 

Fox Film "A" 

Keith Albee Orpheum 

Do. pfd 

Loew's, Inc 

Do. pfd. w. w 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. pfd 

Motion Picture Capita! 

Paramount 

Pathe Exchange 

Do. "A" 

Radio Corporation 1 

Do. pfd. "A" 

Do. pfd. "B" 



Sales 


High 


310,000 


30% 


4,400 


39% 


5,400 


23% 


4,500 


25% 


94,500 


225% 


361,400 


7% 


216,000 


105% 


400 


37 


1,500 


111 


34,300 


68% 



300 
800 
1,800 
254.400 
39.600 
9,700 
318,600 
600 
4.600 



96% 
24% 
39 

74% 
10% 

20% 
95 
54% 
77% 



Week Ending September 28 

oak-; 

T nw Plnsp Radio-Keith-Orpheum 14,400 

30 3o Shubert Theatres 1,300 

•iqi/ Universal Pictures 1st pfd 160 

2i8' 9i.v Warner Bros. "A" 134,100 

24% 25% Do - nfd 700 

206% 219% CHICAGO STOCK MARKET 

5% 6% Marks Brothers evt. p 500 

96% 98% Morgan Litho 200 

$4 NEW YORK CURB 

61% 63% Columbia Pictures 10.200 

96 96 Con. Theat 2,000 

24 24% Educational Pictures pfd 50 

35 35 Fox Theatres "A" 40,000 

70% 72 General Theatre Equipment 65.000 

8% 9% Loew's its 1.300 

17% 19 Do. war. 900 

84% 87% National Theatre Supply 200 

53% 54 Sentry Safety 6.200 

76 76% Trans-Lux 3,900 



Hk'h 


Low 


Clo:;e 


77% 


76 


76% 


41 


39 


40 


67% 


63% 


63% 


59% 


52% 


54% 


50% 


48% 


48% 


18% 


17 


17 


20 


20 


20 


33% 


31 


32% 


20% 


19 


20 


50% 


50% 


50% 


29% 


27 


27% 


66% 


61 


63% 


33% 


30 


31 


10 


8% 


8% 


42 


42 


42 


17% 


13 


13 


13% 


10% 


10% 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS H If RALD-WO RLD 



27 



Film News 
in Pictures 



PICTORIAL SECTION 



Stories Told 
by the Camera 







Admiral of the Swiss Navee, is 
Laura LaPlante, Universal star who 
displays dotted beach pajamas. They 
may not be dotted Swiss, but at 
least they're O. K. for audiens. 



This dynamic little actress is Armida, seventeen 
year old Mexican beauty who is now a Warner 
Brothers star. She has a prominent role in John 
Barrymore's first Vitaphone audien, "General Crack." 



Thelma Todd, M G M comedy 
player, wearing new sport outfit for 
the California Fall Season; black 
hat, grey and black sweater, and 
white accordion plaited crepe skirt. 




The musicians who wrote the song hits for "The Forward Pass," 
First National's football story now in production at Burbank. 
Left to right are Herb Magison, Ned Washington and Michael H. 
Cleary. In this picture Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., will have the 
leading role and in the football action scenes will appear the 
"squad" from the University of Southern California. Loretta 
Young will play the leading feminine role. 




Hiram S. Brown, president of Radio-Keith-Orpheum, on the right, 
is. greeted by William LeBaron, vice president in charge of pro- 
duction of Radio Pictures, as he arrives in Hollywood. "Street 
Girl," Radio Pictures' first picture is breaking records in the R K O 
theatres all over the country and is the first of Radio's huge pro- 
gram of box office hits. "Rio Rita," with Bebe Daniels has just 
been finished and opens at the Earl Carroll theatre, October 6. 



28 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 





Governor Carlton of Florida addressing a gathering at a reception at Plant 
Park, Tampa. Seated on the platform are the principals of "Hell Harbor," 
an audien which United Artists are filming in Florida. Seated left to right 
are Carlotta Monti, Lou Weiss, Harry Allen, Henry King, Lupe Valez, Mrs. 
Carlton, Mayor McKay of Tampa, John Holland, Jean Hersholt and Al 

St. John. 



Betty Boyd, who takes the part of a harem girl in "The 
Green Goddess," displays her charms in this oriental cos- 
tume with a rich piece of tapestry for a background. In 
this picture Warner Brothers will present Geo«-cre Arliss in 
his first audien. Arliss will also remake "Disraeli." 





Reviving a lost art in self defense is Ramon Novarro, M G M star, as 
he takes a lesson in fencing from Albert Pollet, noted fencing expert. 
Novarro will be seen next in "Devil May Care" which is being directed 
by Sidney Franklin. This is his first picture since "The Pagan" in which 
he demonstrated his splendid tenor voice by singing "The Pagan Love 

Song." 



No one would mind being held up by such a beautiful and 
fascinating bandit as Billie Dove, but sometimes things go 
wrong as this scene from First National's "The Painted Angel" 
suggests. Edmund Lowe is seen getting ready to help Billie 
in her escape, perhaps she'll use her six-gun — nuf said, we'll 
see the picture. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



29 



A 






Bebe Daniels as she will appear in one of the sequences from 
"Rio Rita," Radio Pictures' all talking and singing musical ex- 
travaganza. This lavish production was filmed on the ranch 
of Edgar Rice Burroughs, over 300 are in the cast and a danc- 
ing chorus of 60 girls appear in specialty numbers. 



The beautiful Katherine Dale Ov/en, M G M player, plays opposite 
John Gilbert in his latest audien entitled "His Glorious Night." This 
picture is being directed by Lionel Barrymore. Gilbert's last picture 
was "Desert Nights" in which Mary Nolan played the feminine lead. 
Ernest Torrence was also in the cast. 





Charlie Feinberg, Ed Hurley and Charles Hunt, co-directors of 
"Howdy, Broadway," Rayart's latest contribution to the screen's musi- 
cal field, talking things over between "shots" at the Fort Lee studios. 
"Howdy, Broadway" is a feature length all talking and singing picture 
featuring several stars of the legitimate stage Rayart sound pictures 
are released under the trademark name of Raytone. 



The Gleasons entertain the studio force with "sax" strains 
between scenes of "The Shannons of Broadway" which Uni- 
versal is producing. The Gleasons are veterans from the 
vaudeville and legitimate stages and "The Shannons of Broad- 
way" was written by James, who played the leading role on 
the stage. 



30 EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 

Here's Final Proof of Showmanship; 
Town Asks Exhibitor to Stay 

Sam Gordon of Napa, Cal., Helped Build Stores and Open Subdivision 
For Homes, So W hen He Sells His Theatres — 
[By Special Correspondent of the Herald- World] 

NAPA, CAL., October 1. - - When Sam Gordon sold the Hippodrome 
theatre recently to Fox West Coast Theatres, Inc., all Napa rose up 
to ask that he remain in that city. Not that he was an old resident, 
or that he had merely been a good exhibitor, offering a likable brand of enter- 
tainment, but that he had revealed himself as a lovable citizen. 



EIGHT years ago Sam Gordon went to 
Napa practically unknown to residents of 
that city, although well known in San Fran- 
cisco, where he had been a penny arcade owner 
and later a motion picture exhibitor. A 
theatre had been promoted in Napa by M. 
Blumenfeld and J. P. Knox and when it 
seemed that the plan would fall through Sam 
Gordon stepped into the picture and the 
splendid Hippodrome was the result. 

Helps Town Keep Itself 

Apparently, some of the old residents were 
too close to the old town to appreciate some 
of its advantages and possibilities, but Sam 
Gordon saw these and took time from his 
amusement enterprise to make the place look 
more presentable. Dilapidated property ad- 
joining the theatre was taken over and a 
block of beautiful store buildings erected. 
These proved so attractive that they were soon 
taken over by some of the leading retail estab- 
lishments of Napa. 

Few new homes had been erected in Napa 
in recent years and Gordon decided that the 
reason was that no attractive subdivisions had 
been opened. He interested himself in sev- 
eral projects of this kind and a veritable build- 
ing boom started. One of these garden 
home districts has since been named Gordon 
Park, in his honor. 

Even Children Ask Him to Stay 

More recently, the old Empire theatre block- 
in the downtown district was taken over, the 
old buildings torn down and handsome ones 
erected in their place. Space was left in this 
block for another fine theatre, but it remains 
for Fox-West Coast Theatres, Inc., to decide 
whether this will be built. 

When the news came that the Hippodrome 
theatre had been sold, Napa residents united 
in asking that Sam Gordon continue to make 
his home there. The local newspapers printed 
editorials expressing this hope, organizations 
made overtures to that end and children 
begged that he stay in the town that owed him 
so much. That's what Napa thinks of Sam 
Gordon and Sam isn't thinking of moving right 
away. 



Buys 13 Siritzki Houses 

(Washington Bureau of the Herald-World) 

WASHINGTON, Oct. 1.— The Aubert 
Franco-Film chain has further strengthened 
itself by the acquisition of the Siritzki group 



of theatres, according to the Department 
of Commerce. This consists of seven 
cinemas, the Recamier, Maine, Sevres 
Palace, Excelsior, Clichy Palace, Saint- 
Charles and Alhambra, and embraces a 
seating capacity of 8,150. 

1,400,000 Lines in 
838 Newspapers Sets 
Record for Paramount 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Paramount has 
set an advertising record for themselves as 
well as other film companies by using 
approximately 1,400,000 lines in 838 news- 
papers in a single campaign. These adver- 
tisements appeared last week in papers 
throughout the country and is the second 
in a series of ads to acquaint the public 
with Paramount's New Show World pic- 
tures and personalities. 

The first series appeared a month ago in 
836 papers in 350 cities from coast to coast. 
The lineage was 1,396,300 in this series, 
making a total for the two campaigns 
nearly 3,000,000 lines. It is estimated that 
the series reached a reader circulation of 
nearly 40,000,000. 

The advertisements, which were prac- 
tically full page size in all newspapers, were 
prepared under the supervision of Russell 
Holman, advertising manager for the Para- 
mount Famous Lasky corporation. 

13 Canadian Cities to 

Service W E Equipment 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

OTTAWA, Oct. 1.— The Northern Elec- 
tric Company, Limited, Montreal, repre- 
senting Western Electric in Canada, has 
opened service stations in 13 Canadian 
cities to provide engineering attention of 
immediate nature for Western Electric 
synchronization systems. The cities are: 
Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Kingston, To- 
ronto, Hamilton, London, Sudbury, Winni- 
peg, Regina, Calgary, Edmonton and Van- 
couver. 



October 5, 1929 

100 Features to Be in 
Color in 1930, Declares 
Head of Technicolor, Inc. 

Dr. Kalmus Sees Black and White 
Film Going Way of the 
Silent 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— One hundred fea- 
ture productions photographed entirely or 
in part in technicolor will be shown in 
theatres throughout the United States in 
1930, it was said here by Dr. Herbert T. 
Kalmus, president of Technicolor, Inc. 

Paramount, Warner Brothers, Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer, First National, United 
Artists, R K O, Universal and other com- 
panies have signed contracts with Techni- 
color to use its special camera equipment 
and technical experts on more than 50 fea- 
ture productions to be made next year, Dr. 
Kalmus said. These offerings supplement 
the technicolor films completed and await- 
ing release or now before the cameras in 
Hollywood to make a total of 100 techni- 
color features promised for next year. 

The supply of color cameras is being in- 
creased at the rate of one a week in order 
to take care of the tremendous demand for 
color footage. Twenty-five cameras are 
now working night and day. 

"The recent development and public ap- 
proval of the new technicolor process have 
been so phenomenal," Dr. Kalmus said, 
"that it does not seem like a far cry to the 
day when the black and white feature print 
will be as rare as the silent picture is 
today." 

Plans for a New York plant to handle 
technicolor photography are well under 
way, Dr. Kalmus said. 



UFA Film of Ober Trip 
To Moon in Rocket Car 
Released First in Berlin 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— UFA Films, Inc., 
is releasing "The Girl in the Moon" in Ber - 
lin on October 5. This film, which has 
aroused considerable discussion abroad, 
deals with Professor Ober's trip to the 
moon in a rocket machine. UFA is 
financing Ober's real proposed trip to the 
moon. 

Ober has demonstrated a rocket car on 
a Berlin race track and also on a railroad 
track. The vehicle achieved tremendous 
momentum in an incredibly short space of 
time and in its test on the railroad track 
it traveled so fast that it left the rails and 
was destroyed. 

The picture will be brought here soon 
after the Berlin release, UFA officials said 
last week. It has a synchronized score and 
is not a talking film. 

UFA will release Germany's first audien, 
Eric Pommer's "Melody of the Heart," here 
during the second half of December. Wil- 
liam Fritsch stars. The dialog will be in 
English. 

Gloria Swanson to Sing 
Over Radio October 10 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Gloria Swanson's 
singing and talking voice will be heard 
over an American radio station for the first 
time on October 10, at 10:30 o'clock. More 
than 40 stations associated with the Na- 
tional Broadcasting Company will carry the 
film star's song to radio and film followers. 
Miss Swanson will sing "Love" and "Sere- 
nade." 



W hat Exhibitors Are Saying 
About Exhibitors Herald-World 

The Herald-World is as much a part of our existence as the pictures we 
show. We have owned and operated our theatre in Twisp over six years and 
in Winthrop three years, and we realize that we are a very small part of the 
great show world. However, the one way that makes it possible for us to 
remain in business and satisfy our patrons, who are largely the same people 
from year to year, and who occasionally visit the cities and the large theatres, 
is to keep ourselves informed through the Herald-World. We are conscien- 
tious in saying that we (Mrs. Airey and myself) feel that we must have the 
Herald-World in our home in order to attain any degree of success in the 
exhibition of motion pictures. — Frank F. Airey, Ticisp theatre, Twisp, Wash. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



31 



$100,000 Payment to Musicians 
Cancels Final Year of Contract 

Accept Half of What They'd Receive in Wages Rather Than Sit 
in View of Audiences with Nothing to Do, Under 
Famous Players Canadian Agreement 

[By Special Correspondent of the Herald-World] 

OTTAWA, Oct. 1. — Following the threat of projectionists of Toronto that 
they would walk out in 10 days unless Famous Players Canadian Corporation 
arranged for compensation for musicians in the Toronto houses of the com- 
pany, an agreement was reached on September 26 whereby the corporation is to 
pay $100,000 in a lump sum to approximately 100 musicians employed in 19 
theatres of the company. 

The contract with the musicians had one more year to run, the existing agree- 
ment having been for a three-year period. The introduction of audiens brought 
about a theatrical revolution locally, however. The company was prepared to 
continue to employ the musicians for the remaining year despite the fact that 
their services were not required, and instructions had been issued that all musi- 
cians were to report for performances and rehearsals, as outlined in the agree- 
ment. There was nothing for them to do, however, except to sit in plain view 
of the audiences and the men objected to this arrangement even though they 
were being paid full time. Then followed the ultimatum of the projectionists. 



Ohio MPTO Will 
Hold Annual Meeting 
Nov. 19 in Columbus 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

COLUMBUS, Oct. 1.— The ninth annual 
convention of the Ohio M P T O will be 
held in Columbus at the Deshler-Wallick 
Hotel on November 19-20, according to an 
announcement made by P. J. Wood, busi- 
ness manager of that organization. 

Letters have been sent to theatre equip- 
ment dealers asking them to display their 
products, such as seats, screens, projection 
machines and sound equipment. In their 
letter to these dealers it was stated that 
many of the theatres were now in the 
market for sound devices. 

Programs of the convention will be 
mailed to every exhibitor in the state of 
Ohio and not passed out to those attend- 
ing as has been the custom in the past. 



Fox Midwesco Leases 
New Merrill Theatre; 
3 Under Construction 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

MILWAUKEE, Oct. 1.— Fox Midwesco 
has taken a long term lease on the new 
theatre nearing completion in Merrill, Wis., 
according to H. J. Fitzgerald, general man- 
ager of the Fox Midwesco theatres corpo- 
ration. Fitzgerald has just returned from 
New York where he discussed expansion 
plans with Fox officials. 

The new theatre will be one of the most 
modern in the state and is also the first in 
Wisconsin to be built especially for sound 
acoustics and is scheduled to open Octo- 
ber 26. Western Electric sound equipment 
is being installed. The theatre will have 
800 seats, is beautifully decorated and out- 
fitted and will be a valuable addition to the 
Fox-Midwesco chain which now embraces 
nearly 50 theatres in Milwaukee, Kenosha, 
Racine, Beloit, Janesville, Madison, Antigo, 
Wausau, Marinette, Green Bay, Fond du 
Lac, Oshkosh, Waukesha and Stevens 
Point. 

New Fox theatres now being built in 
Green Bay, Marinette and Appleton are 
also expected to be ready for openings in 
the next two months. 

F N Pictures Breaking 

Records in Australia 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Recent First 
National and Warner Brothers pictures are 
breaking box-office records in Australia, 
according to a recent report just received 
from that country. Against the strongest 
sort of opposition, "Weary River" is draw- 
ing capacity audiences to the Haymarket in 
Sydney. At the same time, "The Singing 
Fool," at an advanced scale of prices, is 
packing the St. Tames. 

"The Divine Lady" with Corinne Griffith 
is getting a big play in Canada. Two of 
the most successful engagements were at 
the Kitsilano, Vancouver and the Broadway, 
in the same city, which is the second 
suburban house to play that picture. "The 
Great Divide" is playing to exceptional large 
audiences in all the key cities of the United 
States, according to Ned E. Depinet, gen- 
eral sales manager of First National. 



Berger Renews Contract 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Ludvig Berger, 
European director and musician, will re- 
main under contract to Paramount. Berger 
has just signed a new contract. At present 
he is working on "The Vagabond King." 



Negotiations were entered into between 
Arthur Cohen, the new managing director 
of Famous Players Canadian, and Bert Hen- 
derson and J. Weatherburn, representing 
the musicians, with the result that the con- 
tract was cancelled with the payment of 
$100,000 by the company. This sum repre- 
sents approximately 50 per cent of the total 
which the musicians would have received 
in wages until Sept. 1, 1930, but they are 
now free to obtain other employment. 

Strikers Make Overtures 
On First Day They're Out 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

EVERETT, WASH., Oct. 1.— One of the 
shortest strikes on record was staged here 
in the Fox West Coast houses, and consid- 
erable credit for its brief duration was due 
to the Washington Theatre Owners' Or- 
ganization, who keep a staff of high class 
projectionists at their instant disposal for 
just such instances. 

On September 6 the Everett motion pic- 
ture operators advised the Fox Everett thea- 
tres of a new scale effective September 14. 
On September 11 the operators advised the 
theatres if they did not accept the new scale 
they would walk out September 13. The 
theatres refused, the operators quit Septem- 
ber 13, and the theatres placed non union 
men in the booths. 

All theatres opened up the first day of 
the strike on exact schedule. The night of 
the first day the operators made overtures 
to get their jobs back, but the theatre offi- 
cials refused until all differences had been 
ironed out. This the operators agreed to do 
and were put back to work on September 
16 on the same basis as when they quit. 



Compromise Agreement 
Is Effected at Fresno 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

FRESNO, CAL, Oct. 1.— The four large 
local theatres darkened early last week, 
when projectionists walked out to enforce 
their demands for a higher wage scale, have 
been reopened following a temporary com- 
promise agreement. 

Another Hornet's Nest 
Stirs Up at Cincinnati 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

CINCINNATI, Oct. 1.— Events point to 
additional difficulty between the exhibitors 
and projectionists here following what was 
believed to have been a satisfactory settle- 
ment of the wage controversy, as outlined 
in verbal agreements recently, effective as of 
September 1. 

The operators presented written agree- 
ments to exhibitors for signature a few days 
ago when the latter discovered several 
clauses which did not meet with their ap- 
proval. Under the proposal the operators' 
union would have authority to make ulti- 
mate settlement of any dispute not now 
covered in the agreement. 

Permanent Injunction 
Averts Sympathy Strike 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

CLEVELAND, Oct. 1.— A permanent in- 
junction was granted the Cleveland motion 
pictures exhibitors association last Saturday 
by Common Pleas Judge Thomas M. Ken- 
nedy, restraining members of motion picture 
operators' Union local 160 of the I. A. T. S. E. 
from joining the stagehands' strike. 



Less Daylight, More Patrons Now, Say 

Exhibitors as Freak Time Period Ends 

The October 1st sigh of relief which annually resounds through the motion pic- 
ture industry was heard again on Monday, when most cities and towns having 
daylight saving returned to chronometrical normalcy, so to speak. Reports indi- 
cated that exhibitors forced to operate during the months when outdoor pleasures 
beckon, with the added burden of daylight saving, expect to increase their receipts 
materially with the passing of the freak time. 

Exhibitors in New York state, where hundreds of theatres had to contend with 
the added hour of evening daylight, declare that they lost thousands of dollars 
this summer as a result of the policy. 

Similar reports come from Canada, where the period that daylight saving is in 
force is much the same as that in the United States. The usual period is from the 
latter part of April to the first of October. 



32 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



THE FOURTH 



SERIES 



QUALITY REPRODUCTION by WESTERN ELECTRIC 




The Voice is 

a Precious Cargo- * uarded 

from actor to 

audience through a great chain of men and apparatus so that 
when it reaches the loud speaker it shall be true and faithful. 

If the loud speaker fails to operate efficiently, even the 
best pictures will not "click." 

That this final link shall not fail, the Western Electric 
Sound System uses the horn speaker — developed by the Bell 
Telephone Laboratories — backed by over 50 years of research 
and experience — a direct descendent of the first telephone 
receiver invented by Alexander Graham Bell ! 



he Western Electric 
Horn Speaker delivers u ten times 

as Efficiently as any other 



IT requires just one tenth the amplification 
to produce the desired volume without 
distortion. 

It comes nearest to reproducing the entire 
range of music and voice — over -emphasizing 
none of the notes. It does not play up the low 
notes by sacrificing the high. These high notes 
are essential to quality sound reproduction, to 
preserve the color, charm and individuality of 
the actor's voice. 



Its directional effect creates the perfect 
illusion that the voice comes from the lips of 
the actor on the screen. With speakers that 
lack direction, illusion is lost. 

It is designed especially to direct the sound 
to all parts of the theatre in equal volume, 
bringing words and music clearly to every 
person in the house, and overcoming many 
acoustic faults. With speakers lacking direc- 
tional effect this is impossible. 



The Horn Speaker Contributes to Quality in the 



Westm 



SOUND 




lectric 



SYSTEM 



Distributed by 

Electrical Research Products Inc. 

250 West 57th Street, New lork, N. Y. 



Member of Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, Inc. Will H. Hays, President 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



35 



W 



SOUND PICTURES 

Cleaning Battery Tops 

An ANSWER to Question No. 16 
Authoritative COMMENT 

The BLUEBOOK School 

QUESTION NO. 20— What must and ivill be the result if there is dust in the 
atmosphere of the projection room, and what fault is set up by minute scratches 
in the emulsion caused by dust from the air? 

By F. H. RICHARDSON 



ANSWER TO QUESTION No. 
16: The Question: "What so- 
lutions are recommended for 
cleaning battery tops ; what 
precaution is necessary when 
they are used? What would you 
do if you accidentally spilled 
some electrolyte on a battery 
top? What would you do were 
some of the solution to be acci- 
dentally spilled into one of the 
battery cells?" 

THIS question seems to have met with 
favor, if I may judge by the number of 
answers received. The following have sent 
acceptable answers, up to this time: Frank 
Dudiak, W. C. Budge, Karl Freidrich, Har- 
lan B. Fox, Roy O. Hayes, Thomas Alex- 
ander, G. L. Doe, F. D. Orenbacher, Walter 
J. Lathrop, H. M. Johnson, "Bill" Doe, 
M. D. Peters, John Christensen, A. T. 
Hancock, William Turner, M. D. Thomp- 
son, N. Roth, Louis Styles, Arthur D. 
Peters, John R. Malley, Chas. Hall, J. L. 
Hayes, Edward Gibney, Birk T. Dugan, 
T. R. Lamb, Robert Edlemann and A. D. 
Henley. 

Many of the answers were excellent. I 
have selected that of G. L. Doe, Chicago, 
as perhaps best for publication, though it 



was almost a draw between it and some 
others. Doe says: "What may be best for 
cleaning battery tops may depend upon the 
nature of what they be soiled with. For 
myself, once each day I use a hand bellows 
of ample proportions and blow off all dust, 
if anv there be. If the tops are wet or 
damp with electrolyte, which may be the 
case from either of two or three causes, 
I dampen a clean cloth thoroughly with a 
solution of household ammonia and water, 
mixed half and half and kept in a one 
gallon glass jug. With this cloth I wipe 
off the electrolyte, which is, by the am- 
monia, neutralized. Then I wipe the tops 
dry and, as our editor says, that is that. 

"Another solution equally efficient for 
this purpose is water in which as much 
bicarbonate of soda as possible has been 
dissolved. The soda may be had from any 
grocery store. It is cheap and efficient, 
but I like the ammonia better because you 
have only to fill a gallon glass jug half full 
of water, add two quarts of household am- 
monia, and it is all ready for use. No 
bother at all. 

"If electrolyte be accidentally spilled on 
a battery cell top, I proceed as above. 
When using such solutions it is important 
that all cell vent caps be in place, since 
should any of the solution get into a cell 
it would operate to the injury of the elec- 
trolyte. 



"Should some of the solution (ammonia 
or bicarbonate) accidentally get spilled into 
the cell (I cannot imagine such a thing 
being done, but of course all things are 
possible) I would disconnect that cell im- 
mediately, connecting the other cells by 
means of a jumper, and immediately take 
out all the electrolyte from the cell. The 
battery would work temporarily without 
the cell. I would then, using water suitable 
for use in battery, fill the cell and remove 
it two or three times, permitting it to 
stand in the cell the last time for say an 
hour. After the hour is up I would re- 
move the water and refill the cell with fresh 
electrolyte, a supply of which is always 
kept on hand. 

"In the foregoing I am presuming the 
amount of solution entering the cell to be 
relatively small. In fact, I believe it would 
be a practical impossibility to spill in any 
large amount of it, hence that condition 
need not be considered, except to say that 
if it happened I would secure a substitute 
cell, immediately empty the injured one and 
wash it out three or four times, fill it with 
battery water — not electrolyte but water — 
and ship it back to the manufacturer, or 
take it to the nearest battery service station 
for examination and reconditioning." 

There, I believe that is a very satisfac- 
tory answer, though I am not so certain as 
to the method of cleaning the cell. 



READ THIS COMMENT! 



GL. DOE'S answer to Question No. 16 
• was sent to the Electric Storage Bat- 
tery Company for examination and com- 
ment. Here it is: 

"We have no comment to make down 
to the line beginning, "Should some of the 
solution (ammonia or bicarbonate) acci- 
dentally get spilled into a cell," etc. Down 
to this point the answer is handled very 
satisfactorily. 

"From there on we agree with Mr. Doe 



that the amount of ammonia or bicarbonate 
solution which might accidentally get into 
a cell would be very small, hence would 
have little effect unless the cell be prac- 
tically empty of electrolyte, in which case 
it would need attention for other reasons 
than the ammonia or bicarbonate solution 
getting into the cell. 

"Assuming that the cell contains the nor- 
mal amount of electrolyte, we are quite sure 
the drastic action recommended by Mr. Doe 



is unnecessary. The effect of the ammonia 
or bicarbonate is entirely and wholly on the 
electrolyte. It would not injure the plates 
or separators in any manner, because of 
the fact that it is neutralized the instant it 
comes into contact with the electrolyte. 
There is, therefore, no need for removing 
the cell from the circuit. 

"The amount of solution which could 
get into a cell if the vent plugs be in place 
{Continued on next page) 



The Difference Between FAILURE AND SUCCESS Is Doing 
Things NEARLY RIGHT and Doing Them EXACTLY RIGHT 



34 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 




The street ballyhoo used by the R K O Orpheum, Memphis, to exploit "Half Marriage,'" the 
young couple standing on the left represented the neivlyweds and rode about the city in a 
Packard automobile, which with a chauffeur, was furnished by a local dealer. 



Comment on Reply- 
To Question No. 16 
Of Bluehook School 

(Continued from preceding page") 

(as they always should be when cleaning 
the top of a battery cell) would be so small 
that its effect upon even the electrolyte 
would be negligible, and could be disre- 
garded. The same would be true, ordi- 
narily, even with the vent plugs out at the 
time of cleaning. 

"If, in some unusual manner, a consider- 
able amount of the ammonia or bicarbonate 
solution did get into a cell, as much of the 
electrolyte as can be reached should be 
withdrawn and the cell filled with fresh 
electrolyte, a supply of w^ich -should, of 
course, always be kept on hand, and of 
proper specific gravity for the cells being 
used." 

There, gentlemen, you see we get scared 
by bugaboos. I myself thought that at 
the least the cell should be entirely emptied, 
washed out with battery water and then 
refilled with fresh electrolyte, if any con- 
siderable quantity of ammonia or bicarbon- 
ate solution got into a cell. One man who 
answered the question was of the opinion 
that the plates should be removed, and new 
separators installed. 

So you see it is well that we know what 
is what, and this comes from as high an 
authority as can be found anywhere on 
earth when storage batteries are consid- 
ered. 



Universalis Talking Reporter Makes Weber Machine Co. 
Hit as Novelty at First Showings 



Universalis Newspaper Newsreel in talking form made its first appearance last 
week and is acclaimed by leaders in the trade as a sensation. Theatre managers 
report that the novelty of the way in which the subjects were presented had the 
most favorable reaction upon the audiences and that the skeptical representa- 
tives of the trade admitted they were convinced. 

In this newsreel a talking reporter gives 
the details concerning the scenes as they 
flash upon the screen. His voice was de- 
clared to be especially pleasing, the enun- 
ciation being crisp and clear and the tones 
most pleasing to the ear. The rapid-fire 
description of events connected with the 
scenes lent them color and vividness that 
no sub-titles could possibly supply- 

The Talking Reporter touched on every 
event with a lightness and frothiness that 
created immediate interest in the scenes and 
the incidents connected with the events 
that could not be picturized. The kaleido- 
scopic change from one absorbing event to 
another compelled instant attention and 
held the interest throughout. It was de- 
clared by everyone to be a triumph for 
Universal and one of the important new 
events of the day in an industry that is full -mm- » ri, w rwil * 

of astonishing new developments. Mark OiranCt 1 tieatreS 

Feature Pathe Shorts 

The Mark Strand theatres in both New 
York and Brooklyn are featuring Pathe short 
features this week. Both houses are playing 
"Syncopated Trial," a melody comedy pro- 
duced by Harry Delmar, a Grantland Kice 
Sound Sportlight, "Duffers and Champs," and 
Pathe Sound News. The New York Strand 
is also playing "Hokum in Hoboken," a spe- 
cial Pathe Audio Review offering highlights 
from "After Dark," the famous old-time melo- 
drama that is having a sensational run in 
Hoboken. This subject held forth at the 
Brooklyn Strand last week. 

"Syncopated Trial" is a musical farce trial 
featuring Lew Seymour and Morgan Morley. 



The reel itself carried a strong list of 
subjects, all of world importance. Our 
own Lindy was seen starting on the first 
leg of his flight with his bride to Central 
America to establish a new airmail- 
passenger service. Such important per- 
sonages as the Prince of Wales, Ramsay 
MacDonald, Cardinal Schuster of Milan, 
Rabbi Schanyerson of Latvia, head of 
Jewry, Allan Hoover, the President's 
youngest son, and "Big Bill" Tilden were 
among the star actors who performed for 
the film. 

That this innovation in the newsreel field 
inaugurated by Carl Laemmle is one of the 
finest examples of genuine showmanship 
has been conceded by everyone who has 
seen the film. 



Appoints Dealers for 
Synchrodisk Device 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
ROCHESTER, Oct. 1.— The Weber Ma- 
chine company has appointed the Talking- 
Picture Equipment company of Boston to 
handle Syncrodisk installations throughout 
the New England territory, according to an 
announcement coming from the sales de- 
partment of the Weber company. 

Syncrodisk is a turntable device mounted 
on a pedestal similar to a Simplex stand 
and is adjustable to fit any projector. The 
complete equipment consists of two turn- 
tables and a change-over fader and can 
be purchased with or without amplifiers or 
speakers if desired. 

The mechanism is simple in construction, 
quiet in operation and a special spring sus- 
pension is employed to keep the disc at a 
steady and even speed, regardless of the 
condition of the projector. The tone arm 
is of their own design and so built to greatly 
reduce groove jumping on poor recorded 
records. The only change necessary in in- 
stalling these turntables is that a quarter 
horse motor be used instead of the regular 
projector motor. 




you're not * 
going m 

ANYWHERE^ 

UNLEJV* you ^IGN A 
TIFFANY -/TAH L 

FRANC HI S 9- 



McCormick Will Portray 

Teacher in Audien Debut 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— A cable received 
from Ireland states that John McCormack will 
portray a school teacher instead of a black- 
smith, as had been announced, in his first 
audien. 

Finding a suitable story for the great singer 
was something of a problem. The one w-hich 
had been decided upon before the trip to Ire- 
land was found to be inadequate for the mar- 
velous opportunities presented by the Irish 
country as background. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



35 



Italian Exhibitors 
Rapidly Equipping 
Houses with Sound 

(By Special Correspondence) 

NAPLES, Oct. 1, — Italian exhibitors are 
rapidly equipping their houses for sound 
and by the beginning of next season every 
important town will have at least one house 
for audiens, according to an announcement 
coming from the Pittaluga Film company. 

The sound systems used will be Vita- 
phone and Movietone, which is claimed to 
be giving the best results at the present 
time. In Rome, Milan and Turin only one 
theatre, at present, is showing sound pic- 
tures but this number will be increased to 
two and perhaps three in a short time. The 
pictures to be shown will include the Pit- 
taluga releases and all those now in produc- 
tion in the studios at Rome, which the 
equipped with Western Electric recording 
equipment. 

The Superfilm company at Rome has 
completed three sound pictures, "The Min- 
strel of Venice," "Myriam" and "La 
Sperduta di Allah " Four other companies 
now ready for production are the S. A. C. I. 
A,, Augustus, Suprema and A. D. I. A. The 
National Institute for Cinematography has 
bought the film "Sole" from Augustus and 
will release it throughout Italy and abroad. 



Sono-Art Signs Up 
Reginald Denny for 
Talking Film Series 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Reginald Denny 
has been signed to star, in a series of audiens 
for Sono-Art to be produced at Metropoli- 
tan studios, according to O. E. Goebel, 
president, and George W. Weeks, vice presi- 
dent of that company. 

Denny has been a feature picture star 
since 1926, and, most recently has appeared 
in about 12 pictures. He won his greatest 
popularity in the "Leather Pushers" which 
Universal released and it is the success of 
that series which won him a feature con- 
tract. 

Prior to his motion picture work he ap- 
peared on the English stage for several 
years. His first picture for Sono-Art will 
be announced in a few days and it is thought 
that the company plans to star him in a 
light comedy role, several which are now 
under consideration. 



Postal Telegraph Tieup 

Boosts Warners' Picture 

As part of their campaign of exploitation 
for "Gold Diggers of Broadway" at the 
Winter Garden, Warner Brothers have 
effected a tieup with the Postal Telegraph 
whereby a special enlargement of a mes- 
sage will be placed in the windows of their 
156 branch offices throughout the metro- 
politan area. 

The enlargement, measuring 22x17 inches, 
is signed by Ann Pennington and is ad- 
dressed to her friends in New York, urging 
them to see "Gold Diggers of Broadway" 
at the Winter Garden. 



W B Promote McGann 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1— William McGann, 
who was an assistant director at the War- 
ner Brothers studios, was promoted to 
director by J. L. Warner. McGann's first 
directorial responsibility will be "On the 
Border," starring Rin-Tin-Tin. 



WE Operating 100% in Every 

Land But Germany: Otterson 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1. — In the midst of conflicting and erroneous reports re- 
garding patent suits in Europe on sound picture equipment, J. E. Otterson, presi- 
dent of Electrical Research Products, Inc., who has just returned from abroad, 
makes the authentic statement that Western Electric equipment is operating 100 
per cent in every foreign country except Germany. Installations in England are 
proceeding at a rapid rate and even application for a temporary injunction has 
been withdrawn. The London offices have more than 700 people employed, 250 
theatres are using W. E. equipment and 250 additional theatres are waiting for 
installations. 

"Despite any published reports," he de- 
clared, "the situation in Europe is, as a 
whole, very favorable to the Western 
Electric Company. 

"Within the past two weeks the courts 
in four different countries have denied ap- 
plications for injunctions brought by the 
German interests against Western Electric 
or theatres using its equipment. 

Writ Denied in Budapest 

"In Budapest, contrary to the printed re- 
port which stated that an injunction had 
been granted and a theatre closed, the 
courts denied the application for an in- 
junction and we have had cable advices 
that the theatre which is to show sound 
pictures over our equipment will open on 
schedule time. 

"In Switzerland the injunction proceed- 
ings having failed, and there has been no 
interference whatever with theatres already 
operating. 

"The report of an injunction closing a 
Vienna theatre was also incorrect. We 
have had cable advice that the court in 
Prague has denied the injunction asked for 
in this case. 



Hearing in Germany Oct. 25 

"Germany is the only country in which 
we are under injunction and a hearing on 
the suit to which this injunction is related 
is scheduled to take place Oct. 25. 

"In England Western Electric activities 
are proceeding at a rapid rate, the appli- 
cation for even a temporary injunction 
there having been withdrawn. Our Lon- 



don office now has a staff of more than 700 
people and installations are proceeding at 
a rapid rate. Two hundred and forty West- 
ern Electric equipped theatres are in opera- 
tion in the British Isles and 50 in other 
countries in Europe, while there are 250 ad- 
ditional theatres awaiting installations. 
Taking the foreign field outside of Amer- 
ica, Western Electric has equipped about 
600 theatres to date and has orders on hand 
for as many more. 

Says Litigation Was Natural 

"Looking at Europe as a whole we see 
no occasion for apprehension as to the 
future for the Western Electric Sound Sys- 
tem. The litigation is only such as might 
be expected when a manufacturer enters a 
foreign field in which local manufacturers 
feel disposed to maintain the market ex- 
clusively. 

"There never has been any doubt in our 
minds of the fundamental soundness of the 
Western Electric patent position but foreign 
manufacturers are entitled to the full protec- 
tion of the law; and wherever these issues 
have been taken to court we can simply 
hope for their earliest possible determina- 
tion, feeling full confidence in the outcome. 
Our experience to date strengthens this 
confidence." 



Major Bowes Returns to New York 

NEW YORK — Major Bowes, managing director of 
the Capitol theatre, and vice-president of M G M, re- 
turned to New York September 29, after a month's 
business trip to the Coast. 



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36 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 




Architects' 's sketch of Universal's new $500,000 laboratory, now under construction at Uni- 
versal City. New equipment will be installed which will permit the luindling of 300.000 
feet of sound film per day and machinery to handle a new method of developing sound films. 



300,000 Feet of Film a Day to 

Be Rate of LPs New Laboratory 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Oct. 1. — Universal Pictures has under construction a new 
laboratory with special equipment, developed by Universal engineers, which will 
enable them to handle 300,000 feet of sound film a day. 



Equipment will also be installed for the 
new method of developing sound films which 
eliminates the Mackey line and makes for 
sharper sound projection. The center section 
will house the photographic section including 
the developing plant, printing and administra- 
tion office on the ground floor; the second 
floor will be devoted to the photograph re- 
search laboratories where a special staff will 
continually work on new ideas in improving 
sound negatives. A building on the left will 
house the cutting rooms. Here the dailies 
will be patched and synchronized. The build- 
ing on the right will house the camera de- 
partment, all motion picture cameras, loading 
rooms and the camera department lockers and 
offices. 

The whole layout has been planned for effi- 
ciency being in close juxtaposition to the 
sound projection rooms. The basement con- 
tains a special ventilating unit which purifies 
the air by removing the slightest trace of 
dust from the atmosphere, a system made 
necessary to insure absolutely clean motion 
picture film. 

Hard-to-Record Scene 

Shown in New Fox Film 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— A talking pic- 
ture within a talking picture will be seen 
and heard for the first time on any screen 
when "A Song of Kentucky" is released. 
The sequence shows a Fox Movietone news 
reel shot as seen and heard by an audience 
which applauds at its conclusion. This type 




of scene was not difficult for the silent pic- 
tures, but for audible films it required 
weeks of laboratory experiments and doz- 
ens of retakes. 



Independent Producers 
On Metropolitan Lots 
Keep Recorders Busy 

(Sfccial to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— The Halperin 
Brothers, Victor and Edwin, have moved 
bag and baggage into the Metropolitan 
sound studios, where they are about ready 
to launch a series of all talking- feature 
productions, using Metropolitan's Western 
Electric recording equipment. 

The Halperin Productions will make the 
eighth feature producing organization to 
make use of Metropolitan's studios in 
Hollywood for production of talking pic- 
tures. 

Other activity at Metropolitan in Holly- 
wood includes Harold Lloyd's "Welcome 
Danger;" Sono-Art's "Blaze o' Glory," with 
Eddie Dowling, just starting into produc- 
tion; and also the Broughton-Reid produc- 
tion, "The Dude Wrangler," with Lina 
Basquette and George Duryea. The James 
Cruze productions will start another pic- 
ture immediately, having just completed 
"The Great Gabbo," and the Robert C. 
Bruce's "Outdoor Talking Scenics" are in 
active production on location with one of 
Metropolitan's portable equipment trucks. 



Four More Chain Theatres 

Are Wired by Universal 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Universal Chain 
Theatrical Enterprises will soon have its en- 
tire chain 100 per cent wired. The latest 
installations announced by Louis Cohen, gen- 
eral manager, are: Majestic theatre, Grand 
Island, Nebraska; Stiand theatre, Marshall- 
town, Iowa ; Rialto theatre, Missouri Valley, 
Iowa, and the Strand theatre, Hastings, 
Nebraska. 



Outright Sale and 
No Service Fee Is 
Phono-Kinema Plan 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Phc no-Kinema com- 
pany has acquired the rights to manufacture, 
in the United States and Canada, and lease, 
license, sell and otherwise dispose of any or 
all sound equipment in all parts of the world, 
made under the Nakken patents. Working 
models were completed last August and ex- 
tensive tests have proven the device satis- 
factory, and the company is now ready to 
make installations within four weeks from 
the acceptance of the order. 

All the reproducing equipment will be 
sold outright to the theatre, carries no serv- 
ice charges and complete patent guarantees 
are provided. The price is $2,950 for the 
combination unit of sound-on-film and 
sound-on-disc including installation but ex- 
clusive of wiring between the projection 
room and the stage. 

The complete unit includes pick-ups, 
amplifiers, monitor, control board and loud 
speakers and deliveries can be made within 
four weeks after the order has been 
accepted. 

Sound heads will be sold at $1,750 per 
unit of two, exclusive of monitor, control 
panel and speakers. Disc units are not sold 
separately. Phono-Kinema will sell sound- 
on-film attachments to any reputable disc 
manufacturer of installation with their 
equipment and will furnish technical and 
engineering service so that the two devices 
may be conformed to work together. 

Replacement parts can easily be obtained 
at a cost said to be 40 to 60 per cent less 
than those of any other manufacturer. 

The device is very simple in its construc- 
tion and the Nakken principles permit a 
one-eight inch perpendicular range as com- 
pared with one-five hundredth of an inch 
range in other sound-on-film reproducers. 
One of its outstanding features is that the 
emulsion side of the film cannot be 
scratched owing to the fact that the film 
tension bars are on the opposite side of 
the film. 

Phono-Kinema company is headed by 
Louis C. Pedlar and A. J. Moeller is secre- 
tary and treasurer. Offices are located at 
729 Seventh Avenue, New York City. 



Aspiring Girls Warned 

To Think Again Before 

Training for Audiens 

Chicago girls who think they can break 
into the films by way of the audiens should 
think again before they seriously heed ad- 
vertisements glorifying audien training for 
the amateur, says Flint Grinnell, manager 
of the Chicago Better Business Bureau. 

Sound film actors can be easily obtained 
and no future shortage of able audien ac- 
tors is anticipated, the bureau found in a 
recent investigation. Also, amateurs with- 
out picture or stage experience are not in 
demand, it was stated. 

Cruze s "Great Gabbo" 

Starting Extended Runs 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Two theatres, the 
Criterion, Los Angeles, and Loew's War- 
field, San Francisco, will begin extended 
runs of James Cruze's "The Great Gabbo" 
tomorrow. Erich Von Stroheim is starred 
in "The Great Gabbo." 



October 5, 1929 



EX 



H1BITORS HERALD-WORLD 



37 



Pa the td Produce 
World Review with 
Television Motif 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— The eventual perfec- 
tion and application of television to motion 
pictures is forecast in a new Pathe feature 
which will be put into production immediately, 
which has as its motif the use of television in 
the home. As the first step in the production 
a set is being constructed which shows a huge 
television broadcasting and receiving station, 
complete in every detail. 

The picture, which will be an elaborate 
extravaganza, will be truly an international 
production in every sense of the word. 
Scenes such as have made the Follies 
Bergere in Paris famous; the Moscow Art 
Theatre world known; night club scenes in 
Berlin; Oriental dance numbers and other 
forms of amusement from all corners of the 
globe, will be duplicated in this novel pic- 
ture, together with acts and numbers pre- 
sented by the most popular stage and screen 
talent available. 

The picture will be international too, in 
the sense that special editions will be made 
in the native tongues of France, Germany, 
Russia and Spanish speaking countries. 
This, it is believed, is the first time since 
the advent of talking pictures that a picture 
has been produced in the United States 
aimed at a truly world market. The silent 
picture was international. The picture with 
dialog in English only is national. The 
Pathe innovation points the way to con- 
tinued popularity of the American picture 
abroad. 

The cast has not yet been announced; 
but to insure the authenticity of the foreign 
scenes such noted foreign recruits to Holly- 
wood production as Paul Stein, former 
Viennese stage director; Leo Birinski, the 
German dramatist; Richard Boleslavsky, 
stage director who received his training: in 
the Moscow Art Theatre; Frank Reicher, 
German stage director and actor; and Josiah 
Zuro, the impressario, are definitely named 
to be associated with the production. 

The picture will precede the Greenwich 
Village Follies in the production schedule. 



William Collier Cast 
In Movietone Picture 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, October 1.— William Col- 
lier, Sr., one of Broadway's noted play- 
wrights and stars, and Charlotte Henry, 
one of the stage's youngest stars, make 
their audien debuts simultaneously in "Har- 
mony at Home" for Fox Movietone. Work 
will be started on the production soon un- 
der Russell Birdwell, who directed "Mas- 
querade." 

Others in the cast are Marguerite 
Churchill, who recently completed the femi- 
nine lead in Paul Muni's starring vehicle, 
"Seven Faces;" Charles Eaton, who will be 
remembered from "The Ghost Talks," and 
Rex Bell, who is a graduate from Westerns. 



Lee Supply Company Wires 

Queen with Movie-Phone 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
CANADIAN, TEXAS, Oct. 1.— The Lee 
Theatre Supply company has wired the 
Queen theatre for Movie-phone sound 
equipment, according to an announcement 
coming from Roy C. Lee, manager of the 
company. 



Work Started On $20,000 Theatre 

GLENCOE, MINN.— Work has been started on a 
new $20,000 theatre. The house will be owned by 
the Gould family which is known for its theatrical 
troupes. 



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38 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



THE STUDIO 



Warners Celebrate Opening of New 
Theatre with "Qold Diggers" 

Show at Los Angeles House Proves Success — Beall and Gamer Opening 

Chain of Publicity Offices 
By DOUGLAS HODGES 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1. — Warner Brothers celebrated the opening of its 
new theatre in Los Angeles Thursday evening with the premiere of 
"Gold Diggers of Broadway." The show was a success and the open- 
ing of the theatre was a success. The program was held down to less than 
three hours, which is an hour briefer than most of these flashy affairs. There 
was much swish and swash about the premiere and silk hats were not out of 
order for the opening. 



JACK WARNER represented the Warner 
Brothers in topping fashion and chose 
seats near Al Jolson and Sid Grauman. 
Warner and Jolson as well as Nick Lucas, 
Roy Del Ruth, William Bakewell, Robert 
Lord, Larry Geballos, Ann Pennington, Con- 
way Tearle and a host of others were hailed 
by Frank Fay from the stage for a bow or 
two. Not all of them responded. Del Ruth, 
Jolson and one or two others got stage fright 
at the thought of Fay's anticipated remarks 
and ducked. 

Fay proved one of the most entertaining 
ceremony masters Hollywood has had in 
its prolonged search for men who can cheer 
up the audience after three hours of fidget- 
ting. He said a few nice things about peo- 
ple but the nicest was, "Jack Warner is sort 
of a nice guy." 

The best performances were by Winnie 
Lightner, Nancy Welford, Ann Pennington 
and Nick Lucas. The latter was at the 
disadvantage, however, of having too many 
numbers. Pennington was at the disad- 
vantage of having too few. Nancy Wel- 
ford, an expert vocalist, had little oppor- 
tunity to prove it because of the great num- 
ber of slides that occupied her time and 
permitted her no chance to sing. 

Roy Del Ruth should be and probably 
is pretty proud of his work in "Gold Dig- 
gers." He has taken a good story written 
by Robert Lord and given it settings that 
are dramatic, beautiful, novel and good 
show business. 

The scenario is well perfected. Lord has 
probably never given the screen a better 
piece of his work than he has in this. 

All the picture is in color. A good part 
of the best part of the picture is pure 
musical coined)'. It is a reproduction of 
a stage show. 

The off-stage stuff is a story of Broad- 
way's so-called gold diggers and their way 
with two millionaires and the son of one 
of them. It is farce with very little seri- 
ousness to cloud the brain. In other words 
it is purported to be a tonic for the tired 
business man. Music, dancing and good 
acting make the tonic. Lots of young 
women usually prove such an undertaking a 
success. 

TRVIN WILL AT has left for New York 
■*■ to begin the direction of a picture to 
be announced within a few days. During 



the past few weeks he has written a num- 
ber of scenarios and originals. 



H 



ARRY HAMMOND BEALL and 
Oliver Garver will announce within a 
few days that they are opening a chain 
of publicity offices with headquarters in 
San Francisco, Chicago, New York and 
Peoria, 111. Commercial advertising as 
well as theatrical publicity will be handled 
by the company. 



THERE is only one studio in Hollywood 
that did not offer to put up a prize for 
the third annual motion picture golf tour- 
nament. The others volunteered such 
things as silver flasks, cocktail shakers, 
Ford automobiles, golf equipment of all 
kinds and various kinds of merchandise 
valued as high as $500. Caddo Productions 
sent the golfers a huge silver zeppelin con- 
taining silverware, cups, cocktail shaker and 
whatnot. The committee received 40 prizes 
and sent out the word that that was enough. 
And 20 more came pouring in before the 
committee could make itself understood 
that it did not want more than one prize 
for every two players. 



Fox Music Hall Dedicated; 
Brilliant Program Offered 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— The Hall of 
Music at Fox Movietone City was dedicated 
September 22. Thousands of music lovers at- 
tended the ceremonies. Dr. Rufus von Kleins- 
mid, president of the University of California 
made the dedicatory address. 

Among the artists who took part in the 
musical program are Lawrence Tibbett, 
Mojica, Lumsden Hare and the 100 piece 
symphony orchestra led by Arthur Kay. An 
ensemble of 300 singing voices concluded the 
program. 



Christie Film Has West 
In Lead; Many Locations 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— Indicating that 
talking pictures are moving moving pic- 
tures, "The Dancing Gob" is being filmed 
and recorded in various locations. 



In Schildkraut Picture? 
They Only Say They Are 

(Special to the Herald- World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— Numer- 
ous undesired "self elevated to lead- 
ing roles" actors and actresses, have 
issued statements that they are to be 
either featured or co-featured with 
Joseph Schildkraut in his latest film 
for Universal. 

Carl Laemmle, Jr., has confirmed 
an announcement that Schildkraut 
will star alone in the picture, with 
Barbara Kent the feminine lead. 
Schildkraut found that there were 
many undesired players willing to 
chisel in honors which he alone won. 



Radio Pictures Busy with 
$2,500,000 Expansion; 8 
Big Talkers Are Starting 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— Studio expansion 
involving $2,'SOO,000 and eight big talking 
musical features on the eve of shooting makes 
the home of Radio Pictures a real live spot 
of activity in Hollywood. Included in the 
expansion program is the largest sound stage 
in the world, 150 by 500 feet, it is said. 

Ground will be broken soon for the stage 
and it will have facilities for the making of 
four talking pictures at one time. A new 
studio restaurant will seat 250 persons, a 
mono rail system for the transportation of 
sets from stage to stage and a sprinkler 
system operating in every building in the 
studio. 

Rudy Vallee, the crooning star of the pres^ 
entation stage, is well into his initial picture, 
"The Vagabond Lover." Richard Dix, Bebe 
Daniels and Olive Borden each will face both 
camera and microphones on big productions 
within a few days. "Hit the Deck," "The 
Case of Sergeant Grischa," "The Firewalker" 
and "Hunted" are being made ready for early 
starting. 

Bert Wheeler, Broadway stage comedian, 
has been signed under a long term contract 
by Radio Pictures. The work he did in the 
R K O musical extravaganza, "Rio Rita," 
brought him a contract from William Le 
Baron, production chief. Harry Tierney, com- 
poser of "Rio Rita," "Kid Boots," three an- 
nual editions of "Ziegfeld's Follies,' and other 
stage hits, is writing music for "Dixiana," 
called the first light operetta ever written di- 
rectly for the screen. Bebe Daniels will play 
the featured role. 



Niblo Host at Tennis Party 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— Fred Niblo, Enid 
Bennett entertained at night tennis and a 
swimming party here. There were 20 visit- 
ing tennis champions including Betty Nuthall, 
John Van Ryn, and Edith Cross. Tennis 
enthusiasts who attended were Anita Page, 
Ronald Colman, Katherine Dale Owen, Betty 
Bronson and William Powell. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



39 



NEW YORK 
SHOWINGS 



"Faro Nell or In Old Calif orny" 

Louise Fazenda has a voice that occasion- 
ally twitters with the canaries. This we 
knew. That she also has what almost cor- 
responds to a basso we found out last week 
when we saw her in a beautifully done 
travesty on the old Westerns, called "Faro 
Nell, or In Old Californy." We learned 
again that "there's gold in them thar hills" 
and that her husband had not "done right 
by our Nell." This picture should be espe- 
cially amusing to all those who recall the 
galloping, six-gun Westerns of yore. It is, 
by the way, a Christie Talking Play and 
not a Christie Comedy. 

Another C. T. P. is "The Fatal Forceps" 
with Ford Sterling, again a burlesque. 
Sterling is being tried for felonious assault. 
It seems that he's a dentist and can never 
sleep because of the saxophonic tootings of 
the gentleman in the flat below him. This 
fellow comes to the dentist's chair. Sterling 
goes after him with the forceps and, after 
a tremendously realistic struggle, extracts 
every one of his teeth. He tells his story 
in court — is acquitted. 

A third C. T. P. gives us Taylor Holmes 
and Carmel Myers in "He Did His Best." 
Christie is getting feature stars to be fea- 
tured in his two-reel talking plays. 

Educational Comedies 

Three Educational talking comedies were 
shown at R C A's 411 Fifth avenue studio 
last week. They were: Lupino Lane in 
"Fire Proof," Lloyd Hamilton in "Peace- 
ful Alley," and Harry Gribbon, Andy Clyde 
and Thelma Hill in "The Golfers." 

The first part of the Lane picture con- 
sisted of gags we have seen Messrs. Laurel 
and Hardy get better use of. The last part 
was original and clever. "The Golfers," 
though, should appeal to anyone who has 
ever wielded a club. And outside of the 
humor there is some very nice play by Mr. 
Charlie Guest. 

James FitzPatrick showed two of his 
Traveltalks last week as well as a couple 
of his Movie Horoscopes. The former are 
very well done, the photographer has 
chosen some nice camera angles and picked 
his subjects well. Some of the shots are 
very beautiful and the explanatory dialogue 
which accompanies them is at once inter- 
esting and factual. The particular subjects 
cover a trip from Barcelona to Valencia 
and from Valencia to Granada. And the 
next best thing, in our mind, to going to 
these places is to see them and hear about 
them on the screen. The movie horoscopes 
were for the months of September and 
October. We were informed that they 
would appeal to women. As it is, they are 
neither serious nor amusing, but an awk- 
ward combination of the two. The Travel- 
talks, however, more than made up for any 
deficiency in the Horoscopes. 

— D. F. 



State Shows 11,000 Extras 
Registered and 7S0 Work 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— The California 
state department of industrial relations has 
revealed statistics relating to the employment 
of extras in studios. There are 11,000 extras 
registered with the various casting agencies. 
Those working each day average 756, leaving 
10,244 that do not work. 

The survey was made over a period of one 
year. Extras are paid from five to $15 per 
day. The average daily wage is close to nine 
dollars. 



John Stone Is Made Executive 
Of Fox Silent Film Staff of 30 

Completes Silent Versions of "Cock Eyed World," "Salute" and 
"Behind That Curtain"; Staff Working on 
30 Films for 1929-30 

(Special to the Herald-lVorld) 
HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1. — In the new list of personnel and executives which 
was posted on the bulletin board this week, there appeared the line : 
"Silent Picture Department — John Stone, Editor." 

This recognition of John Stone's long and faithful service on the Fox lot, 

comes after a year of prolific writing to cap ten years of varied assignments. 

Starting as a reader in the scenario de- 
partment in 1919, Stone, a former teacher 
in New York City, became one of Fox's ace 



writers turning out such successes as: 
"Three Bad Men," "Black Watch," "Prep 
and Pep," "Blue Skies," "Chasing Thru 
Europe," "Road House" and a majority of 
the Tom Mix specials for Fox. 

This record of ten years with one com- 
pany remains a record in Hollywood, where 
transients are in the majority. During the 
past year he has been responsible for the 
scenarios of "Hurdy Gurdy Man," "The 
Girl That Wasn't Wanted," "The Girl From 
Havana" and the screen story of "Salute," 
which is proving to be a box office 
attraction. 

In his new role of chief of the newly 
created Silent Picture Department, Stone is 
in charge of more than 30 title writers, cut- 
ters, editors, assistant directors and camera- 
men who are turning out the 30 Fox films 
announced for the coming season. 

As editorial supervisor, Stone's long ex- 
perience as a writer is standing him in 
excellent stead. Already the department 
has turned out silent pictures of "Behind 
That Curtain," "The Cock Eyed World" and 
others which are said to be marked by an 
interesting new style of editorial treatment. 

Walsh Directing McLaglen 

Production on an untitled film featuring 
Victor McLaglen started this week at the 
Fox studios. Raoul Walsh is directing. Fifi 
Dorsay has the feminine lead. Others in the 
cast are El Brendel, Charles Judels, August 
Tollaire, Eddie Dillon and Lennox Pawle. It 
is a sea story based on an idea of Walsh. 
Dudley Nichols wrote the scenario. 

The tail end of the Warner production 
season appears to be the kind of a tail that 
wags the dog. Most of the year's program 
has been completed. Two feature produc- 
tions have started recently, "Mammy" and 
"The Man." It is understood that the Barry- 
more audien, "The Man," represents an en- 
tirely new talking picture field for Barrymore. 

William McGann, who was recently elevated 
to the ranks of directors, is shooting "On the 
Border," featuring Rin Tin Tin. Armida and 
John Litel have the romantic roles. 

The Warner short feature department is 
active with four productions before the 
cameras. Larry Ceballos is directing his first 
picture, "Night Club Baby." Ann Penning- 
ton has the lead. It is being filmed in tech- 
nicolor. Phyllis Crane and Adrienne Dore 
are in the cast. 

Bryan Foy is directing "At the Church 
Festival." Dick Henderson has the lead. 
Immediately upon completing this Foy will 
start production on "The Head of the Family." 
Roy Mack is directing "Minstrel Days." A 
cast of 40 colored artists are featured. 

Howard Bretherton, who was directing 
Monte Blue in "The Isle of Escape," has been 
assigned to direct a number of the short fea- 
tures. Blue broke several ribs while making 
water scenes at Catalina recently. 

Metropolitan Studios Busy 

Activities at ■ the Metropolitan studios in- 
clude the Sono-Art unit which will start pro- 



duction on "Blaze O' Glory." Eddie Dowling 
has the leading role. The cast includes Frankie 
Darro, Henry B. Walthal, Ferdinand Shu- 
mann Heink and William Davidson. 

The James Cruze productions are preparing 
for another picture to start soon. The Robert 
C. Bruce Outdoor Talking Scenics are in 
active production. Broughton Reid produc- 
tions are shooting "The Duke Wrangler." 
Lina Basquette and George Duryea have the 
leading roles. Mrs. Wallace Reid and Richard 
Thorpe are directing. 

The Halperin Brothers are ready to launch 
a series of pictures. They are using the 
Western Electric equipment for recording. 
The Halperin's are the eighth feature produc- 
tion organization to make use of the Metro- 
politan studies. 

Mai St. Clair at M G M 

Mai St. Clair will direct Joan Crawford in 
"Montana" for M G M. The story is a mu- 
sical comedy of the West, with songs and 
other incidental numbers woven into a story 
of the wide open spaces. Joan Crawford 
recently signed a new starring agreement with 
MGM. 

Synchrotone at Tec Art 

The Colorart Synchrotone Corporation has 
established its headquarters at Tec Art 
studios. Production will begin shortly. The 
first feature will be made in color and will 
star Reginald Denny. Eric Von Stroheim, 
Esther Ralston and F. W. Murnau have been 
signed for a number of the Colorart pictures. 

Murnau is now in Tahiti working on a pic- 
ture company. Audrey Scotto and John 
Reinhardt are preparing for a series of short 
features to start production soon. Edward 
Harris, who has perfected a new system for 
recording, has contributed his patents. They 
will be employed in the recording which 
Colorart will use and lease. 

Roach Busy 

Robert MacGowan started production this 
week on an untitled film at the Roach studios. 
It is an Our Gang comedy. There are four 
pictures being made and only one is titled. 
Laurel and Hardy are making "The Hoose- 
gow." James Parrott is directing. 

Harry Langdon is doing a Charley's Aunt, 
playing a butler who impersonates his mis- 
tress in order to secure a proposal of mar- 
riage from her timid old beau. Charles Rogers 
is directing. 

Tuttle and Wellman Start 

Two pictures started this week at the Para- 
mount studios. Nancy Carroll has the lead 
in an untitled film. William Wellman is 
directing. 



David Butler Signs at Fox 

( Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— David Butler has 
been signed on a new long term contract by 
Fox. Butler recently completed the direction 
of "Sunny Side Up." Janet Gaynor and 
Charles Farrell are featured. Others in the 
cast who received new contracts are Sharon 
Lynn, Majorie White, El Brendel, and Frank 
Richardson. 



40 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



"Laughing Lady" in Production; 
Ruth Chatterton Is Featured 

Vitaphone Plant Continues to Be Busiest in East — LeMaire's 
Contract with Pathe Increased Several Times — Trenches 
Of 1914 Reproduced in "Stand To" 
By DOUGLAS FOX 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1. — Victor Schertzinger reports that all is well on the 
Paramount front with "The Laughing Lady," now in production at the As- 
toria studio. Ruth Chatterton, it is said, fits the feature role as well as Jeanne 
Eagels, whose place she has taken. 

The Vitaphone plant is still the busiest in the East and will probably con- 
tinue to be if it maintains its present production schedule. 



Exhibitor demand is believed to have 
caused George LeMaire to increase his out- 
put for Pathe. His initial contract called 
for six talking comedies. This was in- 
creased to eight subjects. Then he was 
given a contract to make another series of 
six (Manhattan Comedies) and finally an- 
other contract came up for a third series 
of six (Checker Comedies). LeMaire, who 
has kept well along on his schedule, has 
only six more comedies to make in his 
present contracted-for series. These, it is 
understood, like the others, will be made at 
Sound Studios. 

Accuracy in "Stand To" 

People who see "Stand To," Bruce Bairns- 
father's new Radio short, will recall the 
author's series of cartoons, "Old Bill in 
France," which were published in England 
during the course of the war and later 
reprinted over here. 

"Stand To," which was made at the 
Gramercy studio last week, boasts of Old 
Bill and Alf as its main characters. The 
scene is laid in a 1914 trench which was not, 
for your information, like the trenches of 
1915, '16, '17 or '18. The styles of trenches 
changed with the new exigencies of war- 
fare. Bairnsfather made the sketches for 
the sets himself. They were gone over by 
Ernst Fegte at the Gramercy studio and the 
sets built with a careful eye for accuracy 
to detail. 

Wenman Gets Major Role 

For the major part RCA landed Henry 
Wenman, who was Old Bill in the first stage 
production of "The Better 'Ole," and is 
now Lieutenant Trotter in the New York 
production of "Journey's End." Harry Mc- 
Naughton, English comedian, has the part 
of Alf. Leo Meehan directed. 

Dudley Murphy's "St. Louis Blues," 
brought so much favorable comment that 
he left the Gramercy plant to go to Para- 
mount. He has been given the post of short 
subject director on the regular staff of the 
Long Island studio. He will produce one 
and two reel features under the supervision 
of Larry Kent. 

Kohler in Ruggles Picture 

Fred Kohler, one of the nicest villains in 
pictures, has been assigned a feature role 
in a production which will present Charles 
Ruggles in an as yet untitled story by 
Ben Hecht. Kohler arrived yesterday. He 
will work under Hobart Henley, who 
directed "The Lady Lies" at the Paramount 
plant. 

Charles J. Hunt and his company are 
putting the finishing touches to "Howdy, 
Broadway," produced by W. Ray Johnston 
at the Metropolitan Studios in Fort Lee. 

Captain Noble has finished three of his 
series of "Schoolday Frolics" at American 
Sound Studios. One of these is on this 
week's program of the Brooklyn Strand. 

Warners has booked Bert Lahr, comedian 
of "Hold Everything," for a Vitaphone 
Variety. Murray Roth last week directed 
Lahr in a sketch entitled "Faint Heart" 



written by Ed. Joseph and Fred Allen. 
Allen is comedian in "The Little Show." 
Arthur Hurley also directed a Variety last 
week with Tex McLeod in a Spanish num- 
ber for foreign consumption. 



Cummings in Sacramento 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— Irving Cum- 
mings, Fox director, has left for Sacra- 
mento. He has taken three principals and 
a technical crew of 40 with him. Cum- 
mings will shoot scenes for "Cameo Kirby." 
J. Harold Murray and Norma Terris have 
the leading roles. 



"Call of the Circus" 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1. — Pickwick 
Productions is in the field to make audiens 
that are for distribution in other than key 
city houses. Officials of the firm are ex- 
perienced picture men and have studied 
needs of small theatres with regard to 
audible pictures and have begun to turn out 
pictures to suit those needs. The first one 
is a great piece of stuff for the theatres 
in small towns or neighborhoods. 

"The Call of the Circus" features Ethel 
Clayton and Francis X. Bushman. It is 
a complete feature length picture that tells 
a story of a clown who has retired from 
the arena and has gone to live in a vine 
covered cottage in the country. 

Bushman meets the son of Ethel Clayton 
and invites him to live with him. Later, 
Bushman marries her and the three live 
together. Happiness is jeopardized when a 
fourth person enters the story. It is a 
young woman who has lost her family in 
a flood. Her presence menaces the story 
very well. It is ended when she falls in 
love with the son of Miss Clayton and a 
happy ending ensues. 

It is a piece of romance that is well told. 
The story was written for the screen by 
Jack Townley. 

The company will make a series of these 
features with the same box office policy 
that was in effect for the last one. 

— D. H. 



"Footlights and Fools" 

HOLLYWOOD.— In my opinion this is 
the finest acting Colleen Moore has ever 
done and it is one of the moniest pictures 
she has ever made. It looks like it will 
forge far into the class with "So Big" and 
"Flaming Youth." But those opinions are 
purely personal. 

"Footlights and Fools" is a story about 



Hal per ins Plan Reptile Age 
Audien; Hoyt Will Direct 
It; To Cost Million, Report 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1.— Victor and Ed- 
ward Halperin are soon to start production 
on "Creation." It will be the first million 
dollar sound special. The baby talk of the 
brontosaurus, pterodactyl, megalosaurus 
and other pets of prehistoric time will be 
heard for the first time. 

Harry O. Hoyt, director of "The Lost 
World" will direct. He also wrote the 
script for the story. It is believed that Tiffany- 
Stahl will release the picture. 

Studio and Theatre Folk 
Meet; Karl Dane Is Cook 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 1— Mark Hansen 
and Karl Dane staged a unique party here. 
The occasion was a birthday part" tendered 
Mrs. M. H. Newman, wife of "Mike" New- 
man, general manager of the Pacific Coast 
Independent Theatres. The program fea- 
tured the Danish star and the theatre mag- 
nate in a cooking contest and songs of their 
native land. 

Those present were Larry Urbach, Renee 
Adoree, Les Weir, Fred Beers, Harold 
Herond and wife, Gwen Lee, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Riesner, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Wheelright, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Strick- 
ling, Captain Carey Harrison and many 
ethers. 



foolish romances behind flickering foot- 
lights. It has a fine cast and fine direc- 
tion. The music and color sequences give 
it richness and a high class type of pro- 
duction. 

Colleen is the Cinderella girl who has 
found stardom in a musical show after 
tedious work in a chorus. She is a dancer 
and singer. Men pursue her. Wealth has 
little charm for her romantic notions. She 
prefers a youngster, enacted by Raymond 
Hackett, who has no limousine and who 
appears to love her simply and sincerely. 
But he is shy of work. And there comes 
the story. 

Colleen insists that he get a job. He 
demurs. Colleen finally breaks with him 
and delivers the ultimatum that he will have 
a job before she sees him again. 

Then comes a job. On its heels a num- 
ber of other developments: The story 
winds up with a finish that is upsetting. It 
is the work of an artist. Screen credit 
should go to the man who conceived that. 
I have very accurate suspicions whom that 
credit would go to. It is the kind of finish 
that suits everyone. Those who care for 
unhappy endings get their dish. But the 
paradox is that those who don't care for 
unhappy endings also get their dish. 

Now if you can produce a picture with 
an ending that suits both kinds of fans you 
certainly have an O. Henry mind. 

The synchronization is as perfect as any 
picture I have seen. Combined with beau- 
tiful color shots of the musical troupe on 
the stage the picture has about everything 
a picture could have. With all of her 
dancing and singing, her tinsel costumes 
and silver wigs, Colleen Moore has retained 
that simplicity and charm that her ten mil- 
lion fans demand. 

In other words I'm trying to get the 
idea over that I think this picture is a 
knockout. 

—HODGES. 



Hollywood Showings 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



41 



THE SHORT FEATURE 




Laurel & Hardy, Hal Roach MGM com- 
edy team who are appearing in several 
"screamingly funny" comedy audiens. 
Among their recent releases are "Early to 
Bed," "Habeas Corpus," "Should Married 
Men Go Home," "Two Tars" and "We 
Faiv Doivn." 



Releases 



WEEK OF OCTOBER 6 

EDUCATIONAL — "Untitled," Lyman H. Howe's 
Hodge Podge, one. 

PATHE — "Pathe Review" No. 41, one; "Big Time 
Charlie," Manhattan Comedy, two; "Topical Ships," 
one-third; Sound Sportlight. 

UNIVERSAL — "Going South," Snappy comedy (re- 
issue), Neely Edwards, one reel; "Ace of Scotland 
Yard" No. 2, "A Cry in the Night," Craufurd Kent 
(silent and sound), two; "Whose Wife," Universal 
comedy, all-star cast (silent and sound), two; "Blue 
Wind's Revenge," Western Featurette (reissue), 
W. E. Lawrence, two. 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 13 

EDUCATIONAL— "Untitled," Mack Sennett Talking 
Comedy, two. 

PATHE — "Fairways and Foul," Golden Rooster com- 
edy, two; "Sound Fable," two-thirds; Pathe Audio 
Review No. 26; Pathe Disc News and Pathe Disc 
Review. 

UNIVERSAL— "Cold Turkey," Oswald comedy, one; 
"The Delicatessen Kid," Benny Rubin, one; "Love 
Birds," Rooney Family, two; "Man of Daring," 
Western Featurette, Carson, two. 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 20 

EDUCATIONAL— "Hunting the Hunter," Raymond 
McKee, Jack White talking comedy, two. 

PATHE— "Gentlemen of the Evening," George Le- 
Maire, two; "Topical Licks," one-third; Pathe 
Sound News, Pathe Audio Review, Pathe Disc News 
and Pathe Disc Review. 

UNIVERSAL— "Cracked Wedding Bells," Re-issue, 
Chuck Reisner, one; "Too Many Women," Sid Say- 
lor, two; "A Sagebrush Vagabond," Featurette, two. 
"Ace of Scotland Yard," No. 4, Kent, two. 
WEEK OF OCTOBER 27 

EDUCATIONAL— "The Talkies," Collins-Dent, Mer- 
maid, two. 

PATHE — "The Smooth Guy," Checker comedy, two; 

"Pathe Audio Review," No. 28, one; Pathe disc 

Review, No. 221. 
UNIVERSAL— "Snow Use," Oswald, one; "Pilgrim's 

Papa's," Benny Rubin, one; "Marking Time," 

Rooney Family, two; "The Kid Comes Through," 

Featurette, Nelson, two. 



400 Vitaphone Varieties on WB 

Schedule for 1929-30 Season 

Vitaphone Varieties, those short entertainment features, will be made at the 
rate of more than one a day by Warner Brothers' and the Vitaphone corpora- 
tion, according to an announcement corning from George E. Quigley, vice presi- 
dent and general manager of the Vitaphone corporation. 



The total number of short subjects for re- 
lease on the 1929-30 program will be 400. Of 
this total, 200 will be made at Warner's West 
Coast studios under the general supervision of 
Bryan Foy, and 200 at the Eastern Vitaphone 
studios under the supervision of Murray Roth. 

At the West Coast studios Foy has at his 
disposal all the facilities of one of the most 
up to date and best equipped studios in the 
world. The casts of the one and two-reel 
subjects produced there will be headed by 
noted players of the screen and the stage. 
Among those who have already appeared, or 
have been signed for the immediate future, 
are Blanche Sweet, Ann Pennington, Harrison 
Ford, William Boyd, the stage star, Helen 
Ferguson, John B. Litel, Margaret Fielding, 
Johnny Arthur, Wheeler Oakman, Geneve 
Mitchell and Phyllis Crane. 

The line-up for the new season includes 26 
musical revues entirely in Technicolor to be 
staged and directed by Larry Ceballos and 
Jack Haskell who staged many musical com- 
edy productions in London and in New York 
before joining Warner's Hollywood produc- 
tion staff; 52 one-reel light comedies and 
slapstick; 26 single reel dramatic sketches; 
26 two-reel dramatic playlets ; 26 two-reel 
comedy playlets, including twelve which will 
be based upon J. P. McEvoy's newspaper 
series of "The Potters" ; 12 one-reel musical 
comedies in black and white; and 32 vaude- 
ville numbers. 

Already signed for part of Murray Roth's 
season's product of 200 Vitaphone Varieties 



Newspictures 



UNIVERSAL NEWSPAPER NEWSREEL NO. 77— 
Britain's occupation troops leave the Rhine — Shearer 
inquiry begins — Senate starts probe of Geneva Naval 
Conference "observer." Jimmy Johnston, new 
amateur champion is welcomed home at St. Paul — 
British racing car plunges into crowd — Mexico cele- 
brates her "fourth of July." 

MGM INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL NO. 13— 
United States motorboat wrecked in contest at 
Venice — Federal axes destroy $500,000 in liquor — 
Mexico celebrates independence with brilliant 
parade — Senators open inquiry into Warship lobby 
— Europe's best cyclists match skill in Paris. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS NO. 16— Mexico hails free- 
dom — 20 die in cabaret fire in Detroit — War mes- 
sages take wing — St. Paul welcomes their own 
Jimmy Johnston home, upon capture of United 
States amateur title — Japan mourns her dead — 
Lindbergh and wife start 10,000 mile trip. 

PATHE NEWS NO. 80— British restore order in 
Palestine — Dry agents go on bust to down rum at 
San Francisco — United States boat wrecked in 
Italian race at Venice — Explorer MacMillan returns 
from Arctic — British troops first to evacuate Rhine- 
land — Racing car crashes in speed contest at Min- 
eola, N. Y. 

KINOGRAMS NO. 5538— Mexico marks her inde- 
pendence day — Shearer under the senate's scrutiny 
— Berlin's mayor looks over the city of New York — 
Jimmy Johnston returns to his St. Paul home amidst 
bursting celebration — English racing car charges 
into crowd. 



are such stars of the musical comedy and 
vaudeville stages as Bert Lahr, comedian of 
"Hold Everything;" Fred Allen, comedian of 
"The Little Show"; Ann Seymour of "A 
Night in Venice;" Harry Conley & Co., from 
"Broadway Nights ;" Fred Kerting from Mur- 
ray Anderson's "Almanac;" the California 
Collegians from a forthcoming Ray Goetz 
musical production ; Hugh O'Connell in more 
Russell Crouse newspaper sketches ; Ruth 
Etting of Ziegfield's "Whoopee;" Sidney 
Toler of Belasco's "It's a Wise Child ;" 
Horace Heidt and his Californians from the 
Palace theatre's sensational hit, and others. 



Double Spread Insert 
Devoted to Exploiting 
Educational Comedy 

One of the most impressive newspaper tieups 
ever based on a short subject was effected by 
the Bison theatre, in Shawnee, Oklahoma, dur- 
ing the engagement of "Jazz Mamas," the first 
Educational all-color, all-talking comedy. 

"Bison's Picture Features All Color — City 
Firms Show Latest Color Harmony for Fall" 
was the streamer on a two-page spread in the 
Shawnee Morning News. A number of mer- 
chants in the town bought space in this special 
section. The tieup between the talking comedy 
and the various products advertised was based 
on the thought of color, with that feature 
stressed in the advertising of both the mer- 
chandise and the short subject. 

In addition to the two pages of paid adver- 
tising, considerable space was devoted to "Jazz 
Mamas" in the editorial columns of the 
Shawnee Morning News. 



Lloyd Hamilton Comedy Is 

Featured in Newspaper Ads 

When the Educational-Lloyd Hamilton 
talking comedy "Don't Be Nervous" played 
at the Missouri theatre, St. Joseph, Mo., 
approximately one-fourth of the newspaper 
advertising space was devoted to this short 
talking feature. The Missouri, affiliated 
with the Publix Circuit, is the largest mo- 
tion picture house in St. Joseph. 

A picture of Hamilton in his familiar garb 
was reproduced and used in this ad. It will 
be recalled that Lloyd Hamilton plays a 
dual role in "Don't Be Nervous" and this 
was emphasized in the advertisement, which 
played on the same program with Al Jolson 
in "Say It With Songs." 

Roxy Dancers For Television Experiments 

NEW YORK— Roxy Ballet Girls took part in an 
experiment at the Madison Square Garden Septem- 
ber 25, to determine the ideal feminine type for tele- 
vision broadcasting. 



42 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



Metro Movietone Acts 

GEORGE LYONS (79). Numbers: a. "Beloved": b. "Ah. 
Sweet Mystery of Life": c. "Don't Be Like That"; d. 
"St. Louis Blues": e. "Rainbow "Hound My Shoulder." 
646 feet. For release August 3. 1929. 

CECIL LEAN AND CLEO MAYFIELD (SO). Number: "Bis 
Lucky Day." 1,735 feet. For release August 10. 1929. 

GEORGIE PRICE (81). Numbers: a. "The One That I 
Love Loves Me"; b. "I'm Marching Home to You." 714 
feet. For release August 17. 1929. 

PHIL SPITALNY and His Pennsylvania Orchestra (82). 
Numbers: a, "Medley of Musical Comedy Hits": b. "Fare- 
well Blues." 701 feet. For release August 24. 1929. 

VAN AND SCHENCK (83). Numbers: a. "That's How Tou 
Can Tell They're Irish": b. "Rainbow 'Round My Shoul- 
der"; c. "Ramona"; d. "The DLrie Troubadours." 838 
feet. For release August 31. 1929. 

GEORGE DEWEY WASHINGTON (84). Numbers: a. "Just 
Be a Builder of Dreams": b. "Down Among the Sugar 
Cane." 632 feet. For release September 7. 1929. 

TITTA RUFFO (85) in "Credo" from "Othello." 525 feet. 
For release September 14. 1929. 

METRO MOVIETONE REVUE— "Bits of Broadway" (86). 
For release September 21, 1929. 

MADAME MARIA KURENKO (87). Numbers: a. "The 
Jewel Song." from Faust, b. "II Bacio"; c, "The Last 
Rose of Summer." 840 feet. For release September 28. 
1929. 

KELLER SISTERS AND LYNCH (88). Numbers: a. "How 
D"Ya Do"; b. "Ka Krazy for Tou": c. "If I Had Tou." 
727 feet. For release October 5. 1929. 

YVETTE RUGEL (89). Numbers: a. "Paradise Lost": b. 
"Marie": c. "The Parting." 713 feet. For release Octo- 
ber 12, 1929. 

BILTMORE TRIO (90). Number: "Jail Birds." 860 feet. 
For release October 19, 1929. 

CLYDE DOERR (91). Saxophone act. Numbers: a. "Saxo- 
phone March"; b. "Sunny South": c. "Technicalities"; 
d. "Bye. Bye. Sweetheart." 795 feet. For release Ooto- 
ber 26. 1929. 

TOM WARING (92). Numbers: a. "Glad Rag Doll": b. 
"Just a Garden"; c. "I'm Marching Home to Tou." 665 
feet. For release November 2, 1929. 

TITTA RUFFO (93). Number: "L'Africaine." 520 feet. 
For release November 9. 1929. 

EARL AND BELL (94). Numbers: a. "La Spagnola": b. 
"Kiss Me Again": c. "Blue Hawaii"; d. "Just a Mel- 
ody." 700 feet. For release November 16. 1929. 

DUCI DE KEREKJARTO (95). Numbers: a. "Serenade"; b. 
"Witches' Dance." 622 feet. For release November 23. 
1929. 

IRVING AARONSON'S COMMANDERS (96). Numbers: a. 
"She's Nobody's Sweetheart Now"; b. "The Sailor's Sweet- 
heart"; c. "I'll Get By." 696 feet. For release Novem- 
ber 30. 1929. 

JIMMY HUSSEY (97). Number: "Uneasy Street." 841 feet. 

For release December 7, 1929. 
ROY EVANS (assisted by Al Belasco) (98). in comedy 

sketch. Exclusive Columbia artist. 795 feet. For release 

December 14, 1929. 
THE REVELLERS (99). Numbers: a. "I'm Looking Over 

a Four Leaf Clover"; b. "Rose of Walkiki"; c. "Breezing 

Along With the Breeze." 607 feet. For release December 

21. 1929. 

MADAME MARIA KURENKO (100). Numbers: a. "Shadow 

Song" from "Dinorah": b. "Song of India." 714 feet 

For release December 28. 1929. 
WALTER C. KELLY (101), in "The Virginia Judge." 803 

feet. For release January 4, 1930. 
VAN AND SCHENCK (102). Numbers: a. "Everything's 

Going to Be All Right": b. "Ain't Got Nothin' Now"; 

o. "St. Louis Blues." 799 feet. For release January 11. 

1930. 

CLYDE DOERR (103). Saxophone act. Numbers: a. "Wed- 
ding of the Painted Doll"; b. "If I Had Tou"; c. 
"Original Music." 572 feet. For release January 18. 1930. 

BILTMORE TRIO (104) In "College Romeos." 853 feet 
For release January 26. 1930. 



Pathe Sound Act Releases 

AT THE DENTIST'S (0501) George LeMaire and Louis 
Simon. Scene: Dentist's office. Louis Simon, suffering 
from a toothache goes to George LeMaire for treatment. 
For release March 24. 1929. 2 reels. 

DANCING AROUND: (0502) George LeMaire and Joe Phil- 
lips. Scenes: Exterior and cabaret. George LeMaire and 
Joe Phillips take girls out for big time. Ivan BrunneH's 
Montrealers play "My Album of Dreams" and Vivienne 
Johnson sings "Marie." For release April 21, 1929. 2 
reels. 

HER NEW CHAUFFEUR: (0511) Louis Simon. Veree Teas- 
dale, Averill Harris. Veree Teasdale thinks Louis Simon 
is her new chauffeur, while he thinks Veree is his bride- 
to-be. For release May 19, 1929. 2 reels. 

WHAT A DAY: (0512) Louis Simon. Kay Mallory. What 
a picnic he had when he started to take his family on a 
picnic. For release June 16. 1929. 2 reels. 

GO EASY. DOCTOR: (0503) George LeMaire. Louis Simon. 
George LeMaire as the bone-breaker — Louis Simon as the 
nut — and how! For release July 14. 1929. 

THE SALESMAN: (0531) Frank T. Davis. Helyn Eby-Roek. 
Frank T. Davis sells a car to Helyn Eby-Rock. For re- 
lease July 21. 1929. 2 reels. 

HARD BOILED HAMPTON: (0513) Harry Holman. Evalyn 
Knapp, Doris McMahon, Alice Bunn, Andy Jochim. Hol- 
man is a hard boiled lawyer with a fast line. For re- 
lease July 28. 1929. 2 reels. 

BEACH BABIES: Charles Kemper, Evelyn Knapp, Naomi 
Casey. Charles Kemper tries to shine in the eyes of 
Evalyn Knapp while Naomi Casey makes him appear ridicu- 
lous. For release August 4, 1929. 2 reels. 

GARDEN OF EATIN': (0561) James Gleason. Lucille Web- 
ster Gleason. The story of Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie's beanery 
that tried to become ritzy — and what happened when I 
Orchestra plays "Pouring Down Rain." For release Aug- 
ust 11. 1929. 2 reels. 

THE PLUMBERS ARE COMING: (0504) George LeMaire 
Louis Simon. LeMaire and Simon, two burglars, trying to 
act like plumbers. For release August 18, 1929. 2 reels. 

TURKEY FOR TWO: (0532) Frank T. Davis, William 
Frawley, Noel Francis. Two escaped convicts with a fond- 
ness for turkey come to A Westchester inn at Thanks- 
giving. Jack LeMaire's Golden Rooster Orchestra features 
"I'll Say She's Pretty." For release August 25. 1929. 2 
reels. 

HAUNTED: (0552) Bob Millikin, Evalyn Knapp. Charles 
Kemper. Mystery comedy embodying all the thrills of 
"The Cat and the Canary," "The Gorilla." "The Bat," 
and others. For release September 1, 1929. 2 reels. 

SYNCOPATED TRIAL: (0571) Morgan Morly. Lew Sey- 
more. A musical mock trial. Eddie Elkins Orchestra and 



SOUND ACT 
RELEASES 

[Where exact date of release is not 
stated, the list of acts is compiled in 
order of release, the most recent release 
being listed first. Number of release fol- 
lows name of act.] 



Ed. Prinz Dancers feature. For release September 8, 1929. 
2 reels. 

BLACK NARCISSUS: (0521) Buck & Bubbles. Wildcat is 
enmeshed in the wiles of a siren while trying to rescue 
his pal Demmy from matrimony with another dusky 
charmer. Southern songs featured. For release September 
15. 1929. 2 reels. 

FANCY THAT: (0541) William Frawley. Earle Dewey. What 
a party would look like if two hobos suddenly became 
millionaires. Frawley sings "Dearest One." For release 
September 22. 1929. 2 reels. 

END OF THE WORLD: (0553) Alexander Carr. Lorin Raker. 
Marcia Manning. A wealthy Hebrew, believing the world 
is about to end, gives his son thousands and his consent 
to the latter's marriage to an Irish maid. For release 
September 29. 1929. 2 reels. 

BIG TIME CHARLIE: (0514) Lew Hearn, Dick Lancaster. 
Evalyn Knapp. A hick comes to New Tork to make 
whoopee on New Tear's Eve. Eddie Elkins Orchestra plays 
in night club sequence. For release October 6. 1929. 2 
reels. 

RKO All-Talking Shorts 

RCA Shorts 

THE BURGLAR (0801). Released Aug. 11. 1929. Two Reels. 
ST. LOUIS BLUES (0802). Released Sept. 8. 1929. Two 
reels. 

TWO GUN GINSBURG (0803). Released Oct. 13, 1925. 
Two reels. 

Record Breakers 

THE CAPTAIN OF HIS ROLL (0601). Alberta Vaughn-Al 
Cooke. Released Sept. 8. 1929. Two reels. 

AS YOU MIKE IT (0602). Alberta Vaughn-Al Cooke. Re- 
leased Sept. 22. 1929. Two reels. 

MEET THE QUINCE (0603). Alberta Vaughn-Al Cooke. Re- 
leased Oct. 6. 1929. Two reels. 

LOVE'S LABOR FOUND (0604). Alberta Vaughn-Al Cooke. 
Released Oct. 20. 1929. Two reels. 

Mickey McGuires 

MICKEY'S MIDNIGHT FOLLIES (0701). Mickey McGuire. 

Released Aug. 18, 1929. Two reels. 
MICKEY'S SURPRISE (0802). Mickey McGuire. Released 

Sept. 15. 1929. Two reels. 
MICKEY'S Mix-up (0703). Mickey McGuire. Released Oct. 

13. 1929. Two reels. 

RCA Novelties 

HEADWORK (0901). Released Sept. 15. 1929. One reeL 
GODFREY LUDLOW AND N. B. C. ORCHESTRA (0902). 
Released Nov. 10. 1929. One reel. 

RCA Marc Connelly's 

THE TRAVELER (0907). Released Aug. 18, 1929. Two 
reels. 

THE BRIDEGROOM (0908). Released Oct. 13, 1929. Two 

reels. 

Universal 

Sound Version Only 

THE ROYAL PAIR (A 204), Special, with Rooney Family. 

Two reels. Released Sept. 30. 
INCOME TACT (A 102). Special, with Benny Rubin. One 

reel. Released Sept. 30. 

Sound and Silent 

ACE OF SCOTLAND YARD No. 2 (A 2202). Adventure pic- 
ture. "Cry in the Night." Craufurd Kent. Two reels. 
Released Oct. 7. 

WHOSE WIFE (A 4643), Universal comedy. All-star cart. 
Two reels. 

Vitaphone Acts 

HER PRIVATE LIFE: Score (3459-3466). Synchronized 
score by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3459 to 
3466 inclusive. Reels 1 to 8. First National-Vitaphone 
talking production. 
HEARTS IN EXILE: Trailer (3364). Dolores CosteUo 
Grant Withers, singing theme song "Like a Breath of 
Springtime," scenes of hardships suffered by prisoners in 
Siberia. Warner Bros, and Vitaphone talking picture. 
GOLD DIGGERS OF BROADWAY: Trailer (3070). Conway 
Tearle as master of ceremonies, with chorus of 100 Holly- 
wood beauties, plus songs of Winnie Lightner, dancing of 
Ann Pennington, crooning of Nick Lucas, comedv of Lilyan 
Tashman. Gertrude Short and Albert Gran. 100 per cent 
natural color. Warner Bros, and Vitaphone talking picture. 
IN THE HEADLINES: Trailer (3010). Edmund Breese, as 
the city editor in a newspaper office, talks things over with 
Grant Withers, Marian Nixon. Pauline Gardon and Frank 
Campeau, who appear as reporters. The beginning of a 
murder mystery is built up and audience left in suspense. 
Warner Bros, and Vitaphone talking picture. 
SKIN DEEP: Trailer (2999). John Davidson, as district 
attorney, introduces cast as inmates of a prison. Cast 
includes Betty Compson. Alice Day and Davey Lee. To 
climax act. Monte Blue is shown in the bizarre make-up 
he uses in the picture. Warner Bros, and Vitaphone talk- 
ing picture. 

DAVE APOLLON AND HIS RUSSIAN STARS (875). Scene: 
Band set. Comedian- musician and recent Broadway - star, 
producing revue for Vitaphone. His "Russian Stars" turn 
out to be Filipinos in Scotch kilties playing American 
jazz. Feminine lead, Isabelle Washington, crooning "Mean 
to Me." Numbers: a. "If I Had Tou"; b. "Louise"; 
c. "Mean to Me": d. "Boo Boo Blues". 



GRACE JOHNSTON AND THE INDIANA FIVE (863). 
Scene: Band set. Radio star and Brunswick artist, solos, 
while the Indiana Five blow hot and cold, chasing the 
blues with blues. Also quintet of jazzmaniacs who nave 
just completed radio, vaudeville and dance palace appear- 
ances, playing the "Box Office Melody". Numbers: t. 
"Bashful Baby": b. "Clarinet Marmalade"; c. "Glad Bag 
Doll". 

HURST AND VOGT (807) in "Before the Bar." Scene: 
Street. Comedians of variety stage. Frank Hurst and 
Eddie Vogt. 

JOHN T. MURRAY and VIVIEN OAKLAND (849) In 

"Satires." Living room. Fast moving satire on mystery 
plays. Laughing spooks and spooky laughter. Two comedy 
stars of screen, stage and vaudeville. Number: a. "Ex- 
celsior". 

MEL KLEE (826). Scene: Drawing room. Mel Klee. black- 
face "prince of wails," in offering of songs and stories. 
Headlined vaudeville bills from coast to coast. Hauls off 
the laugh honors with a highly spiced monologue that 
winds up with a composite imitation of Al Jolson and Ted 
Lewis. Numbers: a. "Rum Turn"; b. "Maybe Who Knows". 

MADAME FRANCES ALD A (805). Scene: Drawing room. 
Diva offers two popular selections, accompanied by Frank 
LaForge, concert artist. > at the piano. Numbers: a. "The 
Last nose of Summer" ; b. 'Birth of Morn". 

ALBERT SPALDING (800). Scene: Drawing room. A 
foremost American violinist, known for his concert work 
and phonograph recordings. Numbers: a. "Liebesleid" ; b. 
"Cavatina". 

THE ISLE OF LOST SHIPS: Trailer (3363). Virginia ValH. 
Jason Robards and Noah Beery Introduce "The Isle of 
Lost Ships." A First National-Vitaphone talking produc- 
tion. 

SO LONG LETTY: Trailer (3090). Charlotte Greenwood 
sings "My Strongest Weakness Is Tou.' and Grant With- 
ers and Marlon Byron follow with some vo-do-deo-do har- 
mony. A Warner Brothers-Vitaphone talking picture. 

SAY IT WITH SONGS: Trailer (3068). Al Jolson gives s 
monologue. A Warner Brothers-Vitaphone talking picture. 

CARLENA DIAMOND (864). Scene: Drawing room. Car- 
lena Diamond sings, dances and plays the harp, and cli- 
maxes her act by doing all three at the same time. 
Numbers: a. "Tura Lura Lura"; b. "Mighty Lak a Rose"; 
o. "Doll Dance"; d. "Nola"; e. "Harp Dance." 

MILLER AND LYLES (862) in "They Know Their Gro- 
ceries." Scene: Grocery store. Numbers: a. "Shuffle 
Along"; b. "Rang Tang"; c. "The Great Temptations" 
and "Running Wild." 

KRAFT AND LAMONT (847) in "Rarin to Go." Scen»: 
Ranch. Jack Kraft attempts some rope throwing and Elsie 
Lamont dances. Numbers: a. "Cowboy": b. "When We 
Get Together In the Moonlight"; o. "I'm Not a 
Romeo." 

FRANCES SHELLEY and THE FOUR ETON BOYS (846). 

Scene: Drawing Room. Frances Shelley, known In musi- 
cal comedy and on the radio as "The Girl With the Gui- 
tar." does her best vo-do-deo-doing with "If I Were Ton. 
I'd Fall in Love With Me." The Eton boys assist her to 
songs, a. "Finding the Long Way Home": b. "If I Wore 
Tou, I'd Fall in Love With Me"; c. "Am I Blue." 

EDISON AND GREGORY (845). Scene: Roadway. Edison 
and Gregory are the college boys who coax tunes from 
automobile tires, saws, balloons and pumps. They've ap- 
peared with Sousa's Band, Paul Whiteman and Ted Lewis. 
Numbers: a. "Stars and Stripes"; b. "Together": c. "Let 
a Smile Be Tour Umbrella"; d. "Sweet Adeline." 

JACK WHITE and HIS CHATEAU MADRID CLUB EN- 
TERTAINERS, (844). Scene: Band Set. Jack White with 
His Chateau Madrid Orchestra and Jeanne Fayal. Num- 
bers: a. "Am I Blue"; b. "Kansas City Kitty"; o. "Then 
We Canoe-dle Ooodle"; d. "Senorita." 

JAMES J. CORBETT & NEIL O'BRIEN (842). Scene: 
Drawing Room. James J. Corbett, professional of the 
prize ring. Has been starred in Ziegfeld's "Follies." Win- 
ter Garden Revues, musical comedy and vaudeville. 

GEORGIE PRICE (841) in "Don't Get Nervous." Scene: 
Vitaphone Studio. Georgie Price of "Artists and Models," 
"A Night in Paris," "The Song Writer." "A Night In 
Spain," and Yictor records, in the role of a oamera-sny 
actor in the screening of a Vitaphone picture in the mak- 
ing. Numbers: a. "Hello Sunshine, Hello"; b. "Sweet- 
heart's Holiday." 

THE BIG PARADERS (840). Scene: Full stage. Tiny and 
Jack Waites, Elsie Thiel. Charlotte Conrad, Edna Howard 
and Ben Wise present a song and dance revue. Numbers: 
a. "Broken Hearted Blackbird"; b. "Prelude in C Sharp 
Minor"; o. "Doin" the Raccoon." 

JUST LIKE A MAN (839). Scene: Kitchen. Husband takes 
wife's place at home. 

THE INTERVIEW (838). Three Scenes. Hugh O'Connell. 
as the veteran reporter, presents the second serio-comlo 
sketch in the Russell Crouse newspaper series. 

HARRY ROSENTHAL and HIS BATH AND TENNIS CLUB 
ORCHESTRA (836). Scene: Band set. Harry Rosenthal, 
composer. Dare and Belmonte, tango dancers. Ziegfeld 
beauties. Cornel Smelser. accordionist, and the Bath and 
Tennis Club Orchestra present songs and dances. Numbers: 
a. "Was It Love"; b. "Ida": c. "Twelfth Street Rag"; 
d. "If I Could Get a Break With Tou." 

BILLY "SWEDE" HALL & CO. (835) in "HILDA," 
Scene: Hotel Lobby. Billy impersonates a Scandinavian 
chambermaid. 

THE OPRY HOUSE (834). Scene: Theatre. Lew Heam, 
Broadway comedian and featured player in "The Royal 
Box": Doris Walker, vaudeville and Vitaphone songstress; 
and The Mound City Blue Blowers, phonograph, radio 
and musical comedy stars. Numbers: a. "I Ain't Got 
Nobody"; b. "Let Me Call You Sweetheart"; c. "My 
Gal Sal." 

CORA GREEN (825). Scene: Drawing Room. Cora Green 
singing a. "Brother-In-Law Dan"; b. "Traveln' All 
Alone": c. "I'll Tell the World." 

CHARLES C. PETERSON (815). Scene: Club Room. 
Charles Peterson's magic cue performs billiard miracles. 

ALBERT SPALDING (797). Scene: Drawing Room. Al- 
bert Spalding, violinist, playing a. "Ave Maria"; b. "Waltz 
in A." 

FRED ARDATH (786) in "These Dry Days." Scene: Park. 
Fred Ardath, as a happy vagabond, roaming the highways. 

SESSUE HAYAKAWA (761-762) In "The Man Who 
Laughed Last." Five scenes. Sessue Hayakawa In a 
fast-moving drama of Oriental love and vengeance in "The 
Man Who Laughed Last", by Edgar Allan Wolf. 

SMILING IRISH EYES: Trailer (3410). Irish songs. 
Irish scenes and an Irish Fair. Colleen Moore's first 
talking appearance. First National Vitaphone talking pro- 
duction. 

HER PRIVATE LIFE: Trailer (3365). A glimpse of "Her 
Private Life." BiUie Dove. Walter Pldgeon, Montagu Love. 
Thelma Todd and Holmes Herbert enacting several thrill- 
ing moments from the picture. Outdoor scenes, dramatic 
sequences, romance and a song number by Walter Pidgeon. 
First National Vitaphone talking production. 

DARK STREETS: Trailer (3349). Double exposure picture 
with Jack Mulhall in two roles, gangster and policeman. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



43 



seen and heard talking in the same scenes — in fact, two 
characters engage in dialog. First National Vitaphone 
talking production. 
THE ARGYLE CASE: Trailer (3059). Thomas Meighao 
speaks and sells the public. Warner Bros. Vitaphone talk- 
ing picture. 

HONKY TONK: Trailer (3049). Sophie Tucker croons a 
few bars from several of the "Honky Tonk" song hits. 
Sophie and entire cast shown in night club scene. Warner 
Bros. Vitaphone talking picture. 

THE HOTTENTOT: Trailer (2269). Comedy sketch in it- 
self with Edward Everett Horton in extremely funny 
struggles with an electric horse and Patsy Ruth Miller 
opposite him. Warner Bros. Vitaphone talking picture. 

SYMPATHY (803). Five scenes. Hen-pecked husband out 
on a spree despite orders of the "ball and chain." A 
night of wine, women and whoopee ends with hubby in 
a hospital cot as his wife and his sweetheart wreak their 
vengeance. Succession of hilarious situations. Cast headed 
by Hobart Cavanaugh. Eegina Wallace, Harry Shannon 
and Wynne Gibson, who played with Richard Dix In 
"Nothing but the Truth." 

HARRY TATE (778-779) in "Selling a Car." Scene: Garage 
exterior. Harry Tate gives an exhibition of his comedy 
power in this two reeler, with an equally talented support- 
ing cast. 

HARRY TATE (754-755) In "Motoring." Scene: Country 
road. Harry Tate, assisted by his company of boisterious 
clowns in a burlesque on motoring. Two reel comedy 
sketch. 

WILLIE AND EUGENE HOWARD (750-751) in "My Peo- 
ple." Five scenes. Two reels of songs and dances worked 
into a powerful human interest story of an actor who 
has to choose between his Ghetto friends and Broadway 
stardom. Numbers: a. "The Volga Boatman"; b. "Blue 
Grass"; o. "My People." 

WILLIE AND EUGENE HOWARD (722-723) in "The Music 
Makers." Scene: Music salon. Former musical comedy 
stars in their first two reel comedy. Willie gives his 
famous imitations of Al Jolson. Eddie Cantor and Gallagher 
and Shean. Numbers: a. "Gallagher and Shean"; b 
"It's Ray Ray Raining"; c. "Baby Curls." 

CARELESS AGE: Trailer (3079). Holmes Herbert, as 
master of ceremonies, introduces Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., 
Loretta Young and Carmel Myers. Miss Myers sings 
"Melody Divine" the theme song. 

HARD TO GET: Trailer (3078). An Introductory play- 
let followed by a scene in a night club with vocal and 
orchestral renditions of the theme song. Dorothy Maokaill, 
Louise Fazenda, Charles Delaney, Jack Oakie and Edmund 
Burns head the cast of this all-star trailer. 

THE MAN AND THE MOMENT: Trailer (3069). Billle 
Dove and Rod LaRocque tell about this picture with the 
theme song "Just a Lucky Moment" sung as a musical 
background. 

HARRY FOX AND BEE CURTIS (829). in "The Fox and 
the Bee." Scene: Drawing room. Of musical comedy 
stage. Harry Fox has an excellent foil for his lightning- 
like chatter in Beatrice Curtis, beautiful songstress. Dance 
interlude by Miss Curtis. Numbers: a. "Underneath the 
Wabash Moon." b. "Love Baby." 

HARRY FOX AND HIS SIX AMERICAN BEAUTIES (828). 
Scene: Drawing room. Star funster of musical corned? 
with his six ludicrous chamber maids in a piece of travesty 
on the modern chorus girl. Musical numbers and breezy 
monologue by Fox. Numbers: a. "Half Way to Heaven": 

b. "Belles of Hotels." 

NORMAN THOMAS QUINTETTE (827). in "Harlem Mania." 
Scene: Drawing room. Colored entertainers singing and 
dancing. Also acrobatic drummer. Numbers: a. "Sleep. 
Baby, Sleep"; b. "Listen to the Mocking Bird"; c 
"Melody in F." 

SEGAR ELLIS AND HIS EMBASSY CLUB ORCHESTRA 

(823). Scene: Band set. Night club entertainer and 
record "name" Is the star of this combination of vocal 
and instrumental numbers, supported by orchestra. Each 
player contributes a snappy solo bit in novel arrangement of 
"Am I Blue" the song hit from "On With the Show." 
Numbers: a. "How Can I Love Again"; b. "Am I Blue": 

c. "I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling." 

GUY ROBERTSON (813), In "High Water." Scene: Draw- 
ing room. Known as Broadway's "hit maker." Offering 
a rendition of a song poem of the floods that devastate 
the southland. Flood scenes have been double exposed 
over the artist's figure. 

THE GAY NINETIES or "The Unfaithful Husband" (811). 
Scene: Living room and cafe. Burlesque of the plays of 
the "gay nineties." Numbers: a. "McSorley's Twins"; b. 
"We Never Speak as We Pass By"; c. "Dp in a Balloon." 

THE FAMILIAR FACE with Hugh O'Connell (807). Scene: 
Newspaper office and speakeasy. Atmosphere of metro- 
politan newspaper office, with disgraced reporter winning 
fame and fortune through the accidental capture of a 
notorious bank robber. Story from the pen of Russel 
Crouse, national known columnist and players picked 
from casts of current Broadway shows. 

ALBERT SPALDING (798). Scene: Drawing room. Two 
performances from this master of the violin. Numbers: 

a. "Minuet in D" — Mozart, b. "Liebesfreud" — Kreisler. 

THE OUT-LAW IN-LAW (782). Comedy of mother-in-law. 
Hubby having a hectic time with "mother" staying at the 
house, until he hires a circus strong woman to act as an 
antidote. Speedy farce with a cast of featured player* 
and directed by Bryan Foy. 

BROADWAY BABIES: Score (3351-3359). Synchronized 
by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3351 to 3359 
inclusive. Reels 1 to 9. First National Vitaphone talk- 
ing productions. 

Oil WITH THE SHOW: Score (3321-3332). Synchronized 
by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3321-3332 
inclusive. Reels 1 to 12. Warner Bros. Vitaphone talk- 
ing picture. 

CAREERS: Score (3311-3320). Synchronized by Vitaphone 
Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3311 to 3320 inclusive. Reels 
1 to 10. First National Vitaphone talking productions. 

GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE, THE: Score (3301-3308). 
Synchronized by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 
3301 to 3308 inclusive. Reels 1 to 8. First National Vita- 
phone talking productions. 

DRAG: Trailer (SOS). Scene from the musical show fea- 
tured in the picture and ca6t sings "My Song of the 
Nile" the theme song. Richard Barthelmess then appears 
to Introduce the cast. First National Vitaphone talking 
production. 

DOOLEY AND SALES (824) in "Dooley's the Name." Scene: 
Drawing room. Winter Garden stars in gay presentation 
of mirth and melody, deliver rollicking repartee and laugh- 
able son kb, plus a dance interlude. Numbers: a. "Oh, Mr. 
Dooley"; b. "Polly-Molly-0." 

FRANK X. SILK (819) In "The Man About Town." Scene: 
Drawing room. Tramp comedian of burlesque and vaude- 
ville. Clever monologue with droll songs put over in 
excellent tenor voice. Numbers: a. "The Millionaire Song"; 

b. "Ohl Oh I OH! What a Night." 



ALL GIRL REVUE. THE (818). Scene: Band set. All 
singing and all dancing show. Cast includes Betty Lou 
Webb, a Paul Ash discovery; Lillian Price, the comedienne; 
Ellen Bunting with DePaco and Kazviki, acrobatic danc- 
ers; and Jean Rankin's Bluebell's orchestra. Numbers: 

a. "That's Her Now"; b. "I'm an Indian"; c. "Chrysan- 
themums"; d. "My Pet." 

KATE SMITH (817). Scene: Drawing room. Offers red 
hot songs with a red hot voice. Known as "The Songbird 
of the South." Numbers: a. "Caroline, Moon"; b. "Bless 
You, Sister." 

RAY AND DOT DEAN (816) in "He's a Devil." Scene: 
Exterior of cottage. Well known vaudeville team. Ray 
doing rube characterizations. 

OKLAHOMA BOB ALBRIGHT and His Rodeo Do Flappers. 
Scene: Drawing room. Bob Albright, baritone, assisted by 
Rodeo Do Flappers who sing and dance with him. Num- 
bers: a. "My Pony Boy"; b. "Chloe"; c. "Lodel"; d. 
"Salter Dog." 

HARRY TATE (767) in "The Patent Office." Scene: Office. 

England's laughing fool. Harry Tate and his troupe of 

fun makers in comedy riot. 
BABY ROSE MARIE (809). Scene: Drawing room. Four 

year old child singing these numbers: a. "Heigh Ho"; b 

"Who Wouldn't Be Jealous of You": c. "Don't Be Like 

That." 

THE BLUE RIDGERS with Cordelia Mayberry (795). 
Scene: Interior of mountain cabin. Four mountaineers 
an a "gal from th' feud county" sing, dance and play 
syncopation as it exists in the mountain country of the 
South. Numbers: a. "Trail of the Lonesome Pine"; b. 
"Oh Susanna"; c. "Medley." 

EL BRENDEL AND FLO BERT (789), in "BeaU Night" 
Scene: Living room. Comedian of "Wings," "The 
Campus Flirt" and other stage and screen successes In 
short sketch. 

TWIN BEDS: Trailer (3020). Jack Mulhall. Patsy Ruth 
Miller and Zasu Pitts introduce picture in novel bedroom 
scene. A First National-Vitaphone talking production. 

SQUALL, THE: Score (3251-3261). Synchronized by Vita- 
phone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3251 to 3261 In- 
clusive. Reels 1 to 11. First National-Vitaphone talk- 
ing production. 

THE TIME, THE PLACE AND THE GIRL: Score (3208- 
3214). Synchronized by Vitaphone Svmphony Orchestra. 
Numbers 3208 to 3214 inclusive. Reels 1 to 7. Warner 
Bros. -Vitaphone talking picture. 

ON WITH THE SHOW: Trailer (3060). Initial all-color, 
all-singing, all-talking, aU-dancing trailer. Sam Hardy 
introducing stars of picture. Warner Bros. -Vitaphone talk- 
ing picture. 

BROADWAY BABIES: Trailer (3008). Alice White sing- 
ing a number from the picture. Also Broadway Babies 
strutting their stuff. First National-Vitaphone talking pro- 
duction. 

CAREERS: Trailer (2980). Entire cast discusses whether a 
woman is justified in ruining her reputation to aid her 
husband's career. Billie Dove speaks from the screen. 
First National-Vitaphone talking production. 

GAMBLERS, THE: Trailer (2970). Entire cast talks in 
this advance agent. Warner Bros. -Vitaphone talking pic- 
ture. 

THE VARSITY THREE (804) in "Blue Streaks of 
Rhythm." Scene: Drawing room. Phonograph and vaude- 
ville stars. Babe. Bob and Jack Hauser singing and 
dancing. Numbers: a. "That's What I Call Sweet 
Music"; b. "I Dsed to Love Her in the Moonlight"; c. 
"Baltimore." 

ALBERT SPALDING (801). Scene: Drawing room. Con- 
cert hall violinist playing his own composition "Alabama" 
first time on screen, also "Valse in G Flat" by Chopin. 

BUD HARRIS AND FRANK RADCLI FFE (783) In "At 
the Party." Scene: Street. Negro melodies and comics. 
Numbers: a. "St. Louis Blues"; b. "She's Mine." 

GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE. THE (2989). Trailer. 
Loretta Young plays the girl in a motion picture box offloe 
and Carroll Nye Is her chatty boy friend. 

ROY SEDLEY AND HIS NIGHT CLUB REVUE (796), 
with Roy Sedley as master of ceremonies, assisted by 
Beth Miller, blues singer, and Billy Smith, eccentrio 
dancer. Scene: Night club. Numbers: a. "Blue Grass"; 

b. "I Ain't Takin' Orders from No One"; c. "Sonny Boy." 
MR. AND MRS. JACK NORWORTH (787) in "Odds and 

Ends." Scene: Drawing room. Norworth of musical 
comedy fame and Dorothy Adelphi. his wife, in patter and 
songs of Northworth's own composition. Numbers: a. 
"Honey Boy"; b. "The Man and the Monkey": o. "My 
Boy." 

IRENE FRANKLIN (777). "The American Comedienne.' 
Two comedy characterizations. Scenes: Restaurant and 
nursery. Numbers: a. "The Waitress"; b. "The Flapper 
Mammy's Lullaby." 

NINETY-NINTH AMENDMENT... THE (776): Comedy. 
Three Broadway stars, Charles Richman. Veree Teasdale 
and Hugh McConnell appear as supporters of an antl- 
gambling amendment. Scene: Living room. 

LEO REISMAN AND HOTEL BRUNSWICK ORCHESTRA 
(770) in "Rhythms." Scene: Band set. Shadowgraph 
silhouettes synchronized with music. Numbers: a. 
"Mooche"; b. "Waters of Perkiomen"; c. "If I Had You"; 
d. "Hyo Mio"; e. "Milenberg Blues"; f. "Lonely"; g. 
"Some of These Days." 

MACK AND PURDY (2795) in "An Everyday Occurrence" 
Scene: Parkway. A smart guy gets himself entangled 
after a few words with a smart lady. 

CECILIA (CISSIE) LOFTUS (792) in "Famous Impersona- 
tions." Scene: Drawing room. Imitation of Sophie 
Tucker and others. Numbers: a. "Gonna Get a Girl"; 
b. "Mama Goes Where Papa Goes"; c. Yiddish version of 
"Mama Goes Where Papa Goes." 

FRED ARDATH (785) in "The Singing Bee," rustic comedy. 
Scene: Rustic home. Was rube comedian of the Follies. 
Numbers: a. "I Pagliacoi": b. "Finiculi-Finicula" ; o. 
"Bring Back My Bonnie to Me." 

PALM BEACH FOUR, THE: (794). night club quartet. 
Scene: Garden. Stars of Helen Morgan Club, Club 
Deauville, and European clubs. Numbers: a. "Some 
Sweet Day": b. "Poo-Poo-Paroop" ; c. "Nobody's Fault 
But Your Own." 

JACK WHITE AND HIS MONTREALERS (791) in a 
number from his own act at the Frivolity Club. Scene: 
Night club. His own orchestra and two pretty accom- 
panists. Numbers: a. "I'm Karazy for You"; b. "Mean 
to Me"; c. "Goodby Broadway: HeUo Montreal": d, 
"Finiculi-Finicula"; e. "Laugh, Clown Laugh"; f. "1 
Pagliacci"; g. "Over There"; h. "Anvil Chorus"; i. "Rose 
of No Man's Land." 

BOBBY FOLSOM (788), In "Typical Types." Scene: Draw- 
ing room. Ziegfeld beauty and leading lady of variety 
stage, doing imitations. Numbers: a. "Two Little Girls"; 
b. "Tess"; c. "I Lost My Stockings." 

TINY TOWN REVUE (74). Scene: Stage set. A pageant 
of the Lilliputians. Dancing and singing by midgets. 
Numbers: a. "Tiny Town Opening"; b. "The Only One to 
Be"; c. Miss Annabelle Lee": d. "I Scream. You Scream, 
We All Scream for Ice Cream." 



GEORGE BROADHURST AND COMPANY (780). In "Three 
o'clock in the Morning." Scene: Cabaret. Drunken sailor 
In night club. Numbers: a. "Anvil Chorus"; b. "Wobblv 
Walk." 

DESERT SONG OVERTURE (2930). Played by Vitaphone 
Symphony Orchestra. 

HOT STUFF: Score (3181-88). Synchronized by Vitaphone 
Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3181 to 3188. inclusive. 
Reels 1 to 8. A First National-Vitaphone talking pro- 
duction. 

HOUSE OF HORRORS: Score (3161-67). Synchronized by 
Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3161 to 81«? 
inclusive. Reels 1 to 7. First National-Vitaphone talk- 
ing production. 

DESERT SONG, THE: Score (3141-54). Synchronized by 
Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra, including exit march. 
Numbers 3141 to 3154. inclusive. Reels 1 to 13. 3154 Is 
exit march. 

HOUSE OF HORRORS: Trailer (2990). Louise Fazenda and 
Chester Conklin at ouija table in spooky looking house. 
First National-Vitaphone talking production. 

DIVINE LADY: THE: Score (3031-40). Synchronized score 
played by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3031 
to 3040 inclusive. Reels 1 to 10. First National-Vita- 
phone production. 

SONNY BOY: Trailer (3000). Presents Davey Lee, juvenile 
star. 

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN: Trailer (2998). Grant Withers, 
male lead, discourses on this Maxwell Anderson picture. 
Flashbacks show some scenes. First National-Vitaphone 
production. 

HOT STUFF: Trailer (2977). Billy Bakewell. juvenile lead, 
and Alice White and Louise Fazenda tell about this 
picture. First National-Vitaphone production. 

WHY BE GOOD: Trailer (2960). Jack Mulhall gives 
glimpses of this Colleen Moore picture. Flashback shown. 
First National-Vitaphone production. 

FROM HEADQUARTERS: Trailer (2867). Henry B. 
Walthall, in jungle hut and wearing TJ. S. Marine uniform, 
explains situation and introduces Monte Blue. star. 

ROBERT EMMETT KEANE (2849-50) in "Gossip." Scene: 
Hotel parlor. Star of legitimate stage is supported by 
John Miljan, Warner Brothers player, and Claire Whitney, 
screen and stage player. 

DAVE BERNIE AND ORCHESTRA (2796) in "Here Comes 
the Showboat." Scene: Showboat. Numbers: a. "Here 
Comes the Showboat"; b. "Oh. You Have No Idea"; c. 
"High. High. High Dp on a Hilltop"; d. "Constantinople." 

MADONNA OF AVENUE A: Trailer (2718). Grant 
Withers, male lead, as master of ceremonies introduces 
Dolores Costello, Louise Dresser and other featured play- 
ers. Shows one of the sets in reproduction. 

RUDY VALLEE AND HIS CONNECTICUT YANKEES (771). 
Band set. Vallee's radio band. Numbers: a. "Down 
the Field": b. "Deep Night"; c. "Cutside." 

CLARENCE TISDALE (766). Scene: Southern plantation. 
Tisdale, negro singer, presents these numbers: a. "The 
Sweetness of Your Song"; b. "Bye and Bye"; c "Oh, 
Didn't It Rain." 

HARRY HORL1CK AND GYPSIES (763). Scene: Band 
set. Horlick and his A. & P. Gypsies, are on a national 
radio hook-up weekly. Numbers: a. "Two Guitars"; 
b. "Black Eyes"; c. "Chiquita"; d. "March of the 
Toys"; e. "Gypsy Love Song." 

RAYMOND HITCHCOCK (760) in "An Evening at Home 
with Hitchy," Scene: Living room. Number: a. "Here 
Comes the Groom." 

BERNIE CUMMINS AND ORCHESTRA (752). Scene: 
Band set. Cummins and his Biltmore orchestra present 
modern songs. Numbers: a. "Come On Baby"; b. "If 
I Had You"; c. "Here Comes the Ball and Chain." 

MAX SCHMELING (745). Scene: Gymnasium. Heavyweight 
champion of Germany skips rope, shadow boxes and en- 
gages in one-round bout. 

PAUL TREMAINE AND ARISTOCRATS (742). Scene: 
Band set. Jazz band of variety stage. Numbers: a. 
"I've Been Working on the Railroad"; b. "On the Road 
to Mandalay": c. "Chinese Dream": d. "Fanfare"; «. 
"Here Comes the Showboat": f. "Medley." 

FANNIE WARD (721). Scene: Living room. Sixty-two 
year old flapper in two numbers: a. "Flapper Fannie"; b. 
"Radio Widow." 

THREE BROX SISTERS, THE (2888) in "Headin' South." 
Scene: Pullman drawing room. Harmonizing of Southern 
songs. Numbers: a. "Doin" the Raccoon"; b. "Imagina- 
tion": c. "Way Down South." 

ELEANOR PAINTER (746). Scene: Salon. Lyrio soprano 
of musical comedy and opera. Presents these numbers: 

a. "Love Is Best of All"; b. "Habanera"; c. "How About 
Me." 

WHITING AND BURT (741). in "Song Sayings. ' Scene: 
Drawing room. Vaudeville and Ziegfeld's Follies players. 
Assited at the piano by Edmund J. Weber, composer, 
who arranged act. Numbers: a. "What Did You Say"; 

b. "The Frog Song"; c. "That's My Idea of Heaven." 
HOPE HAMPTON (740) In the Fourth Act of Massenet's 

Opera. "Manon." Scene: Salon. Former motion picture 
star is assisted by four principals, chorus and the Vita- 
phone Symphony Orchestra. 

MISS MARCELLE (716). Scene: Drawing room set. Vaude- 
ville comedienne, in brown-face makeup, renders syncopated 
songs in southern dialect. Numbers: a. "Shine"; b. "If 
I Never See You Again": c. "My Troubles Are Over." 

LOVE AND THE DEVIL: Score (3111-17). Synchronized 
by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3111 to 3117 
inclusive. Reels 1 to 7. First National-Vitaphone produc- 
tion. 

DAVE BERNE (2797). Scene: Drawing room set. Directs 
own orchestra. Numbers: a. "Happy-Go-Lucky Lane": b. 
"Down Where the Sun Goes Down"; c. "St. Louis Blues", 
d. "San." 

HOLD NGS WORTH AND CRAWFORD (2753). in "Bed- 
time." Scene: The family boudoir. Short sketch of 
sleepy husband and nagging, jealous wife. 

TAL HENRY (732). Scene: Band set. With His North 
Carolinians Orchestra. Has played at college proms and 
over the radio. Renders these numbers: a. "Come On 
Baby"; b. "Shame On You"; c. "Milenberg Joys." 

MAL HALLETT (730). Scene: Band set. Furnishes Jazz 
program with his "Wav Down East Orchestra." Num- 
bers: a. "Lots of Mama"; b. "Mother Machree"; c. "War 
Medley." 

GREEN'S FAYDETTS (710). Scene: Band set. "Green's 
Twentieth Centurv Faydetts" from vaudeville. Numbers: 

a. "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"; b. "Sweet 
Mystery of Life": c. "Changes." 

CHILDREN OF THE RITZ: Score (3071-77). Synchronized 
score bv Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3071 
to 3077." inclusive. Reels 1 to 7. First National-Vitaphone 
production. 

GUIDDO DEIRO (2968). Scene: Living room. Piano- 
accordionist in these numbers: a. "Romeo and Juliet"; 

b. "Drigo's Serenade." 

DIVINE LADY. THE: Trailer (2967). Milton Sills make* 
introductory remarks and shots from the picture are shown. 
Corinne Griffith, the star, also speaks. First National- 
Vitaphone production. 



44 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



SERVICE TALKS 



Incorporated in this department of the Herald-World, which is a department containing news, in- 
formation and gossip on current productions, is the Moving Picture W orld department, "Through 

th<> Bnr Offtrp Window." 



CHESTER MORRIS 

LvOOKING backward is not one of my 
weaknesses, nor have I great interest in the 
giving of credit in an industry where credit 
giving is almost a fetish, but I take this occa- 
sion to look back upon my reports of "Alibi" 
and "Woman Trap," wherein I spoke praises of 
an actor whose name I did not remember, and 
to add here that this actor is Mr. Chester Mor- 
ris and he's greater than I intimated in even 
those enthusiastic comments. I have learned 
his name through seeing him again in "Fast 
Life" and I remark here that this is his best 
exhibit of the three. 

I set this information up here above the 
comment of the week because I know that an 
actor of crook roles, even so capable an actor 
as Mr. Morris, probably will never receive top 
billing elsewhere. Such are the breaks of an 
advertising system based on the theory that the 
world loves Pollyanna more than it loves Peck's 
Bad Boy. I quarrel with this theory to the 
extent of saying that Mr. Morris is a better ac- 
tor of villains than any actor I know is of 
heroes. I quarrel with the theory, but I know 
in advance that I'm licked. I think, however, 
that I win this round. 

"THE: COCKEYED W ORLD" 

^^OU'VE read about the big business this 
picture has done in its early exhibitions. I can 
personally attest that the line in front of Mc- 
Vickers has been so big that I delayed two 
weeks in crashing it to find out the reasons. 
You are not interested, then, in any report I 
might make of the picture as to merit and so 
forth. So I'll just talk about it a bit and let 
nature and "The Cock-Eyed World" take their 
markedly parallel courses. 

The story is, of course, an extension of "What 
Price Glory." Captain Flagg has become a 
mere top-kicker, but Sergeant Quirt is still a 
sergeant. The war is over and the boys, now 
Marines, are busy in Russia and some islands 
where insurrectionists are shooting up the 
populace. There are women here, there and 
everywhere, the principals' contest for them be- 
ing the central theme and Lily Damita being 
the chief of the several women they battle 
about. 

The warfare is a relatively minor incident. 
The scrapping about women is the chief item 
of interest. The wisecracks are the chief weap- 
ons and they are sharp, swift, deft and rough, 
as the wit of upstanding Marines is quite likely 



By T. O. Service 

to be. The Chicago censor board took out 
quite a number of them, shortening others, but 
those that are left in the Chicago print are 
enough to have the town talking and whisper- 
ing and giggling in high if somewhat under- 
cover glee. (Speaking of under-cover stuff, I 
make no secret of the fact that I'd like to see 
the complete picture.) 

Victor McLaglen and Edmund Lowe are 
much as they were in "What Price Glory," a 
bit better actors perhaps, but this may be due 
to their vocality. Yet Lowe is much better 
vocally than in "In Old Arizona" and Mc- 
Laglen is better than in "The Black Watch." 
(I guess this makes them pretty good actors.) 
Lily Damita is not, of course, what Renee 
Adoree was to "What Price Glory," but she is 
plenty, visibly and audibly, and the job is 
slightly different. A good many others should 
be named but no doubt you know who they 
are and what they do. 

I've an idea that "The Cock-Eyed World" 
will be followed by a good many pictures of 
similar character. Things run that way in pro- 
duction. And it's quite all right with me; I 
assure those of you who so kindly worry about 
me that I'll not fall asleep in front of pictures 
like this one. But I'd like to hear what the 
dear old ladies in Primrose, Pennsylvania, will 
say about it all. I know they'll be in to see it, 
hear it, and then I know what they'll say about 
it to each other. I've no idea what you exhibi- 
tors of Primrose will reply to them, but I can 
name a destination whereto you might as well 
direct them now as later. 

"HER PRIVATE LIFE" 

It took a lot of nerve for Billie Dove to at- 
tempt Ethel Barrymore's famous role in "De- 
classe," which "Her Private Life" is. It would 
take a lot of nerve for any actress to do it. 
When a role has been done by a Barrymore, 
and is surrounded by the tradition that settles 
upon a Barrymore performance before it is 
cold and hardens steadily thereafter, it's high 
explosive for another performer. And Miss 
Dove's vocal ability is new, relatively unsung, 
notably un-Barrymoresque. 

But this isn't a prelude to a knock. On the 
contrary, it's preface to the statement that Miss 
Dove not only had a lot of nerve to tackle the 
job but enough more to get away with it. "Her 
Private Life" is easily the best picture she has 
ever made and one of the best pictures of the 



day. Miss Dove is better and better vocally, 
incomparable physically, and her associates are 
up to the high standard that she sets for them 
all the way. 

Montague Love is splendid as the brutish 
husband. Walter Pidgeon is okay as the lover 
and Zasu Pitts contributes a priceless maid. 
The direction is smooth, the continuity flawless, 
the production spic and span, the ensemble up 
to the very top notch. I sweep my chapeau 
in a long, graceful arc to the humble dust and 
proclaim Miss Dove the Ethel Barrymore of 
the speaking screen. Take it or leave it. 

"FAST LIFE" 

^3eCAUSE a major sequence in "Fast Life" 
shows a man and his wife getting ready for 
bed, the picture is limited in Chicago to adult 
exhibition. But don't let that fool you. It's a 
splendid bit of entertainment and the first foot- 
lighting of flaming youth since "Flaming 
Youth" that has seemed to me worth the film 
it's printed on. 

Chester Morris — starred or not — is the star of 
"Fast Life." He comes into the picture in- 
conspicuously, stands in the background most 
of the time, goes out suddenly and quietly to- 
ward the end, but the kick that the picture has 
is the kick he puts in it. Douglas Fairbanks, 
Jr., is the principal by casting, Loretta Young 
is the girl in the triangle, and several others 
do well with prominent assignments. 

"SKIN DEEP" 

I T seems to me that it was Milton Sills who 
made a picture called, "Skin Deep," in which 
a bad man's face was repaired by plastic sur- 
gery and his character straightened out accord- 
ingly. The same thing happens in this picture, 
also called, "Skin Deep," but the incidents of 
this one recall to me none of the incidents of 
the other. This time the bad man, a gangster, 
is Monte Blue. Betty Compson is the bad girl, 
John Davidson is the second bad man, and 
Tully Marshall is the facial carpenter who 
fixes things up for everybody concerned. 

I'm glad to see Mr. Blue standing up along- 
side the other good male actors in the talking- 
pictures. A bit selfishly, this business of be- 
ing glad, because Mrs. Service thinks Mr. Blue 
is a great guy and I'm, going to have to go to 
all his pictures whether I want to or not. If 
they continue as good as this one, and I see 
no reason why they shouldn't, I imagine I'll 
be an addict, too, in no time at all. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



45 



THE THEATRE 

Exhibitors Tell "Cockeyed World" All About 

It with Human Billboards 



HUMAN billboards are the newest form 
of ballyhoo stunts to be used to ex- 
ploit motion picture attractions. The idea 
originated in Hollywood when MGM 
erected a large human billboard to exploit 
the "Hollywood Revue" and the same idea 
is being used successfully to advertise Fox's 
"Cockeyed World" to record breaking at- 
tendance in Dallas and Milwaukee. 

In Milwaukee, Roger Ferri, director of 
advertising for the Fox Midwesco theatres, 
devised the most striking exploitation stunt 
ever staged for a local theatre and broke 
all house records at the Strand theatre. In 
Dallas, Texas, John H. Thoma, manager of 
the Majestic, used the same idea and got 
results which equaled those in Milwaukee. 
How Thoma Did It 
In Dallas a human billboard was located 
on one of the busiest down town corners. 
The sign was two blocks distance from the 
theatre, and buglers standing on the sign 
would sound off at regular intervals to be 
answered by buglers stationed at the mar- 
quee of the theatre. Thirteen boys dressed 
in military uniform appeared on the elev- 
ated billboard and a 30 piece military band 
was stationed under the sign and played 
constantly. 

The living billboard idea was put into 
effect Saturday night to play up the mid- 
night preview and the result was that an 
over capacity crowd was in front of the 
theatre an hour before time for the preview. 
At the end of the last regular show it was 




JOHN H. THOMA 

practically impossible for the patrons in the 
theatre to leave the house, as the lobby 
was a solid mass of humanity. The crowd 
in front was so great the street car traffic 



was tied up for thirty minutes, and waiting 
customers extended a block in each direc- 
tion. 

Ten special traffic policemen had been as- 
signed to the theatre but they soon found 
the job too much for them and three 
special calls for additional patrolmen were 
made and even then the 28 officers found it 
impossible to control the crowd. Show 
windows were cracked and the glasses in 
the lobby frames were broken by the jam. 
A parking station located two blocks away 
found it necessary to press into service 15 
additional employees to take care of 
business. 

1,500 Persons Turned Away 

The management succeeded in packing 
3,408 people into a theatre that seats 2,895 
persons. It was estimated that the theatre 
turned away 1,500 people who were unable 
to gain admittance. 

Thoma stated that the total attendance 
for the first two days' showing and the 
previous midnight preview was 44,500. The 
ballyhoo on this picture included three uni- 
formed bodies who marched through the 
'down town streets displaying a "Cockeyed 
World" banner, 3 bugle corps, 2 drum corps 
and an unusually good lobby display. The 
walls of the lobby were not visible in any 
place as they had been sheathed over with 
artistically painted beaver board displays 
and the ceiling was a solid study of orange 
and blue strips of cloth which radiated 
{Continued on next page) 




Crowds waiting to attend the midnight preview of "The Cock- 
eyed World," at the Dallas Majestic, stopped all traffic on Elm 
street and it was thirty minutes before officers were able to 
clear the street car lines and let the cars pass. The above pic- 
ture shows the crowd assembling. Several lady patrons fainted 
in the jam and show ivindoivs and glasses in the lobby display 
frames were broken by the crowd. 




Human bill-board used by the Dallas Majestic to break records 
with "The Cockeyed World." Thirteen boys in military uni- 
forms appeared on the board at regular intervals and buglers 
stationed immediately below sounded off every ten minutes and 
were answered by buglers stationed on the marquee of the' 
Majestic, two blocks away. A thirty piece military band was 
stationed below the sign and played constantly. 



46 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 




The human billboard devised by Roger Ferri to exploit the opening of Fox's "Cockeyed 
World" at the Strand theatre, Milwaukee. Girls from the Fanchon & Marco presentation 
unit paraded along the top of the building, each carrying an illuminated letter, which 
when all put together spelled "Cockeyed World. 



Free Airplane Rides 
Boosts "Flying Fool" 
Picture in Nashville 

Plenty of air thrills were provided for 
lucky patrons who attended the showings of 
Pathe's "The Flying Fool," starring William 
Boyd, at the Belmont theatre in Nashville, 
Tennessee, through the free airplane rides 
offered in manager Denny B. Dixon's 
effective exploitation campaign. 

Through the cooperation of the Curtiss 
Flying Service at Nashville eighteen free 
'plane rides were offered to the patrons 
writing the best statements of not more 
than 20 words on the superiority of the 
Belmont's talking equipment. Six rides 
were awarded each day of the three-day 
engagement. Articles were sent direct to 
the theatre. Lieutenants Joseph H. Douglas 
and Harry H. Jones of the Curtiss Service 
took personal charge of flying arrange- 
ments. 

Dixon secured three-column-cuts in tru- 
Nashville Banner and in the Tennessean 
showing his theatre front with "The Flying 
Fool" billing and a Curtiss 'plane. In all 
his newspaper advertising, over fifty inches 
of free publicity was secured. Dixon fea- 
tured the eighteen free airplane rides in 
bold display type at the top of his two 
column newspaper ads. The rides were also 
advertised on thousands of the heralds pro- 
vided by Pathe as accessories on this 
William Boyd starring production. 



Publishing Company Will 

Issue Book on W B's Film 

The publishing firm of Efrus & Bennett 
will issue a full length novel based upon 
Warner Brothers Vitaphone production, 
"Is Everybody Happy?" starring Ted 
Lewis. Eleanor Carey is the author of the 
book, the text of which will also be used by 
Warners for their serial service to four hun- 
dred newspapers. It will appear in these 
papers beginning November 1. 



Favorite Star Photograph 

Stunt Clicks in Canada 

With the cooperation of ten local mer- 
chants, Manager Knevels of the Capitol 
theatre, Hamilton, Ontario, is conducting a 
new form of "Favorite Movie Star Photo- 
graph" stunt. Every adult patron on Mon- 



day and Friday nights receives a coupon 
which entitles the holder to one of 16 col- 
ored portraits on application to any of the 
merchants who cooperate with the theatre 
in the full page advertising in the news- 
papers. It gets the people to the theatre 
on "off nights" and the arrangement also 
serves to get the people into the stores. 



"Scotchman's Matinee" 

Brings Added Patronage 
For Kansas City Manager 

After several months of trying out the 
plan, H. A. Jones of Plaza theatre, Kansas 
City, is convinced that his "Scotchman's 
Matinee," which he has advertised widely, 
brings added patronage to his theatre. Trie 
"Scotchman's Matinee," as it is advertised 
in newspapers, consists of the-regular pic- 
ture and a first run pre-view of the ensuing- 
picture each Saturday night. 



OKAY! R KG 
IET S GO/ 

4 



The Fox Broadway Theatre welcomes its 
newest friend . • . the R. K, O. Orpheum . . . 
to Portland . . . we feel that there is, indeed 
. . . room in Portland for both of us . . . 

We of the Pacific Coast are ambitious 
for our own products . . . we know that you 
have heard of Pendleton's Round-up . . . of 
Hood River apples . . . of Salem's cherries 
. . . of Bedford's pears . . . of .Port Orford 
cedar . . . of the thousands and one products 
of this charmed land . . . 

We repeat . . . welcome to this charmed 
land ... and we say, Give the best you have 
. . . for among our own Pacific Coast prod- 
ucts of which Portland is proud . . . are the 
stage shows produced by the West's great 
producers . . . Fanchon & Marco. 

Competition — forgive us the platitude 
. . . i s the life of trade . . . Wherefore we 
welcome you to Portland, and in all sincerity 
with you good luck ... 






The above is part of a newspaper adver- 
tisement of the Fox West Coast Theatres 
in Portland and is devoted to the wel- 
coming of R K O, a competitive com- 
pany, to that city. Read it carefully, it 
is an unusual piece of copy. 



Human Billboards 
On 'Cockeyed World' 
In Dallas, Milwaukee 

{Continued from preceding page) 

from the center. The Majestic offered eight 
complete shows a day which includes a 
midnight show every night during the 
week's run. 

Thoma can never be satisfied unless he 
is breaking records, which reputation he 
made with R K O, and his start as man- 
ager of the Majestic, Dallas, has been more 
than successful. 

Ferri Puts It Over 

The front of the Strand theatre building 
in Milwaukee is only two stories in height 
and Ferri arranged for the girls from the 
Fanchon & Marco unit, playing at the Wis- 
consin theatre, to parade around the top 
of the building the opening night of the 
picture. Each carried a huge illuminated 
letter and when all letters put together the 
words "Cockeyed World" were spelled. The 
girls stayed close to the edge of the build- 
ing and could easily be seen from the 
street. The complete display was lighted 
by spots and flood lights. 

This living sign was advertised in ad- 
vance through the newspapers and nearly 
all the populace of Milwaukee turned out 
for the event. The street was jammed and 
traffic was stopped. Those who were unable 
to buy tickets for the show remained in the 
street to watch the display. 

When "The Cockeyed World" played at 
the Interstate's Majestic theatre in Fort 
Worth, Frank O. Starz, director of pub- 
licity and advertising is to be commended 
on his unusual good newspaper copy, used 
to exploit the picture. The picture played 
to 23,000 persons in four days and estab- 
lished a record for reciepts in that city. 



Midnight Frolic Show 
And Dancing in Lobby 
Goes Big in South Bend 

The Granada theatre in South Bend has 
inaugurated what promises to be a business 
getter. Under the name of "Midnight 
Frolic," midnight performances are prov- 
ing" very popular. 

Starting at 11 o'clock and continuing until 
11:45 dancing in the lobby is permitted with 
music furnished by an orchestra after which 
the performance is started with a stage 
show in the nature of a studio revue. After 
the stage show a preview of the coming 
feature picture is given. The stage show is 
broadcasted over a local radio station. 



Brooklyn Manager Wins 
Fox Thrift Book Drive 

The first prize in the Fox Thrift Book 
drive conducted by the Fox theatres has 
been captured by Harry Moore, manager 
of the Fox Savoy theatre, Brooklyn. Be- 
sides the honor of taking first place, there 
was a cash award of $50, generously di- 
vided by Moore among the staff which 
helped to put over the sales. Second prize 
of $35 went to the Fox theatre in Brooklyn, 
managed by H. J. Rice, and third prize was 
taken by managing director Morton Green 
of the Fox Crotona in the Bronx. 

This intensive campaign on the Fox 
Thrift Books ran for a month and a half 
ending on September 15. The sale of the 
books from the Fox box-offices, will of 
course, continue. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



47 



Public Schools and Football Tieups 
Pep Up Attendance; Here's How 



DUBLIC SCHOOLS may be used to boost 
-*■ attendance at the theatre and in fact it is 
possible to secure the aid of both teachers and 
pupils in playing up a show house, provided 
the proper approach is made however. School 
superintendents and boards of educations are 
always on the job to see that their school work 
is not interfered with and in many cases it 
is rather a difficult problem for any publicity 
man to overcome. 

However, if it is possible to add something 
to the students' knowledge or to induce a more 
studious atmosphere the school officials will 
generally react favorably to the theatre's plans. 
The problems arising in working out such a 
campaign are rather difficult but Bob Kelley, 
district director of Publix advertising and ex- 
ploitation, with offices in Dallas, has worked 
out the following outline which is worth the 
attention of any theatre manager. 

His suggestions for such a public school 
campaign are listed under four headings : 
Essay Contests, Football Tieups, Talent and 
Adult Plugs. 

Essay Contests in Schools 

Educational essay contests planned to run 
until let-down following school opening is 
overcome, the pontests to be sponsored by 
school officials, newspapers and the theatre. 

Offer $10 each week as a prize to the stu- 
dent writing the best 200 word essay on why 
he prefers talking pictures. 

Letters should be sent to all English teach- 
ers in the city schools announcing the contest 
with one addressed to the principals to go on 
the school's bulletin board. 

A lobby frame in the theatre should be de- 
voted to the contest, for the announcement of 
the contest and later the winners. This display 
will do a great deal towards keeping the adult 
and parent patronage interested. A trailer on 
the screen would be good. 

The essays should be judged for originality, 
neatness and its grammatical construction and 
the judges be selected from the schools, news- 
papers and any local personalities, who may be 
prominent as writers. 

All the English instructors should be given 
passes in order to promote their good will and 
cooperation. 

Try and have the school officials to make 
announcement of the contest winners each 
week in the general assemblies. 

Football Tieups 

The publicity man should first get acquainted 
with all the coaches and arrange personal ap- 
pearance night for each of the teams. They 
should be presented to the audience from the 
stage. This can be very effective if the team 
will wear their "fighting togs" or letter 
sweaters. 

The sport writers of the local newspapers 
w r ill gladly play up their appearances and sug- 
gest to him that he cite famous picture stars 
who were formerly football players. 

The theatre should make arrangements with 
a jeweler for the purchase of a cup to be 
awarded the school championship team and 
have the cup displayed in a window with a 
tieup with the current attractions at the 
theatre. 

During the entire football season the school 
paper should carry stories of the theatre's 
activities in sponsoring the games. Arrange 
a contest at the close of the season to pick 
the most popular player and award him a 
trophy. He should be judged by the merits of 
his work in every game of the season. This 
idea should be announced before the first game 
and carried through until the last, with the 
local newspapers and school papers playing it 
up. Give the trophy enough value to create 




r T~ l hE Greater Palace Theater, Dallas, in 
■*- conjunction with Linz Brothers, a 
Dallas jewelry firm, ivill award a foot- 
ball player statue to the most valuable 
player on the Southern Methodist Uni- 
versity team at the close of the season. 
The trophy is designated as the Palace 
Theatrc-Linz Brothers trophy and will be 
aivarded each year. 

The most valuable player will be de- 
termined by the casting of ballots which 
will be published in the school paper 
and also in the Dallas Times-Herald. 
Football fans are to use these ballots in 
voting for their selection as the most 
valuable player. The trophy will be 
awarded the winner at the last game of 
the season and the presentation will be 
made by Jimmy Ellard, stage band 
leader, who will be present at the game. 
The most valuable player and his team- 
mates will then be honor guests of the 
Palace Theatre at a box party that night. 

The above photo shows David Worts- 
man of Linz Brothers Jewelry company 
showing the trophy to Dr. Blackwell. 
(left) Athletic Business Manager, and 
Coach Ray Morrison of S. M. U. (right). 

an incentive in each of the players to do 
their best. 

Photographers should take pictures of the 
most important games and these pictures dis- 
played in the theatre lobby. 

Pep-up parties at the theatre should be ar- 
ranged and as a special attraction the organ- 
ist should present special illustrated song 
slides for his solo. It might be well to have 
the slides specially made with a photo of a 
member of the team on each, and the song 
should bring in the name of each player as 
they flash on the screen. School pennants 
should be used to decorate the lobby of the 
theatre on these nights. 

Dramatic Talent 

The theatre should get in touch with the 
dramatic talent and music instructors and ar- 
range for a personal appearance, on the the- 
atre's stage, of any pupil showing ability as 
a public entertainer. Talent school nights 
should be arranged with students furnishing 
part of the program. If a really good act is 
discovered it should be booked for a run at 
the theatre and the theatre manager can coop- 
erate in making the yearly senior class play 



a real worth while production, by aiding in 
selection of costumes, furnishing a scenic 
painter to help with their sets and by donating 
the theatre's stage for morning rehearsals. 
Th psychology of the students rehearsing on 
a real stage in a real theatre goes a long way 
in creating the right atmosphere tor the entire 
cast. In some instances it is possible that the 
theatre be turned over to the school for this 
play but in any case it is advisable to use the 
cast in a presentation act for the week follow- 
ing its initial school performance. 

Contests can be staged among the pupils and 
the winners be awarded a try out at the local 
theatre. Such tieups will be given considerable 
mention in the newspapers as school activities 
are of public interest. 

Adult Plugs 

During the entire time in which the theatre 
is active in school affairs a campaign should 
be carried offering special inducements to the 
adults and parents of the school children. 
Bargain matinees should be staged when school 
talent appears on the stage and each day a 
special price should be offered for one hour to 
school children, following the close of the 
school for the day. An arrangement should 
be made with the head of the school's R. O. 
T. C. and drill contests be staged at the theatre 
with military officers acting as judges. This 
sort of contest can be run for several weeks 
until one from each school is left and then 
hold a final contest and award prizes to the 
winning cadets. 

* For the theatre manager who will really get 
down and plug with the school, many_ dull 
nights can be made into big paying nights, 
during the entire school year. He cannot 
afford to overlook the possibilities offered by 
such a medium of exploitation and advertising. 
* * * 

Don Smith, manager of the Lake theatre, 
Milwaukee, has been following this policy 
lately with very good results. He had 
pictures taken of local high school football 
squads in the neighborhood of his theatre 
and showed these exclusive pictures to a 
packed house. As a result of this type of 
cooperation he gets constant patronage 
from the students of high schools in that 
section of Milwaukee. 

Ushers Present Patrons 

Personal Invitations to 

See Coming Attractions 

Don Smith, manager of the Lake theatre, 
Milwaukee, has thought up a fine way of 
getting the names of coming pictures be- 
fore his regular theatre patrons. He had 
small, average sized cards printed on 
which was a little copy concerning each 
picture that would show at the Lake dur- 
ing the coming week. It was headed "For 
Your Personal Information" and was signed 
by "Your Usher." 

This is getting a little different slant on 
advertising coming pictures and one which 
has proved very effective. Rather than 
have the manager announce and praise the 
pictures, as is the usual way, the idea of 
having the usher say that he hopes he will 
have the pleasure of seating people at one 
performance of each of the listed attrac- 
tions, attracts more attention from people. 



Bebe Daniels Sings Over Radio 

NEW YORK — Bebe Daniels sang two numbers over 
the NBC chain sunshine hour last week. The broad- 
cast was sponsored by the Fleischmann Yeast Cor- 
poration. Miss Daniels sang "You're Always In My 
Arms" and "If You're In Love You'll Waltz." 



48 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



Electrical Displays Are Only One Feature 
In B&K "Radio Revue" Campaign 



T N developing their recent "Radio Revue 
of 1929" at the Chicago theatre, Balaban 
& Katz employed a wider range of exploita- 
tion than for any other one week's show 
in their history. A daily newspaper contest, 
a special 16 page Sunday supplement, a 
week's use of two radio stations, the co- 
operation of 24 manufacturers of radio 
machines, and the largest electrical signs 
the loop ever saw, were used to attract 
business to the theatre. 

For the first time the Chicago theatre's 
lobby was given over to a tieup with the 
stasje, the entire mezzanine floor of the main 
lobby being devoted to a display of radios, 
each of the 24 interested manufacturers hav- 
ing a specially decorated booth. 

Advance Lobby Display 

For a week previous to the showing this 
lobby was dominated by a gigantic sign, 
artistically constructed of two radio towers 
with lightning strokes playing from tower- 
tip to tower-tip, while across these beams 
in brighter lights and flashing alternately 
with the lightning was placed a large sign 
"Radio Revue" and over it "Friday." 

Two weeks before the event the Chicago 
Herald and Examiner began advertising in 
its columns and over the air from its two 
stations KYW and KFKX a contest by 
which the listeners of the stations could 
vote on which radio artists they most 
wanted to see on the stage. Some 120,000 
votes were sent in due to the daily plug in 
the paper and the 36 daily announcements 
over the air. Ted Fio-Rito, Nubs Allen and 
Wynken, Blynken & Nod were the station' 
artists selected and began at once rehearsing 
in the theatre's production. 

Tieups and Marquee Display 

Meanwhile all the song publishers in town 
were advertising the event in their windows 
on song shops and in all department stores 
where sheet music is sold. Windows were 
obtained in some 65 radio shops advertising 
the records of songs that were to be used 
in the "Revue." On the day that the 
"Revue" began on the stage, the lobby was 
opened for the exhibition of new radio 
models, the immense "Radio Revue" elec- 
trical display was changed as to its letter- 
ing but maintained as to its display. 
Meanwhile on the canopy commanding State 
Street both ways, was erected a larger 
duplicate of the lobby sign, while under the 
canopy was displayed a series of trans- 
parencies in the form of lightning strokes, 
each bearing the name of some one of the 
stage acts, and all striking into a central 
transparency which flashed "Radio Revue" 
like lightning strokes. 

Atmosphere Stage Show 

The result of the whole was more color, 
movement and light than probably any Chi- 
cago theatre had shown before, both inside 
and out. Psychologically the effect was in- 
teresting in that from the moment that a 
patron saw the signs, several blocks away 



from the theatre up to the moment that he 
took his seat he was in the atmosphere, of 
radio and of entertainment. While buying 
his ticket he was surrounded by the jump- 
ing, flashing lights, and as he entered the 
lobby this same effect continued. 

Three special stage settings, one of which 
showed the mythical television apparatus 
by which Mars and the Earth exchange pro- 
grams, was ingenious in the extreme, the 
stage being filled with machinery upon 
which strange human beings moving like 
so many "robots" or mechanical men, kept 
time to the movement of gigantic wheels 
and drivers. 



Canadian Exhibitors 
Active in Community 
Benefit Fund Drives 

Joe Franklin, manager of B. F. Keith's 
theatre, Ottawa, gave evidence of his com- 
munity spirit no less than three times during 
one week. First he staged a benefit for the 
Palestine Relief Fund; then assisted in the 
organization of a financial drive for the Ottawa 
Humane Society, of which he is a director, 
and, thirdly, performed co-operative work for 
the Rotary Club. 

Manager Ray Tubman of the Regent also 
presented a Palestine Relief performance, as 
well as a community show in aid of the 
Kiwanis Club boys work fund. P. J. Nolan, 
proprietor of the Avalon, gave a similar bene- 
fit performance for the Kiwanis Club. 



No less than 32 recording companies will 
record these songs for release to their dealers 
and it is assured that they will receive the 
widest possible distribution. 

All of the new productions such as "Foot- 
lights and Fools," starring Colleen Moore, 
"Paris," starring Irene Bordoni, and "Sally," 
starring Marilyn Miller are well supplied with 
musical numbers certain to attract the public. 
These numbers have been adapted to all 
types of presentation, orchestra, dance, vocal 
or organ. 

The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company 
has recorded "My Song of the Nile," the 
"Drag" theme number; "Smiling Irish Eyes" 
from the picture of the same title starring 
Colleen Moore and "Wishing and Waiting for 
Love" from "Broadway Babies." The Cameo 
Record Corporation and the Columbia Pho- 
nograph Company, Inc., are also handling 
these numbers. The Compo Company, Ltd., 
of Canada is issuing "Song of the Nile," 
"Wishing and Waiting for Love" from 
"Broadway Babies." The Cameo Record 
Corporation and the Columbia Phonograph 
Company, Inc., are also handling these num- 
bers. The Compo Company, Ltd. of Canada 
issuing "Song of the Nile," "Wishing and 
Waiting for Love," "Broadway Baby Dolls," 
"Smiling Irish Eyes," "Lady Divine" from 
"The Divine Lady," "Gypsy Charmer," from 
"The Squall" and "I Love You, I Hate You" 
from "Careers." 



BIG CHICAGO THEATER 1929 RADIO REVUE PACKS HOUSE 




The front page of a 16 page Sunday 
mpplement in the Chicago Herald-Ex- 
aminer in which 24 radio manufacturers, 
cooperated in putting over B & K's 
"Radio Revue" and radio show, staged 
on the mezzanine floor of the Chicago 
theatre. Radio station tieups, electrical 
displays and a stage sliow with radio 
artists put over one of the biggest weeks 
in the history of the theatre. 



The New York Recording Laboratory, the 
Okeh Phonograph Company, the Plaza Music 
Company, the Velvetone Record Corporation, 
and the Victor Talking Machine Company are 
among the other big record manufacturers 
plugging the First National song hits. 

Another source of wide publicity is found in 
the recording of songs by the piano player 
roll companies. The Atlas Player Roll, the 
Aeolian Company, the Ampico Corp., the 
Capitol Roll and Record Company, the Inter- 
national Player Roll Company, the Paramount 
Music Roll Company, the Pianostyle Music 
Company, the Mills Novelty Company, the 
Rolmonica Music Company and the Wurlitzer 
Manufacturing Company are featuring theme 
songs from the new First National pictures 
in their Fall and Winter catalogues. 

Colored Balloon Shower 

Makes Broadway Look Up 

Broadway got a drenching of colored 
balloons that caused considerable attention 
to be paid the Warner Brothers' "Gold Dig- 
gers of Broadway," playing at the Winter 
Garden theatre 

To exploit this picture, thousands of 
colored balloons were dropped from the 
top of the theatre. Each balloon carried this 
message : "Hear 'Painting the Clouds with 
Sunshine' in the 'Gold Diggers of Broadway' 
at the Winter Garden." 



When Receipts Are 
Not B. O. Receipts? 

Here's one method of making cer- 
tain that money invested in printing 
bills is utilized. The management of 
the Mission theatre, Shawnee, Kan., 
advertises that it will admit all per- 
sons free at the end of the month 
who save each printed program that 
is printed during the month. The 
program changes three times weekly. 



FN Will Exploit Theme Songs 

With Records and Piano Rolls 

First National has arranged a tieup whereby the theme songs of each of their 
pictures will be exploited by leading record and piano roll manufacturers. Close 
working arrangements have been made and the release of the song3 will be made 
at a time when this publicity will be most helpful to exhibitors. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



49 



MUSIC AND TALENT 



Third Loew Stageshow House Open 



STAGE SHOWS 

Pittsburgh Enright 

Week Ending Sept. 27 

Dick Powell, m. c, ^alls his stage offering this 
week "Bits of Broadway," and it compares favorably 
with the high quality and entertainment values of the 
other offerings in recent weeks. 

West and West, a couple of sailor boys, put on a 
fast hard shoe dance which is above the ordinary. 
These boys are mighty fast steppers, make a fine 
appearance and their offering is A-No. 1. 

Stanley House does a good loose-jointed dance, and 
also a funny song in which he impersonates a Ger- 
man dancing master. The rest of his number, talk- 
ing and singing, is but fair. 

The Nitoes, tramp tumblers, are the hit of the 
show. These fellows are just about as clever and 
funny as any ever seen here. They panicked the 
audience at every performance. The stage band scored 
again with "Wabash Blues" and "This Is Heaven." 
In the last-named number they imitated a phonograph 
with the spring running down, and then speeded up 
while the drummer turned a Hallowe'en rattler to 
represent the winding up of the phonograph. This got 
one wow of a laugh. 

A beautiful production number brought out Frances 
Ruppert, one of the chorus girls, who led the en- 
semble with the singing of "Dig-a-Dig-a-Doo." Miss 
Ruppert did very well and got a big hand. In this 
number the girls each had a specially constructed 
so-called cymbal, each of these containing three balls. 
They shook these in time with the music and the 
effect was new and interesting. 

Dick Powell as usual scored with his megaphone 
crooning, this time offering "I'm Painting Clouds 
With Sunshine," and as an encore he rendered 
"Here We Are." 



Jersey City Jersey City 

Week Ending Oct. 4 

The inaugural program of this house (the third 
Loew de luxe theatre to open within three weeks), is 
identical to the openings of the other two, with few 
changes that necessitate a report. 

The Loew's Grand Orchestra, led by Don Albert, 
opens proceedings with "The Star Spangled Ban- 
ner." As everyone rose and stood at attention, 
Louise Bave, soloist, as Columbia, sang our national 
anthem, amid a round of applause from the audience. 

Unit 2 — "Divertissement Musicale," an overture by 
the orchestra and led masterly by the internationally 
known conductor, Don Albert. 

Unit 3 — A dedication trailer by the management. 

Unit 4 — A Special Movietone Greeting by Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Stars. 

Unit 5 — M-G-M News and Movietonews. 

Unit 6 — Organ solo feature by Leo Weber (report 
may be found in the Organ Solo Column of this 
issue). 

Unit 7 — Stage Presentation. The inaugural stage 
show, introducing Ben Black and His Rhythm Kings, 
opens with a production called "Cameos." Chester 
Hale, under the personal supervision of Louis K. 
Sidney, devised and staged this beautiful miniature 
musical comedy. This fine show opens to a scene in 
two of a silken drape, with a living cameo suspended 
from the fly gallery, as fourteen Chester Hale Girls, 
in Grecian costume, offer a balloon ballet, as Aileen 
Clarke pleasantly sings a classical number. Follow- 
ing this, the curtain rose, disclosing a Grecian gar- 
den scene, in which Grecian Maidens pose behind 
the orchestra, who are seated in a large pastel shaded 
box. Ben Black enters to a very fine reception, an- 
nounces his appreciation of being chosen as master 
(Continued on page 51) 



At New Loew House 




George Dumond 



Ben Black 



Yessir! Ben Black and George H. Du- 
mond, the important guys at Loew's newest 
house, the Jersey City. Black is the master of 
ceremonies. Of course you know him — The 
Ben Black who with Art Hickman discovered 
this musical fever which is modern jazz. Born 
in this country, Ben went to England by way 
of Africa when just a lad. At 17 he bought 
a banjo and came back home, where he's been 
highly appreciated ever since. Drummond is 
managing director of the big new Loew 
house. He has been in the show business 20 
years. 

Roxy at Radio Show 

The public who have so faithfully tuned in to 
Roxy and His Gang for the past seven years have 
had opportunity of seeing in person that popular 
director and his group of artists at Madison Square 
Garden last week. They broadcast their weekly 
program from the Crystal Studio of the Radio 
World's Fair. The music that Roxy selected for the 
occasion included the works of such . favorite com- 
posers as Victor Herbert, Friml and Romberg. On 
Wednesday the evening following those less fortu- 
nate members of the radio audience who were un- 
able to attend the radio show in person were given 
an opportunity of seeing several of Roxy'6 stars 
through a television broadcast. 



LOUIS ADRIAN 

Conducting 
Orchestral 
Features 
at the 
Balaban & Katz 
PARADISE 

Theatre 
CHICAGO 




Affiliated with 
PUBLIX 



Ben Black Is 
Chosen As M. C. 
Of Jersey City 

Three Deluxe Theatres of Cir- 
cuit Throw Open Doors 
in Three Weeks 
By E. T. DAWSON 

NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— A third 
presentation theatre of the deluxe 
standard has been contributed within 
three weeks to the amusement world 
by Loew's, Inc. 

With Ben Black as master of cere- 
monies, the magnificent 3,300-seat 
Loew's Jersey City theatre, built ex- 
pressly for showing talking pictures, 
threw open its doors at 11 a. m., Satur- 
day, amid a blare of horns, flag wav- 
ing and cheers by a multitude who 
lined up to give this beautiful house 
a royal welcome. 

The completed edifice, housing the most 
lavish temple of entertainment in the state 
of New Jersey, represents an investment 
of approximately $2,000,000. 

Emphasizing the civic importance of the 
event, persons prominent in New York and 
New Jersey affairs participated in extend- 
ing welcome to Nicholas Schenck, presi- 
dent of Loew's, Inc., and of M G M, and 
his fellow executives. 

George K. Arthur on Stage 

Another guest was George K. Arthur, 
screen comedian. The star was - in line at 
the boxorHce waiting to purchase the first 
ticket at 11 a. m. then made a personal 
appearance in the first stageshow, to a 
tumultuous reception. 

Commenting on the opening, President 
Schenck said that the construction of the 
Jersey City theatre is another link in the 
nationwide .expapsion program signalized by 
the opening of the Paradise, New York, 
the Kings, Brooklyn. 

The performances will be continuous, in 
accordance with the deluxe theatre policy 
under the Loew's Jersey City theatre will 
operate. 

Stageshows from the Capitol 

As a deluxe house, with George Dumond, 
as managing director, the theatre will show 
first-run M G M and United Artists talk- 
ing pictures, and stageshows from the Capi- 
tol theatre, New York. 

The initial film offering is "Madame X," 
with a cast headed by Ruth Chatterton, 
Lewis Stone and Raymond Hackett. The 



50 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD October 5, 1929 



ORGAN 

PRESENTATIONS OF 

GREAT SONGS 

SMALL SLIDE SETS 

IF YOU BELIEVED 
IN ME 

"Sensational Ballad" 

SING A LITTLE 
LOVE SONG 

-MY SIN - 

MEAN TO ME 

(If I Were You) 

I'D FALL IN LOVE 
WITH ME 



We also have INDIVIDUAL 
CHORUS SETS for 

LITTLE BY LITTLE 

(From "The Sophomore") 

LOOK WHAT YOU'VE 
DONE TO ME 

(From "Why Leave Home?") 

AS WELL AS THE HITS FROM 
SAY IT WITH SONGS 

and 

FOX MOVIETONE 
FOLLIES 



SPECIALS 

Medley of AL JOLSON hits from 

SAY IT WITH SONGS 

Introducing 

LITTLE PAL 

WHY CAN'T YOU 

USED TO YOU 
I'M IN SEVENTH 
HEAVEN 

"Fox Follies Chorus Medley" 

Introducing 

BREAKAWAY 
THAT'S YOU, BABY 
WALKING WITH 

SUSIE 
BIG CITY BLUES 

Write for All Slides and 
Information to 
SAM LERNER, Mgr. of Publicity 

DeSylva, Brown & 
Henderson, Inc. 

745 7th Ave., New York City 



inaugural week stage presentation is 
"Cameos," with the same cast as produced 
at the Capitol. 

Featured in the first stageshow and all 
others, hereafter, will be Ben Black, as 
master of ceremonies, and his Rhythm 
Kings stagehand. The Loew's Grand Or- 
chestra will be conducted by the interna- 
tionally known director, Don Albert. At 
the console of the $100,000 Robert Morton 
organ is Leo Weber, popular Jersey City 
concert organization, who also will each 
week conduct his Organ School of Broad- 
casting. 

Italian Baroque Architecture 

Designed in lavish Italian baroque style, 
Loew's Jersey City theatre is the latest and 
most ornate addition to the Journal Square 
theatrical district. According to the archi- 
tects, Rapp and Rapp, of New York, it 
embodies virtually every new feature in 
theatrical elegance, convenience and me- 
chanical equipment. 

Entering this distinguished showhouse 
after a glimpse of the imposing street 
facade, one finds an interior the magnifi- 
cence of which reflects the utmost in mag- 
nificence and structural skill. A trip 
through its spacious lobbies, salons, and 
auditorium is rewarded with views of visual 
beauty well worthy of attention. 

Passing through the bonze entrance 
doors, the visitor halts to survey the rich 
and intricate detail of the rotunda-like 
lobby, with its high ceiling exquisitely dec- 
orated in grays and golds, with touches of 
pale blue and rose. Around this oval- 
shaped lobby rise jade green colonnades 
with Roman bronze bases. 

Three-Story Rotunda 

This rotunda is three stories in height, 
with an observation gallery on the mezza- 
nine floor completely girdling its oval cir- 
cumference. All arches and opening in the 
lobby are gorgeously draped in embroidered 
and fringed royal red silk plush. This style 
and color is repeated in the drapings 
throughout the corridors and theatre audi- 
torium. 

Immediately off the rotunda lobby is the 
foyer to the auditorium proper. This is 
notable for its rich furnishings — carved and 
gold framed mirrors and consoles, magnif- 
icent bronzes, luxurious lounges, paintings 
and ornamental, tall Buhlc clock. 

From the mezzanine and orchestra floor 
foyers, one enters the lofty and magnificent 
auditorium, which is executed in the intri- 
cate Italian baroque style. Overhead is a 
gorgeous and opulently decorated dome, 
colored in gold leaf and surrounded by an 
ornamental cornice and bands of ivory, gold 
and soft grey and rose. The vaulted ceil- 
ing has an all-over coffered surface in gold, 
ivory and blue, and is penetrated at the 
sides by six large arches in which elabor- 
ately carved walnut and gold canopies, 
draped with festoons of red velvet, trimmed 
with gold silk gauze and silver cloth. This 
whole treatment is delicately illuminated 
with concealed multi-colored lights. 

The organ fronts, adjoining the proscen- 
ium, which hide the pipes of the mighty 
Morton organ, consist of four ornamental 
and fluted columns supporting a lavishly 
carved cornice, surmounted by a shell 
canopy. From the cornices hang velvet 
valances and drapes embroidered in gold, 
and a crystal trimmed gauze curtain backed 
with silver cloth. The proscenium arch 
forms a beautifully carved framework over 
the stage and is set off by scrolled and 
moulded cartouches and veined marble pan- 
els. The proscenium drape is a festooned 
red velvet, with embroidered bands and 
magnificent appliqued gold shield. The 
lighting fixtures are crystal and bronze with 
illumination mainly indirect. 

George H. Dumond, the managing direc- 
tor, was formerly in charge of production 
and managing director of Loew's State the- 
atre, St. Louis, and has been at other Loew 
houses since 1920. 

Ben Joel is the assistant manager. 



RUSSELL 
SAYS 



MUSIC 0** TALENT 
CHICACIO 



Happenings this week and last. . . . After talking 
to Mr. Lustgarten and reading the papers last week 
of the capture of the theatre box office bandit, I 
guess he is in little danger of having to face the 
experience of reaching the stars. Mr. Lustgarten 
was very proud of the first anniversary and birthday 
of the Paradise Theatre, due to the KYW and KFKX 
radio show held at the Chicago Theatre, the entire 
personnel of the Chicago Theatre ballet and chorus 
numbering fifty people were transferred to the Para- 
dise Theatre. The separate presentation or or- 
chestral extravaganza was ably directed by Uldcrico 
Marcelli, who usually presides at the Chicago The- 
atre. ... If you wi9h to see a show that does not 
tire the audience and will result in keeping the foyer 
and sidewalk in front of your theatre packed with 
people trying to get in, Marks Brothers Collegiate 
stage show at the Granada theatre this week and at 
the Marbro next week. This show is absolutely the 
last word in presentations and about the best stage 
show I've seen in Chicago. Benny Meroff staged a 
wonderful show, his working with Sally Sweet could 
not be surpassed by any M. C. in Chicago. . . . By 
C. Geis, featured organist at the Stanley theatre. 
Jersey City, N. J., has just signed a contract for 
another year as featured organist in this theatre. . . . 
The Organists Club of Newark, N. J., held their first 
meeting of the season September 16th at Newark. 
The featured speakers of the evening were James L. 
Dunn, composer of the New York, Philadelphia and 
Boston Symphony Orchestras. Fred Alwaise and his 
Jazz orchestra furnished the music. . . . Dolores 
Del Kio made a persona! request for Teddy Joyce to 
be sent to Loew's Kings theatre, Brooklyn, N. Y., to 
introduce her to the audience. He is now back as 
M. C. at the Penn theatre, Pittsburgh, where he has 
been for the past year and a half. . . . Ben Black 
former Publix M. C. opened Loew's New Jersey the- 
atre, Jersey City, N. J., last week. . . . Leo Weber 
formerly of the State theatre, Jersey City, has been 
chosen as feature organist for the new Loew's Jersey 
City. . . . Dave Gould, Publix ballet master has 
staged the floor show that is now playing at the 
Everglades Cafe. N. Y. C. He has also staged the 
entire unit for Milton Douglas, that is now playing 
the Keith Circuit. This unit includes twelve Dave 
Gould Girls in the ensemble. Dave is leaving shortly 
for the West Coast to routine sixty-four girls for an 
elaborage picture. . . . Emil Velazco, president of the 
Emil Velazco Organ School is now the featured 
organist over WABC, of the Columbia Broadcasting 
Chain. . . . Grenville Tompsett, featured organist at 
the Granada theatre, South Bend, Ind., is visiting 
New York City and has been polishing up at the 
Velazco Organ School. . . . Fred Tangeman, for- 
merly organist at the Cameo theatre, Jersey City, 
N. J., is now featured organist at the State theatre, 
in the same city. . . . Clem B. Murphy, formerly in 
charge of production for Finklestein and Rubin in 
Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn., is now the manag- 
ing director of the Branford theatre, Newark, N. J. 
. . . Ed Lowry, St. Louis' favorite master of 
ceremonies is now guest master of ceremonies 
at the Branford, Newark. for a limited en- 
gagement. . . . Stanleigh JYlallotte is still feature 
organist at the Publix theatre in Portland. . . . 
Alfredo Meunier has been appointed permanent 
leader of the Capitolians orchestra at the Van- 
couver, B. C, Capitol. . . . Benny and Western for- 
merly dancers on the Publix Circuit were in Chicago 
last week in Fanehon and Marco's "Through the 
Gates" idea. . . . The new Saenger theatre begins 
its weekly programs on Friday instead of Saturday, 
as heretofore. . . . Johnny Hamp, conductor of the 
orchestra at the Congress Hotel, broadcasts daily over 
KYW. . . . Radio Keith Orpheum will broadcast over 
WIBO every Tuesday evening on the R K O hour 
from 9:30 to 10:30. . . . Henri Keats is now back 
home at the Oriental theatre and sure is playing 
havoc with the audiences. . . . Al Tearney has opened 
his new Club Metropole in the Metropole Hotel, and 
has brought the orchestra, Lew Lewis and his Royal 
Vagabonds, intact from the Garden of Allah. . . . 
Lloyd Huntley, and his Isle O'Blue orchestra, re- 
cently headlined by Radio Keith Orpheum have 
opened at the College Inn, Chicago. . . . Palace 
theatre marks its third anniversary with a gala bill 
of 6tars. . . . Jan Carber and his Greater Columbia 
Recording orchestra opened an engagement at the 
Trianon Ballroom last week. 




October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



51 



( mimarksfflihnarh 




STAGE SHOWS 



(Continued from page 49) 

of ceremonies, and then introduces Karavieff, the 
only Russian tap dancer in this country. Karavieff's 
wonderful dancing stops the show, until he is forced 
to encore. 

Black next announces a specially prepared band 
number, arranged by himself, of "The Three Roses." 
This embodies three well known "Rose" songs, "Roses 
of Picardy," "Mighty Lak a Rose" and Ben Black's 
own famous "Moonlight and Roses." These numbers 
are played separately first, but at the finish they are 
all played, simultaneously. (Ben Black leads his 
orchestra in a showmanly, dignified manner that will 
undoubtedly gain him a very large following at this 
house.) The "Moonlight and Roses" number is aug- 
mented by the assistance of Leo Weber at the organ. 
A pleasing effect is lent by large roses, flashed on 
the organ grills, on slides. 

The reception accorded Black and his orchestra, 
is of the best. 

The Three Ritz Brothers, supposedly the original 
collegiates, offer their specialties of eccentric danc- 
ing, comedy singing and hokum gags. Twenty Ches- 
ter Hale Girls, in Mid-Victorian costume, offer an 
old fashioned dance routine, as 12 Grecian Maidens 
pose in background. 

This is followed by the Stone-Vernon Quartette, 
three men and a girl. This team's sensational and 
breath-taking adagio dancng stops the show, and 
they are forced to continue doing some of the most 
perilous stunts ever witnessed by this reporter. The 
way all three of the men, especially Bob Vernon, 
throw Miss Stone around, one would imagine she 
were a rag doll. Their reception could not have been 
better. Miss Aileen Clarke, leading two beautiful 
Russian wolf-hounds, enters as the entire company 
asesmble and form a beautiful picture for the finale. 

Unit 8 — Feature presentation, M-G-M all talking 
film sensation, "Madame X. Unit 9 — Recessional. 

Leo Weber at the organ, playing "Ive Waited a 
Lifetime for You." 



Philadelphia Earle 

Week Ending Sept. 21 

Harry Rose, the "Broadway Jester," makes his 
debut as master of ceremonies at the Earle theatre 
this week and the stage presentation is entitled 
"Hello Harry." The twelve Earle Rockets sing a 
song of welcome to Harry Rose, accompanied by the 
stage band dressed as court jesters. 

Harry Rose sings "I'll Get By as Long as I Have 
You," addressing the song to the stage band. At 
the close of the song a member of the band presents 
his with a large box which he opens with great 
ceremony, only to find that it contains a bunch of 
carrots. 

A miniature piano and xylophone are wheeled on 
to the stage and two boys play a duet with bird 
trills and whistles, which goes over big. Ann Chang, 
billed as the "Chinese Star of Syncopation," a pretty 
little Oriental, with an appealing manner, sings 
several songs' and does a few dance steps. 

The Earle Rockets, in glittering costumes of sil- 
ver, next offer a clever tap dance. Anne Seaman, 
in lavender and rhinestones, is the high light of the 
program with her dancing, kicking and whirling. 
Her act is all too short. 

Billie and Elsie Newell offer some good clowning 
and singing, but there is nothing very original about 
their number. Harry Rose sings "Making Whoopee." 
His voice is good and the audience like it and want 
more. 

In the finale the Rockets in striking red costumes 
with many rhinestones are seen dancing before a 
curtain which rises showing three girl6 suspended 
in swings. The rest of the entertainers appear on 
the stage and all join in a song. 



Brooklyn Paramount 

Week Ending Sept. 20 

"A Jazz Clock Store," a Publix unit by Frank 
Cambria, featuring Paul Ash and His Merry Mad 
Gang opens to a scene with at least fifty clocks of 
various sizes and shapes, ticking and ringing as the 
Tiffany Twins offer a little pantomime just before 
Paul Ash enters. Ash introduces the girls, who 
then lead the Fred Evans Ensemble in a clever and 
well done jazz routine. Paul Kirkland carrying a 
long ladder enters and offers a dance routine while 
perched on top of the ladder. His offering of 
balancing a lighted paper cone on his nose gains 
him a good hand. The Tiffany Twins in cute green 
velvet costume present a well routined jazz tap 
dance, which incorporates many intricate steps and 
for which they receive a very fine hand. 

Ash then announces a specially arranged dance 
number called "Wedding of the Painted Dolls," which 
his orchestra play, in a most novel manner. The 
reception accorded Ash and his orchestra is a very 



fine one. The Fred and Evans ensemble, in beautiful 
costume enter stage as curtain in rear of band parts 
and discloses Bard and Avon standing in front of 
an old fashioned weather clock. Their very fine 
6inging is followed by a pleasing toe and tap routine 
by the girls. Bob LaSalle, in comedy costume enters 
and sings a special lyriced song to the tune of "Your 
the Cream in My Coffee." His special version of 
the "Wedding Bell Blues" in which he interpolates 
bits of many popular tunes earns him an encore and 
a very fine reception. Jim Reutch, a sixty-one-year- 
old youngster gains a good reception for his difficult 
eccentric dansing. 

George Dewey Washington, who has just returned 
from Europe enters to a good hand and sings "Weary 
River" in his own inimitable manner. He encores 
with Irving Berlin's latest number, "Waiting at the 
End of the Road." In this number he interpolates, 
a special arrangement of "St. Louis Blues." The 
finale is the usual beautiful picture. In this one 
Bard and Avon beautifully sing as a number of 
girls posed on a pedestal with an enormous clock. 



St. Louis Ambassador 

Week Ending Sept. 19 

Ed Lowry for two days put on a stage show in 
which he featured Art Frank, popular comedian and 
cartoonist ; Helen Lewis and her girl collegiate band, 
the Senior Quartette, Barbara Vernon, Maria Pauli 
and Lew Beck. And then the Musicians Union 
stepped in and busted up Eddie's good little collegiate 
offering. Since then sound shorts have been en- 
deavoring to fill the void created by the absence of 
Lowry. 

Chicago Paradise 

Week Ending Sept. 27 

Mark Fisher, the most popular band leader in the 
city, and his orchestra celebrated the first anniversary 
of the Paradise Theatre this week with a very elab- 
orate stage 6how. The Foster Girls, no doubt helped 
in making it elaborate. The presentation was called 
"Circus Cabaret," having no connection with the 
anniversary. 

Mark made his appearance before a drop and sang 
a little welcome song. The curtain raised and the 
Foster girls went through a very tricky dance. 

Walter and Betty Reddick opened the show with a 
variety of tricky steps. The couple were announced 
to be from "Be Your Self Show." They put all they 
had in the last number and took a fair applause. 

The orchestra followed with a collection of famous 



TED MEYN 

"the name is MINE" 

organist 
originality showmanship 
virtuoso 

serving time with 

LOEWS INC. 

presenting 

Original Creations 

featured 
at 

LOEWS MIDLAND 
THEATRE 

Kansas City 



ORGAN SLIDE SETS 



SPE 



A MUSICAL 
AER-O-LOGUE 

Entitled 

Around the World with 
the Zeppelin 

(By Billy Curtis and Ruby Zwerling) 
FEATURING 

AM I BLUE? 

A MUSICAL 
COCKTAIL 

(By Billy Curtis) 
Introducing a Medley of 
Theme Songs 

SMILING IRISH EYES 

HARD TO GET 
IF YOU WERE MINE 
WHERE 
THE BUTTERFLIES 

(Kiss the Buttercups Goodnight) 



A SONG DERBY 

BY TED KOEHLER 
FEATURING 
(You Made Me Love You) 

WHY DID YOU? 
AM I BLUE? 
LET ME HAVE MY 
DREAMS 



SMALL SETS 



SMILING IRISH EYES 
MY SONG OF THE NILE 

GYPSY CHARMER 
I LOVE YOU-I HATE YOU 

IF YOU WERE MINE 
MAYBE - WHO KNOWS 
MY MOTHER'S PHOTO- 
GRAPH 
WHERE 
THE BUTTERFLIES 

(Kiss the Buttercups Goodnight) 



mm 



MY SONG OF THE NILE 

GYPSY CHARMER 
ON WITH THE SHOW 
GOLD DIGGERS 

Artists Copies on 
All Popular Songs and Theme 

Songs for Organists 
Write for Slides and Information to 
JIMMY CLARK 

Special Service Manager 

321 West 44th Street, New York 
"VITAPHONB" REG'D TRADEMARK 



52 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



songs, the drummer standing out with his jumping 
up and down while playing all his instruments. 

Fink and Ayres, roller skaters deluxe, gave the 
patrons the thrill of their life. These fellows would 
make anyone hold their breath. They received a 
nice applause. 

Walzer and Dyer, the pair that are making a big 
hit around Chicago these days, were next. The girl 
part of the act has a peculiar laugh that gets at- 
tention. A clever line of jokes also went over. A 



THE SINGING 
MASTER OF 
CEREMONIES 



B 
E 
N 
N 
Y 




R 
0 

S 

s 



Now 

Inaugurating a New 
Stage Band Policy 

For Warner Bros, 
at the 

Earle Theatre 

Atlantic City 



Roy Sedley 

in 

Sound and Unsound 




Touring Publix in the 
"5 and 10c Follies" 

Personal Direction of Tony Shayne 



curtain speech was necessary at the afternoon per- 
formance. 

Then Mark sang "Your Mother and Mine." If this 
fellow isn't the big reason for the Paradise's popu- 
larity, then there's no stars in the sky. Mark re- 
fused to sing more than one song. The Foster girls 
concluded the show with a novelty act on "ringers." 



San Antonio Texas 

Week Ending Sept. 27 

On the stage at The Texas Theatre this week is 
presented the New York Publix stage show "Say 
It With Flowers," featuring "Vic" Insirilo, the popu- 
lar master of ceremonies and leader of the Texas 
Stage Band. This presentation goes over great, be- 
ing filled with mirth and melody and a group of 
artists that is characteristic of The Texas Stage 
Shows. 

Heading this beautiful revue is the inimitable co- 
median and singer, Billy Purl, who keeps the audi- 
ence in an uproar from start to finish, with his 
snappy songs and wise-cracks ; Mahon and Florence 
Trio present a wonderful dance number which is 
new and novel, they also come in for their share 
of applause. Maxine Hamilton, the Personality 
Singer, and The Dave Gould dancing girls complete 
a wonderful stage presentation. 



Salt Lake Orpheum 

Week Ending Sept. 19 

Ruth Mix, the winsome daughter of Tom Mix. 
western hero of motion pictures, headed her own 
vaudeville unit. The Ruth Mix Rodeo Revue, on the 
opening program of the R-K-O Orpheum's bill this 
week. The Ruth Mix revue includes a company of 
35, featuring Jed Dooley, stage and screen comic. 
Also there are the rangers, seven husky cowboy 
singers ; Toby Tobias and his orchestra ; the Gamby- 
Hale Girls, versatile dancers ; Dorothy Douglas- 
Johnny Wright and company, who introduce "Spark 
Plug" in person, and a dusky dancer called "Snow- 
ball." 

Miss Mix introduces her prize winning "high 
school" horse "Lindy," which is to her what "Tony" 
is to her popular dad. 

"Street Girl," a 100 per cent talking-musical 
Radio Picture, is the screen offering, with Betty 
Compson playing the stellar role. Highly satisfac- 
tory attendance has marked the opening week at this 
R-K-O Orpheum. 



Minneapolis Minnesota 

Week Ending October 4 

Circus Cabaret is the offering this week at the 
Minnesota theatre. It is a fine fare, with excellent 
numbers and one of the best trained and best 
matched chorus ever to appear on the stage of this 
theatre. 

To the music of "The Wedding of the Painted 



"THE PRIDE OF THE REGIMENT" 

DORIS ROCHE 

Featured in JACK PARTINGTON'S 

"OVER THE TOP" 

PUBLIX UNIT and PARAMOUNT VITA- 
PHONE SHORT FEATURE 



WEEK OF OCT. 5 — AMBASSADOR, ST. LOUIS 
WEEK OF OCT. 12 — ORIENTAL. CHICAGO 

DIRECTION — WM. MORRIS AGENCY 



Community Organ Novelties 

LEONARD M. SALVO 

Featured Organist 

GATEWAY THEATRE, KENOSHA, WISCONSIN 



Zwerling Takes 'Em for 
A Zeppelin Ride 

Ruby Zwerling, musical director at Loew's 
State, holds the distinction ef creating a mu- 
sical novelty, which need be placed first on 
the list under the caption of exceptional 
offerings. And Billy Curtis captures the prize 
for development of the great idea. Evidently 
Zwerling still believes in the old gag, that two 
heads bumped together, are better than one, 
for the result of such collaboration was "Mu- 
sical Aerologue," subtitled, "Around the World 
With the Zeppelin." The giant dirigible car- 
ried Ruby Zwerling on its recent globe 
circling trip. 

Among the many anecdotes related, not the 
least amusing was the one about the German 
quartette serenading their neighbors with "Am 
I Blue" — and if you've never heard the Ger- 
man interpretation of this hit tune, you're 
missing something. Arriving over Spain, 
wondrous country of sunshine and feminine 
pulchritude, a twist of the radio dials filled 
the cabin with strains of sweet music, com- 
ing from a cabaret where Spanish beauties 
were tripping the light fantastic to (just one 
guess — you have it!) "Am I Blue." 

On to Russia, the next point of disembar- 
kation, there Volga boatmen attempting to 
give an interpretation of this national and in- 
ternational hit. Amusing to the 'nth degree. At 
last — Los Angeles, where sirens seemed to be 
shrieking on all sides, "Am I Blue." 

Zwerling takes you for a ride in a sky-high 
slide specialty which is obtainable from the 
special service department of M. Witmark & 
Sons. Throw this on your screen and you will 
hear plenty of spontaneous laughter from your 
audience. 



Doll," the Foster girls open the presentation. As the 
curtain rises, the girls may be seen through semi- 
opaque ovals. Later they jump through these hoops 
and finish their number in front of the audience. 

Gene Sheldon, master of ceremonies, makes his ap- 
pearance and leads the Serenaders in "Tigerette." 
During the presentation of this piece, several of the 
members of the orchestra give solos. Miss Vera Van, 
billed as the Sweetheart of the Circus Cabaret, is 
on next with a number of songs, during which she 
makes goo-goo eyes at Gene Sheldon. 

Walter and Betty Reddick, soft shoe dancers, ap- 
pear next. They do not offer anything particularly 
original or novel but what they do give is well done 
and gets an enthusiastic hand. 

The Foster girls give a horse drill which is one of 
the prettiest and most original numbers offered. 
Harnessed four abreast and driven by a fifth girl, 
the first set of "horses" makes its appearance. Then 
the second group, in the same formation, enters, 
and then a third group. All the girls wear horses' 
heads from which a long mane falls, and long tights 
in brown, white or black, according to the group in 
which each is placed. After concluding the drill, 
the three sections line up and the audience is asked 
to decide by hand clapping which group deserves the 
blue ribbon. 

Fink and Ayers, roller skaters, present the most 
popular act of the show. Their acrobatic tricks and 
skillful skating sends them over big. 



MLLE. 



LA PIERRE 

FRENCH PERSONALITY GIRL 



Featured 
in 

PUBLIX 

"CREOLE 
NIGHTS" 
UNIT 



m 




\ 



Personal 
Direction 
Sam Bramson 
fm. Morris 
Agency 



Week of Oct. 4, Penn. Pittsburgh 
Week of Oct. 11, Buffalo, Buffalo 
P. S. — BE SURE TO SEE AND HEAR ME IN MY 
FIRST STARRING- ALL-SINGING PARAMOUNT 
SHORT SUBJECT OF FRENCH SONGS 



UNIFORMS 



FOR HOUSE 
ATTACHES 



COSTUMES 



FOR STAGE 
PRESENTATIONS 



BROOKS 



1437 BVaj 
N. Y. City 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



53 



UP*** DOWN 
'ALLEY Q 




Hello Everybody — Jean Herbert, the well known 
song writer, with a wide acquaintance in the music 
business, has been added to the staff of DeSylva, 
Brown and Henderson, Inc., in the capacity of spe- 
cial material writer, replacing Jack Murray, who 
resigned. Jean is a very prolific writer and the pro- 
fession can rest assured that their needs in regards 
to special choruses, patters, recitations, etc., for 
DeSylva, Brown and Henderson's songs will be 
taken care of to the beet of his ability, which is 
plenty. 

* * * 

M. Witmark and Sons have just completed a dance 
folio consisting solely of picture songs. This folio 
is the most novel and attractive idea yet issued by 
these publishers, in that opposite each number is a 
full page photograph of a leading star in that par- 
ticular picture, with a short biography of he or she. 
The list includes 12 songs of the latest releases and 
is destined to become one of the most tremendous 
dance folio sellers in the country. 

* * * 

Jack Mills, president of Mills Music, Inc., has just 
returned from a trip to Chicago and points be- 
tween, where he was very successful in promoting 
bis firm's two best sellers, "Ain't Misbehavin' " and 
"Mistakes." 

* * * 

Leo Feist, Inc., is concentrating heavily on the 
two new songs to feature the new screen produc- 
tion, "Rio Rita." The two new ones are "Sweet- 
heart, We Need Each Other" and "You're Always 
in My Arms," the original score from the stage play 
include "If You're in Love, You'll Waltz," "Follow- 
ing the Sun Around," "The Rangers Song." "The 
Kinkajoo" and "Rio Rita." 

» * * 

The Fox Movietone production, "Married in Hol- 
lywood," has the unusual distinction of being the 
first operetta to contain a music score of waltzes 
only. The waltzes are "Dance Away the Night." 
"Once Upon a Time," "A Man— a Maid," "Deep in 
Love" and "The Peasant Love Song." The score 
for this was written by Oscar Strauss, the waltz 
king, together with Dave Stamper and Harlan 
Thompson, with DeSylva, Brown and Henderson, the 
publishers. 

* * * 

Sherman, Clay Music Co., who have the musical 
score in the "Great Gabbo" picture, boast about hav- 
ing two great songs in, "I'm in Love With You" and 
"Web Of Love." The other songs, in this picture 
that look very good are "Every Now and Then," 
"New Step" and a comedy called, "I'm Laughing." 

ft ft ft 

Billy Berkes of Remick's may be a darned good 
fixer for other people, but his charm does not seem 
to work for himself. At present, and probably for 
the next week or two, Billy Berkes, the Fixer, is 
serving time as a juryman for the state of New 
York. 

* * * 

Dropped in to see Cliff Hess at Remick's the other 
day and had the pleasure of becoming acquainted 
with Julia Dawn, the Singing Organist of Shea's 
Buffalo Theatre, Buffalo, N. Y. Miss Dawn is in 
town, visiting her many friends. 

* * t 

Bernie Pollock, General Sales Manager of M. 
Witmark and Sons, announce a Banjo Folio No. 1 
which contains a list of Warner and First National 
theme songs. This folio has been especially pre- 
pared by Mr. Anthony and is the first one Of its 
kind to contain only songs from musical pictures 
and productions. There are also publishing a Saxo- 
phone folio arranged by Merle Johnson, the w. k. 
saxophonist. 

* * * 

In last week's Herald, you will notice that the 
Santly Bros, latest number, "Lonely Troubadour," 
received a mighty fine write-up in a local news- 
paper. This number has been getting some very fine 
radio plugs by many of the best artists in the busi- 
ness. 



ORGAN SOLOS 



Don Baker (Brooklyn Paramount) In the absence 
of Bob West, who is on a vacation, Baker offered a 
pleasing solo which he called "A Miniature Organ 
Recital." He opened with a popular number, "Baby, 
Where Can You Be," which he played with many 
variances. "The Charge of the Light Brigade," 
played in an impressive style closed this short but 
good solo. 



Preston Sellers (Chicago Paradise) Being the first 
anniversary of the Paradise, Sellers began his 6olo 
with a novelty number telling about the theatre and 
its doings in the past year. Then he went into a 
old time melody "You Made Me What I Am Today," 
and the response to singing was a surprise due to the 
age of the song. After this he played "Song Of 
the Nile." Then another novelty number was played. 
Following was "When Dreams Come True" and "Am 
I Blue." Sellers took three bows. The pleasing 
manner in which he plays his songs makes the pa- 
trons rather listen then sing. Good music will al- 
ways be preferred to singing. 



Bill Meeder (Richmond Hill, N. Y. R. K. O.) 
offered another of his pleasing and original organ 
solos, this week featuring "Smiling Irish Eyes," the 
theme song of the First National picture by the same 
name which this theatre has for the main attraction 
for this week. Meeder opened his solo, with a 
chorus of this number, then turned to his audience 
and orally told his audience that he would play 
many of the old time theme songs, that were played 
by organists for picture before theme 60ngs were 
known as they are to-day. The idea, conveyed was 
for the audience to sing the numbers that they re- 
called. The numbers Meeder played were, "I Love 
You Truly," "Mighty Lak' A Rose" "By Heck," a 
song in German, "Chinese Lullaby," and "Cherie." 
final chorus of "Smiling Irish Eyes" closed this 
fine solo. 



Hy C. Geis (Jersey City Stanley) offered an orig- 
inal and interesting organ solo which he called, "A 
Trip Through Wurlitzertown." This solo deviated 
greatly from Geis' usual song-fests but as it was so 
instructive, the audience enjoyed it as much as his 
song-fests. With the use of explanatory slides, Geis 
demonstrated the entire workings of an organ, play- 
ing bits to emphasize the instrument or part he was 
explaining. The only song he played was, "Am I 
Blue." This was played with orchestral effects that 
brought out all the marvelous workings of the organ. 



Leo Weber (Jersey City, Loew's, Jersey City) long 
a favorite in this city, has been chosen as feature or- 
ganist at this house. Loew's used very good judgment 
in picking Leo Weber, inasmuch as he already has 
a very large following, it can readily be seen that his 
name will draw many of them, who have never seen 
him, but who know him from his Radio concerts, 
which have been broadcast from Jersey City for the 
past two years. Leo opened his "Hello Everybody" 
solo, with a talk, over a "mie" attached to his organ. 
He suggested that he would start a school of broad- 
casting, first naming tnis school the Jersey City 
Mixed Chorus, with the idea that the audience would 
be the mixed chorus. The idea was readily agreed 
to by the audience, and when Leo played the open- 
ing song, "Heigh-Ho, Everybody, Heigh-Ho," every- 
one sang. Weber, offered an innovation here, by 
leading the audience in the singing, with his pleas- 
ing voice. Weber enacts the triple role of organist, 
chorus leader and announcer. His easy and genial 
manner of talking through the mic and his fine play- 
ing, will, undoubtedly, gain him a much larger fol- 
lowing than he already has. The next number to be 
played by Weber and sung by the audience was, "The 
Pagan Love Song.' His final number, was an old 
time favorite which everyone harmonized to, to the 
best of their abilities. This was "Sweet Adeline," 
and I am sure there was no one who failed to sing 
to this. 



Stanleigh Mallotte (Portland Publix) conceived an 
original musical tale titled "Story of Lou." Opened 
with the Prisoners Song. Lou, it seems, was in 
jail for shooting her husband. Depicted the court 
room scene in rhyme, playing "True Blue Lou," 
where she told the story of her life. Mallotte playing 
"When We Were Seventeen," another step falling in 
love, and "O Promise Me," "Precious Little Thing 
Called Love," again "True Blue Lou." 6ung by 
jury. Then he vowed "I'll Always Be in Love 
With You," but then he stepped out with other 
girls, playing "Louise," "Evangeline," "When the 
One That You Love Loves You." He comes back 
temporarily, singing "Are You Sorry," and "What 
Can I Say After I Say I'm Sorry." After short 
deliberation, jury gives verdict and Lou is Allowed 
Freedom of the Knees, making a strong ending with 
Lou "Knows Her Jury," and Mallotte received his 
usual big hand, showing he has a big following. 




BEST SELLERS 
Week Ending September 28th 

No. i 

"My Song of the Nile" — (M. Witmark 
& Sons). 
"Am I Blue"—(M. Witmark & Sons). 
No. 2 

"Pagan Love Song" — (Robbins Music 
Corp.). 

No. 3 

"When My Dreams Come True" — 
(Irving Berlin). 

No. 4 

"I'm Just a Vagabond Lover" — (Leo 
Feist). 

"Little Pal" — (De Sylva, Brown & 
Henderson). 

No. 5 

"Miss You" — (Stanly Bros.). 
"Sleepv Valley" — (Harms, Inc.). 
No. 6 

"True Blue Lou" — (Spier & Coslow). 

"Singing in the Rain" — (Robbins 
Music Corp.). 

"Wedding of the Painted Dolls" — 
(Sherman Clay). 

No. 7 

"Love Me" — (Leo Feist). 
"Baby, Where Can You Be" — (Ber- 
lin). 

"Where the Sweet Forget Me Nots" 
■ — (Remick Music Corp.). 

"Breakaway" — (De Sylva, Brown & 
Henderson). 

"I'll Always Be in Love With You" 
— (Shapiro Bernstein). 

"Smiling Irish Eyes" — (M. Witmark 
& Sons). 

"That's You. Baby"—(De Sylva, 
Brown & Henderson). 

No. 8 

"If You Believed in Me" — (De Sylva, 
Brown & Henderson). 

"Old Virginia Moon" — (Milton Weil). 

* * • 

"BELIEVE IT OR NOT" — (Irving Berlin, Inc.)— 

A song adapted from the Ripley cartoon that is quite 
a rage in the papers. The song is written pretty, 
which in itself makes it different as usually cartoon 
songs are written as a comedy song. Is getting 
quite a radio plug and should sell. Written by Joe 
McCarthy and Jimmie Monaco. 

* * * 

"SONG OF THE SANDS"— (Al Piantadosi)— This 

love scene is set on the deserts and is an Oriental 
number that is very pretty. Also has an appropriate 
melody. By Pat Ballard and Tom Waring. 

* » * 

"PICCOLO PETE"— (J. W. Jenkins Sons Music 
Co.) — A hot tune that should be a big orchestra 
number. Also should be a cinch for mechanicals. 
By Phil Baxter. 

* * v 

"I'M ONLY MAKING BELIEVE" — (Davis-Coots & 
Engel, Inc.) — A pretty thought about the love sick 
lover who is as the saying goes "acting." The writ- 
ers, well known, have just formed their own publish- 
ing company and this is one of their first efforts. 
By Benny Davis and J. Fred Coots. 

* * * 

"WHERE THE BUTTERFLES KISS THE BUT- 
TERCUPS GOODNIGHT"— (M. Witmark & Sons) — 
I have never been there but this song gives you the 
directions, so you can't go wrong. It's cute and looks 
like it has a good chance to make money. Lyrics by 
Harry Pease and Charles O'Flynn, music by Ed G. 
Nelson. 

ft * * 

CANT YOU UNDERSTAND — (Donaldson, Doaglas 
& Gumble) — An excellent fox trot ballad having as 
its melody writer one of the best air plugs in Chi- 
cago. Looks like a big number. By Jack Osterman 
and Victor Young. 



54 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



w 



QUICK REFERENCE PICTURE CHART 



Amkino 



FLAMES ON THE VOLGA, or Bulat Batyr: Anna Wozjik. 

Yaroslavteev. (L) 7000f. (R) Mar. 30, 1929. 
KATORGA (D): A. Zhilinsky. V. Taskin. V. Popov. (E) 

June 1. (L) 7500f. 
KRASSIN: Special cast. (L) 7000f. (E) Feb. 19, 1929. 
LASH OF THE CZAR, THE: Kachalov. Meyerhold. Stenn. 

(L) 6800f. (E) Feb. 9, 1929. 
MOSCOW TODAY (D) : Special cast. (E) April 11. (L) 

5000f. 

NEW BABYLON (D) : Sophia Magarill. Sergei Gerasimow. 
Peter Sobolewski, Elena Kusmina. (E) June 29. (L) 
8000f. 

PRISONERS OF THE SEA : 0. Knipper. Tschechowa. N. 

Kutusow. (E) Apr. 13, 1929. 
SHANGHAI DOCUMENT, A (Travelogue): Special cast. 

(L) 5000C (E) Oct. 13. 1928. 
TEN DAYS THAT SHOOK THE WORLD: Special cast. 

(L) 7600f. (E) Oct. 13. 1928. 
THREE COMRADES AND ONE INVENTION: Olga Tratla- 

kova. (L) 6000f. (E) Oct. 13, 1928. 
TWO DAYS: F. E. Samytschkowsky. (L) 6500f. (E) Feb. 

1, 1929. 

YELLOW PASS, THE: Anna Stenn. (L) 6600f. (B) Dec. 
8. 1928. 



Artclass 



UNMASKED (D-AT) : Eobert Warwick, Sam Ash. Milton 
Krims, Lyons Wickland, Susan Corroy, William Corbett. 
Charles Slattery. Kate Eoemer. Waldo Edwards, Boy Byron, 
Clyde Dillson, Helen Mitchell. Marie Burke. (L) Tatt- 
ing. 544Sf . 



Chesterfield 



ADORABLE CHEAT (D) : Lila Lee. Cornelius Keefe. Burr 
Mcintosh, Beginald Sheffield. Gladden James. Harry Allen. 
Alice Knowland. Virginia Lee. (L) 5400f. (E) Aug. 15. 

1928. (NP) June 9, 1928. 

BELOW THE DEADLINE (D-Underworld) : Barbara Worth. 
Frank Leigh. J. P. MacGowan. Walter Merrill. Arthur 
Eankin. Virginia Sale. "Tiny" Ward. Lou Gory, Fred 
Walton. Bill Patton. Charles Hickman. Mute Donlin. (L) 
5500f. <B) May 1, 1929. (NP) May 25. 

CAMPUS KNIGHTS (CD): Baymond McKee, Shirley Palm- 
er. Marie Quillen. Jean Laverty. (E) June 15, 1929. 

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE: Helen Foster. Cornelius 
Keefe. Alice Lake, Charles Gerrard, Bay Hallor. (L) 
6200f. (E) Jan. 15, 1929. (NP) Mar. 23, 1929. 

HOUSE OF SHAME (D) : Creighton Hale. Virginia Brown 
Faire. Lloyd Whitlock. Florence Dudley, Fred Walton. 
Carlton King. (L) 5300f. (E) Sept. 15. 1928. (NP) 
Oct. 13. 1928. 

HOUSE OF SECRETS (AT-D): Marcia Manning. Joseph 

Striker, Elmer Grandin, Herbert Warren, Francis M. Verdi. 

Eichard Stevenson, Harry H. Southard. Edward Bingham. 

(L) 6.100. Sound only. 
JUST OFF BROADWAY (M) : Donald Keith. Ann Christy. 

Larry Steers. DeSacia Mooers, Jack Tanner, Syd Saylor. 

Beryl Eoberts. Albert Dresden. (L) 6200f. (E) Feb. 15. 

1929. (NP) Mar. 2. 1929. 

PEACOCK FAN, THE (M) : Lucien Preval. Dorothy Dwan. 
Tom O'Brien, Eosemary Theby, Carlton King, Gladden 
James, David Findlay, James Wilcox. Fred Malatesta. Alice 
True, Spencer Bell, John Fowler. (L) 5300f. (K) Mar. 
16. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 

SOUTH OF PANAMA (D) : Carmelita Geraghty, Lewis Sar- 
gent. Philo McCullough. Edouardo Raquello. Marie Mes- 
singer. Carlton King. Harry Arras. Joe Burke, Fred Wal- 
ton. (L) 5800f. (E) Nov. 15. 1928. 



Columbia 



ACQUITTED: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

APACHE, THE (D) : Margaret Livingston. Warner Rich- 
mond, Dan Alvardo. Phil McCullough. (L) 5818f. (E) 
Nov. 19, 1928. (NP) Mar. 2. 1928. 

BACHELOR GIRL, THE (D-TME) : William Collier, Jr., 
Jacqueline Logan. Edward Hearn. Thelma Todd. (E) May 
3, 1929. (NP) June 22. (L) Talking. 5967f; silent. 6245f. 

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS (My): Virginia Valli. Gaston 
Glass, Otto Matiesen, Andre De Segurola, Fanny Midgley. 
Torben Meyer. Broderick O'Farrell, Otto Hoffman. (L) 
5897f. (E) Feb. 24. 1929. (NP) June 15. 1929. 

BROADWAY HOOFER, A: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

COLLEGE COQUETTE (CD-AT) : Euth Taylor. John Hol- 
land. William Collier. Jr.. Jobyna Ealston, Edward Piel, 
Jr. (L) Talking. 6149f; silent, 5566f. Eecording on film 
and disc. (E) Aug. 5. 1929. 

DONOVAN AFFAIR, THE (D-AT): Jack Holt. Agnes Ayres. 
Dorothy Eevier, William Collier. Jr.. John Eoche, Fred 
Kelsey. Hank Mann, Wheeler Oakman. Virginia Brown 
Faire. Alphonse Ethier. Edward Hearn. Ethel Wales. John 
Wallace. (L) Talking. 7140f; silent, 7189f. (E) Apr. 11. 
1929. (NP) May 18. 

DRIFTWOOD (D): Don Alvarado. Marceline Day. Alan 
Eoscoe. J. W. Johnson, Fred Holmes. Fritzi Brunette. 
Nora Cecil. Joe Mack. (L) 6267C (E) Oct. 15, 1928. 
(NP) Nov. 17, 1928. 

ETERNAL WOMAN, THE (D): Olive Borden, Balph 
Graves. Euth Clifford. John Miljan, Nena Quartaro. Josepn 
Swickard, Julia Swayne Gordon. (L) 5812C (E) Mar. 18. 
1929. (NP) Apr. G. 1929. 

FAKER, THE (D): Jacqueline Logan, Charles Delaney, 
Warner Oland, Charles Hill Mailes. Gaston Glass, Flora 
Finch. David Mir, Lon Poff. Fred Kelsey. (L) 5651f. 
(E) Jan. 2, 1929. (NP) Feb. 9, 1929. 

FALL OF EVE, THE (CD-AT): Patsy Euth Miller, Ford 
Sterling, Jed Prouty, Gertrude Astor. Arthur Eankin, Betty 
Farrington. Fred Kelsey. (L) Sound. 6245f. (R) June. 
1929. (NP) July 20. 

FATHER AND SON (D-AT): Jack Holt. Dorothy Revier. 
Helene Chadwick, Mickey McBan, Wheeler Oakman. (L) 
Talking. 6765f; silent. 6310f. (R) Apr. 22, 1929. (NP) 
May 18, 1929. 

FLYING MARINE, THE (D-TME) : Ben Lyon. Shirley 
Mason. Jason Robards. ' (NP) June 29. (L) Talking. 5951f; 
silent. 5736f. 

GREEN EYES: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

GREENWICH VILLAGE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 



Key to 
Abbreviations 



C Comedy F — Farce 

D— Drama M— Melodrama 

R Romance W— — Western 

MC Musical Comedy O — Operetta 

My Mystery 

SOUND 

AT— All Talking T— Talking Sequences 

M Musical Score E— Sound Effects 

S— Singing 

Tha foregoing abbreviations follow immediate- 
ly after the title. As an example, CD-TME 
signifies *Vomedy-drama with talking sequences, 
musical score and sound effects/' 

OTHER ABBREVIATIONS 



PASSION SONG, THE: Noah Beerv and Olmstead. (L) 

5100f. (R) Oct. 20. 1928. 
PENNY PRINCESS: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
ROSES OF PICARDY: (R) Apr. 15. 1929. 
WRECKERS, THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 



L^— Length 

NP New Pictures 



R Release 

TOS T. O. Service 



HURRICANE (AT-D): Hobart Bosworth. Johnny Macs 
Brown. Lelia Hyams. Allan Eoscoe. Tom O'Brien. Leila 
Mclntyre. Joe Bordeaux and Eddie Chandler. (NP) Sept. 
21. Forthcoming 1929 release. 

LIGHT FINGERS (D-AT): Ian Keith. Dorothy Eevier. Car- 
roll Nye. Balph Theodore. Tom Bickets. (L) Talking. 5700f. 
(E) July 29. 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. (L) Silent 5578f. 
Sound 6700f. 

LONE WOLF'S DAUGHTER (TME): Lvtell and Olmstead. 

(L) 6214f (It) Jan. 13. 1929 
LOVE CAPTIVE. THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
NOTHING TO WEAR (CD): Jacqueline Logan. Theodore 

Von Eltz, Bryant Washburn. Jane Wlnton, Willliam Irving. 

Edythe Flynn. (L) 5701f. (E) Nov. 5 1928. (NP) 

Mar. 9. 1929. 

OBJECT ALIMONY (D) : Lois Wilson. Ethel Grey Terry. 

Douglas Gilmore. Eoscoe Karns, Carmelita Geraghty, Dickey 

Moore. Jane Keckley, Thomas Curran. (L) 6266f. (R) 

Dec. 22. 1928. (NP) Jan. 12. 1929. 
POWER OF THE PRESS. THE (D) : Douglas Fairbanks. 

Jr., Jobyna Ealston. Mildred Harris. Philo McCullough, 

Wheeler Oakman. Eobert Edeson. Edward Davis. Del 

Henderson. Charles Clary. (L) 6465f. (E) Oct. 31. 

1928. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 
QUITTER, THE (D): Ben Lyon, Dorothy Revier. Fred 

Kohler. Charles McHugh. Sherrv Hall. Jane Daly. Henry 

Otto. Claire McDowell. (L) 5671C (E) Apr. 1. 1929. 

(NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 
REDEMPTION: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
RESTLESS YOUTH (D) : Marceline Day. Ealph Forbes, 

Norman Trevor, Eobert Ellis, Mary Mabery. Gordon Elliott. 

Coy Watson. (L) 6085C (E) Nov. 30. 1928. (NP) 

Dec. 22. 1928. 

SIDESHOW. THE (D): Marie Prevost. Ralph Graves. "Lit- 
tle Billy." Alan Eoscoe. Pat Harmon. Texas Madesen. 
Martha McGruger, Esteban Clemento, Janet Ford. Paul 
Dismute, Bert Price. Chester Morton, Jacques Bay. (L) 
5999f. (E) Dec. 11, 1928. (NP) Feb. 16, 1929. 

SINNERS PARADE (M) : Victor Varconi, Dorothy Eevier. 
John Patrick. Edna Marion. Marjorie Bonner, Clarissa 
Selwynne, Jack Mower. (L) 5616f. (R) Sept. 14. 1928. 
(NP) Oct. 20. 1928. 

STOOL PIGEON (M): Olive Borden. Charles Delaney. Lucy 
Beaumont. Louis Natheaux, Ernie Adams. Al Hill, Robert 
Wilber, Clarence Burton. (L) 5792C (R) Oct. 25, 1928. 
(NP) Nov. 17. 1928. 

STREET OF ILLUSION (D) : Virginia Valli. Ian Keith, 
Harry Myers, Kenneth Thomson. (L) 5988f. (R) Sept. 
3. 1928. (NP) Mar. 2. 1929. 

SUBMARINE (D-ME) : Jack Holt, Dorothy Eevier. Ealph 
Graves. Clarence Burton. Arthur Eankin. (L) Synchro- 
nized, 8374f; silent. 8192f. (E) Nov. 12. 1928. (NP) 
Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) Dec. 1, 1928. 

TRIAL MARRIAGE (D-ME): Norman Kerry. Sally Eilers. 
Jason Eobards, Thelma Todd, Charles Clary, Naomi Child- 
ers. Eosemary Theby, Gertrude Short. (L) Talking. 6639f: 
silent. 6506C (R) Mar. 10. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 
(TOS) Apr. 20, 1929. 

WICKED ANGEL. THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

YOUNGER GENERATION, THE (D-TM) : Jean Hersholt. 
Lina Basquette. Rosa Rosanova. Eicardo Cortez. Eex Lease. 
Martha Franklin. Julanne Johnston. Jack Baymond. Sydney 
Crossley. Otto Fries. Julia Swayne Gordon, Donald Hall, 
Bernard Siegel. (L) Synchronized. 7866f; silent, 7246f. 
(E) Jan. 24. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 
13. 1929. 

Excellent 

BROKEN BARRIERS: Helene Costello. (L) 5974f. (E) 
Dec. 1, 1928. 

CLEANUP, THE: Delaney and Blake. (L) 56G0f. (R) 

Jan 25 1929 

CONFESSIONS OF A WIFE: Helene Chadwick. (L) 6047f. 

(E) Dec. 10. 1928. 
DREAM MELODY: Eiche and Thelby. (L) 5050f. (E) 

Jan. 20, 1929. 
DAVID VALLORY: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
FANNY HAWTHORNE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
LIFE'S CROSSROADS: Hulette and Hamilton. (L) 5355f. 
HEARTS AND MODELS: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

(R) Oct. 20. 1928. 
MASQUERADE MARRIAGE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
MELLOWING MONEY: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
ONE SPLENDID HOUR: Viola Dana. George Periolot. Allen 
ORCHID WOMAN. THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

Simpson, Lewis Sargent. Jack Eichardson, Lucy Beaumont, 

Florence Cooper. Ernie Adams, Hugh Saxon. Charles 

Hichman. (L) (1129f. (B) May 1. 1929. 



First Division 



LINDA (ME-D): Warner Baxter, Helen Foster, Noali 
Beery, Mitchell Lewis. (L) 6775f. 



First National 



BARKER, THE (D-TME): Milton Sills, Douglas Fairbanks. 
Jr., George Cooper, John Erwin. S. S. Simon, Dorothy 
Mackaill, Betty Compson. Sylvia Ashton. (L) 7137f. (R) 
Dec. 30. 1928. (NP) July 14, 1928. (TOS) Dec. 15. 

1928. 

BROADWAY BABIES (M-TME) : Alice White. Charles 
Delaney, Fred Kohler, Tom Dugan, Bodil Rosing. Sail? 
Eilers, Marion Byron, Jocelyn Lee. Louis Natheaux, Maurice 
Black. (L) 8067f. (R) June 30, 1929. (NP) June 22. 

BUTTER AND EGG MAN. THE (CD): Jack Mulhall. Gret» 
Nissen. Sam Hardy. William Demarest. Gertrude Astor. 
(L) 6457f. (E) Sept. 2. 1928. (NP) June 30. 1928. 
(TOS) July 28. 1928. 

CALIFORNIA MAIL (W) : Ken Maynard. Dorothy Dwan. 
Lafe McKee, Paul Hurst, C. E. Anderson. Fred Burns. 
(L) 5446f. (E) Apr. 7, 1929. (NP) Apr. 20. 1929. 

CAREERS (D-AT): Billie Dove, Antonio Moreno. Thelma 
Todd, Noah Beery, Holmes Herbert. Carmel Myers, Eobert 
Frazer. Sojin. (L) 8435f. (E) June 2. 1929. (NP) June 
22. (TOS) June 29. 

CARELESS AGE, THE (CD): Douglas Fairbanks. Jr.. Lor- 
etta Young. Carmel Myers, Holmes Herbert, Kenneth Thom- 
son, George Baxter, Wilfred Noy. Doris Lloyd, Ilka Chase. 
Eaymond Lawrence. (NP) Aug. 17. 

CHEYENNE (W): Ken Maynard, Gladys McConnell. James 
Bradbury, Jr., Tarzan. William Franey. Charles Whittaker. 
(E) Feb. 3. (L) 5.944f. 

CHILDREN OF THE RITZ (ME-CD) : Dorothy MackaUI. 
Jack Mulhall, James Ford, Eddie Burns, l,ee Moran, 
Kathryn McGuire. Evelyn Hall. Dorris Dawson, Aggie Her- 
ring. Frank Crane. (E) Mar. 3. (I,) Sound. C565f. 
Silent. 6287f. (TOS) Mar. 2. 

COMPANIONATE MARRIAGE (D) : Betty Bronson. Alec B. 
Francis. William J. Welsh. Edward Martindel, Sarah Pad- 
den. Hedda Hopper. Eichard Walling. Arthur Rankin, J una 
Nash. (L) 6227f. <B) Oct. 21. 1928. (NP) Mar. 16. 
1929. 

CRASH, THE (D-M) : Milton Sills, Thelma Todd. Wade 
Boteler. William Demarest, Fred Warren. Sylvia Ashton. 
DeWitt Jennings. (L) 6225f. (E) Oct. 7. 1928. (NP) 
Sept. 20, 1928. (TOS) Nov. 24. 1928. 

DANCING VIENNA (D) : Lya Mara, Ben Lyon. -Herman 
Picha, Kurt Garron. Olga Engl. George Burghardt. Gusla» 
Charle. Julius Falkenstein. Arnold Korlf. Eugene Bum. 
Albert Paulig. (R) Jan. 1. (L) 5.683f. 

DARK STREETS (D-AT): Jack Mulhall. Lila Lee. Aggie 
Herring. Earl Pingree. Will Walling. E. H. Calvert. Maurice 
Black. (NP) Aug. 10. 

DIVINE LADY. THE (D-TME) : Corinne Griffith. Victor 
Varconi. H. B. Warner, Ian Keith. Marie Dressier. Doro- 
thy Cummings. William Conklin. Montague I^ove, Julia 
Swayne Gordon, Michael Vavitch. (L) 9035f. (R) Mar. 
31. 1929. (NP) Apr. 6. 1929. (TOS) May 11. 1929. 

DO YOUR DUTY (CD): Charlie Murray. Lucien Llttlefleld. 
Dons Dawson. Charles Delanev, Ed Brady. Washington 
Blue, Aggie Herring, George Pierce. (L) G027f. (It) Oct. 
14. 1928. (NP) Oct. 13. 1928. 

DRAG (D-TME) : Richard Barthelmess, Lucien Llttlefleld. 
Kathenne Ward, Alice Day, Tom Dugan. Lila Lee, Mar- 
garet Fielding. (L) 7642f. (R) July 21, 1929. (NP) 
July 13. (TOS) August 10. 

FAST LIFE (D-AT): Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.. Loretta Young. 
Chester Morris, William Holden, Frank Sheridan Kay 
Hallon, John St. Polis. (L) Talking. 7541f. <R) Sept. 28, 
1929. (NP) Aug. 31. 

GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE. THE (D-TME): I.oretU 
Young, Carroll Nye. Matthew Betz. Lucien Llttlefleld. Balph 
Lewis. George Stone. Julia Swayne Gordon. Majel Coleman, 
Charles Sellon, Eobert Haines. (E) June 22 1929. (NP) 
June 15. (L) Talking. 7159f; silent, 6705f. 

GLORIOUS TRAIL, THE (W) : Ken Maynard, Gladys Mc- 
Connell, Frank Hagney. Les Bates, James Bradbury, Jr.. 
Billy Franey, Chief Yowlache. (L) 5886f. (E) Oct. 28. 
1928. (NP) Sept. 29. 1928. 

GREAT DIVIDE (AT-MD) : Dorothy Mackaill, Ian Keith, 
Lucien Littlefleld, Ben Hendricks. Myrna I.oy, Frank 
Tang. Creighton Hale. George Fawcett, Jean J,averty. 
Claude Gillingwater. Eov Stewart, James Ford, Jean Lor- 
raine and Gordon Elliott. (NP) Sept. 21. 

HARD TO GET (CD-AT): Dorothy Mackaill. Jimmie Fln- 
layson, Louise Fazenda, Jack Oakie, Edmund Bums 
Clarissa Selwvnne. Charles Delanev. (NP) Aug. 10. (TOS) 
Sept. 28. 

HAUNTED HOUSE. THE (MT-ME) : Chester Conklin, Larry 
Kent, Thelma Todd, Montague Love, Flora Finch. William 
V. Mong. Barbara Bedford. Eve Southern, Edmund Breese. 
(L) 5755. (R) Nov. 4. 1928. (NP) Oct. 27. 1928. 

HER PRIVATE LIFE (T-D) : Billie Dove. Walter Pidgeon. 
Holmes Herbert. Montagu Love, Roland Young. Thelma 
Todd, Marv Forbes, Brandon Hurst and Zasu Pitts. (NP) 
Sept. 21. 

HIS CAPTIVE WOMAN (D-TME): Milton Sills. Dorothy 
Mackaill, Gladden James. Jed Prouty. Sidney Bracey. 
Gertrude Howard. Marion Byron. George Fawcett. William 
Holden, Frank Reicher, August Tollaire. (L) 8305f. (R) 
Apr. 7, 1929. (NP) Mar. 2, 1929. 

HOT STUFF (CD-TME): Alice White, Louise Fazenda. 
William Bakewell. Doris Dawson. Ben Hall. Charles Sel- 
lon, Beddy Messinger. Andy Devine. Larry Banthim. (L) 
6774f. (R) May 5, 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 

HOUSE OF HORROR (MyC-ME) : Louise Fazenda. Chester 
Conklin, James Ford, Thelma Todd, William V. Mong. 
Emile Chautard. William Orlamond. Dale Fuller. Tenan 
Holtz. (L) 5919f. (R) Apr. 28. 1929. (NP) Apr. 13, 
1929. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



55 



ISLE OF LOST SHIPS. THE (D) : Jason Kobards. Vir- 
ginia Valli, Clarissa Selwynne. Noah ' Beery, Robert 
O'Connor. Harry Cording. Margaret Fielding. Katherine 
Ward. Robert Homans, Jack Ackroyd and Sam Baker. 
(P) Sept. 21. 

LAWLESS LEGION, THE (W) : Ken Maynard, Nora Lane. 
Paul Hurst. J. P. McGowan, Frank Rice, Howard Trues- 
dell, Tarzan. (R) Mar. 3, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 

LILAC TIME (D-ME): Colleen Moore, Gary Cooper. Eu- 
genie Besserer, Burr Mcintosh, Kathryn McGuire, Cleve 
Moore. Jack Stone. Emile Chautard. Arthur Lake. (L) 
8967f. (R) Nov. 18, 1928. (NP) June 2, 1928. (TOS) 
Aug. 18, 192S. 

LOVE AND THE DEVIL (D-ME): Milton Sills. Maria 
Corda, Ben Bard, Nellie Bly Baker. Amber Norman. (L) 
6431f. (R) Mar. 24. 1929. (NP) June 29. 

MAN AND THE MOMENT, THE (D-TME) : BUlie Dove. 
Rod LaRocque, Gwen Lee. Robert Schable. Charles Sellon. 
George Bunny. (L) Talking. 708(if; silent 6539f. (R) June 
23, 1929. (NP) Mar. 23, 1929. (TOS) August 3. 

MOST IMMORAL LADY, A (D-TS): Leatrice Joy. Walter 
Pidgeon, Sidney Blackmer, Montague Love. Josephine 
Dunn. Robert Edeson, Donald Reed. Florence Oakley, Wil- 
son Benge. (NP) September 28. 

NAUGHTY BABY (CD-ME): Alice White Jack Mulhall, 
Thelma Todd, Doris Dawson, James Ford, Natalie Joyce, 
Frances Hamilton. Fred Kelsey, Rose Dione, Fanny Midgely, 
Benny Rubin, Andy Devine. George Stone, Raymond Tur- 
ner. Larry Banthim. (L) 6406f. (R) Dec. 16. 1928. 
(NP) Dec. 8. 1928. (TOS) Feb. 9, 1929. 

NIGHT WATCH, THE (D-ME): Billie Dove. Paul Lukas, 
Donald Reed, Nicholas Sousanin, Nicholas Bela. George 
Periolat, William Tooker. Gus Partos. (L) 6C12f. (B) 
Sept. 9. 1928. (NP) Oct. 13. 1928. 

OUTCAST (D-ME): Corinne Griffith. James Ford, Edmund 
Lowe. Huntly Gordon. Kathryn Carver, Louise Fazenda, 
Sam Hardy. Patsy O'Byrne. Lee Moran. (L) 6622f. (R) 
Nov. 11. 1928. (NP) Oct. 27. 1928. (TOS) Dec. 1. 1928. 

PRISONERS (D-TME): Corinne Griffith, James Ford, Bela 
Lugosi, Jan Keith, Julanne Johnston. Ann Schaeffer, Baron 
Hesse, Otto Matieson. Harry Northrup. (L) 7800f. (K) 
May 19. 1929. (NP) July 20. 

ROYAL RIDER. THE (W) : Ken Maynard. (L) 5957f. (R) 
May 5. 1929. 

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN (D-TME): Corinne Griffith. 
Grant Withers. Albert Conti, Alma Tell. Lucien Littlefleld. 
Charles Lane, Ann Schaeffer, Marcia Harris. (L) 7950f. 
(R) Apr. 14. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) May 25. 

SCARLET SEAS (D-ME): Richard Barthelmess. Betty 
Compson. Loretta Young, James Bradbury, Sr., Jack Cur- 
tis, Knute Erickson. (L) 6237f. (R) Dee. 9. 1928. (NP) 
Dec. 1, 1928. (TOS) Feb. 2. 1929. 

SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN (MY-ME) : Creighton 
Hale, Thelma McNeill, Thelma Todd. Sheldon Lewis. Wil- 
liam V. Mong, Sojin, Laska Winters, Ivan Christy, De- 
Witt Jennings. Nora Cecil, Kala Pasha, Harry Fitzgerald, 
Alonzo Rositto, Harry Tenbiooke. (L) 5405f. (R) Feb. 
17. 1929. (NP) March 9, 1929. 

SHOW GIRL (CD-ME): Alice White, Donald Reed. Lee 
Moran. Charles Delaney. Richard Tucker, Gwen Lee, 
Jimmie Finlayson. Kate Price. High Roman, Bernard Ran- 
dall. (L) (il33f. (It) Sept. 23. 1928. (NP) Sept.. 15. 
1928. (TOS) Dec. 15. 1928. 

SMILING IRISH EYES (D-TS): Colleen Moore. James Hall. 
Claude Gillingwater. Robert Homans. Aggie Herring. Betty 
Francisco, Julanne Johnston, Robert O'Connor, John Beck, 
Edward Earl, Tom O'Brien. Oscar Apfel. Fred Kelsey. Otto 
Lederer. (L) 8550f. (R) July 31. 1929. (TOS) Sept. 
7. (NP) July 27. 

SQUALL, THE (D AT): Myrna Loy, Alice Joyce, Richard 
Tucker. Carroll Nye. Loretta Young. (L) 9629f. (R) 
May 2G. 1929. (TOS) June 29. 

SYNTHETIC SIN (D-ME): Colleen Moore. Antonio Moreno. 
Kathryn McGuire. Edythe Chapman, Montague Love, Ger- 
trude Astor, Gertrude Howard, Ben Hendricks, Jr., Ray- 
mond Tucker. (L) 6852f. (R) Jan. 6. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 2 1929. 

TWIN BEDS (C-AT): Jack Mulhall, Patsy Ruth Miller. 
Armond Kaliz. Gertrude Astor, Knute Erickson, Edythe 
Chapman, Jocelyn Lee, Nita Martan, ZaSu Pitts, Eddie 
Gribbon, Ben Hendricks, Jr., Carl Levinnes. Alice Lake. 
Bert Roach. (R) July 14. 1929. (NP) July 20. (L) 
Talking, 72G6f. 

TWO WEEKS OFF (CD-TME) : Dorothy Macltaill, Jack Mul- 
hall. Gertrude Astor. Jimmy Finlayson. Kate Price. Jed 
Prouty. Eddie Gribbon, Dixie Gay. Gertrude Messinger. 
(L) 8017f. (R) May 12. 1929. (NP) May 11. 1929. (TOS) 
June 8. 

WARE CASE. THE (MD) : Stewart Rome. Betty Rome. Ian 
Fleming. Wellington Briggs, Cynthia Murtagh, Patrick 
Stewart, Cameron Carr. Syd Ellery, Patrick Ludlow. (L) 
6185f. (It) Nov. 25, 1928. (NP) Mar. 3. 1929. 

WATERFRONT (CD-ME): Dorothy Mackaill. Jack Mulhall. 
James Bradbury, Jr., Knute Erickson, Ben Hendricks, Jr., 
William Norton Bailey, Pat Harmon. (L) 6142f. (R) 
Sept. 16. 1928. (NP) Sept. 22. 1928. (TOS) Oct. 6. 
1928. 

WEARY RIVER (MD-TME) : Richard Barthelmess, Betty 
Compson. George Stone, William Holden, Louis Natheaux, 
Raymond Turner. Robert O'Connor. (L) 7976f. (R) Feb. 
10, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) May 18. 

WHIP, THE (D-ME): Dorothy Mackaill. Ralph Forbes. 
Anna Q. Nilsson, Lowell Sherman, Albert Gran, Marc 
McDermott. Lou Payne. Arthur Clayton. (L) 6058f. (R) 
Sept. 30, 1928. (NP) JJuly 14. 1928. 

WHY BE GOOD (CD-ME): Colleen Moore. Neil Hamilton. 
Bodil Rosing, John Sainpolis. Edward Martindel, Eddie 
Clayton. Lincoln Stedman, Louis Natheaux. Collette Merton, 
Dixie Gay. (L) 7507f. (R) Mar. 17, 1929. (NP) Mar. 
9. 1929. (TOS) Mar. 30. 1929. 

Fox 

AIR CIRCUS, THE (MD-TME) : David Rollins. Arthur 
Lake, Sue Carol, Charles Delaney, Heinle Conklin, Louise 
Dresser. Earl Robinson. (L) 7702f. (R) Sept. 30, 1928. 
(NP) Oct. 20. 1928. (TOS) Jan. 5. 1929. 

BEHIND THAT CURTAIN (My-AT) : Warner Baxter. Lois 
Moran. Gilbert. Emery, Claude King, Philip Strange. Boris 
Karloff. Jamiel Hassen. Peter Gawthorne, John Rogers. 
Montague Shaw. Finch Smiles, Mercedes De Valasco. E. L. 
Park. (L) 8300f. (R) June 30, 1929. (TOS) Aug. 31. 
(NP) July 6. 

BLACK MAGIC (D-ME): Josephine Dunn. Earle Foxe, John 
Holland, Henry B. Walthall, Dorothy Jordon, Fritz Feld. 
Sheldon Lewis, Ivan Lindow, Blue Washington. (L) 5835f. 
Silent, 5855f. (R) June 2. 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. 

BLACK WATCH, THE (R-AT) : Victor McLaglen. Myrna 
Loy. David Torrence, David Percy, Joseph Diskay. Joyzelle, 
David Rollins. Lumsden Hare, Roy D'Arcy, Mitchell Lewis. 
Cyril Chadwick, Francis Ford. Walter Long. Frederick 
Sullivan. Richard Travers. Pat Somerset, Claude King. 
(L) 8487f. (R) May 26. 1929. (NP) June 15. (TOS) 
July 6. 

BLINDFOLD (D-M) : Lois Moran. George O'Brien. Earl 
Foxe, Don Terry, Maria Alba, Fritz Feld. Andy Clyde, 
Craufurd Kent. Robert E. Homans, John Kelly, Philips 
Smalley. (L) 5598f. (It) Dec. 9, 1928. (NP) Dec. 8. 
1928 

BLUE SKIES (CD-M): Helen Twelvetrees. Frank Albertson. 
Rosa Gore. William Orlamond. Claude King, Carmencita 
Johnson, Freddie Frederick. Ethel Wales. Adele Watson. 
Jerome Eddy. L) Silent. 5367f. ; sound. 5408f. (R) Mar. 
7. 1929. (NP) Apr. 6, 1929. 



CAPTAIN LASH (D-M): Victor McLaglen, Claire Windsor, 

Arthur Stone, Albert Conti, Clyde Cook, Jean Laverty, 

Frank Hagney, Boris Charsky, Jane Winton. (L) 6153f 

(R) Jan. 6. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 
CHASING THROUGH EUROPE (D-TME): Sue Carol, Nick 

Stuart, Gustav von Seyffertitz, Gavin Gordon. E. Alyn 

Warren. (L) Silent. 5622f. ; sound. 5581f. (R) June 9. 

1929. (NP) Aug. 10. 
CHRISTINA (D): Janet Gaynor. Charles Morton. Rudolph 

Schildkraut, Lucy Dorraine. Harry Cording (L) C955f 

(R) Mar. 30. 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. 
COCK-EYED WORLD, THE (D-AT) : Lily Damita, Victor 

McLaglen. Edmund Lowe. Lelia Karnelly. Bobby Burns. 

Jean Bary. Joe Brown. (L) lO.Gllf. (NP) Sept. 7. 
DRY MARTINI (D-M): Mary Astor. Matt Moore. Jocelyn 

Lee. Sally Eilers, Albert Gran. Albert Conti, Tom Rickets. 

Hugh Trevor, John T. Dillon. Marcelle Corday. (L) 7176f 

(R) Oct. 7. 1928. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Dec. 1, 

EXALTED FLAPPER. THE (CD-ME) : Sue Carol. Barry 
Norton. Irene Rich, Albert Conti, Sylvia Field. Stuart 
Irwin, Lawrence Grant. Charles Clary, Michael VisarotT. Don 
Allen. Landers Stevens. (R) May 26, 1829. (NP) June 22. 
(L) 5806f. 

FAR CALL, THE (D-ME): Charles Morton, Leila Hyams 
Ulrich Haupt, Stanley J. Sanford, Warren Hymer, Arthur 
Stone, Charles Middleton, Pat Hartigan, Ivan Linow. Dan 
Wolheim. Randolph Scott, Charles Gorman. Bernard Siegel 
Willie Fung. Harry Gripp. Frank Chew, Sam Baker. (L) 
Sound. 5313f; silent, 5285f. (R) Apr. 28, 1929. (NP) 
June 1. 

FAZIL (RD-M): Charles Parrel], Greta Nissen. Mae Busch. 
Vadim Uraneff, Tyler Brooke. Eddie Sturgis. Josephine 
Bono. John Bole9. John T. Murray. Erville Alderson, Dale 
Fuller. Hank Mann. (L) 7217f. (R) Sept. 9. 1928. (NP) 
Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Dec. 1. 1928. 
FOUR DEVILS (D-TME): Janet Gaynor. Mary Duncan. 
Charles Morton. Barry Norton. Farrell MacDonald, Nancv 
Drexel. (L) 6500C (NP) July 20. 
FOUR SONS (D-ME): Margaret Mann. James Hall. France 
X. Bushman. Jr., Charles Morton. George Meeker, June 
Collyer, Wendell Franklin. Earle Foxe. Albert Gran. August 
Tollaire. Frank Reicher. Jack Penniclt. Hughie Mack. Ruth 
Mix (L) S9G2f. (R) Sept. 2, 1928. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 
(TOS) Jan. 12. 1929. 
FOX MOVIETONE FOLLIES (MC-ATS) : Lola Lane. Frank 
Richardson. David Percy. Sue Carol. Dixie Lee. David 
Rollins, Sharon Lynn. John Breedon. Stepin Fetchit. (L) 
8291f. (R) May 25. 1929. (NP) June 15. (TOS) June 29. 
FUGITIVES (MD-M): Madge Bellamy. Don Terry. Arthur 
Stone. Earle Fox. Matthew Betz, Lumsden Hare. Hap 
Ward, Edith Yorke. Jean Laverty. (L) 5356f. (R) Jan 
27. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 
GHOST TALKS. THE (My-TME) : Special cast. (R) Mar. 

30. 1929. (L) 6482f. 
GIRL FROM HAVANA (AT-D) : Paul Page, Lola Lan<). 
Natalie Moorhead. Kenneth Thomson. Warren Hymer 
Joseph Girard and Adele Windsor. Directed by Benjamin 
Stoloff. (NP) Sept. 21. 
GIRLS GONE WILD (CD-M): Sue Carol. Nick Stuait. 
William Russell. Roy D'Arcy, Leslie Fenton. Hedda 
Hopper. John Darrow. Matthew Betz, Edmund Breeze 
Minna Ferry. Louis Natheaux. Lumsden Hare. (L) Talk- 
ing. 5332f. (R) Feb. 24. 1929. (NP) March 23. 1929 
GREAT WHITE NORTH. THE (D-M): H. A. and Sidney 
Snow's Arctic expedition. (L) 5560f. (R) Dec. 30, 1928. 
(NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 
HEARTS IN DIXIE (AT-D): Stephin Fetchit. Clarence 
Muse. Eugene Jackson. Dorothy Morrison. Bernice Pilot 
Clifford Ingram, Mildred Washington. Zach Williams. Ger- 
trude Howard. Vivian Smith, Robert Brooks, A. C H 
Billbrew, Richard Carlysle. (R) Mar. 10. (L) Sound. 
7463f. Silent. 6444f. (TOS) May 25. 
HOMESICK (F): Sammy Cohen, Harry Sweet. Marjorie 
Beebe. Henry Armetta. Pat Harmon. (L) 5153f. (R) 
Dec. 16. 1928. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 
IN OLD ARIZONA (D-TME): Warner Baxter. Edmund 
Lowe. (L) 8724f. (R) Jan. 20, 1929. (TOS) Mar. 23. 

JOY STREET (CD-M): Lois Moran. Nick Stuart. Rex Bell. 
Jose Crespo. Dorothy Ward. Ada Williams. Maria Alba. 
Sally Phipps. Florence Allen. Mabel Vail, John Breedon. 
(R) Apr. 7, 1929. (L) Silent. 5754f. Sound, 57481'. 
(NP) May 11. 1929. 
LUCKY STAR (D-T) : Charles Farrell. Janet Gaynor. 
Hedwiga Reicher, Guinn (Big Boy) Williams. Paul Fix. 
Gloria Grey. Hector V. Sarno. (L) Talking. 8S95f: 
silent. 8725f. (R) Aug. 18, 1929. (TOS) Sept. 28. 
MAKING THE GRADE (CD-M): Edmund Lowe, Lois 
Moran, Albert Hart, Lucien Littlefleld. James Ford. Sher- 
man Ross. John Alden, Gino Conti. Rolfe Sedan, Ha 
Tora, Mary Ashley. (L) Talking, 5903f; silent. 50241. (R) 
Feb. 10, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 
MASKED EMOTIONS (D-TME): George O'Brien. Nora Lane. 
Farrell MacDonald. David Sharpe. Edward Peil, Sr.. Frank 
Hagney. (L) Silent. 5389f. Sound. 5419f. (R) May 19. 
1929. (NP) June 15. (L) 5419f. 
MASQUERADE (CD): Alan Birmingham, Leila Hyams. 
Clyde Cook. Farrell MacDonald. Arnold Lucy. George 
Pierce. Rita Le Roy. John Breeden. Jack Pierce. Pat 
Moriarity, Jack Carlisle, Frank Richardson. (N) July 27. 
(L) Talking, 5643f. 
ME, GANGSTER (D-M): June Collyer, Don Terry. Anders 
Randoff. Stella Randoff. Al Hill, Burr Mcintosh. Walter 
James, Gustav Von Seyffertitz. Herbert Ashton. Harry 
Cattle, Joe Brown, Arthur Stone, Nigel De Brulier, Carol 
Lombard. Bob Percy. (L) 6042f. (R) Oct. 14. 1928. 
(NP) Nov. 3, 1928. (TOS) Dec. 8, 1928. 
MOTHER KNOWS BEST (D-TME): Madge Bellamy. Louise 
Dresser, Barry Norton. Albert Gran. Joy Auburn, Stuart 
Edwin, Lucien Littlefleld. Dawn O'Day. Annette De Kirby. 
Aaron De Kirby. (L) 10.116f. (R) Oct. 28. 1928. (NP) 
Nov. 17. 1928. (TOS) Nov. 3. 1928. 
MOTHER MACHREE (D-M): Belle Bennett, Phillippe De 
Lacy, Pat Somerset, Victor McLaglen. Ted McNamara. 
Eulalie Jensen. Constance Howard, Rodney Hildebrand, 
Neil Hamilton. William Piatt. Ethel Clayton, Jacque Pol- 
lens, Joyce Wirard. (L) 6807f. (R) Oct. 21. 1928. (NP) 
Mar 9 1929 

NEW YEAR'S EVE (D-M): Mary Astor, Charles Morton, 
Arthur Stone, Helen Ware. Freddie Frederick, Florence 
Lake, Sumner Getchell, Virginia Vance, Stuart Erwin. 
(R) Feb. 24, 1929. (L) Silent. 5959f. Sound. 5984f. 
(NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 

NOT QUITE DECENT (D-TM) : June Collyer, Louise 
Dresser, Allan Lane, Oscar Apfel, Paul Nicholson, Marjorie 
Beebe, Ben Hewlett, Jack Kenney. (L) Talking. 4965f; 
silent, 4653f. (R) Mar. 24. 1929. (TOS) June 22. (NP) 
May 18, 1929. 

ONE WOMAN IDEA. THE (D-ME): Rod La Rocque. 
Marceline Day, Sharon Lynn. Sally Phipps. Shirley Dorman. 
Ivan Lebedeff. Douglas Gilmore, Gino Corrado. Joseph W. 
Girard, Arnold Lucy, Frances Rosay, Guy Tiento. Daniel 
Hasson. Tom Tamarez, Coy Watson. (L) Talking. 6111f ; 
silent, 0106f. (It) June 2. 1929. (NP) June 22. 

PLASTERED IN PARIS (C M): With Cohen, Pennick and 
Linow. (L) 5640f. (It) Sept. 23. 1928. 

PLEASURE CRAZED (D-AT): Marguerite Churchill, Ken- 
neth Macenna, Dorothy Burgess. Campbell Gullan. Douglas 
Gilmore, Henry Kolker, Frederick Graham. Rex Bell. 
Charlotte Merriam. (R) July. 1929. (NP) July 20. (L) 
Talking. 55G0f. 

PREP AND PEP (CD-M) : David Rollins, Nancy Drexel. 
John Darrow. E. II. Calvert. Frank Albertson. (L) 6086C. 
(R) Nov. 18. 192S. (NP) Nov. 3, 1928. 



RED DANCE, THE (MD-M): Dolores Del Bio, Charles 

Farrell. Ivan Linow. Boris Charsky. Dorothy Ilevier. Andre 

Segurola, Dlmitri Alexis. (L) 9250f. (R) Dec. 2, 1928. 

(NP) Sept. 22. 1928. (TOS) Mar. 9, 1928. 
RED WINE (CD-M): June Collyer. Conrad Nagel, Arthur 

Stone, Sharon Lynn, E. Alyn Warren. Ernest Hilliard. 

Ernest Wood. Marshal "Babe" Ruth, Dixie Gay, Margaret 

La Marr. (L) 6194f. (R) Dec. 23, 1928. (NP) Mar. 

9. 1929. (TOS) Jan. 26, 1929. 
RILEY THE COP (CD-M): J. Farrell MacDonald. (L) 

G132f. (R) Nov. 25. 1928. 
RIVER. THE (D): Charles Farrell, Mary Duncan, Ivan 

Linow, Margaret Mann, Aldredo Sabato. (L) 7313f. (NP) 

July 20. 

ROMANCE OF THE UNDERWORLD (D-M): With Astor 
and Boles. (L) 6162f. (R) Nov. 11, 1928. (TOS) Jan. 
19, 1929. 

SALUTE: (AT-D): George O'Brien, William Janey, Frank 
Albertson, Helen Chandler. Joyae Compton. Clifford Demp- 
sey. Lumsden Hare. Stephin Fetchit, David Butler, Rex 
Bell. John Breeden. (NP) Sept. 7. 

SIN SISTER, THE (CD-M): Nancy Carroll, Lawrence Gray. 
Josephine Dunn, Myrtle Stedman, Anders Randoff. Rich- 
ard Alexander, Frederick H. Graham, George Davis. David 
Callis. (L) 6072f. (R) Feb. 3, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 
1929. (TOS) Apr. 27. 1929. 

SPEAKEASY (CD-AT): Paul Page, Lola Lane, Henry B. 
Walthall. Helen Ware, Warren Hymer, Stuart Erwln, 
Sharon Lynn. Erville Alderson. James Guilfoyle, Helen 
Lynch. Marjorie Beebe, Sailor Vincent, Joseph Cawthorne, 
Ivan Linow. (L) 5775f. (R) Mar. 24. 1329. (NP) Apr. 
6. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 27, 1929. 

STRONG BOY (D-M): Victor McLaglen. Leatrice Joy, Far- 
rell MacDonald, Slim Summerville. Kent Sanders Tom 
Wilson, Jack Pennick, Robert Ryan, David Torrence 
Dolores Johnson. (L) 5567f. (R) Mar. 3, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS) May 4, 1929. 

SUNRISE (D-M) : George O'Brien, Janet Gavnor, Bodil 
Rosing, Margaret Livingston, Farrell MacDonald, Ralph 
Sipperly, Jane Winton, Arthur Housman, Eddie Boland. 
(L) 8393f. (R) Nov. 4, 1928. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) 
July 21. 1928. 

TAKING A CHANCE: With Rex Bell. (L) 4876f. (R) 
Nov. 18. 1928. 

THEY HAD TO SEE PARIS (AT-CD) : Will Rogers. Irene 
Rich, Marguerite Churchill, Fifl Dorsay, Owen Davis, Rex 
Bell, Ivan Lebedeff. Christiane Yves. Edgar Kennedy. 
Marcelle Corday. Marcia Manon. Theodore Lodi. Bob Kerr. 
Andre Cheron. Gregory Gay. (NP) Sept. 21. 

THROUGH DIFFERENT EYES (D-AT): Mary Duncan. 
Edmund Lowe. Warner Baxter, Earle Foxe, Donald Gal- 
lagher, Florence Lake. (R) Apr. 7, 1929. (L) 5166f. 
(NP) May 11. 1929. (TOS) June 8. 

TRENT'S LAST CASE (My-M-M) : Raymond Griffith, Ray- 
mond Hatton. Marceline Day, Donald Crisp. Lawrence 
Gray, Nicholas Soussanin. Anita Gravin. Ed Kennedy. 
(R) Mar. 31. 1929. (L) Silent, 5809f. ; sound, 5834/ 
(NP) May 18, 1929. 

TRUE HEAVEN (D-M): George O'Brien, Lois Moran, Phillip 
Smalley, Oscar Apfel. Duke Martin. Andre Cheron. Don- 
ald MacKenzie. Hedwig Reicher. Will Stanton. (L) 5531f. 
(R) Jan. 20. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 
6. 1929. 

VALIANT, THE (D-AT): Paul Muni and Churchill. (E) 

Apr. 21, 1929. (L) 5537f. 
VEILED WOMAN. THE (D-M): Lia Tora. Paul Vincenti. 

Walter McGrail. Josef Swickard, Kenneth Thompson, Andre 

Cheron, Ivan Lebedeff, Maude George. (L) Silent. 5185f. 

Sound. 5192f. (R) Apr. 14. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 
WORDS AND MUSIC (AT-CD): Lois Moran. David Percy. 

Helen Twelvetrees. William Orlamond. Elizabeth Patterson. 

Duke Morrison. Frank Albertson, Tom Patricola, Bubbles 

Crowell. Biltmore Quartet. (NP) Sept. 7. (TOS) Sept. 21. 



General Pictures 



BACHELORS CLUB. THE (D) : Richard Talmadge. Barbara 

Worth. Edna Murphy. Edna Ellsmere. V. Talbot Henderson. 

Herbert Hayes, Barry Palmer. (L) 5600f. (NP) June 15. 
BACK FROM SHANGHAI (D) : Vera Reynolds. Sojin, 

Joseph W. Girard. Henry Sedley. (L) 5400f. (R) Mar. 15. 
HEROIC LOVER (D): Leonard St. Leo. Stuart Holmes. 

Barbara Bedford. Ted Snell, Hugh Metcalf, William Frane» 

(R) Feb. 5. (L) 5500f. 



Gotham 



FATHER AND SON (AT): Noah Beery. Noah Beery. Jr. 
Forthcoming 1929 release. 

HEAD OF THE FAMILY. THE: Virginia Lee Corbin. (L) 
625fif. (R) October. 1928. 

KNEE HIGH: Virginia Corbin. (R) October, 1929. 

MODERN SAPPHO, A (T) : Betty Bronson. (R) Septem- 
ber. 1929. 

RIVER WOMAN, THE (D-ME): Jacqueline Logan. Lionel 
Barrymore. Charles Delaney. Harrv Todd. Mary Doran. 
Sheldon Lewis. (L) 8 reels. (R) April. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 30. 1929. 

TIMES SQUARE (CD-T) : Alice Day. Eddie Kane. Emile 
Chautard, John Miljan, Natalie Joyce, Joseph Swickard. 
(L) 10.500f. (R) March. 1927. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. 

THROUGH THE BREAKERS: Livingston and Herbert. (L) 
6420f. (R) September, 1928. 



Edward L. Klein 



ADVENTURES OF MAYA: (L) Silent, 5400f. (R) Apr. 
28 1929. 

PRESIDENT, THE (D) : Ivan Mosjoukine. Suzy Vernon, 
Nikolai Malilcoff Heinrieh Schrotli I.uigi Servanli (L) 
SlOOf. 



Ernest Mattsson 



IN DALARNA AND JERUSALEM (D) : Hanson and Veidt. 
(L) 14.000. Forthcoming 1929 release. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

ALIAS JIMMY VALENTINE (M-TME) : William Haines. 
Lionel Barrymore. Leila Hyams, Karl Dane, Tully Mar- 
shall. Howard Hickman. Billy Butts. Evelyn Mills. (L) 
8.000L (R) Jan. 26, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) 
Mar. 9, 1929. 

ALL AT SEA (C) : Karl Dane. George K. Arthur, Josephins 

Dunn. Herbert Prior. Eddie Baker. (L) 5345f. (R) Feb. 

9. 1929. (NP) Feb. 23. 1929. 
BELLAMY TRIAL, THE (D-TME): Leatrice Joy, Betty 

Bronson. (L) 7524f. (R) Mar. 2. 1929. (NP) Sept. 29, 

1928. (TOS) Apr. 13. 1929. 
BEYOND THE SIERRAS (W) : Tim McCoy. Sylvia Beecher. 

Itoy D'Arcy, Polly Moran, Richard R. Neill, J. Gordon 

Russell. (L) 5896f. (R) Sept. 15, 192S. (NP) Auk. 

18 lif28 

BRIDGEOF SAN LUIS REY. THE (D-ME): Lily Damita. 
Ernest Torrence. Raquel Torres, Don Alvarado. Duncan Bl- 
naldo, Henry B. Walthall, Mikhail Vavitch. Emily Fitzroy. 
Tully Marshall. (L) 7SS0f. (R) Mar. 30, 1929. (NP) 
May 18. 1929. 

BROADWAY MELODY. THE (MC-TSM) : Anita Page, Bes- 
sie Love. Charles King. Jed Prouty. Kenneth Thomson, Ed- 
ward Dillon. Marv Doran. Eddie Kane. J. Enimett Beck. 
Marshall Ruth. Drew Demarest. (R) Mar. 9. 1929. (L) 
Sound. 9372f. ; silent. 5943f. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. (TOS) 
Apr. 20. 1929. 



56 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



BROTHERLY LOVE 1C-TE) : Karl Dane. George K. Ar- 
thur. Jean Arthur. Richard Carlyle. Edward Connelly. Mar- 
cia Harris. (L) 6053f. (E) Oct. 13. 1928. (NP) Oct. 
13 192S 

CAMERAMAN, THE (C): Buster Keaton, Marceline Day. 
Harold Goodwin. Sidney Bracy. Harry Gribbon. (L) 6995f. 
(R) Sept. 15. 1928. (NP) Sept. 15, 1928. 

CHINA BOUND (CD) : Karl Dane. George K. Arthur. Jose- 
phine Dunn, Polly Moran. Hatty Woods, Carl Stockdale. 
(L) 60()0f. (R) May 18. 1929. (NP) May 11. 1929. 

DANCING DAUGHTERS (D-M) : Joan Crawford. (L) 7652f. 
(R) Sept. 1. 1928. (NP) June 30. 1928. (TOS) Sept. 22. 
1928. 

DESERT NIGHTS (D) : John Gilbert, Ernest Torrence, Mary 
Nolan. (L) 6177f. (R) Mar. 9. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 
1929. (TOS) Mar. 16, 1929. 

DESERT RIDER. THE (W) : Tim McCoy. Raquel Torres, 
Bert Roach. Edward Connelly. Harry Woods. Jess Cavin. 
(R) May 11. 1929. (L) 4943f. (NP) June 22. 

DREAM OF LOVE (D) : Joan Crawford. Nils Asther, Aileen 
Pringle. Warner Oland, Carmel Myers. Harry Reinhardt, 
Harry Mvers, Alphonse Martell. Fletcher Norton. (L) 
7987f. (ill Dec. 1, 1928. (NP) Dec. 22. 1928. (TOS) 
Dec. 8. 1928. 

DUKE STEPS OUT, THE (CD-TME) : William Haines, 
Joan Crawford. Karl Dane. Tenen Holtz. Eddie Nugent. 
Jack Roper. Delmer Dayis. Lulte Cosgroye. Herbert Prior. 
(L) Silent-G210f. Sound-6206f. (R) Mar. 16. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 30, 1929. 

EXCESS BAGGAGE (D-ME): William Haines. Josephine 
Dunn. Neely Edwards. Kathleen Clifford. Greta Grandstedt. 
Ricardo Cortez. Cyril Chadwick. (L) 7180f. (R) Sept. 8. 

1928. (NP) June 23, 1928. (TOS) Sept. 8. 1928. 
FLYING FLEET, THE (D-M): Ramon Novarro, Ralph 

Grayes, Anita Page, Edward Nugent, Carroll Nye. Sumntr 
Getchell. Gardner James, Alfred Allen. (L) 9044f. (R) 
Jan. 19, 1929. (NP) Feb. 9. 1929. (TOS) Jan. 19. 1929. 

GIRL IN THE SHOW. THE (T-CD): Bessie Loye, Ford 
Sterling. Raymond Hackett. (TOS) Aug. 31. 

HALLELUJAH (D-ATS): Nina Mae McKinney. William 
Fountaine, Daniel L. Haynes. Harry Gray. Fannie Bell 
De Knight. Everett McGarrity. Victoria Spivey. Milton 
Dickerson, Robert Couch. Walter Tait. Dixie Jubilee Sing- 
ers. (L) Talking. 9650f. 

HOLLYWOOD REVUE. THE (MC-ATS) : Bessie Loye. 
Charles King. Marion Davies, Norma Shearer. William 
Haines. Gus Edwards. Joan Crawford. John Gilbert. Marie 
Dressier. Polly Moran, Broi Sisters. Anita Page. Buster 
Keaton. Albertina Ballet. (L) Talking. 11.669f. 

HONEYMOON (CD). Polly Moran. Eddie Gribbon. Bert 
Roach. Flash. (L) 4823f. (R) Dec. 22. 1928. (NP) Mar. 
9 1929. 

IDLE RICH, THE (D-AT): Conrad Nagel, Bessie Loye. 
Leila Hyams. Robert Ober. James Neill. Edythe Chapman. 
Paul Kruger. Kenneth Gibson. (L) 7351f. (R) June 15. 

1929. (NP) June 8. (TOS) June 22. 

LADY OF CHANCE, A (D-M): Norma Shearer. Lowll 
Sherman, Gwen Lee. John Mack Brown. Eugenia Besserer. 
Buddy Messinger. (L) 7126f. (R) Dec. 22, 1928. (NP) 
Mar. 9, 1929. 

LAST OF MRS. CHEYNEY, THE (D-AT): Norma Shearer. 
Basil Rathbone. George Berraud, Herbert Bunston, Hedda 
Hopper, Moon Carrol. Madeline Seymour. Cyril Chadwick, 
George K. Arthur (in sound print only). Finch Smiles. 
Maude Turner. (NP) July 20. (L) Talking, 8651f; silent. 
6484f. 

LOVES OF CASANOVA (D) : Iyan Mosoujkine, Diana 
Kerenne, Suzanne Bianchetti. Jenny Jugo, Rina de Liguoro, 
Nina Kochitz, Olga Day. Paul Guide. Decoeur. Bouamerane. 
Rudolf Klein-Rogge. (L) 6179f. (R) Feb. 1G. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 9. 1929. 

MADAME X (D-AT): Lewis Stone. Ruth Chatterton. Ray- 
mond Hackett. Holmes Herbert. Eugenie Besserer, John P. 
Edington. Mitchell Lewis, Ulrich Haupt, Sidney Toler, 
Richard Carle, Claud King. Chappell Dossett. (L) 880fif. 
(NP) June 29. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

MAN'S MAN. A (CD-ME): William Haines. Josephine 
Dunn. Sam Hardy. Mae Busch. (L) 6683f. (R) May 25. 
1929. (NP) June 22. (TOS) June 22. 

MARIANNE (CD-AT): Marion Davies. Oscar Shaw. Robert 
Castle. Scott Kolk. Emil Chautard. Mack Swain. Oscar 
Apfel. Robert Ames. Recorded on film and disc. (R) July 
20. 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. 

MASKS OF THE DEVIL. THE (D-M): John Gilbert. Alma 
Rubens. Theodore Roberts. Frank Reicher. Pva Von Berne. 
Ralph Forbes. Ethel Wales. Polly Ann Young. (L) 6575f. 
(R) Nov. 17. 1928. (NP) Nov. 17. 1928. (TOS) Nov. 
24. 1928. 

MORGAN'S LAST RAID (W) : Tim McCoy, Dorothy Se- 
bastian. Wheeler Oakman, Allan Garcia. Hank Mann. Mon- 
tague Shaw. <L) 5264f. (R) Jan. 5. 1929. (NP) Mar. 
9, 1929. 

NAPOLEON (D): Waldimir Roudenko. Albert Dieudonne. 
Alexandre Koubitzky, Harry Krimer, Edmond Van Daele, 
Antonin Artaud. Gina Manes. Nicholas Koline. (L) 6893f. 
(R) Oct. 27. 1928. (NP) Oct. 27. 1929. 

OUR MODERN MAIDENS AT-D) : Joan Crawford. Rod 
La Rocque. Douglas Fairbanks. Jr., Anita Page, Edward 
Nugent, Josephine Dunn. Albert Gran. (NP) Sept. 14. 

OVERLAND TELEGRAPH, THE (W) : Tim McCoy. Doro- 
thy Janis, Frank Rice. Lawford Davidson. Clarence Geldert. 
Chief Big Tree. (L) 4815f. (R) Mar. 2. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. 

PAGAN. THE (D-SME): Ramon Novarro. Renee Adoree. 
Dorothy Janis. Donald Crisp. (L) Silent-7250f. Sound- 
7359f. (R) Apr. 27. 1929. (NP) May 25. 1929. 

SHOW PEOPLE (CD-TE): Marion Davies. William Haines. 
Dell Henderson, Paul Ralli, Tenen Holtz, Harry Gibbon, 
Sidney Bracy, Polly Moran. Albert Conti. (L) 7453f. 
(R) Oct. 20, 1928. (NP) Sept. 29, 1928. (TOS) Oct. 

SINGLE MAN, A (CD): Lew Cody, Aileen Pringle. Mar- 
celine Day, Edward Nugent, Kathlyn Williams, Eileen 
Manning. (L) 5590f. (R) Jan. 12. 1929. (NP) Feb. 9. 
1929. 

SINGLE STANDARD. THE (D): Greta Garbo. Nils Asthe". 
John Mack Brown. Dorothy Sebastian, Lane Chandler. 
Robert Castle, Mahlon Hamilton, Kathlyn Williams. Zef- 
fle Tidbury. (NP) Aug. 17. (L) 6569f. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

SIOUX BLOOD (W): Tim McCoy. Robert Frazer. Marion 
Douglas. Clarence Geldert. Chief Big Tree. Sidney Bracy. 
(L) 4811f. (R) Apr. 20. 1929. (NP) Apr. 27. 1929. 

SPEEDWAY (T-CD): William Haines, Anita Page. Ernest 
Torrence. Pollv Moran, Karl Dane. John Miljan. (TOS) 
Sept. 14. (NP) Sept. 14. 

SPIES (M): Rudolph-Klein-Rogge. Greda Maurus. Lien 
Deyers. Louis Ralph, Craighall Sherry, Willy Fritsch, Lupu 
Pick. Fritz Rasp. (L) 7999f. (NP) June 15. 

SPITE MARRIAGE (CD-M) : Buster Keaton. Dorothy Se- 
bastian. Edward Earle, Leila Hyams. William Bechtel. 
John Byron. (L) 7047f. (R) Apr. 6, 1929. (NP) Apr. 27. 
1929. 

THUNDER (D-TME): Lon Chaney. James Murray. Phyllis 
Haver. George Duryea, Francis Morris. Wally Albright. 
(L) 7783f. (R) June 25, 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. (TOS) 
Aug. 17. 

TIDE OF EMPIRE (D-M): Renee Adoree and Duryea. (L) 

6552f. (R) Mar. 23. 1929. 
TRIAL OF MARY DUGAN (D-AT): Norma Shearer. Lewis 

Stone, H. B. Warner, Raymond Hackett. Lilyan Tashman. 

Olive Tell, Adrienne D'Ambricourt, Mary Doran, Dewitt 

Jennings, Wilfrid North, Landers Stevens. Charles Moore. 

Claud Allister. (NP) May 25. (L) 10,000f. (R) June 8. 

(TOS) July IS. 



TRAIL OF '98, THE (D-ME): Dolores Del Rio, Ralph 
Forbes. Harry Carey. Tully Marshall, Emily Fitzroy, Tenen 
Holtz. Russell Simpson. Karl Dane, Cesare Gravina, George 
Cooper. John Down. E. Alyn Warmer. (L) 8799f. (R) 
Jan. 6. 1923. (NP) Dec. 29. 1928. (TOS) Mar. 23. 
1929. 

VIKING, THE (D-ME): Donald Crisp, Pauline Starke, 
LeRoy Mason. Anders Randolph. Richard Alexander, Harry 
Lewis Woods. Albert MacQuarrie, Roy Stewart, Torbcn 
Meyer, Claire MacDowell. Julia Swayne Gorden. (L) 8176f. 
(NP) Mar. 9. 1929. All in technicolor. 

VOICE OF THE CITY, THE (D-M): Robert Ames. Willard 
Mack. Sylvia Field. James Farley. John Miljan. Clark 
Marshall. Duane Thompson. Tom McGuire. Alice Moe, 
Beatrice Banyard. (L) Sound-7427f. (R) Apr. 13. 1929. 
(NP) Apr. 27. 1929. (TOS) May 18. 

WEST OF ZANZIBAR (D-M): Lon Chaney. Lionel Barry- 
More. Warner Baxter. Mary Nolan. Jane Daly, Roscoe 
Ward. Kalla Pasha. Curtis Nero. (L) 6150f. (R) Nov. 
24. 1928. (NP) Dec. 8. 1928. 

WHERE EAST IS EAST (D-TME): Lon Chaney. Lupe 
Velez. Estelle Taylor. Lolyd Hughes. Louis Stern. Mrs. 
Wong Wing. (L) C50Of. (R) May 4, 1929. (NP) June 22. 
(TOS) June 15. 

WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS (M-ME) : Lon Chaney (L) 
7448f. (R) Sept. 29, 1928. (TOS) Oct. 20. 1928. 

WHITE SHADOWS OF THE SOUTH SEAS (D-TME): 
Monte Blue, Raquel Torres, Robert Anderson. (L) 7965f. 
(R) Nov. 10. 1928. (NP) July 7. 1928. (TOS) Dec. 1. 
1928. 

WILD ORCHIDS (D) : Greta Garbo. Lewis Stone. Nils As- 
ther. (L) 9235f. (R) Feb. 23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 2. 1929. 
(TOS) Feb. 23, 1929. 

WOMAN OF AFFAIRS (D-M): Greta Garbo. John Gilbert. 
(L) 8319f. (R) Dec. 15. 1928. (TOS) Feb. 16. 1929. 

WONDER OF WOMEN (D-TME): Lewis Stone. Leila Hyams. 
Peggy Wood. Harry Myers. Sarah Padden. George Fawcett. 
Blanche Frederici, Wally Albright, Jr., Camencita Johnson. 
Anita Louise Fremault. Dietrich Haupt, Ullric Haupt, Jr. 
(L) Talking, 8796f: Silent, 6S35f. (R) July 31, 1929. 
(NP) July 27. (TOS) Aug. 17. 



Paramount 



ABIE'S IRISH ROSE (CD-TME): Charles Rogers, Nancy 
Carroll. Jean Hersholt. J. Farrell McDonald, Bernard 
Gorcey, Ida Kramer. Nick Cogley, Camillus Pretal, Rosa 
Rosanova. (L) Silent. 10.187f. Sound. 10,471f. (R) Jan. 
5, 1929. (NP) Nov. 3. 1928. (TOS) Feb. 2. 1929. 

AVALANCHE (W) : Jack Holt. Doris Hill. Baclanova, John 
Darrow. Guy Oliver, Richard Winslow. (L) 6099f. (NP) 
Dec. 1. 1928. 

BEGGARS OF LIFE (M-ME): Wallace Beery. Louise 
Brooks. Richard Arlen, Edgar Blue Washington. H. A. 
Morgan. Andy Clarke. Mike Donlin. Roscoe Karns, Robert 
Perry. Johnnie Morris, George Kotsonaros. Jacque Chapin, 
Robert Brower. Frank Brownlee. (L) 7805f. (R) Sept. 
15. 192S. (NP) July 7. 1928. (TOS) Oct. 20. 1928. 

BEHIND THE GERMAN LINES (D) : Foreign cast. (L) 
Sound. 8254f. (R) Jan. 12. 1929. 

BETRAYAL (D-ME): Emil Jannings. Gary Cooper, Esther 
Ralston, Jada Weller, Douglas Haig. Bodil Rosing. (L) 
8Uent. 6492f: sound. 6614f. (R) May 11, 1929. (NP) Apr. 
27. 1929. (TOS) June 1. 

CANARY MURDER CASE. THE (My-AT) : William Powell. 
James Hall, Louise Brooks. Jean Arthur, Gustav von 
Seyflertltz. Charles Lane. Eugene Pallette. Lawrence Gray. 
Ned Sparks. Louis John Bartels. E. H. Calvert. (L) Talk- 
ing. 71711; silent, 5943f. (R) Feb. 16, 1929. (NP) June 15. 

CARNATION KID, THE (C-AT) : Douglas MacLean. Fran- 
cis Lee, William B. Davidson. Lorraine Eddv. Charles TTil. 
Mailes. Francis McDonald. Maurice Black, Bert Swor, Jr.. 
Carl Stockdale. (L) Silent, G290f; sound, 7267f. (R) Feb 
23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 

CASE OF LENA SMITH, THE (D) : Esther Ralston, James 
Hall. Gustav von Seyffertitz. Emily Fitzroy. Fred Kohler. 
Betty Aho. Lawrence Grant. Leone Lane. Kay DesLys, 
Alex Woloshin. Ann Brody. Wally Albright. Jr., Warner 
Klinger. (L) 7229f. (R) Jan. 19. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 
1929. (TOS) Jan. 26. 1929. 

CHARMING SINNERS (D-TME) : Ruth Chatterton. Clive 
Brook. Man' Nolan. William Powell. Laura Hope Crews. 
Florence Eldridge. Montagu Love. Juliette Crosby. Lorraine 
Eddy, Claude Allister. (L) 6164r. (R) July 6. 1929 
(NP) Aug. 10. (TOS) Aug. 3. 

CHINATOWN NIGHTS (D-AT): Wallace Beery. Florence 
Vidor. Warner Oland. Jack McHugh, Jack Oakie. Tetsu 
Komai. Frank Chew. Mrs. Wing. Peter Morrison. Freeman 

■ Wood. (L) Silent, 7145f; sound, 7081f. (R) Mar. 23 
1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 6. 1929. 

CLOSE HARMONY (CD-AT): Charles Rogers, Nancy Car- 
roll, Harry Green. Jack Oakie, Richard (Skeets) Gallagher, 
Matty Roubert. Ricca Allen. Wade Boteler, Baby Mack. 
Oscar Smith, Greta Grandstedt. Gus Partos. (L) Sound 
6271f. (R) Apr. 13. 1929. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. (TOS) 
Apr. 13, 1929. 

COCOANUTS. THE (MC-ATS): Four Marx Brothers, Mary 
Eaton, Oscar Shaw. Katherine Francis. Margaret Dumont. 
Cyril Ring. Basil Ruysdael. Sylvan Lee, Gamby-Hale Girls 
Allan K. Foster Girls. (L) 8613f. (R) May 23. 1929' 
(NP) July 13. (TOS) July 20. 

DANCE OF LIFE. THE (D-AT): Nancy Carroll, Hal Skelly 
John, May Boley. Oscar Levant. Gladys DuBois. James T 
Dorothy Ravier, Ralph Theador. Charles D. Brown, Al St. 
Quinn. James Farley. George Irving. (Talking. 10 619f 
(P) Sept. 14. Silent. 7488f. (TOS) Sept. 21. 

DANGEROUS CURVES (D-AT): Clara Bow. Richard Arlen 
Kay Francis, David Newell. Anders Randolph. May Boley. 
T. Roy Barnes, Joyce Compton, Charles D. Brown, Stuart 
Erwin. Jack Lude. (R) July 13, 1929. (NP) Aug. 3 
(L) Talking, 7278f; silent, 0539f. (TOS) July 20. 

DANGEROUS WOMAN. A (D-AT): Baclanova. Clive Brook, 
Neil Hamilton. Clyde Cook, Leslie Fenton. Snitz Edwards. 
(L) Sound. 6643f. (R) May 18. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 
1929. (TOS) May 18. 

DIVORCE MADE EASY (CD-AT) : Douglas MacLean, Marie 
Prevost, Johnny Arthur, Frances Lee, Dot Farley. Jack 
Duffy. Buddv Watles, Hal Wilson. (R) July 6, 1929. 
(NP) July 13. (L) Talking. 5386f. ; silent, 5270f. (TOS) 
July 6. 

DOCKS OF NEW YORK, THE (D) : George Bancroft, Betty 
Compson. Baclanova, Clyde Cook, Mitckell Lewis. Gustav 
von Seyffertitz. Guy Oliver. May Foster. Lillian Worth. 
(L) 7202f. (R) Sept. 20, 1928. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 
(TOS) Oct. 27. 1928. 

DOCTOR'S SECRET, THE (D-AT): Ruth Chatterton. H. B. 
Warner, John Loder. Robert Edeson. Wilfored Noy, Ethel 
Wales. Nancy Price. Frank Finch-Smiles. (L) Sound. 
5823f. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS) Feb. 16, 1929. 

DUMMY, THE (D-AT): Ruth Chatterton. Frederic Marcn. 
John Cromwell, Fred Kohler, Mickey Bennett, Vondell 
Darr. Jack Oakie. Zasu Pitts. Richard Tucker, Eugene 
Pallette. (L) Sound, 5357f. (R) Mar. 9. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Mar. 6. 1929. 

FASHIONS IN LOVE (D-AT): Adolphe Menjou. Fay 
Compton. Miriam Seegar, John Miljan, Joan Standing, 
Robert Wayne, Russ Powell, Billie Bennett, Jacques 
Vanaire. (L) Talking. 6325f; silent. 6024f. (R) June 29. 
1929. (NP) July 13. (TOS) July 6. (NP) July 13. 

FAST COMPANY (AT-CD) : Jackie Oakie. Skeets Gallagher. 
Evelyn Brent. Gwen Lee. (TOS) Sept. 7. 



FIRST KISS. THE (D) : Fay Wiay, Gary Cooper. Lane 
Chandler, Leslie Fenton, Paul Fix. Malcolm Williams. 
Monroe Owsley. (I.) 6134f. (R) Sept. 25. 1928. (NP) 
Aug. 4, 1928. (TOS) Sept. 1, 1928. 

FLEET'S IN. THE (CD): Clara Bow. James Hall. Jack 
Oakie. Bodil Rosing. (L) 6918f. (R) Oet. 13. 1928. (NP) 
Sept. 22. 1928. (TOS) Sept. 15. 1928. 

FORGOTTEN FACES (M) : Clive Brook. Mary Brian. Olga 
Baclanova, William Powell, Fred Kohler. Jack I.uden. 
(L) 7640f. (R) Sept. 11, 1928. (NP) Aug. 4. 1928. 
(TOS) Aug. 4. 1928. 

FOUR FEATHERS (SE): Richard Arlen. Fay Wray, Wil- 
liam Powell, Clive Brook. Theodore von Eltz, Noah Beery. 
Zack Williams, Noble Johnson, Harold Hightower. PhilUpe 
de Lacey. Edward Ratcliffe. George Fawcett. Augustine 
Symonds. (L) Sound. 7.472f. Silent, 7472r. (TOS) 
Sept. 14. 

GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS (D-AT): Walter Huston. 
Katherine Francis, Charles Ruggles, Betty Lawford. Nor- 
man Foster. Duncan Perwarden. Lawrence Leslie. (L) 
Sound. 7176f. (R) May 4. 1929. (NP) Apr. 13, 1929. 

GREENE MURDER CASE, THE (My-AT): William Powell. 
Florence Eldridge. Ulrich Haupt. Jean Arthur. Eugene 
Pallette, E. H. Calvert. Gertrude Norman, Lowell Drew, 
Morgan Farley, Brandon Hurst, Augusta Burmester, MarcU 
Hariss. Mildred Golden. Mrs. Wilfred Buckland. Helena 
Philiphs. Shep Camp. Charles E. Evans. (NP) July 10, 
1929. (L) Talking. C383f. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

HOLE IN THE WALL. THE (MyM-AT) : Claudette Colbert 
Edward G. Robinson. David Newell. Nelly Savage. Donald 
Meek. Alan Brooks. Louise Closser Hale. Katherine Em- 
met. Marcia Kagno. Barry Macollum. George McQuarrle. 
Helen Crane. (L) Sound. 5850f. (R) Apr. 27. 1929. (NP) 
Apr. 6, 1929. 

HOMECOMING (D): Lars Hansen. Dita Parlo, Gustav 
Frohlich. (L) 8156f. (R) Feb. 16. 1929. (NP) Feb. 
9 1929 

HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY (D-TME): A Ufa picture. Lil 
Dagover, Willy Fritsch. Dita Parlo. Fritz Greiner. Glsella 
Bathory, Erich Kaiser Tietz. Leopold Kramer. (NP) 
Aug. 3. (L) 6165f. 

ILLUSION (D-AT): Buddy Rogers, Nancy Carroll. June 
Collyer, Knute Erickson, Eugenie Besserer, Kay Francis, 
Maude Turner Gordon, Regis Toomey, William McLaughlin, 
Katherine Wallace, William Austin, Frances Kavmond 
Eddie Kane, Michael Visaroff, Bessie Lyle. Emelie Melville. 
Carl Lukas, Col. G. L. McDonnel. (L) 7536f. Silent 
7538. (NP) July 27. (TOS) Sept. 28. 

INNOCENTS OF PARIS (R-ATM) : Maurice Chevalier. 
Sylvia Beecher. Russell Simpson. George Fawcett, Mrs. 
George Fawcett, John Miljan, Margaret Livingston. David 
Durand, Johnny Morris. (I) Silent-7816f. Sound-6148f. 
(R) May 25. 1929. (NP) May 4. 1929. (TOS) June 15. 

INTERFERENCE (D-AT): William Powell. Evelyn Brent. 
Clive Brook, Doris Kenyon, Tom Rickets. Brandon Hurst. 
Louis Payne, Wilford Noy, Donald Stuart. Raymond Law- 
rence. (L) Silent-6643f. Sound-7487f. (R) Jan. 5. 1M9. 
(NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Feb. 9. 1929. 

JEALOUSY (AT-D): Jeanne Easels. Frederic March. Halll- 
well Hobbes, Blanche Le Clair. Henry Daniel], Hilda 
Moore. (NP) September 28. 

KIBITZER (CD); Harry Green, Mary Brian, Neil Hamil- 
ton. David Newell. Lee Kohlmar, Henry Fink. Tenen Holtz. 
Guy Oliver. Albert Gran. Eddie Kane. (NP) Aug. 17. 

LETTER, THE (D-AT): Jeanne Eagels. O. H. Heggie. 
Reginald Owen, Herbert Marshall. Irene Brown. Lady 
Tsen Mel. Tamaki Yoshiwara. (L) Silent-5490f. Sound 1 
5778f. (R) Apr. 13. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) 
May 18. 

LOOPING THE LOOP (D-ME): Werner Kraus. Jenny Jugo, 
Warwick Ward. Gina Manes. <L) SiIent-CG76r. Sound- 
6769f. (R) Mar. 16. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 

LOVE DOCTOR (T-CD): Richard Dix, June Collyer. Mor- 
gan Farley Mirian Seegar. Winifred Harris, Lawford David- 
son. Gale Henry. (NP) September 28. 

LOVE PARADE, THE (CD): Maurice Chevalier, JeanetU 
MacDonald, Lupino Lane, Lillian Roth. Edgar Norton. 
Lionel Belmore. Robert Roccardi. Carleton Stockdale. Eugene 
Pallette, Russell Powell. Margaret Fealy. Virginia Bruce. 
(NP) Aug. 3. 

LOVES OF AN ACTRESS (D-M): Pola Negri. Nils Asther. 
May McAlister. Richard Tucker. Philip Strange. Paul 
Lukas. Nigel de Brulier. Robert Fischer, Helene Giere. 
(L) 7434f. (R) Sept. 18, 1928. (NP) June 23. 1928. 

MAN I LOVE, THE (R-AT) : Richard Arlen, Mary Brian, 
Baclanova, Harry Green, Jack Oakie, Pat O'Malley, Leslie 
Fenton, Charles Sullivan, William Vincent. (It) May 
25. 1929. (L) 66G9f. Silent C524. (NP) Apr. 6. 1929. 
(TOS) May 25. 

MARQUIS PREFERRED (F) : Adolph Menjou. Nora Lane. 
Chester Conklin. Dot Farley, Mischa Auer, Alex Melesh. 
Michael Visaroff. (L) 5506f. (R) Feb. 2, 1029. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. 

MIGHTY. THE (AT-D): George Bancroft, Esther Ralston. 

Warner Oland. Raymond Hatton, Dorothy Revier, Morgan 

Farley, O. P. Heggie, Charles Sellon, E. H. Calvert, John 

Cromwell. (NP) Sept. 14. 
MODEL FROM MONTMARTE. THE (D) : Nita Naldi, Ivan 

Uetrovitch, Louise LaGrange, Maurce de Cononge. (L) 

5941f. (R) Sept. 22, 1928. (NP) Sept. 15. 1928. 
MORAN OF THE MARINES (CD): Richard Dix. Ruth 

Elder. (L) 5444f. (R) Oct. 27. 1928. (TOS) Oct. 20. 

1928. 

MYSTERIOUS DR. FU MANCHU. THE (My-OT): Warner 
Oland. Jean Arthur. Neil Hamilton, O. P. Heggie. William 
Austin, Claude King, Charles Stevenson, Noble Johnson, 
Evelyn Selbie. Charles Giblyn, Donald Mackenzie, Lawford 
Davidson, Lask Winter. Charles Stevens. Chappel Dosset, 
Tully Marshall. (NP) July 27. (L) Talking, 7663f. 
(TOS) July 20. 

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH (CD-AT): Richard Dix, 
Berton Churchill. Louis John Bartels. Ned S.iarks, Wynne 
Churchill. Helen Kane. Dorothy Hall. Madeline Grey,. 
Nancy Ryon. (L) Sound-7256f. (R) Apr. 20. 1929. (NP) 
Apr. 20, 1929. (TOS) Apr. 27. 1929. 

PATRIOT. THE (D) : Emil Jennings. Florence Vidor. Lewis 
Stone, Vera Voronina. Neil Hamilton. Harry Cording. (L) 
10,172f. (R) Sept. 1, 1928. (NP) Sept. 8. 1928. (TOS) 
Sept. 22. 1928. 

RAINBOW MAN, THE (SR-TS): A bono-Art picture. Eddie 
Dovvling, Marian Nixon, Frankie Darro, Sam Hardy, Lloyd 
Ingraham. George Hayes. (L) Talking, 8500f. (R) May 
18, 1929. (NP) June 22. (TOS) June 22. 

REDSKIN (R-ME): Richard Dix, Gladys Belmont, Jane 
Novak. Larry Steers, Tully Marshall, Bernard Suegel, George 
Rigas. Augustina Lopez, Noble Johnson, Joseph VV. Girard. 
Jack Dunne. Andrew J. Callahan. Philip Anderson. Lo- 
raine. Rivero, George Walker. (L) Silent-7204f. Sound- 
7643f. (R) Feb. 23, 1929. (NP) Feb. 16. 1929. (TOS) 
Feb. 2, 1929. 

RIVER OF ROMANCE, THE (CD-AT): Charles (Buddy) 
Rogers, Mary Brian. June Collyer, Henry B. Walthall. 
Wallace Beery, Fred Kohler, Natalie Kingston, Mrs. George 
Fawcett. Anderson Lawler. George Reed. (L) Talking. 

7009f: silent 7028f. (R) July 20, 1929. (NP) June 29. 
(TOS) Aug. 3. 

SATURDAY NIGHT KID, THE (T-D) : Clara Bow, James 
Hall, Jean Arthur, Charles Sellon, Ethel Wales. Frank 
Ross, Edna May Oliver, Heymen Meyer. Eddie Dunn, 
Leone Lane, Jean Harlow. (NP) Sept. 28. 

SHOPWORN ANGEL (CD-S) : Nancy Carroll. Gary Cooper. 
Paul Lukas. (L) Silent-7112f. Sound-7373f. (R) Jan. 
12, 1929. (NP) Feb. 9. 1929. (TOS) Jan. 19, 1929. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



57 



SINS OF THE FATHERS (D-M) : Emil Jennings, Euth 
Chatterton, Barry Norton. Jean Arthur, Jack Luden, Zasu 
Pitts, Matthew Betz, Harry Cording, Arthur Housman, 
Frank Reicher. (L) 7761f. (R) Deo. 29. 1928. (NP) 
Oct. 20. 1928. 

SOMEONE TO LOVE (CD): Charles Rogers, Mary Brian. 
William Austin, Jack Oakie. James Kirkwood, Mary Alden. 
Frank Beicher. (L) 6323f. (NP) Dec. 29, 1928. (TOS) 
Dec 22 1928 

STAIRS - OF SAND (W) : Wallace Beery, Jean Arthur, 
Phillips B. Holmes, Fred Kohler, Ckester Conklin, Guy 
Oliver, Lillian Worth, Frank Bice, Clarence L. Sherwood. 
(L) 4900f. (R) June 8. 1929. (NP) May 18, 1929. 

STUDIO MURDER CASE, THE (My-AT) : Nell Hamilton. 
Warner Oland, Frederic March, Florence Eldridge. Doris 
Hill, Eugene Pallette. Chester Conklin, Lane Chandler, 
Gardner James. Guy Oliver, E. H. Calvert. Donald Macken- 
zie. (L) Talking. 65001; silent, 6070f. (B) June 1, 1929. 
(NP) June 8. (TOS) June 22. 

SUNSET PASS (W): Jack Holt, Nora Lane. John Loder, 
Christian J. Frank, Pee Wee Holmes, Chester Conklin, 
Pat Harmon, Alfred Allen. Guy Oliver. (L) 5862f. (B) 
Feb. 9. 1929. (NP) Feb. 23, 1929. 

SWEETIE (CD): Nancy Carroll, Stanley Smith, Helen Kane, 
Joseph Depew, Jack Oakie, William Austin, Stuart Erwln, 
Wallace MacDonald, Aileen Manning. (NP) Aug. 17. 

THREE WEEK ENDS (CD): Clara Bow, Neil Hamilton, 
Harrison Ford. Lucille Powers. Julia Swayne Gordon. 
Jack Raymond. Edythe Chapman, Guy Oliver, William 
Holden. (L) 5962f. (NP) Dec. 22. 1928. 

THUNDERBOLT (D-AT): George Bancroft, Eichard Arlen, 
Fay Wray, Tully Marshall, Eugene Besserer. James Spotts- 
wood, Fred Kohler, Mike Donlin, S. S. E. S. Stewart, 
George Irving, William Thorne, E. H. Calvert, King Tut. 
<L) Talking, 8571f: Silent, 7311f. (E) June 22, 1929. 
(NP) June 1. (TOS) Aug. 3. 

VARSITY (CD): Charles Rogers. Mary Brian. Chester 
Conklin, Phillips B. Holmes. Eobert Ellis. John West- 
wood Princeton university undergraduates. (L) 634Jf. (E) 
Oct. 27. 1928. (NP) Aug. 4. 1928. (TOS) Nov. 3. 1928. 

VIRGINIAN. THE (D-AT): Gary Cooper, Walter Huston. 
Eichard Arlen. Mary Brian. Chester Conklin, Eugene Pal- 
lette. E. H. Calvert, Helen Ware. Victor Potel, Tex Young. 
Charles Stevens. (L) 8717f. (NP) July 20. 

WEDDING MARCH, THE (D) : George Fawcett. Maude 
George, Erich von Stroheim. George Nichols, ZaSu Pitts, 
Hugie Mack, Matthew Betz. Cesare Gravina, Dale Fuller. 
Fay Wray. Syd Bracey. (L) 10.400f. (E) Oct. 6. 192S. 
(NP) Oct. 27. 1928. (TOS) Jan. 26. 1929. 

WHAT A NIGHT (CD): Bebe Daniels, Neil Hamilton. Wil- 
liam Austin. Wheeler Oakman, Charles Sellon. Hill Maiies, 
Ernie Adams. (L) 5378f. (B) Oct. 6, 1928. (ND) 
Jan. 12, 1929. „. „ 

WHEEL OF LIFE, THE (D-AT): Eichard Drx. Esther 
Ealston, O. P. Heggie. Arthur Hoyt. Myrtle Stedman. 
Larry Steers, Begis Toomev, Nigel de Brulier. (L) 5153f. : 
silent 5305f. (E) June 22, 1929. (NP) Apr. 27. 1929. 
(TOS) July 0. „ , , „ . 

WILD PARTY. THE (CD-AT): Clara Bow, Frederic March. 
Marceline Day. Shirley O'Hara. Jack Luden, Jack Oakie, 
Arthur Bankin, Lincoln Stedman. Joyce Compton. Ben 
Hendricks, Jr.. Jack Eedmond. Adrienne Dore. Jean Lor- 
raine, Virginia Thomas, Kay Bryant, Alice Adair, Amo 
Ingram, Renee Whitney, Marguerite Cramer. (L) Silent- 
6036f. Sound-7167f. (R) Apr. 6. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 
1929. (TOS) Apr. 13. 1929. 

WOLF OF WALL STREET, THE (D-AT) : George Bancroft. 
Baclanova, Paul Lukas, Nancy Carroll, Lane Chandler, 
Brandon Hurst. Paul Guertsman. Craufurd Kent. (L) 
Silent-6396f. Sound-6810f. (R) Feb. 9, 1929. (NP) Mar. 
9, 1929. (TOS) Mar. 16. 1929. 

WOLF SONG (R-TM): Lupe Velez. Gary Cooper, Louis 
Wolheim, Constantine Romanoff. Michael Vavitch. Russell 
Colombo, Augustine Lopez, George Rigas. (L) Silent, 6060f. 
Sound, 6769f. (R) Mar. 30, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 
(TOS) Apr. 6, 1929. 

WOMAN FROM MOSCOW, THE (D-ME): Pola Negri. Nor- 
man Kerry. Otto Matiesen, Lawrence Grant. Maude George. 
Paul Lukas, Bodil Rosing, Mirra Rayo. Martha Franklin. 
Jack Luden. Tetsu Komai. (L) 6938f. (R) Nov. 3. 1928. 
(NP) June 19, 1928. 

WOMAN TRAP (M-AT) : Hal Skelly. Evelyn Brent. Chester 
Morris. Leslie Fenton. Effle Ellsler, William B. Davidson. 
Guy Oliver. Charles Giblyn. Wilson Hummell. (L) 6168f. : 
silent 6384f. (NP) July 20. (TOS) Sept. 28. 



Parthenon 



WILD HEART OF AFRICA. THE (Animal Picture): (NP) 
June 22. 

Pathe 

ANNAPOLIS (CD-T): Allan, Brown. Loff. (L) 7008f. (R) 
Nov. 18, 1928. 

AWFUL TRUTH, THE (D-AT): Ina Claire. (L) 6129f. 

(R) Aug. 10, 1929. (TOS) Sept. 7. (NP) Sept. 7. 
BACHELOR'S SECRET. A (CD-AT): Allan Hale. (R) Mar 

1. 1930. 

BIG NEWS (My-AT): Robert Armstrong. Carol Lombard. 
Tom Kennedy, Warner Richmond, Wade Boteler. Sam 
Hardy, Charles Sellon. Robert Dudley. (L) Talking, 6028f. 
Recorded on film and disc. (R) Sept. 7. 1929. (NPt 
Sept. 7. 

BIG SHOT. THE (D-T) : (R) Nov. 30. 1929. 
BLACK ACE. THE (W) : Don Coleman. (L) 5722f. (R) 
Sept. 2. 1928. 

BORDER PATROL (W): Harry Carey. (L) 4598f. (R) 
Dec. 23, 1928. 

BURNING BRIDGES (W) : Harry Carey. (L) 4846f. (R) 
Sept. 30. 1928. „ „ , 

CAPTAIN SWAGGER (D-ME): Rod La Rocque. Sue Carol. 
Richard Tucker. Victor Potel. Ulrich Haupt. (L) 6312f. 
(R) Oct. 14. 1928. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 

CELEBRITY (D) : Armstrong. (L) 6145f. (R) Oct. 7, 

CLOTHES (D-AT): Constance Bennett. (R) Feb. 15. 1930. 
CRASHING THROUGH (D-AT) : William Boyd. (E) Jan. 
18. 1930. 

DEVIL'S TWIN (W): Leo Maloney. 

FLYING FOOL. THE (D-AT): William Boyd, Mane Prevost, 
Tom O'Brien. Eussell Gleason. (L) Talking. 6746f: silent. 
6700f. (NP) July 27. . (TJ> 

FORBIDDEN LOVE (D) : Lila Damita. (L) 6787f. (E) 
Oct. 28. 1928. „ „ 

.45 CALIBRE WAR (W) : Don Coleman, Ben Corbett, Al 
Hart, Edward Jones. Duke R. Lee. Floyd Ames. Jeanette 
Loff. Murdock MacQuarrie. Orrin Jackson. <R) Feb. 17, 
1929. (L) 4790f. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 

GERALDINE (CD-TME) : Eddie Qutllan, Marian Nixon. 
Albert Gran. Gaston Glass. (L) 5587f. (R) Jan. 20. 1929. 
(NP) May 25. 1929. 

GODLESS GIRL, THE (D-TME) : Llna Basquette. Marie 
Prevost, George Durvea, Noah Beery. Eddie Quillan. Mary 
Jane Irving, Julia Faye. Viola Louie. Emily Barrye. Clar- 
ence Burton. Dick Alexander. Kate Price. Hedwig Reicher. 
(L) Talking. 9328f: silent, 9019f. (R) Mar. 31. 1929. 
(NP) June 1. ■„ 

GRAND PARADE, THE (MC) : (R) Nov. 16, 1929. 

GREENWICH VILLAGE FOLLIES (MC) : (R) Nov. 2, 1929. 

HAWK OF THE HILLS (W) : Allene Ray. Robert Chandler. 
Jack Ganzhorn, Frank Lackteen. Paul Panzer, Wally Oct- 
tel. Harry Semels. Walter Miller. Jack Pratt, Parky Jones, 
Frederick Dana. John T. Prince. Chief White Horse. 
George Magrill, Evangeline Russell, Chief Yowlache. <L) 
4840f. (R) Mar. 17. 1929. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. 
HER PRIVATE AFFAIR (D-AT): Ann Harding. Harry 
Bannister. (R) Sept. 28, 1929. 



HIGH VOLTAGE (D-AT): William Boyd, Owen Moore, 
Carol Lombard, Diane Ellis. Billy Bevan. Phillips Smalley. 
(L) 5743f. (NP) June 29. 

HIS FIRST COMMAND (D-AT): William Boyd. (R) Oct. 
26 1920 

HOT AND BOTHERED (CD-AT): Eddie Quillan. (R) 
Mar. 8, 1930. 

KING OF KINGS (D-ME): H. B. Warner, Jacqueline Lo- 
gan, Dorothy Cummtng, Ernest Torrence. Joseph Schild- 
kraut, Robert Edeson. Sidney D'Albrook, Rudolph Schild- 
kraut. Sam DeGrasse, Victor Varconi, William Boyd, Matt 
Moore Julia Faye, Kenneth Thomson, Alan Brooks. (L) 
13.500f. (R) Sept. 30, 1928. (TOS) Mar. 10. 1928. 

LEATHERNECK, THE (D-T): William Boyd. Alan Hale. 
Robert Armstrong, Fred Kohler. Diane Ellis, James Al- 
dine. Paul Weigel. Jules Cowles. Wade Boteler. Phllo 
McCullough, Joe Girard, Mlchell Lewis. (L) 6898f. (R) 
Feb. 24, 1929. (NP) Apr. 20, 1929. (TOS) June 1. 

LOVE OVER NIGHT (CD): Rod La Rocque, Jeanette Loff, 
Richard Tucker. Tom Kennedy, Mary Carr. (L) 7530f. 
(R) Nov. 25. 1928. (NP) Sept. 8. 1928. 

LUCKY IN LOVE (D-AT): Morton Downey. Betty Dawford, 
Colin Keith-Johnson, Halliwell Hobbes. J. M. Kerrigan, 
Richard Taber, Edward O'Connor, Mary Murray, Mackenzie 
Ward. Louis Sorin, Sonia Karlov. Tyrrell Davis, Elizabeth 
Murray (L) 6870f. (R) Aug. 17. 1929. (NP) July 27. 

MARKED MONEY (D) : Coghlan. (L) 5506f. (R) Nov. 
4, 1928. 

MAN-MADE WOMEN (D) : Leatrlce Joy. (L) 5762f. (R) 
Sept. 9. 1928. 

MOTHER'S BOY (D-TME): Morton Downey. Beryl Mercer, 
John T. Doyle. Brian Donlevy, Helen Chandler. Osgood 
Perkins. Lorin Baker. Barbara Bennett, Jennie Moskowitz. 
Jacob Frank, Louis Sorin, Robert Glecker. Tyrrell Davis, 
Allan Vincent. Leslie Stowe. (L) 7423f. (NP) Apr. 6, 
1929. 

NED McCOBB'S DAUGHTER (D-ME): Irene Rich. Theo- 
dore Roberts, Robert Armstrong. George Barraud. Edward 
Hearn, Carol Lombard. Louis Natheaux. (L) 6070f. (R) 
Dec. 2, 1928. 

NEGLIGEE (D-AT): Ina Claire. (R) Jan. 4. 1930. 

NOISY NEIGHBORS (CD-TME): Eddie Quillan. Alberta 
Vaughn. Qullan Family. Theodore Roberts, Ray Hallor, 
Russell Simpson, Robert Perry, Mike Donlin, Billy Gil- 
bert. (L) 5737f. (R) Jan. 27. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 
1929. 

OFFICER O'BRIEN (D AT): William Boyd. (R) Nov. 
30 1929. 

OFFICE SCANDAL (CD-TME): Phyllis Haver. Leslie Fen- 
ton. Raymond Hatton, Margaret Livingston, Jimmy Adams. 
Jimmy Aldine. (L) 6511f. (R) Mar. 3. 1929. (NP) 
May 25. 1929. (TOS) July 27. 

OH. YEAH! (D-AT): Robert Armstrong, James Gleason. 
Zasu Pitts, Patricia Caron. (R) Oct. 5. 1929. 

PARIS BOUND (D-AT): Ann Harding, Frederic March, 
George Irving, Leslie Fenton, Hallam Cooley, Juliette 
Crosby, Charlotte Walker, Carmelita Geraghty, Ilka Chase. 
(L) Talking. 6.684f. (R) Aug. 3, 1929. (NP) July 20. 
(TOS) Aug. 10. 

POWER (CD): William Boyd, Alan Hale. Jaquellne Logan. 
Jerry Drew, Joan Bennett, Carol Lombard, Pauline Cur- 
ley. (L) 6092f. (E) Sept. 23. 1928. (NP) Oct. 13. 
1928. 

SAILORS' HOLIDAY (CD): Allan Hale. Sally Eilers. 

George Cooper, Paul Hurst, Mary Carr, Charles Clary. 

(NP) Sept. 21. (E) Sept. 14. 
SAL OF SINGAPORE (D-T): Phyllis Haver. (L) 6804f. 

(R) Nov. 11, 1928. 
SHADY LADY, THE (D-TME): Phyllis Haver. Robert 

Armstrong, Louis Wolheim, Russell Gleason. (L) Talking, 

6132f; silent. 5808f. (R) Jan. 20. 1929. (NP) June 1. 
SHOW FOLKS (CD-T): Eddie Quillan. (L) 6581f. (R) 

Oct. 21, 1928. 

SIN TOWN (CD): Elinor Fair, Ivan Lebedeff, Hugh Allan, 
Jack Oakie. (L) 4554f. (R) Jan. 20, 1929. (NP) June 1. 

SOPHOMORE, THE (OD-AT) : Eddie Quillan. SaUy O'Neil. 
Stanley Smith, Jeanette Loff, Russell Gleason. Sarah Pad- 
den. Brooks Benedict, Spec O'Donnell. (L) Talking 6526f. 
(R) Aug. 24. 1929. (TOS) Aug. 24. 

SPEILER, THE (D-T): Alan Hale, Renee Adoree. (L) 
5816f. (R) Dec. 30, 1928. (TOS) Mar. 9, 1929. 

SQUARE SHOULDERS (M-TME) : Louis Wolheim. Junior 
Coghlan, Philippe De Lacey, Anita Louise, Montague 
Shaw, Johnny Morris, Kewpie Morris, Clarence Geldert. 
(L) 5477f. (R) Mar. 31, 1929. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. 

STRANGE CARGO (D-AT): Lee Patrick, June Nash, George 
Barraud, Kyrle Beliew, Russell Gleason, Frank Reicher, 
Claude King, Ned Sparks, Josephine Brown, Charles Hamil- 
ton. Andre Beranger, Otto Matieson. (L) Talking. 7099f; 
silent. 6134f. (R) Mar. 31, 1929. (P) June 1. 



Rayart 



ANNE AGAINST WORLD (D) : Shirley Mason. Jack Mower. 
James Bradbury, Jr., Isabel Keith, Thomas A. Curran, 
Henry Roquemore. Belle Stoddard. Bill Franey. (L) 5732f. 
(R) Apr. 15. 1929. (NP) June 29. 

BLACK PEARL, THE (My-M) : Lila Lee, Ray Hallor. Carl- 
ton Stockdale, Thomas Curran. George French. Howard 
Lorenz, Sybil Grove, Baldy Belmont, Adele Watson, Lew 
Short, Art Rowlands. (L) 5261f. (R) Jan. 1. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. 

BROTHERS (D) : Bedford. Keefe. (L) 60921. (R) Feb. 
15, 1929. 

CITY OF PURPLE DREAMS, THE (D) : Bedford. Frazer. 

(L) 5937f. (E) September, 1928. 
DEVIL'S CHAPLAIN, THE (D) : C. Keefe, Virginia Brown 

Faire. (L) 5451f. (E) Mar. 15. 1929. 
HANDCUFFED (AT-MD): Virginia Brown Faire, Broderlck 

O'Farrell, Frank Clarke, Charles West. (NP) Sept. 7. 
ISLE OF LOST MEN. THE (D): Santschi. Connor. (L) 

5800f. (R) October. 1928. 
SHANGHAI ROSE: Irene Rich. (L) 6539f. (R) Mar. 1, 

1929. (NP) May 18. 
SHIPS OF THE NIGHT (M) : Jacqueline Logan. Sojin. 

Jack Mower, Andy Clyde, Arthur Rankin. Glen Cavender, 

Thomas A. Curran, Frank Lanning, J. P. McGowan, Frank 

Morsn. (L) 5940f. (R) December, 1928. (NP) Mar. 23. 

1929. 

SHOULD A GIRL MARRY7 (D-TME): Foster. Keith. <L) 

6525f. (R) November. 1928. 
SISTERS OF EVE (D) : Mae Busch. (L) 5675f. (R) 

September. 1928. 
SOME MOTHER'S BOY (D): Mary Carr, Jason Robards. 

Jobyna Ralston, M. A. Dickinson. Henry Barrows. (L) 

6901f. (R) Feb. 15. 1929. 
TWO SISTERS (D): Viola Dana. Rex Lease. Claire Du- 

Brey, Irving Bacon, Boris Karloff, Tom Lingham, Thomas 

A. Curran, Adalyn Asbury. (L) 5161f. (R) Apr. 1. 1929. 

(NP) May 25. 1929. 
WHEN DREAMS COME TRUE (D) : Helene Costello. Rex 

Lease. Claire McDowell. Ernest Hilliard. Emmett King. 

George Periolat, Danny Hoy. Buddy Brown, Ranger, Rags. 

(L) 6242f. (R) Jan. 15, 1929. (NP) Feb. 16. 1929. 



AVENGING RIDER, THE (W): Tom Tyler, Florence Al- 
len, Frankle Darro, Al Ferguson, Bob Fleming, Arthur 
Thalasso. (L) 4808f. (R) Oct. 7, 1928. (NP) Mar. 
16. 1929. 

BIG DIAMOND ROBBERY, THE (W) : Tom Mix. (L) 

6114f. (R) May 13, 1929. 
BLOCKADE (D) : Anna Q. Nllsson. McDonald. (L) 6409f. 

(R) Jan. 30. 1929. 
CHARGE OF THE GAUCHOS (M) : Francis X. Bushman, 

Jacqueline Logan, Guldo Trento, Paul Ellis, Henry Kolker, 

Charles Hill, Malles, John Hopkins, Charles K French, 

Olive Hasbrouek, Mathllde Comont. Jack Ponder, Llge 

Conley, Glno Con-ado. Frank Hagney. (L) 5548f. (R) 

Sept. 16. 1928. (NP) Sept. 15. 1928. 
COME AND GET IT (W) : Bob Steele, Jimmy Quinn. Jay 

Morley, Betty Welsh. James B. Leong, William Welsh. 

Marian Sals. (R) Feb. 3. (L) 6254f. 
DELIGHTFUL ROGUE, THE (AT): Rod La Rocque. Bebe 

Daniels. (R) Sept. 22. 1929. Serial number. 0203. 
DRIFTER, THE (W) : Tom Mix, Dorothy Dwan. Barney 

Furey. Al Smith, Ernest Wilson, Frank Austin, Joe Rick- 

aon, Wynn Mace. (R) Mar. 18. (L) 5896f. 
FRECKLED RASCAL (W) : Buzz Barton. Milburn Morante. 

Tom Lingham. Lotus Thompson, Pat O'Brien, Bill Paton. 

(R) Mar. 31. (L) 4 884f. 
FURY OF THE WILD (D): Ranger, Barbara Worth, Robert 

Homans, Pat O'Brien, Al Smith. (R) Jan. 6. (L) 4899f. 
GUN LAW (W): Tom Tyler, Barney Furey, Ethlyne Clair. 

Frankie Darro, Lew Meehan, Tom Brooker, Harry Woods. 

(R) Mar. 3. (L) 4688f. 
HALF MARRIAGE (D-AT) : Olive Borden. Morgan Farley. 

Ann Greenway, Sally Blaine. Ken Murray. Anderson Law- 

lor, Hedda Hopper, Richard Tucker. (L) Talking, 6481f. 

(R) Oct. 13. 1929. 
HARDBOI LED (D) : Sally O'Neil. Donald Reed, Iilyan 

Tashman, Bob Sinclair, Ole M. Ness, Tom O'Grady, Al- 

phonz Ethier. (R) Feb. 3. (L) 5940f. 
JAZZ AGE (T-D): Douglas Fairbanks. Jr.. Marceline Day. 

Henry B. Walthall. Myrtle Stedman. E. J. Ratcliffc. 

Gertrudo Messinger. Joel McCrea. William Bechtal, lone 

Holmes and Ed Dealing. (R) February 10. (L) 6245f. 
IDAHO RED (W): Frankie Darro, Tom Tyler. Patricia 

Caron. Lew Meehan. Barney Furey. (R) Apr. 21. (L) 

Sound 4783f. ; silent 4769f. With sound effects. 
LAUGHING AT DEATH (D) : Bob Steele, Natalie Joyce. 

Captain Vic. Kai Schmidt, Ethan Laidlaw, Armand Trillor, 

Hector V. Sarno. (R) June 2. (L) 5500f. 
LITTLE SAVAGE (W) : Buzz Barton. Milburn Morante. 

Willard Boelner, Patrica Palmer. Sam Nelson, Ethan 

Laidlaw. (R) May 19. (L) 4781f. 
LOVE IN THE DESERT (T-D): Olive Borden. Hugh Trevor, 

Noah Beery, Frank Leigh, William Tooker, Ida Darling. 

Alan Roscoe. Fatty Carr, Charles Brinlcy, Pearl Varnell, 

Gordon Magee. (R) March 17. (L) Sound 5365f. ; silent 

6365f. 

ONE MAN DOG (W) : Ranger, Sam Nelson. Edward Hearn. 

Virginia Bradford. William Patton. Henry O'Connor, Art 

Robbins. (R) March 3. (L) 4481f. 
OUTLAW (W): Tom Mix. Sally Blane. Frank M. Clarke. 

Al Smith, Ethan Laidlaw. Al Ferguson, Barney Furey. 

(R) Jan. 21. (L) 6057f. 
PRIDE OF PAWNEE (W) : Tom Tyler. Frankie Darro, 

Ethlyne Clair, Barney Furey, Jack Hilliard, Lew Meekan, 

Jimmy Casey. (L) 4750f. (R) June 9. 1929. (NP) June 22. 
RED SWORD. THE (D) : Marion Nixon. William Collier, 

Jr., Carmel Myers, Allan Roscoe. (L) 6243f. (R) Feb. 17, 

1929. 

RIO RITA (O-ATS): Bebe Daniels. John Boles. (R) Sept. 
15, 1929. Serial number, 0102. 

SIDE STREET (D-AT): Tom, Matt and Owen Moore, 
Kathryn Perry, Emma Dunn, Frank Sheridan. (L) Talk- 
ing, 6965f. (R) Sept. 8, 1929. Serial number. 0202. 

STREET GIRL (CD-ATS) : Jack Oakie, Ned Sparks. John 
Harron, Joseph Cawthorn. Betty Compson. (L) Talking, 
8188f. (R) Aug. 11, 1929. (NP) Sept. 28. (TOS) 
Sept. 21. 

VERY IDEA. THE (AT): Frank Craven. Hugh Trevor. 
Theodore von Eltz, Olive Tell. Doris Eaton, Adele Watson, 
Oeanne de Bard. Allen Kearns, Sally Blane. (L) Talk- 
ing 6139f. (R) Sept. 1, 1929. Serial number. 0503. 



Tiffany-Stahl 



BROADWAY FEVER (CD): Sally O'Neil Roland Drew. 

Corliss Palmer. (R) Jan. 1. (L) 5412f. 
LUCKY BOY (TS-CD): George Jessel. Margaret Quimby. 

Rosa Rosanova, William Strauss. Gwen Lee. Richard 

Tucker. Gayne Whitman. Mary Doran. (R) Feb. 2. (L) 

Sound 8643f.; silent 6?°"". (NP) Feb. 2. 
MIDSTREAM (D-TJIK)' Ulaire Windsor. Montague Love. 

Larry Kent, Helen Jerome Eddy, Louis Alvarez, Leslie 

Brigham, Genevieve Shrader. (L) 7353f. 
MY LADY'S PAST (D-TME): Belle Bennett. Joe E. Brown. 

Alma Bennett, Russell Simpson. Joan Standing, Billie 

Bennett. (NP) June 15. (L) Talking, 7948f. 
NEW ORLEANS (D-TME): William Collier. Jr.. Ricardo 

Cortez, Alma Bennett. (L) 6765f. (R) Aug. 1. 1929. 
TWO MEN AND A MAID (D-T): William Collier, Jr.. 

Alma Bennett. Eddie Gribbon. George E. Stone. (L) 

Talking, 6423f. (R) Aug. 1. 1929. 



United Artists 



RKO 



AIR LEGION, THE (D) : Ben Lyon, Antonio Moreno, 
Martha Sleeper, John Gough. Colin Chase. (L) 6361f. 
(R) Jan. 6. 1929. (NP) Jan. 12, 1929. 

AMAZING VAGABOND, THE (M) : Bob Steele. Tom Ling- 
ham, Jay Morley. Perry Murdock, Lafe McKee, Thelma 
Daniels. (L) 5081f. (R) Apr. 7, 1929. (NP) Apr. 6. 
1929. 



ALIBI (M-AT): Chester Morris. Pat O'Malley, Harry Stubbs. 
Mae Busch, Eleanor Griffith, Inna Harrison, Regis Toomey, 
Al Hill, James Bradbury, Jr., Elmer Ballard, Kerman 
Cripps. Purnell B. Pratt. DeWitt Jennings, Edward Brady. 
(L) Talking. 81C7f. (R) Apr. 20. 1929. (NP) June 1. 
(TOS) Sept. 21. 

BULLDOG DRUMMOND (D-AT): Ronald Colman, Joan 
Bennett, Lilyan Tashman. Montagu Love. Lawrence Grant, 
Wilson Benge, Claud Allister. Adolph Millar, Cahrles Sellon. 
Tetsu Komal. (L) Talking. 8256f. 

COQUETTE (D-AT): Mary Pickford. John Mack Brown. 
Matt Moore, John Sainpolis, William Janney, Henry 
Kolker, George Irving, Louise Beavers. (L) Silent, 6993f. 
(R) Apr. 12. 1929. (NP) June 1. 

ETERNAL LOVE (D-ME): John Barrymore. Camilla Horn, 
Victor Varconi, Hobart Bosworth, Bodil Rosing, Mona Rico. 
Evelyn Selbie. (R) Mav 11, 1929. (L) 6948f. : silent, 
6318f. (NP) June 15. (TOS) June 1. 

EVANGELINE (D-ME): Dolores Del Rio, Roland Drew. 
Alec B. Francis. John Holland, James Marcus. Paul 
McAllister, Lawrence Grant, Bobby Mack, George Marion, 
(L) 8268f. (NP) June 1. 

IRON MASK. THE (D-TME): Douglas Fairbanks. BeUe 
Bennett. Marguerite de la Motte. Dorothy Ravier. Vera 
Lewis. Rolfe Sedan. William Bakewell. Gordon Thorpe, 
Nigel de Brulier. Ulrich Haupt, Lon Poff. Charles Stevens, 
Henry Otto, Leon Barry. Standley J. Sandford, Glno Cor- 
rado. (L) Talking. 8S55f; silent. 8659f. (R) Mar. 8. 
1929. (NP) June 15. 

LADY OF THE PAVEMENTS (ST-D) : Lupe Velez. Wil- 
liam Boyd, Jetta Goudal, George Fawcett. Albert Contl. 
Henry Armetta. (R) Feb. 16. (L) Sound S329f. ; silent 
7495f. 

RESCUE, THE (D-ME): Ronald Colman. Lily Damita, 
Alfred Hickman, Theodore von Eltz. John Davidson. Phillip 
Strande. Bernard Siegel, Sojin, Harry Cording, Laska 
Winters, Duke Kahanamoku, Louis Morrison, George Rigas. 
Christopher Martin. (L) Musical. 7980f; silent, 7910f. (B) 
Jan. 12. 1929. (NP) June 15. 



58 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



SHE GOES TO WAR (D-TMS): Eleanor Boardman, John 
Holland. Edmund Btfrns. Alma Rubens. Al St. John. Glen 
Waters. Margaret Seddon. Yola D'Avril. Evelyn Hall. (L) 
8864f. (It) July 13. 1929. (NP) June 1. (TOS) Aug. lu. 

THIS IS HEAVEN (D-TME) : Vilma Banky. James Hall. 
Fritzie Ridgeway. Lucien Littlefield. Itichard Tucker. (Li 
7948f. (It) June 22. 1929. (NP) June 1. (TOS) July 2(1. 

THREE PASSIONS. THE (D-M) : Alice Terry. Ivan Petro- 
vitch. Shayie Gardner. Leslie Faber, Andrew Engelman, 
Claire Eames. (L) Talking. 6646f; silent. 7576f. (It) 
June 1. 1929. 

VENUS (D-iME) : Constance Talmadge, Andre Roanne, Jean 
Murat. Mas Maxudian. Baron Pils and Jean Mercauton. 

(L) Sound GS82f. (NP) June 1. 

Universal 

BEAUTY AND BULLETS (W) : Ted Wells. Duane Thomp- 
son, Jack Kenney, Wilbur Mack. (L) 479f. 

BODY PUNCH, THE (D) : Jack Dougherty. Virginia Brown 
Faire. George Kotsonaros, Wilbur Mack Monte Montague. 
(L) 4786f. (R) July 14. 1929. (NP) July 27. 

BORDER WILCAT, THE (W): Ted Wells, Kathryn Me 
Guile. <R) Mav 12. (L) 42591. 

BORN TO THE SADDLE (VV): Ted Wells, Duane Thomp- 
son, Leo White. Merrill McCormick. Bryon Douglas. Nelson 
McDowell. (R) Mar. 10. (L) 412Gf. 

BROADWAY (AT-D): Glen Tryon, Merna Kennedy. Evelyn 
Brent, Thomas Jackson. Robert Ellis. Otis Harlan. Paul 
Porcasi, Marion Lord. Fritz Field. Leslie Fenton, Arihur 
Housman. George Davis, Betty Francisco, Edytlie Flynn 
Florence Dudley. Ruby McCoy. (L) 9330f. 

BURNING THE WIND (W): Hoot Gibson, Cesare Gravine. 
Virginia Brown Faire. Boris Karloff. Robert Holmes. Re- 
leased Feb. 10. (L) 5202f. 

CHARLATAN, THE (T-D): Holmes Herbert. Rockdiffe Fel- 
lows, Margaret Livingston. (R) Apr. 14. (L) Silent. 
59721. Sound C50Bf. 

CLEAR THE DECKS (T-CD) : Reginald Denny. Olive Has- 
brouck. Otis Harlan. Colette Merton. Lucien Littlefield. 
Brooks Benedict. Robert Anderson. Elinor Leslie. (It! 
Mar. 3. (L) Sound. 57921. Silent. 5740f. 

COHENS AND KELLYS IN ATLANTIC CITY (T-CD): 
George Sidney. Mack Swain. Vera Gordon. Kate Price. 
Cornelius Keefe. Nora Lane, Virginia Sales, Tom Kennedy. 
(R) Mar. 17. (L) Sound. 74001. Silent. 7752C 

COLLEGE LOVE (D-AT) : George Lewis. Eddie Phillips. 
Dorothy Gulliver. Churchill Ross. Hayden Stevenson. Sumner 
Getchell. (L) Talking. 6864f. (R) July 7. 1929. (NP) 
July 27. 

COME ACROSS (M-TME): Lina Basquette. Reed Howes. 
Flora Finch. Craufurd Kent, Gustav von Seyffertitz, Clarissa 
Selwynne. (R) June 30, 1929. (NP) July 27. (L) Talk- 
ing. 5330f; silent. 5593f. 
DRAKE CASE. THE (AT-MD): Gladys Brockwell. (NP) 

Sept. 2S. (TOS) Sept. 21. 
EYES OF THE UNDERWORLD (W) : Bill Cody. Sallv 

Blane. (R) Apr. 28. (L) 4208f. 
GIRL ON THE BARGE (T-D): Jean Hersholt. Sally O'Neil. 
Malcolm McGregor. Morris Mcintosh, Nancy Kelly. George 
Offerman. Henry West. Rex. (R) Feb. 3. (L) Sound. 
7510f. Silent. 0908f. 
GIRL OVERBOARD (D-T): Mary Philbin. Fred Mackaye. 
Otis Harlan. Edmund Breese, Francis McDonald. (L) 
Talking. 7391f; silent, 75311. (R) July 28, 1929. (NP) 
Sept. 21. 

GRIT WINS (W): Ted Wells. Kathleen Collins. Al Ferguson. 

Buck Conners. Nelson McDowell, Edwin Mouiton. (It) 

Jan. 27. (L) 450Gf. 
HARVEST OF HATE (W) : Rex. Jack Perin, Helen Foster. 

Tom London. (L) 47-9f. 
HIS LUCKY DAY (CO-TME): Reginald Denny. LoRayne 

Duval, Otis Harlan, Eddie Phillips. Cissie Fitzgerald. 

Harvey Clark, Tom O'Brien. (L) Talking. 67311; silent. 

5630f. (R) June 30, 1929. (NP) June 22. 
HOOFBEATS OF VENGEANCE (W): Rex. Jack Perrin. 

Helen Foster. Al Ferguson. Starlight. (R) June 1(5. (L) 

4525f. 

IT CAN BE DONE (ST-CD): Glenn Tryon. Sue Carol. 
Richard Carlyle. Jack Egan. Tom O'Brien. (R) Mar.h 
24. (L) Sound G3G0f. : silent GOOOf. 

KID'S CLEVER (CD): Glenn Tryon. Kathryn Crawford. 
Russell Simpson. Lloyd Whitlock, George Chandler. Vir- 
ginia Sales. Joan Standing. Max Asher. Florence Turner. 
Stephin Fetchit. (R) Feb. 17. (L) 5729f. 

KING OF THE CAMPUS (T-CD): George Lewis. Dorothy 
Gulliver. Eddie Phillips. Hayden Stevenson. Churchill 
Ross, Collette Merton. 

KING OF THE RODEO (W) : Hoot Gibson. Kathryn Craw- 
ford. Slim Summerville. Charles K. French. Monty Mon- 
tague, Joseph W. Gerard. (R) Jan. 20. (L) 5509f. 

LARIAT KID. THE (W): Hoot Gibson. Ann Christy. Can 
Anderson, Mary Foy. Francis Ford. Walter Brennan. Andy 
Waldron. Bud Osborne, Joe Bennett, Jim Corey. (L) 
5247f. (R) June 23. 1929. (NP) June 15. 

LAST WARNING. THE (M-TME): Laura La Plante. 
Montagu Love. John Boles, Roy D'Arcy. Bert Boach. Mar- 
garet Livingston, Mack Swain, Burr Mcintosh, Carry 
Daumery, George Summerville. Torben Meyer. D'Arcy Cor- 
rigan. Bud Phelps, Charles French. Fred Kelsey. Tom 
O'Brien. Harry Northrup. (L) Talking. 7980f; silent. 7731f. 
(R) Tan. 6, 1929. (NP) June 29. 

LONESOME (T-CD): Glenn Tryon, Barbara Kent. (R) 
Jan. 20. (L) Sound 67Glf. ; silent G142f. 

MAN. WOMAN AND WIFE (D-TME) : Norman Kerry. 
Pauline Starke. Marian Nixon. Kenneth Harlan. CraufurO 
Kent. Byron Douglas. (L) 6589f. (It) Jan. 13. 1929. 
(NP) June 29. 

MELODY LANE (ATS): Eddie Leonard. Josephine Dunn. 

Rose Coe. George Stone, Huntley Gordon. (L) Talking. 

6350f. (R) July 21. 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. 
MODERN LOVE (CD-AT) : Charley Chase. Jean Hersholt. 

Kathlyn Crawford. Edward Martindel. (R) July 14. 1929. 

(NP) June 22. (L) Talking. 6501f: silent. 5730f. 
PLUNGING HOOFS (W) : Tack Perin. Rex. Barbara Worth. 

J. P. McGowan. David Dunbar. (L) Silent. 4344f. (R) 

Apr. 14. (NP) May IS. 
POINTS WEST (W): Hoot Gibson. Alberta Vaughn. Frank 

Campeau. Jack Raymond. Martha Franklin. Milt Brown. 

Jim Corey. (L) 5491f. (NP) Sept. 28. 
RED HOT SPEED (CD-TME): Reginald Denny. Alice Day. 

Charles Byer. Thomas Ricketts. De Witt Jennings. Fritzi 

Ridgeway. Hector V. Sarno. (L) 6621f. (R) Jan. 27. 

1929. (NP) June 29. 
Rl DIN' DEMON. THE (W): Ted Wells. Kathleen Collins. 

Lucy Beaumont. Otto Bibber. (L) 4380f. (R) Aug. 18. 

1929. (NP) Aug. 3. 
TIP OFF. THE (W): William Cody. George Hackathorne. 

Duane Thompson. L. J. O'Connor. Jack Singleton. Robert 

Bolder. Monte Montague. Walter Shumway. (L) 4109f. 

(R) June 2. 1929. (NP) July 13. 
SCANDAL (TD): Laura LaPlante. John Boles. Jane Win- 
ton, Huntlev Gordon. Nancy Dover. Eddie Phillips. Julia 
Swayne Gordon. (R) May 4. (L) Sound. GG75f. ; silent 

G475f. (TOS) June 13. 
SHOW BOAT (D-T): Laura LaPlante. Joseph Schildkraut. 

Emily Fitzroy. Otis Harlan. Helen Morgan. Jane La- 
Verne Alma Rubens. Jack McDonald. Neely Edwards. 

(L) 11.772f. : silent. 10.290f. 
SMILING TERROR, THE (W) : Ted Wells. Derelys Perdue. 

Al Ferguson. Bed Osborne. (L) 4525f. (R) Jmne 30. 1929. 

(NP) July 13. 

WAGON MASTER. THE (W-TS) : Ken Maynard. Edith 
Roberts. Frederick Dana. Tom Santschi. Al Ferguson. Jack 
Hanlon. Bobby Dunn. White Horse, Frank Rice. (L) 
Sound 6335f. ; silent 5G79f. (NP) Sept. 29. 

WINGED HORSEMEN. THE (W) : Hoot Gibson, Ruth Elder, 
Charles N. Schaeffer, Allan Forrest. Herbert Prior. (L) 
5544f. (R) June 23, 1929. (NP) July 13. 



Warner Bros. 



ARGYLE CASE, THE (AT-MD): Thomas Meighan, H. B. 

Warner, Gladys Brockwell. Lila Lee. Bert Roach. (TOS) 

Aug. 31. (L) 7794f. 
CONQUEST (D-AT): Monte Blue. Lois Wilson. H. B. 

Warner. TuUy Marshall. (L) 4706f. (R) Jan. 19, 1929. 

(NP) Aug. 3. 

DESERT SONG. THE (TMS) : John Boles, Charlotte King. 
Louise Fazenda, Edward Martindel. Jack Pratt. Otto Hoff- 
man. John Miljan, Del Elliott. Myrna Loy. (L) Talking, 
11.034f. (R) May 11. 1929. (NP) May 18. (TOS) 
June 8. 

FANCY BAGGAGE (T-D): Audrey Ferris. Myrna Loy. 
George Fawcett, Edmund Breese, Hallam Cooley, Burr 
Mcintosh. Wallace MaeDonald, Eddie Gribbon. Virginia 
Sales. (R) Feb. 23. (L) Sound, 6447f. Silent, 5983f. 

FROM HEADQUARTERS (T-D): Monte Blue, Edmund 
Breese, Ethlvne Claire, Guinn Williams, Lionel Belmore, 
Henry B. Walthall. Gladys Brockwell, Eddie Gribbon, Pat 
Hartigan, John Kelly, Otto Lederer. William Irving, Pat 
Somerset. J. Girard. (R) June G. (L) 6323f. 

FROZEN RIVER (T-D): Rin-Tin-Tin. Davey Lee, Lew 
Harvey, Nina Quartaro, Duane Thompson, Joseph Swickard. 
Frank Campeau. (R) May 25. (L) 5482f. 

GAMBLERS, THE (D-AT): Lois Wilson, H. B. Warner. 
Jason Robards. George Fawcett. Johnny Arthur, Frank 
Campeau. Pauline Garon. Charles SeUon. (L) Talking. 
GGllf : silent, 4844f. Recorded on disc. (TOS) Aug. 24. 
(R) June 29, 1929. 

GREYHOUND LIMITED (T-D): Monte Blue. Edna Murphy. 
Grant Withers. Lucy Beaumont. Lew Harvey. Ernie Shields. 
(R) Mar. 23. (L) Sound. G114f. Silent, 499Gf. 

HARDBOILED ROSE (T-D): Myrna Loy. William Collier. 
Jr., Lucv Beaumont, Gladys Brockwell, Edward Martindel. 
John Milajn. (R) May 4. (L) Sound. 5610f. Silent, 
4 87 of. 

HONKY TONK (AT-CD) : Sophie Tucker, Lila Lee, Audrey 
Ferris, George Duryea. Mahlon Hamilton. John T. Murray. 
(L) Sound. 6412f. (R) Aug. 3. (TOS) Aug. 31. (NP) 
Sept. 14. 

KID GLOVES (T-D): Conrad Nagel. Lois Wilson, Edna 

Murphy, John Davidson. Tom Dugan and Edward Earle. 

(R) Apr. 13. (L) Sound 6273f. ; silent 5658f. 
LITTLE WILDCAT (T-D): George Fawcett, Robert Edeson. 

Audrey Ferris. (R) Jan. 5. (L) Sound 5644f . ; silent 

51Glf. 

MADONNA OF AVENUE A (D-ATM) : Dolores Costello. 
Grant Withers. Louise Dresser, Douglass Gerard, Otto Hoff- 
man, Lee Moran. (L) Talking 6461f: silent. 5294f. (R) 
June 22. 1929. 

MILLION DOLLAR COLLAR (TE-D) : Rin-Tin-Tin. Matty 
Kemp. Evelyn French, Tommy Dugan, Allen Cavin, Philo 
McCullough, Grover Liggon. (R) Feb. 9. (NP) March 16. 
(L) Sound 55Glf. : silent 4878f. 

NOAH'S ARK (TE-D): Dolores CosteUo. George O'Brien. 
Noah Beery. Louise Fazenda. Guinn Williams. Paul Mc- 
Allister, Anders Randolf. Nigel de Brulier. Armand Kaliz. 
Mvrna Loy. William Mong. Malcolm White. (L) Sound 
9478f. : silent 7752f. 

MY MAN (CD-AT): Fannie Brice. Guinn Williams. Andre 
de Segurola, Ann Brody. Richard Tucker. Billy Sealy. Edna 
Murphy. Arthur Hoyt. (L) 9247f. Silent. G136f. (NP) 
June 29. 

NO DEFENSE (D-AT): Monte Blue. May McAvoy, Lee 
Moran. Kathryn Carver, William Tooker, William Desmond. 
Bud Marshall. (L) Talking. 5558f; silent. 4712T. (R) 
Apr. 6. 1929. (NP) July 13. 

ON WITH THE SHOW (ATS-D) : Betty Compson. Sam 
Hardy. Molly O'Day. Joe E. Brown. Sally O'Neil. Louise 
Fazenda, William Bakewell. Purnell Pratt, Fairbanks 
twins. Wheeler Oakman. Sam Hardy, Thomas Jefferson, 
Lee Moran, Harry Gribbon, Arthur Lake. Josephine Hous- 
ton. Henry Kink. Otto Hoffman. Ethel Walters. Harmoun 
Four. Angelus Babe. (L) Sound 8S64f.; silent 8441f. 
(TOS) Aug. 17. 

ONE STOLEN NIGHT (TM-D) : Betty Bronson, Mitchell 
Lewis. Buster Collier, Rose Dione, Nina Quartaro, Harry 
Todd. Otto Lederer, Angelo Rossitto. Jack Santaro. Harry 
Shultz. Chashill Mailes. (R) Apr. 6. (L) Sound 5243f. ; 
silent 4797f. (NP) March 30. 

SAY IT WITH SONGS (D-ATS) : Al Jolson. David Lee. 
Marian Nixon. (L) Talking, 8324f. (R) Aug. 24, 1929. 

STOLEN KISSES (C-T) : Claude GUlingwater, Hallen Coo- 
ley, May McAvoy, Edna Murphy. Reed Howes. Arthur 
Hoyt. (L) Talking. 6273f; silent. 5683f. (R) Apr. 13. 
1929. 

STARK MAD (MAT): Louise Fazenda, Claude GUling- 
water, H. B. Warner. John Miljan. Jacquline Logan. 
Henry B. Walthall. Andre Beranger. Warner Richmond, 
Lionel Belmore, Floyd Schackelford. (L) Talking, 6681f; 
silent, 4917f. (R) Mar. 2. 1929. 
TIME. PLACE AND GIRL, THE (AT-D): Grant Withers. 
Betty Compson. James Kirkwood. Bert Roach. (TOS) 
June 22. 

World Wide 

BERLIN AFTER DARK (MD) : Kurt Gerron. Ernst Stahl 
Nachbauer. Fritz Kampers, Grita Ley. (L) 6553f. (R) 
June. 

BLACK WATERS (AT-D): James Kirkwood. Lloyd Hamil- 
ton. Mary Brian, John Loder, Frank Reicher. Robert Ames. 
Ben Hendricks, Noble Johnson, Hallam Cooley. (L) 7322f. 
(It) Apr. 14. No silent version. 

BONDMAN. THE (D) : Norman Kerry. (R) Mar. 17. 
(L) 7000f. 

KITTY (T-D): Estelle Brody. John Stuart, Marie Ault. 

Dorothy Cummings, Winter HaU, Olaf Hytten. Charles 

O'Shaughnessy. (R) June 15. (L) 8441f. 
MOULIN ROUGE (ME-D): Olga Chekova. Eve Gray. Jean 

Bradin. (R) January 30. (L) Sound 8312f. 
PAWNS OF PASSION (D) : Olga Chekova, Sidney Suberly. 

Henry Baudin, Hans Stever, Lola Josane, Carmine GaUone. 

(R) Feb. 17. (L) 7196f. 
PICCADILLY (AT-MD): Gilda Grey. Anna May Wong. 

Jameson Thomas. (L) S080f. (R) June 1. (TOS) Aug. 24 
PRINCE AND THE DANCER (D) : Dina Graller, Albert 

Paulig. Werner Pittschau, Anna Kallina. (R) June 29. 
TRIUMPH OF THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL, THE (D): 

Matheson Lang. Margaret Hume. Nelson Keys. Hadden 

Mason, Juliette Compton. Douglass Payne. Harold Ruth. 

(L) 6490L (R) June 22, 1929. 

Miscellaneous Companies 
Affiliated European 

BEHIND THE ALTAR (D): Wilhelm Dieterle. Marcella 

Albani. ID 6200f. Silent film. 
ESCAPE FROM HELL (MD): Jean Murat, Louis Ralph, 

Countess Agnes von Esterhazy, Paul Heidman. R. Van 

Riel, Leo Penkert, W. Kaiser Hayl. Harry Frank. Lewis 

Brndy. 

PASSION OF JOAN DE ARC (D): Mile. Falconetti, M. 
Silvain. M. Schutz, Ravet, Andre Berly, Antonin Artaud. 
(L) 7000f. 

Aid a Films 

KIF TEBBI: Marcello Spade. Donatelle Neri. Gini Vloti. 
TJgo Graccio. Silent film. 



Amer.-Anglo 

BETRAYAL, THE (D) : Jerro 'd Robertshaw, Gerald Pring, 
Charles Emerald. Elissa Landi. (L) 7400f. 

LIVINGSTONE IN AMERICA (D) : M. A. WetheraU. Henry 
Walton, Molly Rogers, Reginald Fox. (L) 5799f. 

Ass. Ind. Prod. 

FAR WESTERN TRAILS (W): Ted Thompson, Bud Os- 
borne, Lew Ames. Betty O'Doan. (R) May 20. (L) 4315f. 

MIDNIGHT ON THE BARBARY COAST (D) : William 
Barrymore, Kala Pasha, Jack Richardson. (R) Feb. 9. 
(L) 4250f. 

Australasian Films 

BLACK CARGOES OF THE SOUTH SEAS (D) : Edmund 

Burns. Edith Roberts. Susan Dennis. Silent film. 
FOR THE TERM OF HIS NATURAL LIFE (D) : Eva 

Novak, Arthur McLaglen. George Fisk, Kay Soupen, Matian 
Clark, Dunstan Webb, Susan Dennis. (L) ll.OOOf. 

Aywon 

BEAUTIFUL BLUE DANUBE (D): Hans Junkerman. Julius 
Falkenstein, Harry Liedke, Ernest Verebes and Lya Mara. 
Silent picture. 

Bell Pictures 

BAD MAN'S MONEY (W) : Yakima Canutt. (L) 4850f. 
(R) Mar. 31. 

BOHEMIAN DANCER (D) : Lya Mara. Harry Liedtkn. 
(L) 5800f. Silent only. 

Bertad Pictures 

BLACK CRUISE (MD): (L) 9000f. (R) June 1. Silem 
film. 

FIGHTING THE WHITE SLAVE TRAFFIC (T-D): Eniil 
Jannings. Werner Kraus. (R) June 15. (L) Sound. 9000f. 



Biltmore Prod. 



PHANTOMS OF THE NORTH (D) : Edith Roberts. Donald 
Keith. Kathleen Key, Borris Karloff, Joe Bonomo, Josef 
Swickard. (R) June 2. (L) 4G0Of. 

El Dorado Pictures 

ARIZONA DAYS (W): Bob Custer, Peggy Montgomery, 
John Lowell Russell, J. P. McGowan, Mack V. Wright. 
Jack Ponder. Silent picture only. 

FALSE FEATHERS (D) : Noah Beery, Horace B. Car- 
penter, Francis Pomerantz, E. A. Martin. 

Film Arts Guild 

LIFE OF BEETHOVEN (Di : Fritz Kortner. Ernest 
Baumeister, Lilian Gray, Heinz Altringen, Willy Schmeider. 
(L) 7000f. 

Franco-Film 

APASSIONATA: (L) G800f. Silent Aim. 

Gainsborough 

CONSTANT NYMPH (D) : Ivor Novello, Mabel Poulten. 
George Heinrich, Dorothy Boyd, Frances Dable. Silent 
film. 

Michael J. Gourland 

CRIME AND PUNISHMENT (D) : Gregor Chmara. Michael 
Tarshanoff, Maria Germanova. Pavel Payloff, M. Toma, 
Vera Orlova. Ivan Bersennieff. (L) GOOOf. 

Capt. C. W. R. Knight 

FILMING OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE: Silent picture. 

Mutual 

LUCRETIA BORGIA (D): Conrad Veidt. Diane Haid, Paul 
Wegener. Luigi Robaccio. (L) 7100f. 

New Era 

BATTLE OF MOMS (D) : Special cast. (L) 5900f. Silent 
film only. 

Pole Pictures 

AT THE SOUTH POLE: Special aast. (L) 8000f. Silent 
film only. 

Syndicate 

LAW OF THE MOUNTED (D) : Bob Custer. J. P. McGowan. 
MacV. Wright. Frank Ellis, Sally Winters, Cliff Lyons, 
Mary Mabery, Lynn Anderson. (R) Jan. 15. (L) 4694f. 

Trinity 

BROKEN HEARTED (D) : Agnes Ayres, Gareth Hughe;, 

Eddie Bronell. (L) GOOOf. Silent only. 
BYE. BYE BUDDY (D) : Agnes Ayres. Bud Shaw. Fred 

Shanley. Ben Wilson. John Orlando, Arthur Hotaling, Dave 

Henderson. (R) Mar. 25. (L) 5700f. 
CHINA SLAVER (D) : Sojin, Albert Valentino. Iris Yamaoaka, 

Carl Theobald, Bud Shaw, Ben Wilson, Dick Sutherland 

Jimmy Aubrey, Opal Baker. (R) Jan. 25. (L) 5500f. 
GIRLS WHO DARE (D) : Rex Lease. Priscilla Bonner, 

Rosemary Theby, Ben Wilson, Steve Hall. Hall Cline 

(R) Jan. 1. (L) 5600f. 
LITTLE WILD GIRL (D) : Lila Lee. CuUen Landis, Frank 

Merril. Sheldon Lewis, Boris Karloff. Bud Shaw, Cyclone, 

Arthur Hotaling. (L) 5300f. 
MUST WE MARRY (D): Pauline Garon. Loraine Eason. 

Bud Shaw, Vivian Rich, Edward Brownell, Louise Carver, 

Charles Hill, Thomas A. Curran. (L) 5400f. 

UFA 

ELEVEN WHO WERE LOYAL (D) : Mary Nolan. Ernst 
Rueckert. Greta Reinwald, Gustav Semmler. Rudolf Meinert. 
(L) 6925f. 

HIS LATEST EXCELLENCY (D) : Willy Frisch, Ernst 
Gronau. Max Hansen. Hermine Sterler. Lydia Potechina. 
Olga Tschekova. Fritz Kampers, Hans Junkermann, Truus 
Von Aalten, Max Guekstorf, Julius Falkenstein. 

Unusual Photoplays 

MARIE ANTOINETTE (D) : Diana Karenne. Walter 
Schwanneke. (L) 6000f. Unusual photoplays. 



Franklin Warner 



GREAT POWER (T-D): Hirshel Mayall, Minna Gombell. 
Allan Birmingham, Nelan Jaap, G. Davidson Clark. John 
Anthony. Helen Shipman. Jack Leslie. Walter Walker. 
Conway Wingfleld. Alfred Swenson, Walter F. Scott. 
Eleanor Martin. 



Worldart Films 



EAST SIDE SADIE (D): Bertina Goldin. Jack Ellis. Boris 
Rosenthal. Abe Sinkoff, Lucia Segar. Jack Halliday. Al 
Stanley. 



Zakc 



FACES OF CHILDREN (D) : Rachel Devrys. Victor Vina. 
Henry Duval. Pierrietta Honyez. Arlette Teryon, Jean 

Forest. (L) 8000f. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



59 



CLASSIFIED 
Advertising 

Ten cents per word, payable in advance. Minimum charge. 
$1.00. Copy and checks should be addressed Classified Ad Dept 
Exhibiiurs Herald-World, 407 So. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

The Recognized National C I assii ied Advertising Medium 




Theatre for Sale 



LIBERTY THEATRE for sale in Mason City, Illi- 
nois. A good town of 2S00 population. Reason for 
selling other business. Act quick. The only show in 
town. 

CENTRAL NEW YORK CITY, population_200,000. 
Residential theatre, 1000 seats, building included, 
$45,000. Reasonable terms. Business established 16 
years. A real buy for quick sale. Address Box 441, 
Exhibitors Herald- World, 407 South Dearborn street, 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Managers' Schools 



THEATRE EMPLOYEES— Modern Theatre Man- 
agement training will help you to better positions. 
Complete training at home. Send for your free Copy 
of catalog H. Address Moving Picture Theatre Man- 
agers Institute, Elmira, New York. 



Position Wanted 



MANAGER — Unquestionable record, now with larg- 
est circuit of first class theatres in Canada, desires 
change. Thoroughly experienced, real worker, go- 
getter, high pressure exploiteer. Object of change to 
return to U. S. A. Circuit or Independent. Stand 
thorough investigation. Go anywhere. Address Box 440, 
Exhibitors Herald-World, 407 South Dearborn street, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

THEATRE MANAGER: Experienced in sound, 
wishes to make permanent connection at once. Ad- 
dress Box 434, Exhibitors Herald- World, 407 South 
Dearborn street, Chicago, Illinois. 

ORGANIST — Young lady. Capable soloist. Union. 
References. Address Organist, 914 McKinley Ave., 
N. W., Canton, O. 

FORMER Wisconsin theatre owner wants position 
to manage theatre. Or will manage with privilege of 
buying. Man and wife are capable of taking full 
charge. Address Eugene Pellettiere, 3224 Verdugo 
Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 

CHICAGO YOUNG MAN, age 25, wishes oppor- 
tunity to learn show business. Five years' amusement 
experience. Will consider anything that might lead 
to real future. Address Box 437, Exhibitors Herald- 
World, 407 South Dearborn street, Chicago, Illinois. 

ORGANIST — Graduate organists available at short 
notice. Vermond Knauss School of Theatre Organ 
Playing, 210 North 7th street, Allentown, Pa. 



Equipment for Sale 



ORCHESTRAPHONE and 500 Brunswick rec- 
ords. 1000 selections of music. Bought from Na- 
tional Supply Company. Liberal terms, used six 
months. Can be seen. Address U. S. Theatre, 546 
S. State, Chicago, 111. 



DRAMAPHONE Talking Equipment, synchronous 
also non-synchronous machine. Practically new, first 
class condition, ideal for 1,000 house. Also Da-Tone-X 
screen (regular Western Electric sound screen). Real 
bargain. Address Nordland theatre, Cincinnati, O. 



BIG BARGAINS in rebuilt Simplex Powers 6-B 
and 6-A motiograph machines, all motor driven, in 
guaranteed condition, as well as used low intensity 
arc reflector lamps, with or without machines at 
reasonable prices. Big stock of rebuilt exhaust and 
oscillating fans for AC and DC current. Generators, 
all makes, ticket selling machines, film containers, all 
at bargain prices for immediate shipment. Write for 
bargain list. Address Illinois Theatre Equipmem 
Company, 12-14 East Ninth street, Chicago, Illinois. 



THEATRE EQUIPMENT, new and used. Opera 
chairs, projectors, screens, generators, rectifiers, re- 
flecting arc lamps, etc. Write for bargain list and 
catalogue. Address Movie Supply Co., 844 Wabash, 
Chicago. 



FOR SALE — Reflector Arc Lamps and accessories, 
also guaranteed rebuilt Powers 6-A and 6-B and Sim. 
plex Heads. Best Prices. Write Joseph Spratler, 
12-14 E. Ninth St.. Chicago, 111. 



Chairs for Sale 



NEW SPRING CUSHION UPHOLSTERED 
CHAIRS. Almost at half price. Don't miss this 
exceptional rare opportunity. Write today for exact 
photograph. Address C. G. Demel, 845 South State 
street, Chicago. 



1,600 HIGH GRADE, spring constructed uphol- 
stered theatre chairs, made by the Heywood-Wake- 
field company. Upholstered in imitation Spanish 
leather, at very reasonable prices. 500 upholstered 
theatre chairs, back and seat covered in broadcloth. 
1,000 upholstered seats covered in Spanish imitation 
leather. Veneered back and squab seats, very reason- 
able. 1,000 heavy 5-ply veneer chairs, 54 in. back. 
1,500 light 5-ply veneer chairs at very reasonable 
prices. 300 folding chairs in sections of 2. Also a 
large stock of chair parts to match any style seat. 
In fact, everything for the theatre. We assure you 
great savings, for information, prices and literature 
on our merchandise, write Illinois Theatre Equip- 
ment Company, 12-14 East Ninth street, Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 

BIG BARGAIN in used Opera chairs, 600 uphol- 
stered, 800 Veneer. Address Movie Supply Co., 
844 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

2500 USED 5 PLY VENEERED theatre chairs in 
good condition. $1.00 each. Immediate delivery. 
Address Illinois Theatre Equipment Company, 12-14 
East Ninth street, Chicago, 111. 



For Sale 



OPERA CHAIRS, seats and backs for all makes, 
fire ply, at prices that save you money. Jobs in new 
and used chairs. Address Redington Company, 
Scranton, Pa. 



Equipment Wanted 



WANT SEVERAL MERCURY RECTIFIERS, 
good, bad or incomplete, cheap. Address Preddey, 
188 Golden Gate Are., San Francisco, Cal. 



WANTED — 2 Peerless or Simplex projectors, also 
Strong reflector arc lamps. State price, condition 
and number of machines. Will pay cash, er one 
third down and balance C.O.D. Address Box 337 
Exhibitors Herald-World, 407 S. Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago, 111. 



HIGHEST PRICES paid for used opera chairs, 
projection machines, etc. Address Movie Supply Co., 
844 Wabash, Chicago. 



Cameras for Sale 



AKELEY: Bell-Howell (professional). Write for 
booklet. Address Wood, 204 Inland Bank, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 



Stationery 



"NEARGRAVURE" ("Neargravuretnboso" plate- 
less embossing) processes. Special Neargravure 250 
envelopes, 500 8V 2 x7H" letterheads $3.33, or 854x11" 
$4.44, postpaid. Sollidays, EXH-124, Knox, Indiana. 



Projector Repairing 



SKILLED MECHANICS, specialized tools, and a 
shop equipped for but one purpose can offer you 
nothing but the best in repair work. That is what I 
have, and I can offer you the best in the overhauling 
of your motion picture machinery equipment. One 
of the oldest repair men in the territory, and serving 
some of the largest houses. Relief equipment fur- 
nished free. For results bring your work to Joseph 
Spratler, 12-14 E. Ninth St., Chicago, 111. 



BEST SHOP for repairing projection machines. 
Prompt service, reasonable prices. Address Movie 
Supply Co., 844 Wabash, Chicago. 



Miscellaneous 



TEN DIAMOND RINGS, blue white perfect, about 
2% carats, white gold mountings. One beautiful 
dark green velvet velour curtain, 32x17 feet with 
border and track, cost $480, practically new. One 
Garden City spot light with color wheel. Two new 
1000 watt Mazda lamps and other goods, all for $435 
cash. Address Farmers Exchange, 238 Main avenue, 
Clinton, Iowa. 



Your Classified Ad Will Do the Work 

Exhibitors Herald- World has helped hundreds of Theatre owners in solving many a problem. The classified advertising 
department has placed organists all over the country, has helped in obtaining equipment, in selling equipment, and in 
solving many another problem that seemed difficult. The rates are but 10c per word payable with order, 10% discount 
if run for 3 insertions. See this week's classified pages. Maybe you are in need of something that is being advertised this 
week. The cost b small, the results are great. 



60 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



THE VOICE OF THE INDUSTRY 

LETTERS FROM READERS 



Silent Pictures 

WE HAVE BEEN IN THE PICTURE 

business only about four years and have 
been a consistent reader of your valued 
magazine for the full period. This is a 
town of 1200, pavement leading in and out 
and only 25 miles from Waterloo and the 
wired houses. 

We are still showing only good silent 
programs supplemented with the best in 
non-synchronous music and many like it 
as well or better than some of the talkies 
they have heard. As stated above, we said 
"have been" a consistent reader of your 
magazine and we are wondering if other 
"silent" exhibitors like ourselves are not 
losing interest in your magazine as well 
as other periodicals that are similar, due to 
the fact that nearly all space is now given 
to the all-talkie sensations that are made or 
are going to be made, saying nothing about 
the silent pictures that the hundreds of 
small exhibitors are going to use during 
the coming season. 

True it is that all producers claim they 
are making silent versions. This fact is 
usually stated in small type somewhere 
and the headlines given to the 100 per cent 
sound sensations, instead. Who is telling 
us about how good the silent product is 
going to be? We get no reviews on the 
silent pictures. How can we when even 
T. O. Service sleeps through them? May 
we suggest that you give him a box of 
tinker toys and suggest a vacation, then get 
someone that can stay awake long enough 
to report on the good silent pictures, so 
that we little fellows can find something 
of interest to read. 

Our business this year has been as good 
or a little better than in previous years, due 
to the fact that we believe we are "up 
and on" our toes all the time and showing 
the best obtainable in good silent programs. 
What we want to know is more about the 
silent pictures for '29-30. Who is going to 
tell us? — C. V. Hunerberg, Princess theatre, 
Parkersburg, la. 



We're Paging "J ay see" 

WE WISH TO EXPRESS OUR SIN- 
cere thanks for the additional supple- 
mentary auto license plate and each having 
been placed in its proper position removes 
all rivalry between the Chrysler and the 
Ford, by making both the proud possessors 
of an emblem, which to us, represents not 
only the greatest publication of its kind in 
the industry, but a magazine that is indis- 
pensable to the small town exhibitor. 

The Herald-World is as much a part 
of our existence as the pictures we show. 
We have owned and operated our theatre 
in Twisp over six years and in Winthrop 
three years, and we realize that we are a 
very small part of the great show world. 
However, the one way that makes it pos- 
sible for us to remain in business and sat- 
isfy our patrons who are largely the same 
people from year to year and who occasion- 
ally visit the cities and the large theatres, 
is to keep ourselves informed through the 
Herald- World. We are conscientious in 
saying that we (Mrs. Airey and myself) 
feel that we must have the Herald- World 
in our home in order to attain any degree 



of success in the exhibition of motion pic- 
tures. 

We are very sorry that Mr. J. C. Jenkins 
did not see fit to extend his recent trip 
to Spokane a little farther and visit us at 
Twisp. If he thinks Omak sounds like 
Eskimo, what about Twisp? Nevertheless, 
if he could have been induced to venture 
this far into the wilds of the Great North- 
west we would have extended him a most 
cordial welcome, served him some real farm 
chicken dinners that would have made him 
glad he came, introduced him to the live- 
liest trout that ever inhabited a mountain 
stream and shown him scenery second only 
to the Alps. 

We are herewith enclosing a check in the 
amount of $3.00 for another two years of 
the Herald- World and also a few snapshots 
of our farm and the town of Twisp, which 
is located on one corner of our home ranch. 
(Pictures will appear in a later issue. — Ed.) 

We are also enclosing two marked copies 
of the Motion Picture Record, Seattle, 
Wash., which further substantiate the fact 
previously stated that aside from the visits 
we receive from the representatives of the 
various exchanges, we derive our theatrical 
knowledge largely from the Herald-World 
and not from association and contact with 
the city theatres which we rarely have an 
opportunity to visit. 

Again thanking you, we are — Frank F. 
Airey, Twisp theatre, Twisp, Wash. 

$1,003,590 Ticket Tax 

Collected by Montreal 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
MONTREAL, Oct. 1. — Figures an- 
nounced by the License Department of the 
City of Montreal, show that the sum of 
$1,003,590.55 was collected in the Amuse- 
ment Ticket Tax at local theatres during 
the past fiscal year, of which amount 50 
per cent was turned over to the Provincial 
Government in compliance with the Que- 
bec Public Charities Act. 

The City of Montreal also collected $40,- 
937.49 in theatre license fees during the 12 
months, according to statistics just released. 

Warners to Pre-Release 

3 Specials in October 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— Three Warner 
Brothers specials will be prereleased in 
their Vitaphone versions during the month 
of October, according to announcement by 
Sam E. Morris, vice-president. 

The three releases are: "Gold Diggers of 
Broadway," "Evidence" and "Is Everybody 
Happy?" the latter with Ted Lewis. 



Arliss* "Disraeli" to 
Open at W B House Oct. 2 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.— George Arliss in 
"Disraeli" will open at the Warner Brothers 
theatre October 2. This will be the pre- 
miere showing of the picture. "Disraeli" 
was particularly written for Arliss. The 
play had its original production in Chicago 
after which it came to New York. 



NEW 
PICTURES 



In "New Pictures" the EXHIBITORS 
HERALD-WORLD presents in concise 
form information on current and forthcom- 
ing attractions. 

The facts as presented will serve exhib- 
itors in booking and in the preparation o£ 
their advertising campaign. 

OH YEAH: Pathe talking comedy drama, from the 
story, "No Brakes," by A. W. Somerville, with 
Robert Armstrong, James Gleason, Patricia Carson, 
Zazu Pitts, Bud Fine, Frank Hagney, Harry Tyler 
and Paul Hurst. Directed by Tay Garnett. 

TYPE AND THEME: Dude and Dusty arrive, 
in a little railroad town seeking work. They get o 
job with the railroad. Dude meets Pinkie, who 
works in the railroad office; Dusty becomes ac- 
quaintea with "The Elk," a waitress. The boys 
get into a dice game and lose their money. That 
night Splinters, another railroader, is robbed of his 
pay and the blame falls on Dude. To escape 
trouble the boys decide to leave town. They flip 
a train on which Pop Eye and Hot Foot are also 
riding. A fight begins and Dude and Dusty make 
Pop Eye confess that he robbed the money. In 
the meantime Pinkie and "The Elk" follow the boys 
on another train. A wreck lands Dusty and Dude 
in the hospital. Pop Eye and Hot Foot are jailed. 
Pinkie and "The Elk" plan where they will spend 
their honeymoons. 

* # * 

BIG TIME: Fox Movietone all-talking comedy drama 
from the story by Wallace Smith, with Lee Tracy, 
Mae Clarke, Daphine Pollard, Josephine Dunn, and 
Steisin Fetchit. Directed by Kenneth Hawks. 

TYPE AND THEME: Eddie Burns and his wife, 
IAly, are teamed as a small vaudeville act. Eddie 
thinks he's what makes the act click, but its 
really his wife who deserves credit. Both look for 
the time when they'll be big shots on Broadway. 
Their act goes pretty fair until Lily, about to 
become a mother, has to give up her work. Eddie 
teams up with Gl.oria, another dancer. LUy at first 
decides to go back as Eddie's partner, but she 
suspects a romance between Eddie and Gloria. She 
leaves him. Eddie finds the going tough and quits 
the shoiv game. He goes to Hollywood and wanders 
on the set where the great actress Marilyn is re- 
hearsing. To his surprise he finds she is none 
other than Lily. They're reconciled. 

* * • 

LADY LIES, THE: Walter Huston, Claudette Col- 
bert, Charles Ruggles. Patricia Deering, Tom 
Brown, Betty Garde, Jean Dixon, Duncan Pen- 
warden, Virginia True Boardman, Verne Deane. 
Directed by Hobart Henley. 

TYPE AND THEME: Robert Rossiter is the 
widowed father of Bob and Jo. Rossiter meets 
Joyce Roamer, a sales girl in a department store. 
He finds Joyce a lovable girl although not of his 
social standing. Rossiter's aunt and uncle arrive 
in tmvn and warn him about going around with a 
salesgirl. They prefer that he marry Ann Gardner 
for the children's sake. In the meantime the two 
children go to Joyce's apartments and tell her she 
must keep away from their father. Joyce is heart- 
broken. Rossiter goes to Joyce and tells her they 
must break up. Jo and Bob, realizing they are 
doing their father a wrong, go to the apartment 
and ask forgiveness. They ask their father to 
marry Joyce. The four celebrate in their happiness. 

* * * 

HER PRIVATE LIFE: Pathe all-talking drama, 
with Ann Harding, Harry Bannister, John Loder, 
Kay Hammond, Arthur Hoyt, William Orlamond, 
Lawford Davidson, Elmer Ballard and Frank 
Reicher. Directed by Paul Stein. 

TYPE AND THEME: Judge Kessler and his 
wife. Vera, unite after a brief separation. Vera 
plans to go to the opera when Arnold Hartman, 
who is blackmailing Vera because he has a few 
letters that she wrote him while separated from her 
husband, calls and threatens to reveal her affair 
with him. Vera agrees to see him after the show. 
After the opera Vera meets Hartman and pays 
him for the letters. He tries to make advances. 
She sees a pistol that Grimm, a deranged man, left 
there, and kills Hartman. Grimm is accused but 
the court frees him. Realizing that she cannot 
be happy with her husband tvith Hartman's blood 
on her hands, Vera leaves home. On New Year 
Eve, Vera goes to a restaurant where she meets 
Grimm. He recognizes her as the person he satv 
with Hartman the day of the murder. Grimm 
pleads with Vera to tell him he ivasn't the one who 
killed Hartman. She confesses she killed him. 
Judge Kessler, %oho is in the restaurant, overhears 
the conversation. He goes to Vera and assures 
her that the law wUl be fully complied with and she 
will be permitted to tell her story in private. Vera 
and her husband embrace, rejoicing that this New 
Year finds them in complete happiness. 



Vincent Trotta Proud Dad 

FLUSHING, L. I. — A son was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Vincent Trotta at the Long Island College Hos- 
pital, September 21. Daddy Trotta is art manager 
of Paramount. 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



WHAT THE PICTURE DID FOR ME 

Verdicts on Films in Language of Exhibitor 



Copyright, 1929 

AT — All Talking; T — Talking Sequences; M — Music (synchronous) ; E — Sound Effects. (Example: ATM, 
means the picture is all-talking and has a synchronized musical score. In the same way all other symbols 

may he combined.) 



Columbia 

SUBMARINE: Jack Holt— September 14. Very 
good production and pleased. Nine reels. — C. A. 
Swircinsky, Majestic theatre, Washington, Kan. — 
General patronage. 

COURT MARTIAL: Jack Holt— September 
5-6-7. This is purely American, but it pleased 
here which just goes to show that Canada is 
just as interested in America as America is in 
Canada. A page from American history, partly 
in technicolor, plenty of action and a good story. 
Seven reels. — S. B. Kennedy, Central theatre, 
Selkirk, Man., Canada. — General patronage. 
BEHIND CLOSED DOORS: Special cast— Sep- 
tember 9-10-11. Can't say much for this. A rather 
slow, draggy affair that will not interest present 
day patrons. Seven reels. — S. B. Kennedy, Central 
theatre, Selkirk, Man., Canada. — General patronage. 

THE BACHELOR GIRL (TME) : Special cast- 
September 5-6-7. A nice little picture. Not a special. 
— M. W. Mattecheck, Lark theatre, McMinnville, Ore. 
— Local patronage. 

First National 

THE LAWLESS LEGION: Ken Maynard— 
September 14. Good Ken Maynard picture, and while 
we thought it not quite so good as some of his 
others, many said it was very good indeed. I have 
never seen a Ken Maynard picture that was not 
good. Of course, some are better than others. This 
picture was too dark. Wish they would make some 
of them light. This seems to be a general fault. 
Six reels. — R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, 
Va. — General patronage. 

THE SQUALL (TME) : Myrna Loy— September 
11-12-13. Too long. Slow action and tiresome. Just 
a picture. — M. W. Mattecheck, Lark theatre, McMinn- 
ville, Ore. — Local patronage. 

CHEYENNE: Ken Maynard— September 13-14. A 
mighty good Western with plenty of rodeo scenes, 
and you can tell 'em that my crowd likes to see the 
action. Buy this and give it a big bally, then sit 
back and cash in. It will more than please and I 
consider it as one of the best Westerns that I have 
played this year. Six reels. — Ray W. Musselman, 
Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General patronage. 

TWO WEEKS OFF: Mulhall-Mackaill— September 
2-3. A fair picture with a lot of wise cracks and 
subtitles. Seven reels. — Orris F. Collins, Palace thea- 
tre, Rector, Ark.— Small town patronage. 

THE UPLAND RrVER: Ken Maynard— September 
14. This is one of the best Westerns I ever played 
from any company. It will please the kids and make 
the old folks come out smiling. The cross country 
race is quite thrilling. Print in good condition. — 
James L. Sears, Liberty theatre, Humansville, Mo. — 
Small town patronage. 

CHILDREN OF THE RITZ: Mulhall-Mackaill 
— September 5-6. A very good picture, lots of 
good comedy and a good story. Will please in 
any house. — Page & Goetz, Gem theatre, Canton, 
Mo. — Small town patronage. 

HOT STUFF (TME): Alice White— September 
18-19. Very little talking, but a very good picture. 
Good sound and effects gave general satisfaction. — 
Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. 
— General patronage. 

THE BARKER (ME): Milton Sills— August 
26-27-28. Good carnival picture. While a little 
rough, you forget this because it is so very well 
done, so interesting. Milton Sills — well, he's just 
fine in every way, voice extra good, and how he can 
"bark" ! Indeed all the cast is good. A little dark 
because of so many night scenes. Business off be- 



FALL IS HERE 

FALL is here — and that reminds us 
that just the other day we wrote in 
this same place another little piece en- 
titled, "Spring is Here." At least, it 
seems as though it were just the other 
day, although, of course, it must have 
been quite a few months ago. We ex- 
pect some criticism for not being able 
to think up another kind of title, and 
doubtless we deserve some. It certainly 
is not our desire to be monotonous. But 
in speaking of the seasons, some 
monotony is bound to creep into one's 
statements. Do not the seasons repeat 
themselves? And how more accurately 
can one announce the latest arrival of 
one of the old familiar seasons than by 
merely saying that it is here? 

To merely announce the coming of 
fall, however, is not our purpose. We 
assume, despite our introduction, that 
our readers have noted the turning of 
the leaves and fhe death of September 
on the calendar. We feel, moreover, 
that there are more important things 
about fall than the botanical and 
astronomical evidence of its arrival. We 
feel, for instance, that the advent of fall 
should mean an increase in the number 
of reports. 

Summertime is vacation time, and no 
one expects anyone else to do more than 
he has to. If the contributor who regu- 
larly sends in reports on about a dozen 
pictures in winter, allows his contribu- 
tions to slough off to four or five in 
summer, the loss must be accepted and 
charged to seasonal expense. But in fall, 
winter and spring, there can be no very 
good excuses, can there? And every 
report counts — there should be no holes 
in the record to which so many exhibi- 
tors refer for guidance in the operation 
of their theatres. It is as Brother 
Shnitka says on another page: when one 
gets help, one feels like giving help. 

And that is why we make this un- 
necessary announcement that fall is here. 
Its coming should bring all contributors 
back to the habit of reporting on all the 
pictures they play. For doing so, we 
thank you, and in thanking you, voice, 
we know, the gratitude of all concerned. 

—GEORGE SCHUTZ. 



cause of a tent show nearby. Eight reels. — R. D. 
Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General 
patronage. 

BROADWAY/ BABIES: Alice White— Septem- 
ber 9-10. A whizz of a good picture. Will 
stand plenty of advertising and a raise at the 
box office. Eight reels. — Orris F. Collins, Palace 
theatre, Rector, Ark. — Small town patronage. 

CHINATOWN CHARLIE: Special cast— September 
16. This is not a picture to rave over, but it is 



good enough for any exhibitor to buy without being 
ashamed to 6how it. Still having crowded houses 
on Monday night, our serial night. "Tarzan the 
Mighty" still drawing strong. Six reels. — H. B. 
Griee, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. C. — Small town 
patronage. 

OUTCAST: Special cast— August 26. Quite a let- 
down from "Heart to Heart" to "The Outcast." 
Two extremes of entertainment. The first great, the 
second poor. Not received well here at all. No 
comedy. Worst side of society shown. Drags. Just 
a flop for us. May please in the cities, but I doubt 
it. Eight reels. — H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, 
Bath, S. C— Small town patronage. 

SCARLET SEAS (ME): Special east— September 
13-14. A very good picture. Both stars. As always, 
in any picture they make, it is a good one. No 
talking in it, but has good music and sound effects 
and makes a good entertainment. — Bert Silver, Silver 
Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

THREE RING MARRIAGE: Special cast— Septem- 
ber 9. Anyone who enjoys a circus (and who 
doesn't?) will enjoy this picture immensely. The two 
midgets are the real stars and sure produce the 
laughs. Also showed the tenth episode of "Tarzan 
the Mighty" to more people than any of the pre- 
vious episodes, taking in 90 per cent of the house 
record. At this rate it will break the record be- 
fore the end. Six reels. — H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills 
theatre, Bath, S. C. — Small town patronage. 

FLYING ROMEOS: Special cast— September 2. 
Now here's a picture to our liking. We laughed and 
laughed. Six reels. — H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills 
theatre, Bath, S. C. — Small town patronage. 

SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS: Richard Barthelmess 
— I am sorry to report that the condition of this 
print was terrible. I have been a constant user of 
F N products, but they certainly played me a dirty 
trick in sending me a print of this kind, after my 
paying them a fancy price for it. The picture would 
have been a great picture if we had gotten all of 
it, but we didn't. Eight reels. — W. J. Shoup, 
DeLuxe theatre, Spearville, Kan. — General patronage. 

Fox 

GIRLS GONE WILD: Sue Carol— September 17. 
Better picture than the title would indicate and 
business just fair. Six reels.— C. A. Swircinsky, 
Majestic theatre, Washington, Kan. — General pat- 
ronage. 

WIN THAT GIRL: Special cast— September 16. 

A very good little school picture which took very 
good here, as we had it for the opening day of our 
college. Six reels. — Page & Goetz, Gem theatre. 
Canton, Mo. — Small town patronage. 

M-G-M 

DESERT NIGHTS: John Gilbert — September 
6-7. Another hit from Metro. Neared the house 
record for a two-day picture in this town. Gilbert 
is very popular here. Am sorry I do not have 
some more of his pictures. Seven reels. — G. H» 
Wright, Jr., Star theatre, Wendell, N. C— 
Small town patronage. 

CIRCUS ROOKIES: Dane-Arthur— This was ■ 
little below their standard of pictures. While it is 
good from a comedy angle, it is not as good as their 
other pictures. Print was in very bad shape. Its 
ending was entirely gone — it just jumped off into' 
space and stopped with a jar and a groan from the 
audience, which sat still for a moment waiting for 
the balance of the picture to appear, until they could 
realize that it was all over. There were a number 
of other scenes that were cut short or cut out 
entirely. Six reels. — W. J. Shoup, DeLuxe theatre, 
Spearville, Kan. — General patronage. 



62 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



THAT HERALD- WORLD 
FAMILY SPIRIT! 

The letter that follows is commented 
or. sufficiently ( if, indeed, any comment is 
called for) in the heading above. But be- 
fore submitting this welcome message to 
the "family," we should like io explain 
that the blanks referred to huve been 
sent — yes, absolutely this time. And 
now: 

Editor: On April 23 yon wrote me 
advising that some report blanks to re- 
port to your department, "What the Pic- 
ture Did for Me," would be sent. To 
date I have not received them, and 
would request you to forward same. I 
think when reading some of the reports, 
how I was saved by not playing some 
of the pictures, features and comedies, 
which have been reported on by others, 
and I feel that I should do my share 
and report the pictures I play. It might 
help some exhibitor. 

Thanking you and hoping yoa will 
keep up the good work, I am, very truly 
yours. — Benjamin Shnitka, Royal Thea- 
tres, Ltd., Innisfail, Alb. 

Thanks, Brother Shnitka, for the let- 
ter and for the spirit in which it was 
written! 



WEST OF ZANZIBAR: Lon Chaney— September 
4-5. Very, very good. One of Chaney's best, I 
think. We pulled a good crowd two nights on it. 
Seven reels. — G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre, 
Wendell, N. C. — Small town patronage. 

WEST OF ZANZIBAR: Lon Chaney— A very 
gruesome picture well acted and will please most 
of the men, but ladies shudder at it. Who can say 
that Chaney is not a great actor? I say he is 
great in this type of role. If you have a hard 
!x>iled audience this should please, but if your people 
are of a refined type, better pass it up. — W. J. 
Shoup, DeLuxe theatre, Spearville, Kan. — General 
patronage. 

TIDE OF EMPIRE: Special cast— September 11-12. 

A good picture, but they sent me a synchronized 
print with half of the titles left out. Seven reels. 
— Orris F. Collin6, Palace theatre, Rector, Ark. — 
Small town patronage. 

TIDE OF EMPIRE (TME) : Special cast- 
September 20-21. A splendid picture. Played by a 
wonderful orchestra. Great sound effects. I claim 
it 100 per cent entertainment. Gave satisfaction 
here. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, 
Mich. — General patronage. 

WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS: Lon Chaney— Real 
good and pleased. Did well at the box office. — W. W. 
Graves, Graves theatre, St. Paul, Kan. — Small town 
patronage. 

THE CAMERAMAN: Buster Keaton— August 24. 
Drew the largest house we had all summer. — W. W. 
Graves, Graves theatre, St. Paul, Kan. — Small town 
patronage. 

BEAU BROADWAY: Special cast— Good, but noth- 
ing extra. — W. W. Graves, Graves theatre, St. Paul, 
Kan. — Small town patronage. 

THE DUKE STEPS OUT: William Haines— Here's 
a real good one. Play it even if old. Seven reels. 
— C. A. Swircinsky, Majestic theatre, Washington, 
Kan. — General patronage. 

THE SMART SET: William Haines— Septem- 
ber 9-10. This picture is rather old to report 
On as I had to set it out, but I am glad I went 



No Losses in the Box Office 

Z™ f(Z®^® Sim, 
Ticket registers 




Automatic Ti ck et 
Register Corp. 

723 Seventh Ave. New York 

^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ 



back and got it, as William Haines has become 
one of my best bets, and this one is a typical 
William Haines picture. Print in perfect con- 
dition. By the way, if you are looking for good 
old silent product with perfect conditioned print, 
don't overlook Metro's 28-29 product. I am in the 
Kansas City district and in three years have yet 
to receive a print that broke. Seven reels. — 
James L. Sears, Liberty theatre, Humansville, 
Mo. — Small town patronage. 

A WOMAN OF AFFAIRS: Greta Garbo— Septem- 
ber 15. A fairly good production that pleased the 
majority. Gilbert i6 not a big favorite here and as 
a result does not draw extra patronage. Ten reels. 
— Paul B. Hoffmann, Legion theatre, Holyrood, Kan. 
— Small town patronage. 



Paramount 



THE SHOPWORN ANGEL: Special cast— Septem- 
ber 8. Just a fair picture. Rather slow-moving 
and not very cheerful. The ending is logical 60 far 
as the story is concerned, although rather abrupt, 
but it is certainly all wrong from the audience 
standpoint. Some of our patrons even accused us of 
gypping them out of part of the show. Print rather 
ragged, and the photography must have been shot 
in the dark of the moon. Very unsatisfactory for 
Mazda projection. Eight reels. — O. B. Wolfe, Screen- 
land theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town patronage. 

THE SHOPWORN ANGEL (TME) : Special cast 
— September 2-3-4. We opened our "Paramount 
Week" with this one. It is good and did a nice 
business. Would have been a 100 per cent enter- 
tainment if they had put more song and dance in it 
and given it a real good ending. But even with these 
faults it pleased above average. However, this pic- 
ture does not carry enough dialogue or 6ong to be 
called a talking and singing picture. Film badly 
worn. Photography good. Eight reels. — R. D. 
Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General 
patronage. 

THE SHOPWORN ANGEL: Special cast— Good 
picture, with a surprise ending that patrons dis- 
approved. Yet this is above average entertainment. 
Eight reels. — C. A. Swircinsky, Majestic theatre, 
Washington, Kan. — General patronage. 

THE CARNATION KID: Douglas MacLean— 
September 14. Good entertaining comedy-drama, and 
ideal weather didn't mean a nickel in our jeans, as 
business was unusually rotten. Did not get expenses, 
but the picture is all right. Guess they shied off from 
the star, as he has not been here for a couple of 
years. Seven reels. — O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, 
Nevada, O. — Small town patronage. 

CHINATOWN NIGHTS: Wallace Beery— September 
17. A very poor picture. So dark most of the time 
one could not tell anything about the picture. People 
are tired of these rough stuff pictures. Seven reels. 
— Page & Goetz, Gem theatre, Canton, Mo. — Small 
town patronage. 

SOMEONE TO LOVE: Special cast— September 7. 
Rogers and Brian sure make a sweet pair. Everyone 
satisfied. Seven reels. — H. D. Beebe, Rialto theatre. 
Nelson, Neb. — General patronage. 

RED HAIR: Clara Bow— September 12-13. 
This is another old one I traded for and, boy, 
how they did flock to see her! Wish I could 
play a Clara Bow every week. Print in fair 
condition. Seven reels. — James L. Sears, Liberty 
theatre, Humansville, Mo. — Small town patronage. 
BETRAYAL: Emil Jannings— September 12. This 
is a good picture, and Jannings is a wonderful actor, 
but for some reason or other his pictures do not 
go with the average show goer. Eight reels. — Page 
& Goetz, Gem theatre, Canton, Mo. — Small town 
patronage. 

THE SUNSET PASS: Jack Holt— September 
7. A very good Western — Zane Grey's story, so 
'nuf said. It packed our house and closed our 
"Paramount Week" with a big bang. Thanks, 
everybody! It is all a mistake about the public 
not wanting Westerns. Ninety per cent of the 
grown-ups like them very well, and all the kids 
do. We must have them, for nothing will ever 
take their place. Six reels. — R. D. Carter, Fair- 
fax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage. 
THREE WEEK ENDS: Clara Bow— September 
11-12. An average Clara Bow picture, light comedy 
entertainment that pleased. Business about average. 
Photography and film fair. And as to the weather, 
we have had nothing but fair weather ever since the 
last of May. Never have known such a dry sum- 
mer. Six reels. — R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, 
Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage. 

STAIRS OF SAND: Wallace Beery— September 3. 
A very good Zane Grey picture. A Western better 
than the average picture. Six reels. — Page & 
Goetz, Gem theatre. Canton, Mo. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

THE CANARY MURDER CASE: William 
Powell — September 14. Really an interesting 



NAMING J. C. JENKINS' 
NEW CAR 

Another suggestion for a name for J. 
C. Jenkins' new car, successor to the) re- 
tired Nancy. Perhaps everyone will not 
yet appreciate the full significance of 
this nomination — the editor of this de- 
partment confesses that he doesn't, and 
he charges this ignorance up to a de- 
ficiency in his schooling. The name has 
been added to the list published else- 
where in the department. Below is the 
note in which it was submitted: 

Editor: How is this name for Jen- 
kins' car? — Douglas (Exhibitors Herald- 
World cruiser). — A. E. Sirica, Capitol 
theatre, Waterbury, Conn. 



picture that most people thought was going to 
be spooky before they had seen it. Sorry we 
really don't have some intelligent cops like Vance. 
We might have relief for the independent ex- 
hibitors if we did. Seven reels. — H. D. Beebe, 
Rialto theatre, Nelson, Neb. — General patronage. 
INNOCENTS OF PARIS (AT): Maurice Cheva- 
lier — September 22-23. Talking, singing and dancing. 
This picture has got everything. Fine story. A 
great star, none of them has a thing on him as an 
entertainer. Direction fine. I call it a 100 per 
cent picture. — Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

REDSKIN (ME) Richard Dix— September 5-6. A 
real picture that pleased 100 per cent. All the Indian 
and desert scenes are in color and very beautiful. 
Richard Dix is fine as Wing-foot. Don't miss this 
one — and don't be afraid to give it the gas, it will 
stand it. Just the picture for a school benefit. 
Film good, recording fair. Seven reels. — R. D. 
Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General 
patronage. 



Pathe 



THE FLYING FOOL: William Boyd— September 
16-17. A dandy good picture, plenty of comedy and 
some good air shots. Seven reels. — Orris F. Collins, 
Palace theatre, Rector, Ark. — Small town patronage. 

KING OF KINGS: Special cast— September 5-6-7-8. 
This picture will do you more good than giving your 
house a fresh coat of paint — in prestige. Will make 
you glad you're in the show business even though 
you're broke. Every exhibitor should play this pic- 
ture as it is good for the entire industry. Will not 
make you rich, so don't pay too much for it. Don't 
miss this chance to tie up with your local ministers. 
Twelve reels. — James L. Sears, Liberty theatre, 
Humansville, Mo. — Small town patronage. 

CAPTAIN SWAGGER: Rod LaRocque— September 
19-20. A pretty fair picture. Starts out with a bang 
and is interesting all the way through. Seven reels. 
— H. D. Beebe, Rialto theatre, Nelson, Neb. — General 
patronage. 

THE COP: William Boyd— September 12-13. A 

fair program picture that is somewhat tiresome up 
until the last two or three reels, when it begins to 
pep up. I should order some pills from the exchange 
to go with some of these that are so draggy. Even 
some of the walkouts seem dopey. Eight reels. — 
H. D. Beebe, Rialto theatre, Nelson, Neb. — General 
patronage. 

THE RED MARK: Special cast— August 31. No 

excuse for making any 6uch picture. The public is 
not interested in foreign prison life, nor is it enter- 
taining. Most of Pathe's pictures have been good, 
but this one is off, and we are glad it's over. Eight 
reels. — R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, 
Va. — General patronage. 



Rayart 



SHOULD A GIRL MARRY?: Helen Foster- 
September 13. A good clean sex picture, no children 
admitted. Brought them in by storm, our doors 
were opened at 6:45 P. M. and at 7 P. M. there 
was standing room only. Book this one and make 
money. Advertise it big. It will satisfy. Seven 
reels. — E. Berenson, State theatre, Bogalusa, La. — 
General patronage. 



RKO 



STREET GIRL (ME) : Betty Compson — I am re- 
porting on this, as I have seen it at a preview. I 
consider the picture as an entertaining one, and the 
recording was good. I am not wired, but believe 



[Reports continued on page following Jaysee] 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



63 



J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 



PORTLAND, ORE., 
September 22, 1929. 

DEAR HERALD-WORLD: 

Portland people say they can't understand why anybody would want 
to live in Seattle, and Seattle folks look upon Portland as just a place 
to stop and get hot dogs and gas when on their way to the Puget 
Sound country, and Los Angeles says they are both crazy and should 
have a guardian. 

What puzzles us is why Lewis and Clark traveled clear across Iowa 
and Nebraska and came out to this country to locate their homesteads 
in a land where you have to change your B. V. D.'s for heavy under- 
wear every 30 minutes. We have been in this Pacific slope country 
for about three weeks, and the only evidence that the sun ever shines 
out here is the statement of some of the oldest inhabitants that they 
have seen it, but none of 'em can remember just when it was. 

When Seattle wakes up of a morning and finds the fog has lifted 
so they can see their way to the garage, they ring up their climatic 
press agents and tell 'em to get busy and step hard on the climatic 
stuff, and Portland is longing for the rainy season to set in to put 
out the forest fires and do away with the smoke so tourists can see 
Mt. Hood and the new Burnsides bridge. But what we would like to 
see right now is a Berkshire sow full of good, yellow Nebraska corn 
and get a breath of Nebraska ozone that makes a man want to get up 
at 4 o'clock in the morning and hunt for a wildcat to give him exer- 
cise before breakfast. If we perambulate for a couple or three weeks 
more in this fog and rain, our rheumatism will demand a couple of 
crutches and a wheel chair. We can feel our bones commencing to 
growl right now, and the bunions on our dogs feel like an overripe 
carbuncle on a Chicago bootlegger's neck. It will be mighty unpopu- 
lar out here for anyone to intimate that this isn't the Garden of Eden, 
but until they show us some fig leaves as evidence, we are going to 
have our doubts about it. When we get down to Los Angeles, we ex- 
pect they will try to fill us so full of this "climatic" stuff that we 
will have to take a strong drink as a back-fire measure. 

* * * 

Through the courtesy of the local manager of RKO we were 
privileged to witness Betty Compson in "THE STREET GIRL" at 
the Capitol theatre, and while we are not going to attempt a review 
of this picture, we wish to say that it ranks well up with the best we 
have witnessed in some days and is worthy of a showing in any 
theatre. 

We also saw William Boyd in "THE LEATHERNECK," and we 
have applied every known rule to try and determine just why this 
picture was made and have to give it up. We have resorted to trigo- 
nometry and calculus, we read the Koran, we applied Christian 
Science and re-read the Declaration of Independence and the Demo- 
cratic platform, but to no avail, then we concluded it was another 
example of high finance where they take your money and give you 
whatever they damplease, and so we let it go at that. If "THE 
LEATHERNECK" is a good picture, then the Pacific slope hasn't 
seen a fog in 30 years. There were six adults and five kids (by 
actual count) who saw the picture at the first show, and we felt 
sorry for 'em, so sorry, in fact, that we got up and left before the 
agony was over. But getting back to Lewis and Clark, we are glad 





they came out here and opened up this country so Iowa and Nebraska 
would have a place to go and spend their loose cash that they make 
raising the produce to feed the world. 

(There now, every Pacific slope booster who reads this will want 
to take a shot at us, but our hide is so full of holes now that they 
will have to use pumpkins for bullets to even touch us.) 



Should any of the readers of this Colyum (in case there should be 
any) be halting between two opinions as to whether the talking pic- 
tures will live or die, we would refer them to an article under the 
caption, "A REAL TAIL ON A BRONZE BULL," by Welford Bea- 
ton, appearing in the Saturday Evening Post under date of Sep- 
tember 21. 

If for no other reason, Mr. Beaton is to be commended for the 
bold position he has assumed in this article. Living as he does right 
in the heart of the producing end of talking pictures, he takes a 
stand against this form of entertainment that those of less daring 
would hesitate to take. If you will read this article, you may find it 
interesting for many reasons. 

That with the coming of talking pictures, many theatres have closed, 
no person with a knowledge of the facts can deny. That hundreds 
of other theatres will be forced to close unless some relief is given 
in the way of cheaper film prices is equally true, and it remains to 
be seen whether or not the industry can educate the public away 
from an art that has built the industry to the tremendous propor- 
tions it possesses today. Maybe it can be done. Mr. Beaton doubts 
it, and there are two of us. 

* * * 

We understand there is a fight on here in Portland by several 
houses against the demands of the projectionists' union. We know 
nothing of the merits of the case, but we are told that a peculiar 
and unusual thing has occurred that is causing no little merriment in 
union circles. 

It seems that two downtown houses, the Capitol and the Circle, 
have their places picketed. We are told that the Circle management 
was the first to take up the fight, and the Capitol followed suit in an 
agreement to fight the demands of the union along with several 
other houses, and it seems that the union picketed the Capitol but 
did not picket the Circle, the one that started the rumpus. When 
the management of the Capitol found that the Circle wasn't picketed, 
they threatened to withdraw from the agreement unless the Circle 
was also picketed, so it is said that the Circle hired its own picket and 
the public is now advised that the Capitol and Circle are unfair to 
union labor. We don't know whether the projectionist boys framed 
this up or not, but it is a good joke on somebody, and the union boys 
don't seem to think it is on them. 



When we get to Hollywood, which will be about the time this gets 
in print, we are going to ask Polly Moran and Louise Fazenda to 
assist us in selecting a name for our car from the list of names sent 
in, and if the three of us can't agree, we will call in Marie Dressier 
and Kate Price to settle the matter, for we simply must have a name 
— the matter has been delayed altogether too long already. We hope 
the girls won't be out to some quilting bee or putting on a whoopee 
party when we get there, for we want to get this matter off ourjnind 
—it is simply wearing us down to a shadow. 

J. C. JENKINS, 
The HERALD-WORLD man. 

P. S.— The HERALD-WORLD COVERS the field LIKE an April 
SHOWER. 



64 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 



that this picture would do business. It has some- 
thing besides a bunch of crooks and courtrooms and 
the music was fast and snappy. — Ray W. Musselman, 
Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General patronage. 
THE AIR LEGION: Special cast— September 
8-10. One of the best RKO pictures we have 
run. This is truly a Gold Bond. Good photog- 
raphy. Only one thing to keep it from being a 
perfect picture — one scene was shot when it was 
supposed to be raining in torrents, and the 
shadows were plainly visible, so that the folks 
know the sun was shining and that there was a 
fake. Seven reels. — G. H. Wright, Jr., Star 
theatre, Wendell, N. C. — Small town patronage. 

THE PERFECT CRIME: Special cast— September 
7. A mighty good mystery picture, well acted. 
Pleased about 80 per cent. Seven reels. — Page & 
Goetz, Gem theatre. Canton. Mo. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

CROOKS CAN'T WIN: Special cast— September 
30-11. Substitution that wasn't so good. Story of 
sops and crime again, mostly cops this time. Ter- 
rible I Seven reels. — H. D. Beebe. Rialto theatre. 
Nelson, Neb. — General patronage. 

LAUGHING AT DEATH: Bob Steele— September 
3-4. A fair Steele picture. Clean, but then most 
of U3 wish Steele were making Westerns with the 
same action, etc. Six reels. — H. D. Beebe, Rialto 
theatre, Nelson. Neb. — General patronage. 

ORPHAN OF SAGE: Buzz Barton— September 14. 
A good Western picture, lots of good comedy and 
plenty of action. Seven reels. — Page & Goetz, Gem 
theatre. Canton, Mo. — Small town patronage. 

STOLEN LOVE: Special cast— September 13. 
Everyone seemed to like this picture of the good 
Kttle girl who was a shut-in by two old maiden 
aunts. Some comedy, interesting love story, ending 
5>y the bad man getting a punch in the nose, and 
the boy getting the girl. Seven reels. — R. D. Carter, 
Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage. 

VOICE OF THE STORM: Special cast— September 
17-18. Just a program picture that is nothing to 
rave about. Seven reels. — H. D. Beebe, Rialto thea- 
tre, Nelson, Neb. — General patronage. 

THE BOY RIDER: Buzz Barton— September 6. 
A good Western. Buzz is quite attractive. — W. W. 
Graves, Graves theatre, St. Paul, Kan. — Small town 
patronage. 

DRIFTING SANDS: Bob Steele— Much favorable 
comment on this.- — W. W. Graves, Graves theatre, 
St. Paul, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

TRAIL OF THE HORSE THIEVES: Tom 
Tyler — September 11. Very good Western. We 
ran it on Wednesday night for a dime as a 
special offering and had a packed house. Prob- 
ably the most folks we have had in the theatre 
at any one time this year. Six reels. — G. H. 
Wright, Jr., Star theatre, Wendell, N. C— Small 
town patronage. 

TRAIL OF HORSE THIEVES: Special cast— 
September 17. Silent Western and a good one. — 
Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville. Mich. 
— General patronage. 

Tiffany-Stahl 

MIDSTREAM: Special cast— September 9-10. A 
wonderful picture at the box office. Pleased every- 
body. I could stand running more like this one. 
The people think they are in the Metropolitan Opera 
House when they hear the singing, you will make 
ao mistake booking this one. Nine reels. — E. Beren- 
son, State theatre, Bogalusa, La. — General patronage. 

LUCKY BOY (M) : George Jessel— This picture is 
200 per cent good recording, clear as a bell. Any 
exhibitor selling good sound to his public should 
use "Lucky Boy." As far as recording and good- 
shape discs, it is of the very best. Besides it has 
lots of good singing and heart appeal. Ten reels. — 
J. F. Fleitas, Monroe theatre. Key West, Fla. — 
General patronage. 

United Artists 

ALIBI: Special cast— September 12-13-14. Splen- 
did. An ace amongst underworld dramas. Sound or 
silent this is real entertainment. An unusual theme 
and splendidly done. Nine reels. — S. B. Kennedy. 
Central theatre, Selkirk, Man., Canada. — General 
patronage. 

THE MAGIC FLAME: Special cast— September 
12. The same Thursday night story : An excellent 
picture shown to half the crowd that flocks to our 
theatre on Monday to see "Tarzan" and the First 
National pictures. Only 40 per cent against 90 per 
cent for Monday. The "Magic Flame" is a really 
fine picture and worth showing in any theatre and 
■will please. Nine reels. — H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills 
theatre, Bath, S. C. — Small town patronage. 

RAMONA: Dolores Del Rio — August 29. You can't 
count on the rating of pictures to make money for 
you. Ramona was fourth in the list of money making 



pictures for 1928, and I thought it was worth more 
and paid more for it, but I did not take in as much 
as on a program picture — only 34 per cent. In fact, 
I lost money on it. No fault to find with the pic- 
ture, but comedy would have helped it in the small 
towns. Poor people want to laugh. Eight reels. — 
H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. C— Small 
town patronage. 

COLLEGE: Buster Keaton— September 19. A 
picture made to order for the small town. It's 
packed with laughs. Six reels. — H. B. Grice, 
Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. C. — Small town 
patronage. 

ARABIAN KNIGHTS: Special cast— September 5. 

An interesting picture, with quite a bit of comedy 
scattered through it. Attendance better than for 
"Ramona," and we made just a little money, but 
have suffered a loss, taking all the four pictures we 
have run so far from United Artists. The exhibitors 
must be right — United Artists pictures do not seem 
suited for small towns. Nine reels. — H. B. Grice, 
Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. C. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 



NAMES FOR 
"JAYSEE'S" CAR 

The following names have been sug- 
gested for J. C. Jenkins' new car, now 
taking the place of Nancy, retired: 
ALICE 

By Mrs. Cres Swails, Clay Center, Neb. 
BETSY 

By Mrs. G. V. Higgins, Crawford, Neb. 
IRENE 
PRUDENCE 
HIRAM 

By Miss Ashby Tibbetts, Bethel, Me. 
PAT 
PILL 
PILGREE 

LADY 
PRISCILLA 
LUCHADOR 
By Miss Orva Wurman, Ogden, Utah. 

COLLEEN 
By Mrs. H. C. Mullens, Hettick, 111. 
POLLY 
LUPE 

By Mrs. C. R. Grimes, Ackley, la. 
ELMER 
ELMERITA 
MABEL 

By Mrs. Raymond Robbins, Belt, Monl. 
PRISCILLA 
POLLY 

By Mrs. Frances Estee, Parker, S. D. 
AUSSIE 
JUANITA 
SHEBA 
INA 

By W. E. Dickson, Lemmon, S. D. 
WHIFFLEPOOF 
By Trag, formerly of Neillsville, Wis., 
and now a denizen of New York. 
O' MIN 

By G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre, Wen- 
dell, N. Carolina. 
SLOWGO 

By Ray W. Musselman, Lincoln, Kan. 

LITTLE PAL 
By Mrs. Mabel Hockenberry, Oakland, la. 
CLARA 

By W. H. Russell, Okeechobee, Fla. 

SNIKNEJ 
By F. P. Hollywood, Deering, Me. 

DOUGLAS 
By A. E. Sirica, Waterbury, Conn. 

All those caring to submit names are 
invited to do so, provided they are con- 
nected tvith the motion picture industry 
by either employment or kinship. An 
award of one year's subscription to the 
HERALD WORLD will be made to the 
person submitting the chosen name. 



Universal 

THE TIP-OFF: Bill Cody— September 11. Here's 
something novel — a crook reforms and goes straight, 
all for love. Think of that ! Not a great deal to 
this one, but we got by with it on bargain night. 
Five reels.' — O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, 
O. — Small town patronage. 

THE SHAKEDOWN: Charles Murray— Sep- 
tember 9-10. A very good picture, with a prize 
fight racket being worked by the principals. 
Plenty of prize fight in the last reel, and it 
looks real. Get it for dad's night. We let them 
* smoke and enjoy themselves on that night and 
boy they sure come out. Usually use some 
picture with sport as its background, and they 
like it. Try it. Seven reels. — Ray W. Mussel- 
man, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General 
patronage. 

GRIP OF THE YUKON: Special cast— September 
7. An extra-good picture of the great Northwest. 
A picture that is well worth a place on any house 
program. — Page & Goetz, Gem theatre, Canton, Mo. 
— Small town patronage. 

CLEARING THE TRAIL: Hoot Gibson— September 
2-3-4. Carl Laemmle was crazy like a fox when he 
grabbed all the Western stars off. Anyone who says 
the Westerns are through has a lot to learn. Ask 
any small town showman who earns his bread and 
butter. To get back, this is an outstanding Western, 
and how ! Six reels. — S. B. Kennedy, Central thea- 
tre, Selkirk, Man., Canada. — General patronage. 

Warner Bros. 

ON WITH THE SHOW (TME) : Betty Compson— 
September 1-2-3. Splendid picture and well liked. 
A real show. — M. W. Mattecheck, Lark theatre, 
McMinnville, Ore. — Local patronage. 

THE SINGING FOOL (TME) : Al Jolson— Septem- 
ber 8-9-10. Old, but still a good drawing card. 
Did a nice business. — M W. Mattecheck, Lark theatre, 
McMinnville, Ore. — Local patronage. 

THE SINGING FOOL: Al Jolson— September 
15-16. Have seen both versions and cannot say that 
I consider the silent one as being a special. It takes 
sound to put it across right. Played it too late to 
get the benefit of the wide publicity. Paid too much 
for film and advertising, considering the glutted 
market. A big half of our regulars had already seen 
it at least once. Consequently, we didn't clear a 
dime on it and realized too late that it should have 
been played regular program, if at all. Eight reels. 
— O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — 
Small town patronage. 

GLORIOUS BETSY: Special cast— September 5-6. 
Oh, did I get a stinging on this! One of the first 
sound pictures done also silent and one that makes 
a fellow never want to see a sound picture if they 
are equal to the silent version. What they said to 
me when they passed out wouldn't be the best thing 
in the world for a preacher to hear. May fault? 
Yes — why in hell did I buy Warners in the first 
place? Seven reels. — H. D. Beebe, Rialto theatre, 
Nelson, Neb. — General patronage. 

GLORIOUS BETSY (T) : Special cast— September 
11-12. A good talking picture. Story fine and cast 
good. Played too old to get expenses out of it here, 
but it is a good picture. — Bert Silver, Silver Family 
theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 

THE TERROR (T) : Special cast— September 
15-16. A mighty good entertainment by a wonderful 
cast, but like all of this company's pictures, playing 
them too old to get results according to the film 
rental, we were compelled to pay for them. — Bert 
Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — 
General patronage. 

THE GLAD RAG DOLL (TM) : Special cast— The 
picuret is most all-talking, which is very, very clear. 
Too much age in some of the players for my theatre 
although their costumes, fine scenery and good 
music gives it plenty of interest. To my way of lik- 
ing, give me pictures with plenty of youth. It's not 
interesting to see an older person making love to a 
younger person. It's bosh, it cannot be done and 
thought of as real. An older person is fine to play 
a sympathetic dad or mother part. There is plenty 
room for them in parts which become them. Well, 
we are living and waiting because they are going 
to come to us better and better as time goes on. 
Eight reels. — Walter Odom & Sons, Dixie theatre, 
Durant, Miss. — General patronage. 

Serials 

PIRATE OF PANAMA (Universal) : Special cast 
— Best serial since "Tarzan." Ten chapters. — Orris 
F. Collins, Palace theatre. Rector, Ark. — Small town 
patronage. 

HAWK OF THE HILLS : Special cast— September 
14. I thought this to be a very poor offering, but 
many seemed to like it. It is a typical Western 
with Indians, bad actors, soldiers and plenty of 



October 5, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



65 



The "Evidence" of That Salmon Fishing Trip! 





[Prefatory Note by the Editor: The captions for these pictures on the fishing trip on Pugent Sound referred to by Mr. Jenkins last week, 
were written by the great Colyumnist himself, and any statements therein implying that he, himself, captured representatives of the specie in 
question, are made without editorial sanction, to be read with competent knowledge of the Colyumnist's mendacity regarding his fishing ex- 
ploits. Thus warned, the reader may proceed at his own peril.] — At left: The lady seated on the deck with her husband is an osteopath from 
Seattle. The guy holding the fish is — Oh, girls, doesn't he look just too sweet in the captain's cap and uniform? The fish? Oh, yes, we for- 
got about those! Well, at one time they were swimming in the Sound. Later on they swam in hot grease. Look 'em over, boys! Center: 
This baby started the water to get rough. It took us 30 minutes to bring him to gaff. He was a silver salmon right from Cape Flattery. 
Right: The gentleman with the captain's cap and green goggles and holding the fish is none other than — well, we will let that bullhead 
fisher at Wayne, Neb., tell you who he is. He knows him! Seventeen and 21 pounds, is the story told by the scales. No, we didn't carry a 

bathtub with us. That's a landing net in the dory. 



shooting. Five reels. — Paul B. Hoffmann, Legion 
theatre, Holyrood, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

Short Features 

(SOUND) 
FOX 

CHIC SALES, 1.— "Coming to Get Me." A very 
funny act. (Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. — General patronage.) 

M-G-M 

CHARLIE CHASE COMEDIES, 2.— "Big Squawk." 
A very funny talking comedy. (Bert Silver, Silver 
Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage.) 

GUS EDWARDS REVUE, 1 A splendid singing 

and talking act in colors. (Bert Silver, Silver Family 
theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage.) 

LAUREL-HARDY COMEDIES, 2.— "Unaccustomed 
As We Are." A real honest-to-goodness comedy, and 
you can tell them so, for it will make them laugh. 
Oliver Hardy's and Thelma Todd's voices record very 
good. The others fair. (R. D. Carter, Fairfax 
theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage.) 

OUR GANG COMEDIES, 3.— "Small Talk." Good 
all-talking comedy. Some of the children's voices 
record well, others not so good. The dog and the 
little nigger are about the best. (R. D. Carter, 
Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General pat- 
ronage.) 

UNIVERSAL 

THE COLLEGIANS, Series, 2 A good talking 

two-reel subject, lots of pep. (Bert Silver, Silver 
Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General pat- 
ronage.) 

THE COLLEGIANS, 2 "On Guard." These talk- 
ing Collegians are fine. Give good satisfaction. 
(Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. 
— General patronage.) 



WARNER BROTHERS 

VINCENT LOPEZ (Vitaphone Act A19). — A very 
good act. (Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — General patronage.) 

VITAPHONE No. 2320 "Police Quartette," 1. 

— -A very good act. (Bert Silver, Silver Family 
theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage.) 

(SILENT) 
EDUCATIONAL 

MERMAID COMEDIES, 2.— "Smart Steppers." 

One of the Mermaid series. Slapstick comedy which 
drew lots of laffs. Good print and photography. 
(O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small 
town patronage.) 

BIG BOY COMEDIES, 2.— "Kid Hayseed." These 
Big Boys are all more or less alike and just fair. 
(H. D. Beebe, Rialto theatre, Nelson, Neb. — General 
patronage.) "Joy Tonic." A real good comedy for 
the children. (S. B. Kennedy, Central theatre, Sel- 
kirk, Man., Canada. — General patronage.) 

THE BOY FRIEND, 2.— When we finished showing 
this comedy I had to hunt the bath tub to wash 
the dirt off me, and had to use plenty of soap to do 
it. How this ever could get by a real censor board 
I am unable to understand. Of course, it would 
get a few laughs from the roughnecks and those who 
don't care for decency, but anyone with a clean 
mind does not care for such smut. (W. J. Shoup. 
DeLuxe theatre, Spearville, Kan. — General patronage.) 

M-G-M 

CHARLIE CHASE COMEDIES, 2.— "Loud Soup." 

Patrons enjoyed this more than most of Chase's 
comedies. (C. A. Swircinsky, Majestic theatre, 
Washington, Kan. — General patronage.) "Family 
Group." A fair Chase comedy. (Orris F. Collins, 
Palace theatre, Rector, Ark. — Small town patronage. 

FEED 'EM AND WEEP, 2 Fair comedy and 

mostly clean. Had one smutty scene, but we can 



overlook just a little of that when it is not too bad. 
(W. J. Shoup. DeLuxe theatre, Spearville, Kan. — 
General patronage). 

PARAMOUNT 
CONFESSIONS OF CHORUS GIRL SERIES, 2.— 
"Picture My Astonishment." Just fair. (H. D. 
Beebe, Rialto theatre, Nelson, Neb. — General pat- 
ronage. ) 

DAISY BELL, 1. — Here is a corker, brought down 
the house. Played this with "Redskin," and believe 
me, it was some entertainment. (R. D. Carter, 
Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General pat- 
ronage. ) 

PATHE 

DENT-BEVAN COMEDIES, 2.— "Don't Get Jeal- 
ous." Good comedy with action and laughs. (R. D. 
Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General 
patronage.) 

JOHNNY BURKE COMEDIES, 2.— "Matchmaking 
Mamas." This is the best one of Johnny Burke's we 
have had. Averagedly good. (R. D. Carter, Fairfax 
theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage.) 
R K O 

BARNEY GOOGLE COMEDIES, 2.— "The Pace 
That Thrills." Some laughs in this one. These 
Google comedies have been much improved by Slim 
Summerdale. (R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kil- 
marnock, Va. — General patronage.) 

BEAUTY PARLOR SERIES, 2 — Real good, but it 
didn't draw like Mickey. (W. W. Graves, Graves 
theatre, St. Paul, Kan. — Small town patronage.) 

UNIVERSAL 
UNMASKED (Reissue), 2.— "Unmasked." Haw! 
Get this one, if your sense of humor isn't warped. 
It's better than many a comedy. See what they used 
to fall for in the dear old days, not long passed, 
thank God ! And get a load of Esther Ralston when 
she was a sweet and innocent young thing in horse 
opera! O wow! (O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, 
Nevada. O. — Small town patronage.) 



66 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 5, 1929 




CHICAGO PERSONALITIES 



By JOE FISHER 

THE Chicago censor board took it upon itself to bar another film last 
week. This time it happened to be M G M's "Our Modern Maidens," 
starring Joan Crawford. The picture was to have opened at the Chi- 
cago theatre Friday (September 27) and Balaban & Katz had advertised the 
production extensively, only to find that its exploitation department's work 
had gone for naught when the City Hall's official shears got to snipping. 

HE censors ruled that the film could be by the end of next week. The Vision is a 



in Cicero will be 
has been leased by 
Corporation, which 

Symphony theatre, 



T^-riJi censors 
■*■ run as a white (with no restrictions) if 
certain cuts were made, or as a pink (for 
adults only) without any cuts, William Shir- 
ley, district manager of M G M, said. In- 
stead of ruining the picture by making such 
deletions, it was decided by B & K to yank 
it entirely, and First National's "Her Pri- 
vate Life" was substituted. 

This makes the third picture in a short 
while that has been met with a "thumbs 
down" from the censors. "Alibi," United 
Artists all-talking melodrama, was barred, 
but a court ruling brought a permanent in- 
junction restraining the board from inter- 
fering with its exhibition, and the picture 
now is running at the United Artists thea- 
tre to big business. 

"The Trial of Mary Dugan" did not fare 
so at the hands of officials. It was held 
up for a long time by the censors and finally 
was run after the scissors had had their 
inning. Several other pictures in loop thea- 
tres have run with pink tickets attached, 
children being barred. 

* * * 
The Palace theatre 

closed some time. Tt 
the United Theatres 
now is operating the 

Chicago. The deal was closed by Albert 
Goldman, Chicago. The Palace is a 2,000- 
seat house. 

* * # 

The new model Simplex projector is be- 
ing displayed in the National Theatre Sup- 
ply offices on Wabash avenue. 

Young Alexander Nepo, son of Harry 
Nepo, manager of the Lindy theatre, ar- 
rived in Chicago last Monday. The boy 
came all the way from Russia alone. The 
Travelors' Aid was in charge of the boy 
and saw that he arrived in the hands of 
his father safely. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Jimmie Abrose is so busy commuting 
to New York that we've just had our first 
chat with him since his appointment as 
branch manager of Tiffany-Stahl. Jimmie 
served as manager of the local United Art- 
ists exchange for four years before joining 
TS. 

^ ^ * 

Henri Ellman is back from New York all 
steamed up over his visit on that famous 
ship "Levi-nation." Henri threatens to 
take a ride on the boat as soon as he can 
get a vacation. All we could get out of 
him was "I'm telling you," which is be- 
coming a famous phrase. Henri says it 
takes more than five days to inspect the 
Leviathan. It'd be kinda tough to be down 
in the hold when the boat docked — if it 
started the return trip at once. 

sj: $ $ 

The Vision theatre is installing a DeFor- 
est Phonofilm. Installation will be finished 



900-seat house. 

The Alamo theatre, Milwaukee; Ameri- 
cus, Chicago, and Granada, Racine, Wis., 



See M. A. Block About 

M P T O A Equipment Show 

M. A. Block, representing the ex- 
hibition and program committee of 
the Motion Picture Theatre Owners 
of America, is making his headquar- 
ters here in Chicago at the Congress 
hotel. He is here for the purpose of 
interviewing manufacturers of equip- 
ment used in theatres with regard to 
their exhibiting at the national con- 
vention in Memphis October 29, 30 
and 31. 

He reports unprecedented interest, 
especially among those companies 
making sound equipment apparatus, 
and from the number of reservations 
now in, there is every indication that 
this will be the largest trade exposi- 
tion in the history of the theatre 
owners organization. 



are others who've just installed DeForest 
equipment, Freddie Martin reports. 

* * * 

A man giving his name as Lee Phillips 
was questioned by the police at the 
Eleventh Street station last week, in con- 
nection with the robbery of the Film Ex- 
change building last week. 

i}C ifc ifc 

Charlie Lonnenberg, U publicity man, 
made a flying trip to Milwaukee last week 
to exploit Universal's "Broadway" at the 
Alhambra theatre. Charlie's favorite song 
on the trip was "If I Had the Wings of an 
Angel." 

* * * 

The Gage Park theatre is installing Duo- 
phone sound equipment. 

% ^ 

The Cornell Square theatre opened with 
sound last week. The feature picture was 
"College Love." 

* * * 

Irving Mack's fish story, after a two- 
weeks vacation was 12^4 pounds. To make 
a long story short — but Irving sticks to his 
figures. 

^ ^ ^ 

Checking up the sales for the last six 
months the home office of United Artists 
found Chicago's own Frank Young to be 
the leader. Figures showed that Young 
received a percentage of 66 per cent. The 
Chicago office, managed by Eddie Gross- 



Ma* Stahl and Dave Dubin were snapped 
by the Herald-World camera just after 
Stahl ivas named manager of the local 
exchange succeeding Dubin, resigned. 
No doubt these two gentlemen would 
pass for brothers. 

man, led all other exchanges for sales. In 
one week four salesmen of the Chicago 
branch went out and signed contracts for 
287 pictures. Since the appointment of 
Grossman as manager, the U A Chicago 
exchange has been doing big things in a 
big way. L. L. Ballard was second of the 
Chicago crew with 54 per cent. The drive 
was on old pictures. 

* * * 

Gus Canstanapoulous was an out-of-town 
exhibitor to visit Film Row this week. 
Only one film man in the industry can 
spell his name and that's the fellow who 
gave us this item. Oh, pardon us Frank 
Ishmael. And when Frank pronounces 
Gus' name it sounds suspiciously like 
"Bosporus." 

The Calo theatre was opened by the 
Bland Brothers and Aron Saperstein last 
Wednesday. The house was redecorated 
and RCA sound equipment was installed. 

* * * 

Tess Heraty, Jack Miller's secretary, was 
home for a few days last week. 

We had a delightful visit at the newly- 
decorated offices of Tommy Malloy, head 
of the operators' union in Chicago. The 
office is elaborately set out. 

* ♦ ♦ 

The Melrose Park theatre and Maywood 
theatre were opened last week by E. W. 
Ritzger. 

* ♦ .♦ 

J. W. Edwards, 84-year-old exhibitor of 
Aledo, 111., was down on Film Row last 
week. He came without his wife, how- 
ever. Edwards still runs a theatre in Aledo 
and according to reports is making himself 
some money. He discussed the T-S fran- 
chise with Henri Ellman. 

* * * 

Here's a Reel Buyer 

An exhibitor walked into a Chicago 
film exchange last week and offered the 
salesman $3 for a two-reel all-talking 
short. It took a tub of water — almost — 
to revive the salesman, but when he re- 
covered there was a footrace ( the ex~ 
hibitor got to the door first.) The sales- 
man said that not in his career had he 
seen one like this one. A two-reel all- 
talking short for three bucks! 

* # * 

Jerry Abrams, wellknown among the film 
people, was on the Row also last week. 
Jerry explained that his bull pup is doing 
well, thank you. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Steve Montgomery reports that the new 
T-S franchises are selling like hot "theme 
songs." 











NEW BEAUTY 






for the 












SCREEN 






EaSTMAN SONOCHROME embraces the widest range of 
tinted positive films that has ever been available for the 
screen. And — what is all-important in this new age — the 
sixteen delicate Sonochrome tints are so adjusted as not to 
interfere with the faithful reproduction of sound .... Successors 
to the tints of the silent era, these Eastman films bring new 
color moods — new beauty — to the sound screen. 






EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 













JOHN GILBERT'S FIRST TALKIE A WOW! 

His Glorious Night in Preview is a Box Office Natural 

E X H I BITORS 





RALD 



W 







D 



CECIL B. DE MILLE'S |/E LUXE DIALOGUE DRAMA! 

Y 

IT HAS OUTH! 



N 



IT HAS ROMA CE! 
IT HAS SPECT AcLE ! 




TWO GREAT ONTHS AT $2 



AT CARTHAY C RCLE THEATRE, L. A. 



»T 



IT'S GO EVERYTHING! 



DYNAMITE 10 M-G- 





Pictorial Story of Herald-World Tournament 

E X H I B I TO R S 

RALD 





W 









-G-M SOUND TECHNICIANS 
AT YOUR SERVICE! ^ 

Young Blood is First 
to back its great 
Sound product with 
a nation-wide force 
of experts I 

AGAIN M-G-M does it ! Graduates of our own Sound 
School are in the field Sound-insuring the Year's Biggest hits: 

HOLLYWOOD REVUE - DYNAMITE - HALLELUJAH 
MARIANNE - OUR MODERN MAIDENS - MADAME X 
THE UNHOLY NIGHT - SPEEDWAY - HIS GLORIOUS 



D 

sit 



NIGHT - SO THIS IS COLLEGE and othe 





iiS 



rs 




METRO GOLDWYN-MAYER 



\/r»l Q7 Mf» "2 Entered as second-class matter, August 20, 1917, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111, under the act of March S, 1879. Published flrtnhpr II IQ^Q 
TUI< ** ' ' weekly by Quigley Publishing Co., at 407 South Dearborn St., Chicago. Subscription, $S.0U a year. Single copies, 25 cents. utluucl 1 ' " 



Read 'em and LEAP! 

The public's and critics' comments on the greatest 
box-office sensation to hit the screen in months. 

GLORIA 
SWANSON 



Singing, Talking in her first ALL -TALKING PICTURE 

The TRESPASSER 

DETROIT tells the world it's the greatest ever. 



Detroit Daily: "Miss Swanson proves in this picture that she 
can hold her own in the talkies with any of our present day 
movie actresses and that she surpasses many of them with 
her naturalness in emotional scenes. She is the same Gloria 
of the 'Humming Bird', 'Manhandled' and many other 
pictures that made her the great screen star that she is. 
The.picture is well directed and excellently cast. A picture 
well worth viewing." 

Detroit News: "Gloria Talks — and Sings — and Triumphs. 
Not since the debut of Mary Pickford in voice has there 
been such a breathless moment for movie fans as that 
which occurred at the United ArtistsTheatre.Thursday.at 
the midnight premiere of 'The Trespasser' when the Glori- 
ous Gloria Swanson uttered audible sounds for the first 
time. Gloria not only spoke, but she sang — and great was 
the excitement and pleasure among her followers over the 
unanimous agreement that she really has a charming man- 
ner of getting her personality over through the medium of 
the sound screen. 'The Trespasser' is a complete triumph 
for Gloria in almost every respect and it should mark the 
beginning of new achievements for the star. 'The Tres- 
passer' fills the Swanson requirements in every particular." 



Free Press: "She speaks from the screen for thefirst time and 
her voice proves to be pleasing and well -modulated with 
clear enunciation and diction. Then, she discloses the pos- 
session of a singing voice of operatic timbre, well trained 
and carefully handled. She sings two songs, one of which 
is 'Love.' Miss Swanson's gowns, coiffures and jewels in the 
picture are so gorgeous, varied and bizarre that the audi- 
ence offered audible evidence of its astonishment and en- 
thusiasm. Thestory has many pathetic dramatic moments, 
is so well acted, directed and mounted as to stand out as a 
real achievement for Miss Swanson and those with whom 
she was associated in its screening and production." 

Evening Times: "Director Goulding has placed Gloria in a 
role that is most suited to her. 'The Trespasser* is a credit 
to Miss Swanson. Likewise it is a credit to Goulding. Miss 
Swanson has one of the finest speaking voices of any of the 
original movie stars that it has been your correspondent's 
pleasure to hear. Not only that, she sings a pleasanttheme 
song about love quite agreeably. The picture is substantially 
built and should be good for at least a three-week engage- 
ment at the United Artists Theatre." 



BUFFALO agrees and starts off to record business. 



imes: "Miss Swanson worth your while. A charming Gloria 
Swanson made our last evening at the Buffalo a happy one. 
We thought her beautiful. We thought her photophone- 
recorded voice lovely and well used. We think you'd miss 
something should you pass up her first talkie 'The Tres- 
passer' made by United Artists. She had us near breaking 
down and joining in the sobs of the women who sat all 
'round us. Indeed we cannot deny that a tear or two 
trembled on the old lashes. You'd enjoy seeing and hear- 
ing Gloria. The Swanson songs are lovely. Her 10 gowns 
are exquisite." 



Courier Express: "Everybody who's been eager to know what 
Gloria Swanson sounds like on the audible screen and hop- 
ing for the best, will find it's worth all the waiting. The 
stage has sent a lot of its stars to the talkies. Gloria's is as 
good as any of the voices that drew raves, and better than 
at least five that have been acclaimed as what the chatter- 
movies needed. Gloria talksand she sings, both excellently. 
A standout. Biggest of all the surprises is Gloria's singing 
voice. And let it be said there's no double. The phono- 
graph records will prove that. It's remarkably well done. 
It's a truly great picture. And for the women, there are 
Gloria's clothes." 



BOOK IT- DATE IT-TODAY! 

It's the picture millions have been waiting 
months for you to play 

UNITED ARTISTS -of course 



Presented by Joseph P. Kennedy 



EDMUND GOULDING PRODUCTION 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 




! SR0 



your S. »• ° 



Sign! 







B^ACli CROWS 

MOB*" — MACft 

,„ the la«*W"* 
HIT OF BITS! 

, «4Rltt OREKN. Directed by 

George Abbott, Sl °; y ^ 1, b, George Abb.«. P ' 
Tnn dwU. Sereen »>»J 1 p ro duetb»» 

UB Genera. M-^ WMlCOM 

Sehulberg, Genera 




ItKVVK 





.vant »s «° w " ,e 
Jvfrtisin'b°>'" 
the Paramount an w 

MORAS: ;'S£™I'" „, «W 9 *«Xd in the 

ab . We ea» » tel ^ tol U ^ 

£3* Andaheaaaebef 




PARAMOUNT 



' «r At* in 



4 EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD October 12, 1929 

Not even 
his best 
friend 
would 
tell him! 

H He was a smart showman. He thought he 
booked the best. But for weeks he'd realized 
his sound news reel was a time-filler and not 
a seat-filler. <I He stood in the lobby and 
asked audiences night after night, "How did you like the sound news?" They didn't want to hurt 
his feelings. So they replied, * r Oh — all right." But not convincingly. Not even his best friend would 
tell him the truth. 

Then he went down 
to the opposition house and eaught 

PARAMOUNT SOUND NEWS 

And got the right answer. tJHe realized a new and better sound news reel had won the public. 
Real NEWS in it, not magazine shots. Fast, modern tempo. Snappy titles, clever editing. Obviously 
the work of a mighty world-wide organization, with brains at the head. €| Paramount Sound News 
made the others look old fashioned. <JHe saw his Paramount representative the next day. 

THE SOUND NEWS OF THE NEW SHOW WORLD 




WHOLE INDUSTR 
AS RADIO SWEE 

PRAISE IS 
BUT THIS IS 




WILFRED BEATON, brilliant critic-editor 
of Hollywood Spectator, writes 

**With the coming of RIO RITA to the 
screen the sound device takes on a 
new dignity and RKO becomes a 
giant among producers/ 7 




ARTHUR 
JAMES 

I N SWE E PI N G 
TRIBUTE. . . re a v.ew 



Without question, the finest motion pic- 
ture entertainment that we have ever 
seen is "RIO RITA." We expected much 
— we saw and heard ten times as much. 
We might also say that it opens up a new 
epoch in the presentation of musical and 
dialogue entertainment, for it is so much 
greater than the stage success of which it 
is builded that it puts the stage in eclipse. 



October 12, 1929 



E X H I BI I O N S H I RA I D - WO I LD 




of an Independent Publisher, 

Arthur James, in an Editorial in 

the Exhibitor's Daily Review! 

NEWSPAPERS IN UNIVERSAL 
TALKING NEWSREEL COMBINE 



The Evening World 

(New York. N. Y.) 
The Philadelphia Inquirer 
The Chicago Daily News 
San Francisco Chronicle 
Los Angeles Times 
The Indianapolis News 
The Seattle Star 
The Dallas Dispatch 
The Commercial Appeal 

(Memphis, Tenn.) 
The Houston Chronicle 
The Portland News 
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 
The World-Herald 

(Omaha, Neb.) 
The Montana Standard 

(Butte, Mont.) 
The Salt Lake Tribune 
The Daily Missoulian 
The Billings Gazette 
Charlotte News 
The Oklahoma News 
Kansas City Journal-Post 
The Evening Star 

(Washington. D. C.) 
Minneapolis Morning Tribune 
The Cleveland News 



The Detroit News 
The Atlanta Journal 
San Antonio Express 
The San Antonio News 
Arkansas Democrat 

(Little Rock, Ark.) 
b't. Worth Star-Telegram 
The Toronto Star 
El Paso Evening Post 
The Spokane Press 
Boston Traveler 
The Knickerbocker Press 

(Albany, N. Y.) 
Albany Evening News 
New Haven Eve. Register 
Buffalo Evening News 
Rochester Times-Union 
The San Diego Sun 
Phoenix Evening Gazette 
The St. Louis POI;t Dispatch 
The Times-Star 

(Cincinnati, Ohio) 
The Milwaukee Journal 
The Vancouver Sun 
The Toledo Blade 
Tacksonville Journal 
The Richmond News Leader 



Presented by 

Carl Laemmle 

Produced under the supervision 
of Sam B. Jaeobson 



Two a Week 



On Disc 



UNIVERSALE TALKING NEWSREEL 



Member Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, Inc. — Will H. Hays, President 



TIFFANY- 
TTAHLT 



FIRXT 5QQ 



HARRY MARKUM, Belmont, Talbot and Sheldon, Indianapolis. 
CHARLES R. METZGER, Mecca and Two Johns, Indianapolis. 

H. G. STETTMUND, Jr., H. S. and Odeon, Chandler, Olcla. 

A. C. GORTATOWSKY, Albany and Liberty, Albany, Ca. 
H. PERELMAN, Lehigh and West Alleghany, Philadelphia 

FRED WEHRENBERG, Wehrenberg Circuit, St. Louis. . 
JAMES J. BODEN, Grand or Garden, South Milwaukee /A 
CHARLES F. VONDRA, Rainbow. Mahnomen, Minn. 'M 




E. E. HOLMQU1ST, New Broadway, Centerville, S. 
BEN E. MURPHY, Heights, Muskegon Heights. Mic 
W. ZIMMERMAN, New Warrenton, Warrenton, Mo 
CHARLES PERRIZO, Grand, Grand Rapids. Minn. 
ALEX S. MOORE, Hilltop or Capitol, Pittsburgh. 
E. A. SCHLUETER. Community, Arlington, Minn. 
BEN & MORRIS FLAKS, New Lincoln, Baltimore 
R. C. HARPER, Blackstone, New Rockford, N. D. 

CHARLES M. WALKER, Irving, Indianapolis. 
H. E. WESTER, Lyric, Le Seur, Center, Minn. 
C. W. THAMPE, Thampe Circuit, Milwaukee. 
C. E. WILLIAMS, Victoria and Park, Omaha. 
ALFRED G. WERTIN. Wertin. Albanv Mi™ 





R. B. CAMPBELL, Majestic, Wayne ka, Okla. 
L. WHITE, Parkview, San Francisco, Calif. 
THOMAS BOULDEN, Lyric, St. Charles, Mich. 
f. T. MORTON, Park, Huntington Park, Calif. 
H. J. LUDCKE, Opera House, Saint Peter, Minn. 
MRS. H. H. CHASE, Diamond, Lake Odessa, Mich. 
MARY M. COSTIGAN, New Orph eum, Flagstaff, Ariz. 
L. V. BERGTOLD, Ideal, Hayheld, Minn., and Opera 
House, Dodge Center, Minn. 
WILLIAM OSTENBERG, Orpheum, Scotts Bluff, Neb. 
LOUIS B. CHRIST, Columb us or Audion, Green Bav, Wis. 
S. J. DAVIDSON, Ritz, Cordell, Okla. and Ritz, Cherokee, Okla. 
F. C. LYON, Jewel, Anthon, la, m^^hhm 



J. C. ilNYDtK, Lrand. Wi] lesion. IN. L> 
E. R. SCHUTTE, Savoy, New Prague, Minn. 
L. E. DAWSON, Gem, Shakopee. Minn. 
B. BERGER, Elko, Bemidji, Minn 
JOHN DE MARCE, Viking, Benson, Minr. 

G. O. TERRY, Bijou, Minneapolis. 
OTTO N. RATHS, Ideal, South St. Paul. Minn 
C. W. BURKEY, Summit, Kansas City 
W. A. ROGERS, Columbian, Wamego, Kan. 

H. M. DRYER. Savoy, Minneapolis. 

O. A.- LEE, Leola, Minneapol sf: 
MRS. D. F. ESLIN, lone, Minneapolis " 
M. STAHL, Wellston, St. Louis 
JAMES T. LAWSON, Grand, Mt. Olive, III 
R. C. WILSON, Palace, Staples, Minn 
FREDERICK HOYT, Strand, Newton, la 
T. GARRETTI, Casino, Melchcr, la. 
THOMAS BARNETT, Royal, Danville, Ind. 

A. C. MILLER, Lark, Brazil, Ind. 
JOE BROKAW. Opera House, Angola, Ind. 



C. H. SPEARMAN, Gem, Edmond, Okla. Wk 
O. A. WEICKERT, Lux, Perham, Minn. fE< 
W. E. LYON, Broadway, Crosby, Minn. TM 
M. MILTENBERG, Opera House, Ely, Minn. JK 
H. F. ANKRUM, Gem, Balston, Minn. iM 

% 



F. J. BOGUMILL, Rialto, Thorp, Wis 
C. C. DUNSMORE, Capitol, Marshalltown, la 

R. O. GOLDEN, Palace. St. Louis \ 



I 
| 

I 

I 

m. 1 



W L. A. LEBER, Royal, St. Louis, Mo. 
Ij H. F. STROWIG, Lyric, Abilene, Kan. 
/// W. J. CLARK, Clark, Vacaville, Calif. 
'// L. R. STACY, Unique, Mobridge, S. D. 
(/ P. C. SCHRAM, Strand, Hastings, Mich. 
/ A. L. MERRITT, Princess, Oconto, Wis. 
J. E. WHITLEY, Colonial, Kokomo," Ind. , 
WALDO NEAL, Limberlost, Geneva, Ind. 
JAMES LYNCH, Granada, Bridgeville, Pa. 
M. D. LEDBETTER, Little, Elizabethtown, 111. 
DONTHORNBURG, New, Marshallt&wn, la. 
J. C. SELLERS, Dunbar and Willis,' Detroit. 
WALTER HOHLFELD, Elite, Greenleaf, Kan. 
JOSEPH OLSCHEFSKY, Fredro, Detroit. / 
CHARLES KERBY, Elks, Worland, Wyo. % 
GEORGE W. LUCE, Ideal, Morrill, Neb. - 
E. A. RHOADES, Grand, Story City, la. 
I WILLIAM COX, Palace, Royalton, 111. 
l\ T. J. GUTHRIE, LibeTty, Maiden, Mo. 
j\ F. M. SATKAUSKAS, Milda, Chicago 
\\\ R. MICHEL, Larkin, San Francisco ' 

J. F. MOORE, Majestic, Pottsville, Pa. 
SIDNEY H. SELIG, Gem, Chicago 
A. ROSEN, Model, Pittsburgh. 



H. P. VONDERSCHMITT Circuit, Indian.!. 

D. E. HECKMAN, Royal, Nazareth. Pa. '» \ 
DAVID S. NELSON, King Bee, St. Louis Jai l \ 

J. L. SCHARLEY, Keiths. Baltimore IgK \M 
O. C. LEHR, Lehr Circu t, St. Louis. l Kjj A 
LOUIS W. VICK, Ashland, St. Louis Ht 
FRED KORB, Strand. Knight.towr., '«■{ 
I. E. ROBINSON, Empire. Sellersburg, Ind. 9R< 
H. N. TURNER, Family, Pine City, Minn. Wj 
G. N. TURNER. Family, North Branch, Minn, fg! 

H. THORPE, Peoples, Crosby, Minn. WSJ 
W. P. LOWELL, Lowell, Canton, S. D. !«\ 
CHRIS EFTHIN, Star, St. Louis |S§& 
LOUIS J. MENGES, State, East St. Louis .§§& 
ROBERT SHEN, Lakeville, Lakeville. Minn. 'JR 
FRANK MILLER, Whiteway, MaVlow, Okla. nj 
J. M. ANDERSON, Princess, Boone, la. W 
H. HIERSTEINER, Family, Des Moines Mi 



WILL 
NAME 
HEPE 

WEEK 




WATCH FOR 



m M. U. CAKBItlNtK, Honeymoon, South Bend, Ind. 
' \ JOSEPH PORTELL, Greenwood and Virginia Parkf Detroit. 
^ L. L. LEWIS, Lyric, Lebanon^ Mo., Lyric, Salem, Mo., 
^ and Lyric, Rollo, Mo. 

^ JOSEPH CAUDELL, Wanoca, Wallace, N. C. and 
SSwS\ Pastime, Lumberton, N. C. 

•^ttk SHERMAN WIGGINS, Golden Bell, Ellsworth, 

'. lik G. G. SHIPLEY, Community, Harbor Beach, Mich. 
BjMk GEORGE L. BLAKESLEE, Grand, Lander, Wyo. 

GEORGE HANIOTIS, Yale, Okmulgee, Okla. 




B. SCHINDLER, Opera House, Dover. Del. ME 
H STFINRFPT. M,JI.„„ M,A:. III WM\ 




GEORGE PASSEN, Amuzu, Jasonville, Ind. 
MRS. LEE MOTE, Acme, Riverton, 



EDWARD BRUNELL, Metropole, Chicago 
M. RUBIN, Uptown, Michigan City, Ind. 
G. GLENN FLESER, Liberty, Grand Rapids. 
G. MACPHERSON, Vox, Klamath Falls, Ore. 
H. T. REYNOLDS, Family, Grand Rapids 
W. H. ARTHUR, Garden, Marshall, Mich. 
C F, SEERS, Ostego, Ostego, Mich. 
E. C OATLEY, Star, Rockford, Mich. 
O. E. VARNEAU, Wealtny, Grand Rapids 
E. L. DALE, Park, Newaygo. Mich. 
H. C. COLLIER, Strand, Lowell, Mich. 
N. L. McCAKTY, Calewood, Grand Rapids 
I. W. MAPLE, Cozy, Bethany. Mo. 
L. E. MAPLE, Maple, Albany, Mo. 
A. B. MOMAND, Deireck, Maud, Okla. 



DIPPO, Rialto 
BAILEY, Be 
J. SPAYNE, 




T I F F 01 Si V 

72 9 SEVENTH AVE. 



c/>T 0 H L 



FRANCHISE HOLDER/ 




CHARLES PERRIZO, Lyceum, Deer River, and Lyric, CassUke, Minn. 
A. H. RECORDS, Empress, Deshler, and Majestic, Hebron, Neb. 
SHOREWOOD THEATRES INC., Shorewood, Shorewood, Wis. 
CIRCUIT THEATRES INC., New Cudahy, Cudahy, Wis. 
LEO PAUL, Lyric, Philadelphia, and Lyric, Chester, Pa. 
CHARLES H. GEORGE, Capitol, Port Angeles, Wash. 
WILLIAM A. LEUCHT, Jr., Savoy, St. Joseph, Mo. 
k\ GLEN D. THOMPSON, Thompson, Healdton, Okla. 
|k CHARLES E. GUCKER, Dawn, Hartford City, Ind. 

FRANCES PEART, Colonial or Peart, Cillispie, III. 
CHARLES TRIFON, New Gulf, Coose Creek, Tex. 
* FERRIS M. THOMPSON, Thompson. Wilson, Okla. 

>. HARRY FINKEL, Arcade or Colonial, Pittsburgh. 

'JSt\ A " Wp BECKER - Becker and Castle, Philadelphia. 




JOSEPH PRICE, Howard and Eagle, Philadelphia 
HENRY GOLDBERG, Lincoln Hippodrome, Chicago 
E. E. ALGER, Capitol, Morrison; Princess, Urbana; \\w 
Park, Champaign; Rexy, Lasalle and Peru, Peru, 111. \ 
J. SCHIEFERECKE, Opera House, Lenora, Kan. and 



-xARRY K1NK.EL, Arcade or Colonial, rittsrjurgn. 
A. W. BECKER, Becker and Castle, Philadelphia. 
JOHN M. CAMPBELL, Wonderland, Minneapolis. 
FERRIN & JOSSLYN, Liberty, Mantorville, Minn. 
ELI RESNICK, Grant, Philadelphia. 
JOSEPH BRODIE, Brodie, Baltimore. 
JAMES C. RITTER, Rivola, Detroit. 
J. E. STOCKER, Myrtle, Detroit. 
1. JOSEPH ROSZKOSKI, Fulton. Detroit. 

A. B. MOMAND, Momand Circuit, Okla. 
A. E. MUNROE, Munroe, Rolla, N. D. 
i\ D. J. LARSON. Grand. Wallock, Minn. 



v^reston, la. in 
A. E. JONES, JR., Lyric, Galatia, 111. /l 
L. R. MARKUM, Rex, Indianapolis. jj L 
G. FISCHER, Milwaukee and National, Milwaukee, and ///////i 

Allis, West Allis, Wis. ////////i 



~-~ " "nuiuuu.vn, Lctyion rarK, reari ana n/i 

Grace, Milwaukee. ////// 

W. N. ROOB, Ozaukee or Strand, Port Washington Wis w///j 
FRANK HOLLISTER, Opera House, Girardsville, Pa *£@"/A 

C. FENYVESSY, Mad ison, West Rochester N Y Jk 
M. M. FEDERHAR, Cameo or Regent, Akron O 
FRANK BORCHERT, Door, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 



Electric, Jennings, Kan. 
HARRY R. LUSH, P. & A., Plymouth, Mich., and P. & 
^^mm A., North ville, Mich. 



G. BOWS, Biltmore, New York City 
S. RODENOK, Lehigh, Oakmont, Pa. VSHMM 
H. D. TALLEY, Majestic, Devine, Tex. MvS 
WALTER JENSEN, Rex, Currie, Minn. UV\\V 
R. M. FULLER, Palace, Grandview, Tex. 
G. C. JOHNSON, Pictureland, Metropolis, 111. ttl 
H. McCORMICK, State, Woodbridge, N. J. 
J. C. BROWN, Roosevelt, Jamestown ~N. Y. «\ J 
A. TSCHEMACHER, Casino, Buffalo, N. Y. I 
AL FILBEY, Triangle, Howard Lake, Minn. 
LYDIA BEHLING, Ellen Terry, Buffalo, N. Y. 
M. E. MITCHELL, Regent, Prarie Du Chien, Wis. 

G. L. ADAMS, Welcome, China Grove, N. C. 
G. M. PHILLIPS, Schiller Park, Syracuse, N. Y. 

CARL JOHNSON, Arcadia, Floresville, Tex. 
MRS. ESLE LARSON, Cecile, Cokato, Minn. 

CARL SOTHER, Grand, Annandale, Minn. 

T. B. LEWIS, Capitol, Eaton Rapids, Mich. 

RAY PEACOCK, Majestic, Stafford, Kan. 
J. J. HARWOOD, Lexington, Cleveland 

H. H. STURCHE, Palace, Se guin, Tex. 
S. HENRY, Opera House, Ambler, Pa. 




i 



A. E. MUINKUE., munroe, nolia, vt. u. 
D. J. LARSON, Grand, Wallock, Minn. 
J. C. ARNOLD, Arna, Rolette, N. D. 
JULIUS OVERMOE, Gem, Hillsboro, N. D. 
b C. H. TOLAN, Delchar, Mayville, N. D. 
», W. H. GOODROAD, Strand, Warren, Minn. 
§§; M. B. QUIRE, Star, Kanawah, la. 
§fc. S. A. HAYMAN, Lyde. Grand Island, Neb. 
fM\ HARRY FLEISHMAN, Brighton, Pittsburgh, 
iffifc C - E - HERMAN, New Carnegie. Carnegie, Pa. 
I3§; JULIUS GOODMAN, Astor, Baltimore, 
tlfll E - A - CRANE . Par k. Tampa. Fla. 
iVW B " J " COONEY . Cooney Circui;, Chicago. 
tifrW F - N - KENNEY > Star ' Watseka, 111. 

J " A - PHII - LIPS - Palace, Freeport. Tex. 
Iltflk G " L " WILLER . ° ur ' Grand Rapids, 
lllnl) HERMAN A. BIRD, Rivoli, Grand Rapids. 

LlllK- J " KULMS > Burton, Grand Rapids, 
lllf fjK ■>■ C. CHERVENKA, Fairmont, Grand Rapids. 
nt|» A. RUTTENBERG, Oliver. Detroit. 
■Ill U|. C. A. FERRY, Granada. Alhambra, Calif. 
i|||»;B. K. FISCHER, Alamo, Milwaukee. 
B||n|)D. C. SCOTT, Royal. LeMars, la. 
H|| j &( FRED KOCH, Grand, Remsen. Ia. 
H||K\ A. M. HERMAN, Rivoii, West Point. Neb. 
■If 1 W °" WESLEY, Wilsonville. Wilsonville. 111. 
HIIK SAM DU BOIS, Dos Palos, Dos Palos. Calif. 
BUI S' :G - W ' KENDALL, Arr - Delphia, Ind. 
Hllfly LEO UPCHURCH, Grand, Walters, Okla. 
IIIlsW J - E - DAVIS, Majestic. Hattiesburg, Miss, 
if If 111 HAROLD A. HILL, Hollywood, Chicago. 
HI I WmL HYMAN L. LUBERTHAL, Austin. Chicago. 
Iff f MS; WALTER J. FLUEGAL, Pekin, 111. 
If If |K< L. B. BROWN, Regal. Gatesville, Tex. 
|f I f MHK H. T. HODGE, Hodge Circuit, Tex. 
If jf ljK' J. T. O'HEARN, Isis, Lockney. Tex. 
f|||7 JR\ L. C. McNEESE, Grand. Kenedy, Tex. 
fffj «B P. V. WILLIAMS, Roxy. Munday, Tex. 
Iff/ flui F. W. ZIMMERMAN, Palace, San Marc 
'If/ 111' R " C " GARBODE, Palace, Shiner, Tex. 
If/ 11? BESSIE RAWLS, Mutual, Hamlin, Tex. 
IS' Si! W " E ' THORNE . Colonial. Alma, Kan. 
#/ W' E °WARP BUCKLEY, Idle Hour. Olivi; 
SI mm F. W. BOLL, Majestic. Stillwater. Minn. 
I W&i CHARLES D - S1LBER - S,ale - Eureka. S. D. 



Tex! 



Mil 



r 



Ind- 



E. S. CUMMINGS, Miles Standish, Minneapolis' 
STACY, Mascot. Mobridge. S. D. V 
NEDRY, Lyric. Little Falls. Minn. 
! M. C. RIGGS. Metropolitan. Owatonna. Minn. 
;< W. GILMORE, Pala -e, Royalton. Minn. v 
B. B. HOLDRIDGE, State. Shenandoah, la. 
W. A. COLLIN, Regal, Elvins. Mo. 
I. H. DAVIS, Gem. Alton, 111. 
! { SOL BEST, Mabel, Chicago. 
|l M. HARTZMAN, Lawndale, Chicago. 
lj JOHN E. NIEBES, Dawn, Detroit. 
1) J. L. GEEDY, Palace, Montpelier. Ind. 
'/ FRANK FORREST, Forrest, Booneville 
11 ABE SANDOW, Pico. Los Angeles. 
fj P. C. LARSON, Grand. Jordan. Minn. 
*il HENRY A. WIECKS, State. Belle Plain 
J ROY C. BERRY, Campus. Norman, Okla. 
{ C. H. SARTORIOUS, Capitol. Heartlcy. la, 
ij LOUIS LINKER, Majestic. Bridgelon, N. J. . 
k H. E. MILLER, Idle Hour. Festus. Mo. 
}) C. C. GRIFFIN, New Piedmont. Oakland. Calif. 
5 M. ATLAS, Capitol. Niagara Falls 
p RALPH AVERSA, Hippodrome. Niagara Falls. 
/ E. C. CURDTZ, Majestic. Greenville. S. C. 
FJ J. F. BARRY, Vernon. Chicago. 
k A. GOFFINET, Gofnnet. Rittman. O. 
V M. SPAYNE. Dayton. Akron. O. 
I" W. F. MAGINNIS. Tivoli. Lorain. O. 
{ L. L. DUNBAR. Cliff Queen, Dallas. T. -c. 
• E. L. SCHI BF.CK: Palace.' F.j Compi; Tex 
H. MULKF.Y. I'.hi.me, Clar.-n'lon. T.-x. 
W. J. WOOTEN, Olympia. Canyon. Tex. 
H. A. COLE, American. Bnnh.in. Tew. 



— • — ~ Ljuuuiuan, uillgllcuruon, IN. I. 

FRANK J. UJKA, Grand, Larrimore, N D 
A. C. GUTENBERG, Grand, Mil waukee. /A 
J. WARD A, Cazenovia, Buffalo, N. Y. 
A. J. HANZE, Arcade, Akr. 
B. HIRSH, Century, Phila 




PRODUCTIONS I NC; 

MEW YORK CITY; 



8 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



There is no answer to 
the important question — 
"What motion picture 
trade paper is subscribed 
for and read by first run 
theatres of the country?" — 
more conclusive than this 
plain statement of fact: 

Of the first 2,142 
houses wired by West- 
ern Electric, 2,029 
subscribe to the 

Herald -World. 



Y IN UPHEAVAL 
PS TO TRIUMPH! 

PRAISE . . 
IDOLATRY 



11 RIO RITA sweeps away our memories of 
The Desert Song, The Broadway Melody, 
The Hollywood Revue, On With The Show 
and the other musical offerings that 
did little more than hint at the possibil- 
ity that this Radio picture has achieved/ 




JACK 

A LI CO ATE 

BESTOWS UNSTINTED 
APPROVAL . . . 



FILM 
DAILY 



7 RIO RITA 7 is a smash and if they 
won't take this one we are will- 
ing to admit they don't want any 
part of talking pictures. It's sure 
hox-office.We could write columns 
about it and still say no more 
than that to date it is the PERFECT 
SCREEN MUSICAL/ 7 



MOST DRAMATIC 
OPENING in SHOW 
WORLD H If TORY 

WHAT MET CRITICS SAY 



"Sumptuousness . . . and vividness and pictorial 
beauty . . . Quite as astonishing as these striking 
mountings and settings is the work of Miss Bebe 
Daniels ... It will make a barrel of money." 

— QUINN MARTIN in THE WORLD 

"Handsome, spendthrift and entirely faithful . . . 
Tuneful and picturesque . . ." 

— RICHARD WATTS, Jr. in HERALD TRIBUNE 

"An evening of good music, enjoyable fun and 
constant screenfuls of striking scenes . . . Im- 
pressive spectacular passages . . . always inter- 
esting because of their loveliness." 

— MORDAUNT HALL in THE TIMES 

"One of the best entertainments yet 
to emerge from the Hollywood sound 
studios . . . Bebe Daniels a revelation 

— best of the singing stars yet made 
audible . . . Enthusiastic greeting of 
last night's premier is bound to be re- 
peated by audiences throughout the 
nation." 

— Regina Crewe in The American 

"For Bole's and Bebe's songs alone'Rio 
Rita' is worth the price of admission." 

— Irene Thirer in Daily News 




"Gorgeous riot of color and movement, massed 
groupings and pretty music . . . Best of the musi- 
cal romances that have been translated to the 
screen . . ." 

-NEW YORK TELEGRAM 

"Technicolor gorgeous . . . sets extravagant . . . 
dancing ensembles well-nigh perfect . . . costum- 
ing most elaborate . . . and the recording an 
excellent job." 

— JULIA SHAWELL in EVENING GRAPHIC 



"A lavish spectacle, extravagantly mounted, 
colorfully costumed and excellently recorded. 
One of the most pretentious screen musicals! 



— Rose Pelswick in Evening Journal 



"Will click wherever it is shown . . .By 
all means take it in if you like beauty 
and tunefulness." 

George Gerhard in Even'g World 

"Most successful transcription of a 
musical show that has come to the 
screen." 

— John S. Cohen, Jr. in The Sun 



The Miracle ▼ Workers 




\ 



FOOTttALL! 



ear the 



King of Radio 



Announcers 



Graham McNamee 



Describe Its 



Thrills in a new 




6RANTLAND RICE SPORTLI6HT 
IN SOUND — GRIDIRON GLORY" 




The most famous voice on the air- 
Graham McJVauiec's — recognized by 
millions every time a sporting event 
of national importance is held . . . He 
announces in his old magic way in 
''Gridiron (•lory"— describing football 
thrills, crowds, music, college cheers 
. . . Another example of Pathc's perfect 
timing, with sport-mad hordes shout- 
ing in the new football season! 

Presented by VAN BEUREN CORPORATION 



PATH E 



Advance ads for 
$2 00 engagement 
at Central, N. Y. 




And tomorrow ifoull get - 

GREAT COLOR XPECIALS 




101 IE 
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IRENE 

//i 

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—Bi/ a Mile f— 



The 
Independent 
Film Trade 
Paper 



EXHIBITORS 

HERALD 
WORLD 



Home 
Office: 
407 So. Dearborn St. 
Chicago 



IN THIS ISSUE — 



TELEVISION 

Theatres Will Be Benefited By Television. 
Says William S. Paley, President of Columbia 
Broadcasting System, Declaring that Home 
Cannot Be Transformed Into Playhouse- 
New Invention Will Play Large Part in Op- 
eration of Theatres, Industry Is Told — News- 
reels Called Particularly Fertile Field. 



THE HOE CLUB 

Charter Members of the Hoe Club Pledge 
Themselves to Dig for Greater Box Office by 
Exchanging Exploitation Ideas Through Col- 
umns of the Herald-World — New Organiza- 
tion, Taking Name from Initials of House Or- 
gan Exchange, Is Open to All Exhibitors 
Willing to Cooperate. 



COMPLETE INDEX TO CONTENTS 



NEWS 

Society of Motion Picture Engineers convenes at Ottawa with 
Canadian exhibitors cooperating — Sound is one of chief topics. 
Blind prejudice is blamed for British production situation — 
Ignore opportunities and instead ape passe American ideas, de- 
clares native Briton. 

Motion Picture Department of Harvard Business School will con- 
centrate on specific problems of industry — Tri-State exhibitors 
convention dates changed to follow M P T O A meeting. 
Contract adjustment committee will report results at Memphis 
gathering of M P T O A — Paramount acquires 37 theatres and 



half-interest in William Morris agency. 

FEATURES 

The Voice of the Industry (Letters from Readers) 58 

Motion Picture Finance 20 

Service Talks 40 

Los Angeles by Dougla> Hodges 33 

Broadway 14 

Sound Pictures 28 

Pictorial Section 21 

Sound Act Releases 38 

J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum ^?-J 63 



DEPARTMENTS 



The Studio 33 

Short Features 37 

Music and Talent 45 

The Theatre 41 

Classified Advertising 57 

Quick Reference Picture Chart 52 

What the Picture Did for Me 59 

New Pictures 65 

Chicago Personalities by J. F 66 



ADVERTISEMENTS 

FILM, SOUND AND EQUIPMENT— Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 
United Artists, Eastman Kodak, Educational, RKO, Paramount, 
Universal, Tiffany-Stahl, Pathe, First National, Western Electric, 
Renaud Hoffman, Simplimus, Inc., Mellaphone Corporation, 
Walt's Theatre Supply Company, National Screen Service, Elm-, 
Hotel, Weber Machine Company, Community Theatres. 

MUSIC AND TALENT— Leo Feist, Inc., Remick Music Corpora- 
tion, Henri Keates, Eddie Fitch, Charles Williams, Brooks Cos- 
tumes, Walzer and Dyer-, Ransley Studios. 



CHICAGO 

407 South Dearborn St. Telephone Harrison 0036-37-38 

Cable Address : Quigpubco 
EDWIN S. CLIFFORD, General Manager 
JAY M. SHRECK. Managing Editor 
GEORGE CLIFFORD, Business Manager 
ERNEST A. ROVELSTAD, IVcnrs Editor 
HOLLYWOOD 

1605 North Cahuenga St. Telephone Gladstone 2118-2119 
DOUGLAS HODGES 

West Coast Manager 



EDITORIAL 

AND 
ADVERTISING 
OFFICES 



565 Fifth Avenue 



NEW YORK 

Telephone Wickersham 2366-236" 



PETER VISCHER, New York Editor 
JAMES BEECROFT, New York Advertising Manager 

LONDON 
THE BIOSCOPE 
Faraday House 
8-10 Charing Cross Rd., W. C. 2 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: United States and its possessions. Canada and all countries of the Americas S3.00 per year; Great Britain and its colonies £l per v»ar 

Other foreign countries S5.00 per year. Single copies— 25 cents. Advertising rate cards and Audit Bureau of Circulations statements furnished upon application. ' 



The HERA!LD-WORLD assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts. No manuscripts are returned unless ai 



so request. 



•4 



12 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS 

H E RALD 
WORLD 

Martin J. Quigley, Publisher & Editor 

Incorporating Exhibitors Herald, founded in 1915: Moving Pic- 
ture World, founded in 1907; Motography, founded in 1909; and 
The Film Index, founded in 1909 

Published Every Wednesday by 

Quigley Publishing Company 

Publication Office: 407 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 

Martin J. Quigley, President 
Edwin S. Clifford, Secretary George Clifford, Asst. Treasurer 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
Copyright, 1929, by Quigley Publishing Company 

All editorial and business correspondence 
should be addressed to the Chicago office 

Other publications: Better Theatres, devoted to construction, equipment and 
operation of theatres; published every fourth week in conjunction with Exhibitors 
Herald- World; The Motion Picture Almanac, Pictures and Personalities, pub- 
lished annually; The Chicagoan and Polo, Class publications. 



Vol. 97, No. 2 October 12, 1929 



The March on Memphis 

A THEATRE owner who holds himself aloof and apart 
from an exhibitors' association is either a very power- 
ful exhibitor or a very foolish one. To the vast majority 
of exhibitors, association membership — and the taking 
of an active part in the affairs of the association — is not 
merely a matter of choice. It is a matter of necessity. 

This little preamble, containing nothing at all new, yet 
a great deal that many theatremen have not yet realized, 
leads us to a consideration of an important impending 
event. We refer to the coming convention of the Motion 
Picture Theatre Owners of America, to be held commenc- 
ing on October 29 at Memphis. 

The way of the exhibitors' organizations has not been 
smooth or placid. Since that first Ohio Convention it has 
been a hard and difficult road, strewn with many pitfalls 
and obstacles. Outside of the usual, natural difficulties 
of organization, it has been our observation that a very 
large percentage of the pitfalls and difficulties which ex- 
hibitors' associations have encountered have been dug or 
built up by the exhibitors themselves. There have been 
rash efforts at personal aggrandizement among leaders; 
there have been futile efforts at petty, political maneuver- 
ing and there has been a decided lack of cooperation and 
support among the rank and file of the membership. 

But organization continues, despite all of this. It con- 
tinues because of the urgent and basic need for organ- 
ization. 

The motion picture industry in all of its ramifications 
is passing through severe and radical readjustments. It 
is to be hoped that out of the readjustments affecting the 
exhibition branch of the business there will come a new 
and better attitude toward organization on the part of 
the individual exhibitors throughout the country. 

And a good time to let this new attitude show itself 
would be at the forthcoming Memphis convention. 

There have always been good reasons and pressing 
necessities for an annual conference among exhibitors. 
But at no time since the start of the business has there 
been greater or better reasons or greater necessities than 
at this time. There are new conditions, new problems 
and new opportunities, all of which call for a measure 
of attention. A well-planned and actively supported con- 
vention at this time will pay and pay well. 



It is to be hoped that the march on Memphis will 
demonstrate that the individual exhibitors of the country 
are awake to the necessities and the opportunities of their 
situation. 

Motion Picture Stocks 

DURING the recent hectic days in the stock markets 
the strength and stability of the leading motion pic- 
ture securities were sufficiently outstanding to attract con- 
siderable attention. This should be very gratifying to the 
motion picture industry. At a time when securities of 
practically all the great industries were suffering severe 
market depreciation it is significant indeed that the film 
shares were so well supported. 

The obvious import of this is that the motion picture 
business is and is known to be a good business and that 
its leading concerns are and are known to be sound, secure 
and ably managed enterprises. 

The transition from only a few years ago is remarkable. 
At that time the industry was virtually without financial 
support from the regular sources of credit upon which 
commerce arid industry at large depend. By its own 
merits and ability to show results — and without any par- 
ticular indulgence on the part of banks and bankers — 
the industry has raised itself to a position of such fine 
financial standing that even in a severe market break its 
securities serenely hold their positions in the stock markets. 

Neiv Pictures 

GOOD pictures and great pictures continue to show up 
among the new season's programs now being given 
premieres on Broadway. "Sunny Side Up," a truly great 
entertainment for all kinds of people everywhere, was a 
notable new arrival of last week. George Arliss in 
"Disraeli" received, both inside and outside the trade, 
very remarkable recognition. The Arliss performance in 
this fine play gives an histrionic display which Holly- 
wood, Long Island and other places where talking pictures 
are made may study with profit. Another fine attraction 
is Moran and Mack in "The Two Black Crows." Richard 
Barthelmess came into New York in a week of fine new 
pictures in "Young Nowheres," the best subject he has had 
in a long time. 

The Hollywood answer to the challenge of the audible 
picture has been spoken, most distinctly. The handling 
of the new medium if not completely mastered has prog- 
ressed to a most remarkable degree. Some extraordinary 
precedents have been established: "Madam X," "Broad- 
way Melody," "Sunny Side Up" and "Disraeli." The pace 
the Hollywood producer has set for himself is a bewilder- 
ing one. That it will become even more accelerated as 
time goes on there is no doubt. But even the present 
pace is sufficient to insure the most crowded houses dur- 
ing the coming Winter that the industry has ever seen. 

♦ # # 

Acoustics 

RETURNING to our favorite subject this season — bet- 
ter reproduction — the exhibitor is reminded that 
the company supplying the reproducing device is responsi- 
ble for the device but is not responsible for the theatre. 
Yet without reasonably good acoustical qualities in the 
theatre the equipment company, no matter how zealous 
it may be in its effort to render satisfaction, cannot succeed. 

Equipment in various instances is receiving a blame 
which it is not deserving of. The qualities of the audi- 
torium in its sounding faculties must be adequate or 
proper results will remain unattainable. 

The theatreman, therefore, is urged to look to the con- 
ditions existing in his theatre. This is a job for an expert, 
but it is the exhibitor's responsibility to see that the job 
is done. 

—MARTIN J. QUIGLEY. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



I J 



Television 
Draw 



Will Make Theatre 

Better, Says Paley 



Why Paley Thinks 
Television Ally 
Of Theatres 



"The coming of radio broadcasting 
brought fears that the public would pre- 
fer to stay at home to listen to radio 
program. The groundlessness of these 
fears is proved by the fact that the at- 
tendance at film houses has increased 
consistently year by year." 

"The progress of science was not de- 
structive to the entertainment industry. 
It simply gave the public the right to 
demand more for its money." 

* * * 

"This advent of an element (radio talk- 
ing pictures, television) into each field 
that was formerly peculiar to the other 
has resulted in a mutuality of interest 
of such far-reaching significance that un- 
limited new possibilities are dawning in 
the entertainment world." 

* * * 

"Usually new inventions simply make 
old ones more useful." 

* * * 

"Far from driving out the phonograph, 
radio stimulated it to new usefulness." 

* * * 

"When television comes, whether it be 
in five years or a score, it will play a 
large part in the operation of the very 
theatres that some feel it threatens. 
Consider what can be done in the field 
of newsreels alone." 

* * * 

"Perfections in the projection of mo- 
tion pictures will play a large part in 
making television applicable to theatre 
rather than home presentation." 

'"The home can hardly be expected to 
be transformed into a modern theatre 
having all the perfected devices and ap- 
purtenances available to the theatre." 

"We have not seen the cheap and popu- 
lar use of filming cameras and projecting 
machine affect the motion picture indus- 
try perceptibly." 

* * * 

"The combination of these elements 
(supersized screen, third dimension, 
color) with spoken dialog, music and 
natural sound will set a standard for 
screen entertainment that audiences will 
naturally expect and demand when tele- 
vision becomes a commercial practicabil- 
ity." 

* * * 

"Someone will have to foot the bill for 
home television, and it is hard to con- 
ceive of an advertising sponsorship of 
the filmed efforts of Charlie Chaplin, 
Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks." 

* * * 

"Experienced engineers are proving in- 
valuable in the. recording and other tech- 
nical phases of talking picture produc- 
tion. They will still be speaking the 
language of radio when television 
comes." 



Home Can't Be Changed into 
Playhouse, Industry Is Told 

More Applicable to Theatres Than Private Residences, 
Says Columbia Broadcasting System's President 

Just as the radio has become a valuable ally of the motion picture theatre, 
so television will stimulate theatre going, and "play a large part in the opera- 
tion of the very theatres that some feel it threatens," says William S. Paley, 
president of the Columbia Broadcasting System, in an article in the October 
issue of Nation's Business, published by the Chamber of Commerce of the 
United States. 

Paley, as head of the broadcasting organization which recently became 
affiliated with Paramount Famous Lasky, predicts that perfections in motion 
picture projection will help make television "applicable to theatre rather than 
home presentation." 



It is illogical to believe that the home 
can be changed into the modern theatre 
with all its perfected devices and appur- 
tenances, such as supersized screen, color 
and third dimension, Paley holds. 

Public Must Be Amused 

His article, with the title, "Radio and the 
Movies Join Hands," follows: 
TT is more than an axiom that the public 
-*- has to be amused and entertained. It 
is an economic necessity. What the motion 
picture has done for the worker wearied by 
a day of toil has been dealt with in pulpit 
and press, debated for years by statesmen 
and educators. Now we have radio, with 
its manifold potentialities and problems. 

People have assembled to be entertained 
and instructed for thousands of years. They 
will, I believe, continue to gather for these 
purposes for many generations to come. 
The theatre is as natural an institution_ as 
is the school room. It is the expression 
of group psychology. Man being a social 
creature, he likes to rub shoulders with his 
fellows. Emotional response in an audience 
is infectious. Laughs engender laughs, 
thrills sweep like electric currents through 
multitudes. Scenes of dramatic poignancy, 
on stage or screen or platform, affect a 
group mind that exists for the moment as 
one, though it may, be composed of thou- 
sands of individuals. 

The theatre is a major industry in the 
national economy. Millions of dollars and 
hundreds and thousands of persons are en- 
gaged in this industry. The theatre is at 
once a stable institution and a capricious 
one. It is affected by a multitude of factors. 
Not the least important factor now enter- 



Maybe Santa Will 
Come Via Television 

Work on the development of Tele- 
vision is progressing very rapidly 
and it is predicted that sets will 
make their appearance on the market 
by Christmas, according to J. E. 
Smith, president of the National Ra- 
dio Institute of Washington. Tele- 
vision was demonstrated at the 
Radio World's Fair in New York 
under the supervision of R C A en- 
gineers. These demonstrations in- 
cluded the voice of the subject as 
well as their image. 



ing into the theatrical business is the radio, 
youngest and most ambitious of entertain- 
ment mediums. 

We of the broadcasting branch of the 
radio industry, the branch that now enters 
almost as intimately into the daily lives of 
the citizenry as the newspaper, are con- 
stantly beset with inquiries about our pres- 
ent and future activities, about the possible 
and probable effect of radio on the basic 
medium of entertainment, which is the 
theatre. 

Cynosure of Industrialists 

We are asked again and again whether 
a clash is not imminent between the par- 
venu radio and the old established theatre. 
Particularly since the introduction of the 
socalled "talkies," which demonstrated that 
the motion picture industry is also a crea- 
ture of the laboratory whence radio sprang, 
have we become the cynosure of industrial- 
ists and sociologists. 

These "talkies," emerging from the elec- 
trical laboratories ahead of television, have 
served as the basis of much speculation 
about radio and the theatre. Will not the 
simultaneous reception by radio (or wires) 
of vision along with sound shake the the- 
atrical business — and I must refer especially 
to the motion picture business — to its foun- 
dations? 

Radio and Films Now Allies 

The recent affiliation of the Columbia 
Broadcasting System with one of the great- 
est of the film organizations, the Para- 
mount Famous Lasky Corporation, has 
served to stimulate all sorts of theories 
and conjectures. My own interest has been 
whetted and my fancy intrigued, for I must 
guess along with the others. 

Radio and motion pictures, once 
considered potential rivals, have be- 
come allies. Scientific progress has 
served to introduce sound into mo- 
tion pictures. Science gives us rea- 
sonable prospect for vision in radio 
broadcasting. This advent of an ele- 
ment into each field that was formerly 
peculiar to the other has resulted in 
a mutuality of interests of such far- 
reaching significance that unlimited 
new possibilities are dawning in the 
entertainment world. 
Talking motion pictures are an accom- 
plished fact and apparently are here to 
stay. Television, we are told by the best 
minds in the laboratory, is "just around 
the corner." I shall not attempt to pre- 
{Continued on page 26) 



14 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



must 



"Sunny Side Up" 

TN the new Movietone musical romance 
A brought to Broadway, "Sunny Side Up," 
William Fox has a smash hit that you'll 
hear about for many months to come. 

This picture is easy to rave about. It 
is grand production, with one of the hottest 
numbers yet seen on screen or stage. It 
is bright and amusing, with many a laugh. 
Its music is well up to the DeSylva, Brown 
and Henderson standard, and I don't know 
how I could heap any higher praise upon it. 

"Sunny Side Up" brings that popular 
pair, Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell, 
their first talking parts. They are no dra- 
matic stars, that's a cinch, but there is an 
air of refreshing youth and wistfulness 
about them that is thoroughly appealing. 
Janet Gaynor particularly won the loud and 
enthusiastic applause of a crowded house- 
that included many a celebrity, including 
the ever-popular Al Smith. 

William Fox and Winfield Sheehan did 
a courageous job when they decided upon 
this "musical romance,'' something quite 
new and unusual in entertainment. They 
grabbed off the best talent in sight and 
achieved a success that will echo and re- 
echo for many months to come. 

"'Disraeli" 

IN "Disraeli" the brothers Warner have 
brought the screen one of its most thor- 
oughly satisfying productions. Here is a 
picture that the industry might point to 
with pride. It is glamorous, exciting, dra- 
matic, romantic, and graced by a perform- 
ance that is magnificent. 

George Arliss, of course, is the star of 
"Disraeli," for the stage play upon which 
the picture is closely modeled was made 
to order for him. He plays the part with 
consummate art, the finished actor in a 
sweet part. 

Here's heartiest congratulations. 

A Busy Week 

BROADWAY just finished one of the 
busiest weeks in its history. 
On Tuesday evening came the premiere 
of "Young Nowheres." On Wednesday 
came a private showing of Gloria Swanson's 
new picture, "The Trespasser," and the 
marvellous "Disraeli." On Thursday ap- 
peared the new Fox picture, "Sunny Side 
Up." Friday brought two more to Broad- 
way, the British-made "Blackmail" and 
Paramount's picture with Moran and Mack. 
Sunday came the spectacular "Rio Rita," 
with which Radio made a triumphant bow. 

Who says the season isn't on in full 
force ? 

Good Pictures, Too 

THE fascinating part of it is that there 
wasn't a dud in the whole lot of them. 
One or two of them turned out to be aces 
high, the rest were all good. 

If the picture industry keeps on offering 
the public such a list of attractions, busi- 
ness this winter will be better than ever. 
Things are certainly looking up. 

Prom ptness 

XT ERE'S a tip not to stall around too 
- 1 long. Paramount brought out Moran 
and Mack when the great vogue they en- 
joyed was almost over. "The Trespasser" 
allows Miss Swanson in magnificent gowns 
— to her knees — now all out of style. 

—PETER YISCHER. 



"Street Girl" on Main Streets 



"D ADIO PICTURES' first production, '"Street Girl," has established attendance records 
^- in many of the key cities and in the smaller cities the main street picture houses are 
preparing for her arrival. '"Street Girl" is the first picture to be made under the Radio 
Pictures' banner and is being followed by "Rio Rita." which is expected to set a record, 

even higher than "Street Girl." 




Ivan Lebedeff mid Betty Compson. 




A gorgeous night club scene. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



15 



Growth of World Film Trade 
Emphas ized at S M P E Meeting 

Sound Not Presented as Well 
As Recorded, Convention Told 



PF L "Applause" Gets 
Varied Reception; Is 
Lauded by Lay Press 

Trade Agrees Performance by Prin- 
cipals Is Splendid but Calls 
Story Sordid 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— Paramount started 
something last night when it premiered "Ap- 
plause," with Helen Morgan, at the Criterion 
theatre on Broadway here. Audience opinion 
was as varied as it was strong. Critics of the 
lay press, though, were as one in their praise 
of the picture as an artistic truism and of 
Miss Morgan as a great actress in a splendidly 
executed tragic role. 

Trade Calls Story Sordid 

The trade had a different angle. It granted 
that the story was unusually strong, that the 
principals could not have given better perform- 
ances, that direction was superb and that the 
photography, on the whole, was selectively 
fine and on occasion extraordinarily diverting. 
But it also stated that the story was sordid, 
the character work too disturbing, one or two 
pieces of dialog too pungent to suit the sugar- 
coated taste of a large portion of the public. 

The picture was directed by Rouben 
Mamoulian, fresh from his triumphs with the 
Theatre Guild. 

The tale concerns a faded burlesque queen 
who is persuaded by her lover, also in the 
show, to take her daughter out of a convent 
and put her to work in the show business, 
Daughter Makes Hit 

Her mother, who really doesn't want her in 
the show business, is delighted. The man, 
thinking he can make a fortune out of the 
child, becomes enraged and threatens to throw 
over his ageing love. The girl decides her 
place is with her mother, sends her sailor boy 
back to his ship. The disconsolate burlesque 
queen takes poison, the theatre management 
thinks she's drunk and the daughter goes on 
in her stead, making a hit and hating it. As 
she comes off the stage she falls into the arms 
of her sailor, who has providentially returned. 
They decide to take her mother with them to 
the Wisconsin farm, turn to the dressing room 
to tell her about it, not realizing she is dead. 

With Helen Morgan as the star, loan Peers 
as the girl, Fuller Mellish, Jr., as the man, 
and Henry Wadsworth as the young sailor, 
the picture is excellently cast. Wadsworth 
particularly will bear watching. In connection 
with the show there was an interesting exhibit 
of old programs and photographs of stars who 
played the Criterion in the course of its 35 
years of theatrical history. — P. V. 



R K O Leases Chicago 
Loop "Legit" Theatre 
For Long-Run Audiens 

Radio-Keith-Orpheum has taken over the 
Woods theatre, Loop "legit" house in Chi- 
cago, and will operate it on a long-run 
policy, with R K 0 special productions as 
preferred attractions. Negotiations for a 
long-term lease were completed Tuesday, 
October 8. R K O will open the house 
October 26, with "Rio Rita." 

The theatre will be remodeled and re- 
decorated, possibly also reseated. A new 
marquise will bear the name R K O-Woods. 
All pictures will be in sound, and there 
will be no band or orchestra. Prices will 
be around 75 cents. 



Many of Industry's Leaders Describe Technical Progress 
In Paper Read at Toronto 

By F. H. RICHARDSON 

TORONTO, Oct. 8. — The Society of Motion Picture Engineers yesterday 
opened its fall convention here at the Royal York hotel, with an attendance 
both larg-e and highly representative. 

Mayor McBride of Toronto addressed the convention in a speech of wel- 
come. However, there was a catch in it. He tendered us the keys to the city 
but warned us that it did not ht the inside of the Hoose Gow door, which 
of course got him an appreciative laugh. 

In his address, President L. C. Porter that inference is backed up by knowledge — 
brought out a number of interesting- points. that it is due either to inferiority in the 



The society was founded by C. Francis 
Jenkins in 1916. At its beginning it was 
composed of less than a dozen members. 
Today it has 617 members. It has pub- 
lished 38 volumes of transactions contain- 
ing approximately 5,000 pages, than which 
there is no more valuable work to be found 
anywhere. It has 81 members in its Pacific 
Coast section, 90 in its London section, and 
it has 19 committees composed of about 
152 members. 

Sees Great Prosperity 

The president made plain the fact that he 
sees great prosperity and much useful work 
ahead for the society. The past year was 
literally a record year in its history. Dur- 
ing - the past 12 months, 330 names were 
added to its roll, and 1,331 copies of its 
transactions were circulated. The treas- 
urer's report showed . $17,232.31 in the 
treasury, without any debts due. 

Reverting to the mayor's address, he 
made this remark in the course of his talk: 

"Some like vaudeville, some like drama, 
some like musical comedy, some like grand 
opera, but it may be safely said that 95 per 
cent of the people of Toronto and Ontario 
like the motion picture, regardless of their 
other likes or dislikes." 

Inferior Reproduction Cited 

In the report of the progress committee, 
the fact was brought out that in a great 
many theatres the sound sent into the audi- 
torium was far inferior in excellence to that 
recorded in the film. The report made no 
criticism pointing to whom this was due, 
but of course the natural inference is — and 



sound reproducing and projecting apparatus, 
or to inferiority in the handling of this 
apparatus or to a combination of both. 

The progress committee also made note 
of the fact that one theatre out in Cali- 
fornia has installed ear phones, the volume 
in which is controlled by small choke coils. 
These phones are for the use of the par- 
tially deaf. The committee report also 
brought out the fact that a good many peo- 
ple, especially in Germany, are still labor- 
ing hopefully with the non-intermittent pro- 
jector idea. Germany, said the report, has 
at this time at least half a dozen of these 
projectors upon which inventors are 
working. 

250 Millions Attend in Week 

The report stated that a psychologist at 
Columbia University has reported on a two- 
year investigation made on the influence of 
motion pictures on crime. The results in- 
dicated that most children remembered very 
little detail of the picture and were unsym- 
pathetic with wrongdoers. Only 5.2 per 
cent of 150,000 theatre patrons were under 
21 years of age. Over 250,000,000 persons 
see motion pictures weekly throughout the 
world. Over 23,000 controversies were 
arbitrated by film boards during 1928, only 
28 claims requiring the services of a seventh 
arbitrator. This was reported by the Hays 
office. 

Export of positive and negative film from 
the United States fell off 10,000,000 feet in 
1928, when 222,000,000 feet were shipped out, 
as compared with 232,000,000 feet in 1927, 
(Continued on payc 30) 



Contract Adjustment Body to Report 

Results at the MP TO A Convention 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8. — An important position on the program of the tenth annual 
convention of the M P T O A in Memphis October 29-31, will be allotted the report 
of the recent meeting of the exhibitors' and distributors' committee on contract 
adjustments. 

It is disclosed that several hundred changes in contracts for talking picture 
service were made at the meeting, which was called following appointment of the 
committee to make more equitable the prices some exhibitors had alrady agreed 
to pay. M. A. Lightman, president of the M P T O A, heads the exhibitor group, 
and Sidney R. Kent, vice president and general manager of Paramount, leads the 
distributor bloc. 

The convention, which is the first M P T O A meeting to be held in the South, 
is being regarded by Southern business leaders as a part of the program to expand 
their territory commercially and industrially. 

Among the demonstrations to take place will concern Mississippi river Hood 
control work, a project to which the M P T O A has already committed itself, as 
a means of bettering conditions for Southern exhibitors. 



16 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



Harvard Picture School to Specialize 
On Specific Problems of Industry 

Department of Business School Out of Swaddling Clothes and Valuable 
Potential Asset to Trade, Says Professor H. L. Lewis 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS., Oct. 8.— The Motion Picture Department of the 
Harvard Business School, the name of which is constantly cropping 
up in connection with the motion picture business, has passed through 
its adolescence and may now be considered part and parcel of the motion 
picture industry, according to Howard T. Lewis, professor of marketing. 
JN an interview with the Herald- World, problem is a specific one, dealing with 2 



Professor Lewis outlined the work of the 
motion picture department, explained its 
aim and showed clearly enough how it 
could be a valuable asset to the business 
end of our industry. 

Get Material from Industry 
The Harvard Business School is an in- 
tegral part of that larger organization 
known as Harvard University. Its student 
body selected from candidates who already 
have been graduated from an accredited 
college or university. Its two-year course 
is confined exclusively to the problems of 
business. Its faculty is made up of trained 
men, keen students of business in a prac- 
tical way, who constantly are being called 
upon as consultants by business organiza- 
tions. 

"To get a fair view of the problems of 
the motion picture industry," Professor 
Lewis said, "the school began the collection 
of material in 'case' form from producers, 
distributors and exhibitors alike, regardless 
of their size or position. 

"This gave it something to work with, 
provided it with teaching material for class- 
room use. Courses were outlined in general 
marketing, sales management, real estate 
fundamentals, finance, statistics and the 
like. There were no courses in production, 
distribution or exhibition. 

125 Concrete Cases Studied 

"In 1927 the school was given a boost 
when William Fox, Will Hays, Adolph 
Zukor, Jesse Lasky, Earle W. Hammons, 
Harry Warner, Robert Cochrane, Samuel 
Katz, Joseph P. Kennedy and other men 
whose names were household words de- 
livered lectures on the many problems of 
their work. These lectures were later 
edited by Mr. Kennedy and published under 
the title 'The Story of the Films.' 

"To date between 125 and ISO detailed 
concrete cases or experiences have been 
compiled and studied, thanks to the splen- 
did cooperation of many people. These 
cases deal with a number of varying prob- 
lems such as theatre location, purchase of 
sound equipment, percentage pricing, arbi- 
tration, block booking, protection, analysis 
of market conditions, raising working cap- 
ital, operation of exchanges, trade and con- 
sumer advertising. In every case the 



specific situation in a specific company. 
Facts in Strictest Confidence 
"But it will be said," Professor Lewis 
continued, "that to be of real value, the 
information required for such a 'case' would 
have to be so confidential that no executive 
would divulge it. Here a word of explana- 
tion may be in order. The usual procedure 
in gathering material is for a representative 
of the school to talk over with some re- 
sponsible person, some problem with which 
that individual is — or has been — confronted. 
All pertinent facts, so far as known, are 
frankly presented — always in strictest con- 
fidence. These facts are then written up 
and submitted to the informer. He edits 
the material, and it is returned to the 
school's representative. A final copy is then 
drawn up, and its release authorized by the 
company. 

"The school publishes a series of vol- 
umes known as the Harvard Business Re- 
ports. These reports contain the best cases 
which the school has collected. These are 
used very generally by the other educational 
institutions and are very carefully read by 
many business men. Another such volume 
will probably appear early this winter. 
Specific Problem Emphasized 

"The study, however, will not be com- 
pleted with the publishing of this 600-page 
volume. Its character may change some- 
what so that, although the work of collect- 
ing 'cases' will not be discontinued, greater 
emphasis will be placed upon some specific 
problem. It is our belief that the material 
now collected gives the best general view 
of the field, in detailed and authentic form, 
that exists. 

"If someone could have anticipated some 
of the problems arising from the introduc- 
tion of sound, the chaos which developed 
would have been in some measure reduced. 
If someone could now anticipate somewhat 
concretely the possible effect of television 
on problems of distribution and of theatre 
operation, the industry would be far better 
prepared for its introduction. Again, the 
school has been foremost in the collection 
of comparative cost figures." 



Zanuck Sails on the Bremen 

NEW YORK. — Darryl Zanuck, associate producer 
of the Warner studio, has sailed, with Mrs. Zanuck, 
on the Bremen for a six weeks' vacation in Europe. 
Before Zanuck left Hollywood he completed the su- 
pervision of "Show of Shows," the biggest Vitaphone 
attraction to be released by Warners this year. 



Paramount Acquires 37 Theatres and 

Half an Interest in William Morris 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8. — Paramount has added three more circuits to its string. 
The number of houses acquired totals 37. One-half of the physical assets of the 
William Morris vaudeville agency has also been acquired. 

The New York stock exchange approved the application for the listing of 
289,976 additional shares of common stock to cover the purchase and also to be 
sold to employes. The latter will have available 250,000 shares. 

Of the remaining shares just listed, 16,323 will be applied on the acquisition of 
the Strand Amusement Company in Florida; 14,112 for the Rickards & Nace 
Amusement Company in Arizona; 6,875 for the Hostetter Amusement Company 
in Nebraska and Iowa; and 2,666 shares for the vaudeville property. 



$2,000,000 Pledged 
By Colum bia Forces as 
Goldberg Testimonial 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— Columbia's sales or- 
ganization has pledged itself to bring in $2,- 
000,000 in contracts as a testimonial to Joe 
Goldberg, the general sales manager. The 
country is divided into three sections, which 
will compete for first place in the play date 
drive. These sections are headed by Rube 
Jackter, assistant sales manager; Ben Rosen- 
berg, circuit manager, and Hal Hodes, director 
of exploitation. 

A friendly rivalry exists among the three, 
and in order to stimulate interest and assure 
a successful conclusion to the drive the coun- 
try was divided into three sections, one falling 
to each of the drive sponsors. 



Hanson, Stefies Reach 
Los Angeles in Coast 
Tour on T-S Franchise 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 8.— Oscar R. Han- 
son, general sales manager of Tiffany-Stahl, 
arrived in Los Angeles last week, accompanied 
by Al Steffes of Allied States. The Los 
Angeles franchise meeting for exhibitors of 
the Southern California territory will open 
tomorrow and continue through Wednesday 
and Thursday. 
Seuttle Meeting 
Well Attended 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
SEATTLE, Oct. 8. — A successful two-day 
conference sponsored by Tiffany-Stahl and 
Allied States was held here, the principal ad- 
dresses being made by Al Steffes, representing 
Allied States, and Oscar Hanson, general sales 
manager of Tiffany-Stahl. On the request of 
Jim Hone, local secretary of Allied, and Al 
Rosenberg, president of Allied in Washington, 
a record attendance turned out for all four 
meetings. 

Toronto Franchise 
Meeting Is Held 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

TORONTO, Oct. 8.— Tiffany-Stahl held a 
meeting here last week to present its new 
franchise plan to exhibitors. Those who 
spoke on the franchise were Carl J. Goe, 
assistant general sales manager; J. Earl Law- 
son, chairman of the board; Phil Hazza, gen- 
eral manager in Canada; and W. C. Gehring, 
Eastern division manager. 



Oswald Brooks Joins 

New Audien Company 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— E. Oswald Brooks, 
who resigned the position of Eastern produc- 
tion manager of Pathe Exchange, Inc., last 
year in order to survey the production field in 
England (and while there supervised produc- 
tion of "Young Woodley" for Regal Film Co., 
London), has returned to America and joined 
the production staff of the newly formed 
Talking Picture Epics, Inc., at 11 West 42nd 
street, New York City. 



Luncheon to Be Given 
For W. F. Canavan Nov, 14 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— The Projection 
Advisory Council will give a luncheon to 
William F. Canavan, International presi- 
dent of the I. A. T. S. E. & M. P. M. O., at 
the hotel Astor, at 1 p. m., November 14. 
Canavan will deliver a talk on "projection 
and the projectionist." Charles E. Eichorn 
is chairman of the committee. 



October 12, 1929 EXHIBITORS H If RALD-WU RLD IT 



Blind Prejudice Is Blamed for 

British Production Situation 

Ignores Opportunity, But Apes 
Passe U. S. Ideas, Says Briton 



Thou Shalt Not 
Hiss the Villain 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
BOSTON, Oct. 8. — Assistant Cor- 
poration Counsel Samuel Silverman 
notified theatre managers that hissing 
the villain would not be permitted in 
Boston theatres hereafter. He 
claimed to represent City Censor 
Casey in making the order. So far 
there is no ban on crying or laughing 
coughing or sneezing by those in the 
audiences. 



Stupidity Now Supplants 
Immorality as "What Is 
Wrong with the Movies 

Mrs. T. G. Winter Goes to Holly- 
wood to Supply Missing Femi- 
nine Vieivpoint 

Motion pictures do not contain immorality 
— at least not enough to worry about. It is 
their stupidity — nothing less — that should re- 
ceive public attention. 

This novel point of view was inserted into 
the well known issue, "What Is the Matter 
with the 'Movies'," by Mrs. T. G. Winter of 
Pasadena, Cal., former president of the Na- 
tional Federation of Women's Clubs, while she 
was spending last week-end in Chicago. She 
is on her way to Hollywood, following her 
appointment in New York last week at a 
conference of clubwomen and educators, as 
a committee of one to eradicate stupidity from 
the films. One thing she complained of was 
that there was no "woman's viewpoint" in 
pictures. 

"It is all tosh that women's minds are any 
different from men's," she suggested. "What 
men want in 'movies' women also want. 
Women are no more concerned with love 
than men." 

Representatives of producers also met with 
the conference which appointed Mrs. Winter. 



PFL's Talking Western 
Plan Confirms Results 
Of Herald-World Survey 

The demand for Westerns is seen in 
Paramount's announced plans to film Zane 
Grey's latest novel, "Fighting Caravans," 
as an audien. This bears out the results 
of the Herald-World survey on sound. 
Many exhibitors stated their belief that 
their audiences wanted talking Westerns 
provided they are of high standard. 

Paramount's plan to film this story was 
announced by Jesse L. Lasky, vice presi- 
dent, when he returned to New York from 
the West Coast last week. "Fighting- 
Caravans" will be the first Zane Grey story 
to be put in audible form and in the opinion 
of Lasky, sound will enhance the telling 
of western adventure stories a hundredfold. 
This belief developed from results ob- 
tained in filming "The Virginian." 

Gary Cooper has been selected for the 
leading role in this sort and Otto Brower 
will do the directing. The story is being 
adapted by Edward Paramore, Jr., and 
Keene Thompson is assisting with the 
dialog. 



Blackmail," Good and Bad, Found Case in Point- 
Market Open for W ell-Made Films 

The Herald-World presents herewith an article devoted in particular to 
the British picture, "Blackmail," which opened at the Selwyn theatre in 
New York last week, and in general to the British production situation. It 
is written by an Englishman ivho has sought to approach his subject as a 
practicality and not as a matter of patriotism. The author knoivs, naturally, 
the British viewpoint and he knows British production. In addition he 
knoivs the American market and American pictures. Thus equipped he 
offers an interesting discussion. — M. J. Q. 

"Blackmail," called the first British talking picture, is a particularly inter- 
esting film to one who is familiar with motion pictures on both sides of the 
Atlantic. 

The British trade hailed it as a sensational melodrama, as good as or better 
than anything America has ever produced. The American trade said that it 
was a good program picture and far better than the first American pictures 
in the new medium. 



Let us take a look at the picture itself. 
Prejudiced in its favor by what I had read 
in the London papers, I attended the trade 
preview in New York. I saw a crook story 
somewhat on the same order as United 
Artists' "Alibi." I saw excellent character 
work. In several sequences in a tobacco- 
nist's shop the people could not have been 
drawn better. Action was slow. Mr. John 
Longdes, the hero, was expressionless and 
unconvincing. Mr. Cyril Ricthard, minor 
bad man of the piece, gave no real indica- 
tion of his evil leanings until, behind a cur- 
tain (where I could not watch his features), 
he attempted the assault which resulted in 
his death. Mr. Donald Calthorp, the black- 
mailer, experienced actor of the legitimate 
stage, was excellent in every way, could not 
have been better. 

Splendid Synchronizing Feat 

Miss Anny Ondra, the heroine, was sweet 
and appealing. When I stopped to consider 
that another voice was synchronized to 
her lip movement I must congratulate the 
recording engineers. This particular phase 
of the picture was a beautiful piece of work 
and, unless I had known it beforehand, I 
should never have guessed it possible. 

Voices, throughout, were uniformly good. 

The faults of the picture, I think, with a 
few exceptions, were those of omission 
rather than commission. These exceptions 
were an absurd chase through the British 
Museum and the manner in which a telling 
Lubitsch touch on the psychological effect 
of the repetition of the word "knife" to 
the murderess was grossly overdone. 
Faults of Omission 

The faults of omission were these: Ex- 
cept for a brief shot of the National Gallery 
the picture made no use at all of the archi- 
tectural beauty which is London's. It failed 
to start the picture proper until half-way 
through the footage. It lacked tempo as 
well as that subtle thing which is known 
as atmosphere. The direction was inex- 
cusably bad. 

Mr. Maurice Arthur Dent, who came 
over here to see that his company's initial 
talking opus received proper attention, 
made a speech at a luncheon after the 
showing in which he confirmed many of 
my impressions of the present, and past, 
state of mind of the British industry. 

There are times when one gets very much 



annoyed at one's own countrymen. This 
was one of those occasions. 

Want Any Film That Is Good 

Dr. Dent talked of prejudice. He spoke 
of theatre trusts which might keep "Black- 
mail" from a Broadway run. He suggested 
that legislation be enacted to insure Amer- 
ican distribution of British pictures. He 
entirely ignored the fact that Americans are 
primarily showmen and business men and 
want any picture, no matter what its origin, 
that will make money. "Variety" and "The 
Last Laugh" are cases in point of foreign 
pictures which were tremendously success- 
ful in the United States. 

There is a tendency in the motion picture 
business on both sides of the Atlantic 
towards imitation. If one company comes 
out with a night club picture and the pic- 
ture makes a hit, 50 other night club fea- 
tures spring into production between 
evening and dawn. This results in many 
mediocre and sometimes rotten films being 
foisted on a public which does not appreci- 
ate the difference between one company 
and another. 

Follows American Method 

While production in England is on a 
much smaller scale than it is in the States, 
there is little that is new about it. It fol- 
lows the American method and does not do 
it so well. 

When talking pictures were new the Brit- 
ish trade said to itself: "Here's where we 
start off on a clean slate. Sound is new 
and everyone has an equal opportunity. In 
fact, with our dramatic talent, our great 
writers, we have a slight advantage over 
the gentlemen from Hollywood." 

Which may have been true and should 
have been true. But England, with this ad- 
vantage, sat still, failed to act, didn't wake 
up to the possibility of the talking pictures 
till certain American made pictures were 
toppling box office records in the West 
End theatres. Audiences jeered_ at the 
crude American accent but they paid to see 
the pictures because, in spite of their alien 
lingual crudities, they were the only talk- 
ing pictures to be patronized. Later_ on 
they kept on paying because the American 
pictures were the best talking pictures to 
be seen or heard anywhere. 

With its wealth of literature, far tran- 
{Contimted on next page) 



18 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



Boston Public Urges New Deal 
On Censors; Suburbs Make Hay 

Quincy's Merchants Wax Fat on Showing of "The Strange Inter- 
lude" When Mayor of the Hub Bars It — Newspapers 

Deride Action 

[By Special Correspondent of the Herald-World] 

BOSTON, Oct. 8. — Public sentiment against existing- censorship of pictures, 
plays, books and magazines has readied a high pitch and it is believed that 
drastic changes will be made within a very short time. 

While the present situation has been brought about by the banning of a 
legitimate stage play, "Strange Interlude," by Mayor Malcolm D. Nichols of 
Boston, the public is including motion pictures, books and magazines in it- 
clamors for sensible censorship regulation or no censorship at all. 

Refused the right to present the play in play, deleted lines and all, and Bennett took 
Boston, the Theatre Guild was invited by 
the mayor and city council of Quincy, a 
suburb eight miles south of Boston, to pre- 
vent the play at the Quincy theatre in that 
city and the offer was accepted. The ad- 
vance sale of tickets was so heavy that the 
theatre practically was sold out four weeks 
ahead, with every mail bringing in demands 
ior tickets. Manager Murphy, for years 
prominently identified with the management 
of motion picture theatres, was unable to 
say how long a run the play will have. 
Great for Quincy Merchants 

Meanwhile Quincy merchants were mak- 
ing the most of the forthcoming visit of 
thousands of Bostonians and out-of- 
towners, starting a campaign of advertising 
in the Boston newspapers and expecting to 
wax fat on outside trade during the weeks 
the play is showing. Richard Bennett, starring 
in "Jarnegan," denounced Boston's censorship 
in a curtain speech. 

"It is my last appearance here,'' he said, 
"and I shall not appear here again until 
your censorship is changed. Don't think T 
don't love Boston. I love two cities, 
London and Boston. What you people- 
need is another Boston Tea Party." 

Neither the police nor -theatre manage- 
ment interfered with the continuance of the 



the midnight train for New York without 
any interference from the authorities. It 
marked the first occasion of open defiance 
of censorship in any Boston theatre. 
Chief Editorial Topic 

Bennett referred to the order of Mayor 
Ralph S. Bauer of Lynn, Mass., banning 
stockingless girls from the streets of Lynn, 
declaring it to be an example of the extreme 
to which censorship is being carried. 

Censorship, which has been the chief front 
page topic in all the newspapers and has 
been the occasion for scores of editorials, 
a vast majority of which are pointedly 
against censorship as practised in Boston 
and throughout the state, will undoubtedly 
come up for drastic changes at the next 
session of the legislature. 



Headquarters of North 
America Corp. Are Moved 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— The North Amer- 
ican Sound and Talking Picture Equipment 
Corporation, manufacturers of Tone-O- 
Graph, have moved headquarters from 565 
Fifth Avenue to 729 Seventh Avenue. The 
Corporation is located in rooms 301 and 302. 



Says British Must Drop Idea Picture Is 
Good Simply Because It Is Made by British 



{Continued from preceding page) 



scending anything which America may 
hope to have for a hundred years or more, 
with its theatrical talent, with a scenic 
beauty peculiarly its own, its glories of 
architecture, is there any good reason, pro- 
viding there are men with brains, vision 
and initiative, why the British shouldn't 
make good pictures, pictures that would be 
box office hits in America as w r ell as in the 
United Kingdom? 

Go to See Imported Pictures 
There is no place in the world in which 
the foreign label is so much (and often 
needlessly) admired as in America. The 
well dressed man must have British clothes, 
his shoes must come from London as must 
his pipes, tobacco and neckwear. The 
woman insists on the mark of the Parisian 
coutouriere. The American artist finds no 
market for his wares. The New York Gal- 
leries, with few exceptions, devote their 
wall space and their selling efforts to the 
works of Englishmen, Frenchmen, Czechs 
and Italians. British literature is hailed as 
something finer than the product of the 
native mind, the British play is an immedi- 
ate success and few but Englishmen lecture 
here. 

In other words the imported article is 
de rigeur. 



On the same premise Americans will go 
to see imported pictures (and do) rather 
than the product of the Hollywood movie 
mills. Ninety per cent of the films shown 
in the socalled art theatres there are of 
foreign origin. People go to these little 
places week after week hoping to see some- 
thing good. Occasionally they are re- 
warded with a "Cabinet of Dr. Caligari," a 
"Potemkin," or a "Passion of loan of Arc." 
But this is rare, for the simple reason that 
the pictures are in these smaller houses be- 
cause they are not good enough to be on 
Broadway. 

Which is not a statement to the effect 
that Broadway is the home of only good 
pictures. We've seen more tripe on the 
socalled "Alain Stem" than we have any- 
where else in the world. But the average 
is fairly high. It has to be. 

Good British Film Can be Sold 

What I am getting at is that a good 
British picture can be distributed in the 
States as easily, if not more easily than a 
good American one, that American audi- 
ences are more than willing to see and hear 
something from across the water — a fact 
which has already been demonstrated with- 
out the shadow of a doubt and which many 



Europeans are now (and have been for 
some years) capitalizing astutely. 

It remained for an American company to 
turn out a first class British talking pic- 
ture, "Bulldog Drummond," and then an- 
other one, "Three Live Ghosts," one of the 
most delightful pictures (the cast is pre- 
dominantly British) that we have seen in a 
long time. Warner Brothers came along 
with "Disraeli" starring Mr. George Arliss, 
a British actor, in a beautifully acted talker. 
Neglects Opportunities 

Why weren't these pictures made in Eng- 
land? Why, before the days of the talkies, 
were "Robin Hood," "The Connecticut 
Yankee" and other classics made in the 
States? 

For the simple reason, and I'm ashamed 
to say it, that the British motion picture 
industry has not availed itself of its oppor- 
tunities. Americans in London, with new 
ideas, men who could (and have) done won- 
ders for the British trade, were scoffed at 
as hopeless visionaries. . I know of one 
case where a man who has done as much 
for English pictures as anyone living was 
libelled in the trade press, was called by the 
trade a scoundrel, thug and thief about a 
matter on which no one was able to bring 
any proof and which had no bearing at all 
on his activities in the British motion pic- 
ture field. 

Ignored Visionary's Studios 
When this hopeless visionary had his 
studios built the British trade refused to 
admit their existence. They hadn't seen 
them, didn't know anything about them, 
preferred not to discuss them in spite of the 
fact that there, possibly, with a new leader- 
ship, lay the road to something different 
which might put England on the map as a 
production center. This same man now has 
another scheme, entirely practical, which, if 
it receives any encouragement, will be the 
making of the British talking picture in- 
dustry. Perhaps, now, the gentlemen who 
scoffed before w T ill stop to consider a 
moment. But I rather doubt it. 

There is another factor to the British 
situation which has never before received 
attention simply because it is rather a deli- 
cate subject. I refer to the indifferent repu- 
tation of certain persons in the trade who 
are not qualified by brains, deportment, 
disposition, or general moral culture to pro- 
duce or assist in the production of motion 
pictures. Their presence may account, to 
a certain extent, for that disfavor with 
which financial interests have been known 
to regard the British motion picture in- 
dustry. 

Must Overcome Prejudice 

Let England make a Morte D'Arthur. 
With all its tradition of the sea, let it make 
a good sea picture. Let it make a good 
hunting picture, something which has never 
been made and can only be produced prop- 
erly in England. Let it overcome its blind 
prejudice against anything new. 

America has no aversion to novelty. Eng- 
land complains that America buys British 
talent. True. Let England, if it hasn't got 
them, hire competent engineers and di- 
rectors. Let it make a native product that 
is good without copying American ideas 
which are rapidly going out of date. Talk- 
ing pictures are still in their infancy. Eng- 
land has everything with which to make 
them. What it hasn't got it can buy — ex- 
cept a state of mind which makes that 
purchase possible. 

If we get out of the rut, if we forget our 
prejudice and propaganda, if we give up 
trying to put over pictures because they 
are British instead of pushing pictures be- 
cause they are good entertainment, we can 
and we will turn out a product which is as 
good or better than anything else in the 
world. But our biggest battle will be with 
ourselves. 



Talbert Named Publix Manager 

COLUMBIA, S. C— R. B. Talbert has been named 
city manager of the Publix theatres, according to an 
announcement from the Publix headquarters. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



19 



Exhibitors Hail the HOE Club; 
Agree to Dig for Greater B.O. 

Members' Exploitation Ideas 
Exchanged via Herald- World 

Enroll by Agreeing to Send in Their Campaigns for 
Publication — Short Cut to Showmanship 



First to Join 
Herald-World's 
The HOE Club 

ORRIS F. COLLINS 
Palace Theatre 
Rector, Arkansas 

A 

HARRY M. PALMER 
Riviera Theatre 
Anderson. Indiana 

A 

CARL DIJNLAP 
Gem Theatre 
Kinmundy. Illinois 

E. BERENSON 
State Theatre 
Bogalusa. Louisiana 

A 

W. J. SHOUP 
DeLuxe Theatre 
Spearville. Kansas 

A 

C. W. MASSY 
Jefferson Theatre 
Huntington. Indiana 

A 

JULIUS W. SCHMIDT 
Grand Theatre 
Breese. Illinois 



Tri- State Meeting 
Changed to Oct 31 
Following MPT OA 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
MEMPHIS, Oct. 8.— Plans for the mid- 
October convention of the Motion Picture 
Theatre Owners of Arkansas, Mississippi and 
Tennessee have been changed and instead the 
convention will be held on October 31, im- 
mediately after the M P T O A closes its 
Memphis convention. So president M. A. 
Lightman, head of both the tri-state and na- 
tional bodies, announced to the territory's ex- 
hibitors this week, following a conference 
Monday with several tri-state directors. 

Many small exhibitors will be enabled to at- 
tend both meetings who otherwise could have 
come to only one, Lightman pointed out in 
making the announcement. Aside from this, 
the energies of those planning the tri-state 
convention can now be turned undividedly to 
making the national convention a success, with 
the assurance that the regional, immediately 
following is certain to be so. 

Coincident with the announcement, Light- 
man sent out a new appeal to tri-state exhibi- 
tors for support in planning for the 
MPTOA convention, October 29-31. Mean- 
while he continued hard at work, collaborat- 
ing with M. J. O'Toole, secretary, New York, 
in planning the national meeting. Plans are 
already going forward for an exhibit of sound 
and other technical apparatus. 



By ERNEST A. ROVELSTAD 

Exhibitors, you are cordially invited to become members of The HOE Club, 
with its slogan, "Dig !" 

Never in the history of motion picture exhibition has showmanship been 
so greatly in demand, and The HOE Club offers a practicable method for each 
and every exhibitor to reap the harvest of showmanship by a simple applica- 
tion of the Golden Rule. It is an organization of exhibitors whose members 
individually and voluntarily agree to tell each other through the Herald- 
World, how they are putting over pictures successfully. Thus for one work- 
able idea presented by a member he receives in turn the benefit of the ideas 
of all the others, and these will be published in the Herald- World. 
The idea of The HOE Club, proposed to 



a few of the exhibitors who contribute to 
"What the Picture Did for Me," has been 
accepted so enthusiastically by them that 
it now is offered to all exhibitor readers 
of the Herald-World. In an adjoining col- 
umn appear the names of several theatre 
owmers and managers who have asked to 
get in on the ground floor of the club. 
There will be only one floor — the oppor- 
tunity is open to all exhibitors to share 
equally in the benefits — but the sooner one 
enrolls the sooner he will begin to draw 
dividends. 

Fill Out Opplication Blank 

Whence the name of the club? All read- 
ers of "The Theatre" department are famil- 
iar with the House Organ Exchange, a 
steadily growing organization of exhibitors 
(now 73, to be exact) who are cooperating 
in sending regularly to one another the 
issues of their house organs. To recount 
the value of that organization to its mem- 
bers would be to publish the letters con- 
stantly arriving from exhibitors who, in the 
house organs of other members, have found 
countless workable ideas for putting over 
pictures in their own communities. 

From the first letter of each word of 
House Organ Exchange comes the name 
of The HOE Club, and an ideal name it is 
for all exhibitors who are willing to dig, 
in order to increase their box office receipts. 
But whereas the House Organ Exchange 
is for exhibitors who publish house organs, 
The HOE Club has no such limitation. 
All that is necessary is to sign the applica- 
tion below and agree to send in the details 
of how you have put over a picture. 

Send in Your Ideas 

It is not necessary that j'our exploita- 
tion "campaign" be more than an idea that 



you have tried out. Other exhibitors may 
have a better opportunity to work up into 
an extensive campaign the idea which cir- 
cumstances in your own case held down to 
perhaps only the suggestion of one. 

Nor is it essential that the exploitation 
idea increased your business for that par- 
ticular period. Preferably so, of course, 
but unforeseen circumstances — a storm, 
some special competitive event in your com- 
munity — may have held down your attend- 
ance, though the use of that idea by an- 
other exhibitor in another town may bring 
him a house record for the year. And you 
may be sure — as has been the experience 
in the House Organ Exchange — that a thea- 
tre owner or manager who has benefited by 
your idea will be more than glad to re- 
ciprocate by giving you the opportunity to 
cash in on his. 

House Organ Exchange Continues 

The House Organ Exchange, of course, 
will continue to grow as a separate organ- 
ization. Exhibitor members have found it 
such a help to one another that there would 
be a chorus of protests if it were simply 
to be merged into The HOE Club. At 
the same time, House Organ Exchange 
members are invited to join The HOE Club 
as well, as therein they will have available 
to them the ideas of exhibitors who do not 
have house organs. 

We said that showmanship is at a greater 
premium now than it ever has been before 
in the history of the motion picture theatre. 
The motion picture is such a widely ac- 
cepted part of community activity that it 
no longer is only entertainment — it is now 
considered a necessary part of community 
life. But with that has come intense com- 
petition, with the black or red on the book- 
keeping records of either competing house 
(Continued on page 41) 



To The HOE Club Manager, 
Exhibitors Herald-World. 
407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago 

Please enroll me as a member of The HOE Club, with its slogan. "Dig!" 

I appreciate the benefits to be made available to me by publication of exploitation ideas 
of other members and I agree to send in mine. 



(My Name) 

(Theatre) 

(City) (State). 



20 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 




MOTION PICTURE FINANCE 

Excellent Buying in Film Shares 

By LAURENCE STERN 

NEW YORK, October 8. — In a week in which the stock market en- 
countered the heaviest concentrated liquidation of the last year, the 
motion picture shares have continued to meet with the same excellent 
buying which appeared prior to the decline. 

company is now out of the red and is mak- 
ing' money on its first important sound pro- 
ductions. 



THERE could be no better test of the 
increasingly strong rating which such 
securities command, both on the part of 
"insiders" and the investment and specula- 
tive public. Almost invariably at such a 
time all stocks suffer, the good with the 
mediocre. Yet the fact is that the majority 
of the prominent amusement issues came 
through the deluge of liquidation without 
damage. 

* # % 

An expanding trend of earnings is not 
sufficient in itself to account for this. It 
seems probable that the various merger 
plans now in negotiation provide a key to 
the buying. The net result, to cite a few 
instances, was a fractional decline for Fox 
Film, an unchanged price for Paramount, 
an advance of 2 points in Radio-Keith-Or- 
pheum and a drop of more than 5 points 
in Warner Brothers. 



Despite the conflicting public statements 
made regarding the Warner-Paramount 
merger, the announcement by Attorney 
General Mitchell that his department is con- 
sidering the proposal supplies official proof 
that the deal is near consummation. The 
current heaviness of Warner shares is not 
taken to indicate that the plan will be 
dropped, but perhaps means that the terms 
of exchange will be less favorable for 
Warner than those originally reported. The 
Fox-Loew's merger can be blocked only if 
the Department of lustice opposes it. 
There are no difficulties otherwise. The 
Kolster-Earl radio combination is being 
mentioned as a possible Paramount acquisi- 
tion. 

* * * 

Inside buying of Radio-Keith-Orpheum 
stands out like a sore thumb in the present 
market. It is based on the fact that the 



Ned Marin Appointed 
Associate Producer 
In Fox Organization 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— Ned Marin has been 
appointed associate producer for Fox Films, 
according to an announcement by Winfiekl 
Sheehan, vice presi- 
dent and general 
manager of Fox. He 
will leave New York 
in about two weeks 
for Hollywood where 
he will take up his 
new duties. 

Marin started his 
career in the motion 
picture industry as a 
clerk in the financial 
department of Para- 
mount and later be- 
coming sales man- 
ager for Universal. 
After leaving Uni- 
versal Marin joined 

First National and was variously, sales man- 
ager, assistant general manager of production 
to Richard A. Rowland and for a year and a 
half acted as producer at the First National 
studios in Burbank. During that period he 
produced approximately 15 pictures including 
"No, No, Nanette," "Isle of Lost Ships," "For- 
ward Pass," "Painted Angel," "Dark Streets" 
and "Her Private Life." 

He is a graduate of New York University. 
He studied law at Columbia and during the 
war served as a lieutenant in the infantry. He 
is 35 years old. 




Ned Maria 



At the New York 
Theatres 



NEW FILMS 

RIALTO— "Why Bring That Up?", all-talking Para- 
mount picture with Moran and Mack, directed by 
George Abbott. Opened October 4 

PARAMOUNT — "Fast Company," Paramount talking 
picture with Evelyn Brent, Jack Oakie, Skeets Gal- 
lagher, Gwen Lee and Sam Hardy. From Ring 
Lardner's story, "Elmer the Great." Opened 
October 4. 

CAPITOL— "His Glorious Knight," M G M talking 
picture with John Gilbert and Catherine Dale Owen 
from Ferenc Molnar's play, "Olympia." Opened 
October 4. 

ROXY— "Salute," Fox talking picture with George 
O'Brien, Helen Chandler and William Janney. 
Many scenes at West Point and Annapolis. Opened 
October 4. 

STRAND — "Evidence," all-talking Warner picture 
with Pauline Frederick, William Courtenay, Lowell 
Sherman, Conway Tearle, Myrna Loy and Alec B. 
Francis. Opened October 4. 

SELWYN — "Blackmail," British all-talking picture 
with Anny Ondra and Donald Calthorp. Called first 
British talker. Opened October 4. 

COLONY — "Big News," Pathe all-talking picture with 
Robert Armstrong, Carol Lombard, Charles Seldon, 
Sam Hardy and Louis Payne. Newspaper story. 
Opened October 5. 

FILM GUILD CINEMA— "Forest People of Siberia," 
silent Russian film. Also revival of Poli Negri in 
"Forbidden Paradise." Opened October 5. 

55TH STREET — "The Weavers," silent German film 
from Gerhart Hauptmann's novel. Opened Oc- 
tober 5. 

EARL CARROLL — "Rio Rita," all-talking Radio 
special music picture with too many stars to men- 
tion. Opened October 6. 

CRITERION — "Applause," all-talking Paramount pic- 
ture with Helen Morgan, directed by Reuben Ma- 
moulian. Opened October 8. 

HELD OVER AND REVIVED 

ASTOR— "Hollywood Revue," M G M all-talker. 

Opened August 14. 
EMBASSY— "Hallelujah," M G M all talker. Opened 

August 20. 

WINTER GARDEN— "Gold Diggers of Broadway," 
Warners all-talker. Opened August 30. 

GLOBE — "The Great Gabbo," James Cruze all-talker. 
Opened (at the Selwyn) September 12. 

GEORGE M. COHAN— "Flight," Columbia all-talker. 
Opened September 13. 

t tttLE CARNEGIE— "The Passion of Joan of Arc," 
Societe Generate des Films. Opened Sept. 28. 
(Played at this theatre for a month last winter. 
Return engagement by request.) 

RIVOLI — "Three Live Ghosts," a United Artists 
talker with Joan Bennett, Robert Montgomery, 
Charles McNaughton, Claude Allister, directed by 
Thornton Freeland. Opened Sept. 28. 

CAMEO — "Afghanistan," Silent Soviet Travelogue. 
Opened Sept. 28. 

CENTRAL — "Young Nowheres," First National 
talker with Richard Barthelmess. Marion Nixon, 
Bert Roach, Anders Randolph, Jocelyn Lee and 
Raymond Turner, directed by Frank Lloyd. Opened 
Oct. 1. 

WARNERS— "Disraeli," Warner Brothers all-talker 
with George Arliss, Mrs. Arliss, David Torrence, 
Joan Bennett, Doris Lloyd, Anthony Bushell and 
Michael Visaroff, directed by Alfred E. Green. 
Opened Oct. 2. 

GAIETY— "Sunny Side Up." Fox all-talker with 
Charles Farrell and Janet Gaynor. Opened Oct. 3. 



PFL Australian Official in U. S. 

NEW YORK. — J. A. Sixsmith of Sidney, Aus- 
tralia, secretary and treasurer of the Paramount or- 
ganization in that country, arrived in this country 
last week for his first visit to the Paramount home 
office. 



SECURITIES PRICE RANGE 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Sales Hiffh 

American Seating 4.700 30% 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender 9,900 41% 

Consolidated Film 3.500 22% 

Do. pfd 5,500 25% 

Eastman Kodak 104,700 248 

Do. rts 10 123% 

Fox Film "A" 56,100 99% 

Keith Albee Orpheum 300 37 

Do. pfd 1,000 120 

Loew's, Ine 20.200 65% 

Do. pfd. w. w 300 95% 

Metro-Golclwyn-Mayer, pfd 100 24 

Motion Picture Capital 3,700 35 

Paramount 126,000 7Syi 

Pathe Exchange 31,500 9% 

Do. "A" 7.500 19 

Radio Corporation 842,100 91% 

Do. pfd. "A" 700 54«', 

Do. pfd. "B" 5,500 77% 



W eek Ending October 5 

Sales 

Radio-Keith-Orpheum 294,900 

Shubert Theatres 2,600 

Universal Pictures 1st pfd 260 

Warner Bros. "A" 63,700 

Do. pfd 1,700 

CHICAGO STOCK MARKET 

Marks Brothers c. p. f 200 

Morgan Litho 1,900 

NEW YORK CURB 

Columbia Pictures 8,200 

Cons. Theat 1,900 

Fox Theatres "A" 17.900 

72 General Theatre Equipment 59,600 

8% Loew's rts 100 

16% Do. war 800 

88% National Theatre Supply 400 

54% Sentry Safety 12.000 

77% Trans-Lux — - 9,800 



Low 

30 
37 
21 

23% 
216 
123% 

93 

36% 
110 

59% 
93% 
24 
32 

69% 
8 

16% 
81% 
54 
76 



Close 

30 

37% 

21% 

23% 
246 
123% 

96% 

37 
111 

62 

93% 

24 

32 



High 

39% 
39% 
63% 
55% 



16 

20% 



32% 

19 

28 

64% 

27% 

30 

42% 

13% 

11% 



Low 

33% 

32 

59 

48% 
45% 



16 

18% 



29 
18 
25 
56 

27% 
28% 
40% 

9 
9 



Close 
37% 
39% 
63% 
49% 
45% 



16 

18% 



30% 
18 

26% 

60 

27% 

28% 

42% 

12 

10% 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



21 




Film News 
in Pictures 



PIC 



THE HERALD-WORLD GOLF 
TOURNEY IN PICTURES 



ION 



Stories Told 
by the Camera 




On the executive committee — Brandon Hurst, George Marshall, Al The prizes as displayed in a window of Schwab's store in the film 

Cohn, Ollie Painter, John Mescall, Gil Wright and Jay M. Shreck capital. There were 50 trophies, headed by the Herald- World cup, 

and Douglas Hodges of the Herald- World. which went to John Mescall. 



Players in the Herald-World Golf Tournament at Lakeside, Cal. 



George Abbott 


H. Crist 


Bill Gibbs 


George Marshall 


Jack Schulze 


Richard Arlen 


Henry M. Clark 


Tony Gaudio 


Antonio Moreno 


Earl Sinks 


Robert Armstrong 


Alfred A. Cohn 


George P. Hommal 


William Slavens McNutt 


Billy Shea 


Milton B. Arthur 


W. Scott Darling 


Graydon B. Howe 


Wesley C. Miller 


Lou Seiler 


Max Munn Autrey 


Hap Depew 


George J. Hawke 


W. Miller 


Pete Smith 


Kenneth Alexander 


Tack Dennis 


L. Virgil Hart 


John J. Mescall 


Howard Strickling 


K. R. Ahlbury 


Earle Douglas 


J. A. Hutchins 


John Peere Miles 


John Monk Saunders 


R. N. Allobark 


William B. Davidson 


Tom Held 


Roy G. Miller 


George B. Smith 


Lloyd Brownfield 


Carroll H. Dunning 


Eddie Hearn 


John Miehle 


R. L. Shaw 


Herbert Barr 


Robert DeLacy 


Milt Howe 


Lex Neal 


William Snyder 


Sam Bischoff 


Scott Dunlap 


Kenneth Hawks 


Jack Nelson 


Karl Struss 


Elmer A. Benjamin 


Billy Dooley 


Mahlon Hamilton 


Ray McCarey 


Nick Stuart 


Dave Bershon 


George Davidson 


Otis Hoyt 


James McGuinness 


Louis J. Sarecky 


T. Roy Barnes 


Robert Edeson 


Brandon Hurst 


Leo McCarey 


J. Wesley Smith 


Ben Bard 


Louis Edelman 


Earle Hampton 


Robert F. McGowan 


Phillip Strange 


Andrew Bennison 


James Fidler 


Winter Hall 


Arthur MacArthur 


Edward Sutherland 


Archie Buchanan 


Robert Fairbanks 


Ernest Hilliard 


Norman McLeod 


James Tinling 


Lloyd Bacon 


Jules Furth 


E. Haller 


Wilbur Mack 


D. T. Tomlinson 


Jack Boland 


John Ford 


Gene Hornbostel 


Edward M. McDermott 


Conway Tearle 


E. J. Bleger 


William Foxall 


J. Howe 


Wallace MacDonald 


E. A. Tambert 


Neal Burns 


Charles Freshwater 


Jim Hum 


Tom McNamara 


R. A. Towers 


Rex Bell 


E. Fredericks 


Sol Hoopii, Jr. 


Tim O'Donnell 


Hector Turnbull 


George Brown 


Eugene J. Forde 


Ray Hoadley 


George Ovey 


George Todd 


S. Brennecke 


M. D. Farley 


Ben Hershfield 


E. J. O'Carroll 


Joseph A. Valentine 


Norbert Brodine 


Richard Fantl 


Charles Irwin 


Harry J. Poppe 


Charles Van Enger 


Richard A. Blaydon 


W. F. Fitzmalo 


Roy L. Johnson 


Eddie Phillips 


Dewey Wrigley 


Edward W. Butcher 


Wid Gunning 


Carlyle Jones 


Frank Pope 


Roy Webb 


James Bradbury, Jr. 
Anthony Bushell 


Jack Gardner 


Gordon Jennings 


H. M. Pugh 


Paul Weatherwell 


Tom J. Geraghty 


Don W. Knapp 


H. Perry 


Kenneth Webb 


Graham Baker 


Frank Griffin 


J. T. Knapp 


Eddie Quillan 


Bill Wise 


Edmund Breese 


Ray Griffith 


Edgar Kennedy 


Joe Reddy 


Raoul Walsh 


Joseph Cawthorn 


Bert Glennon 


Richard Keene 


Nat G. Rothstein 


W. T. Wookey 


Frank Coleman 


Max Gold 


Raymond A. Klune 


Lon Rosenberg 


John W. A. Weaver 


Capt. E. H. Calvert 


Carl H. Graff 


Don Keyes 


James Ryan 


Ben Ames Williams 


Duncan Kramer 


Danny Grav 


Harry Langdon 


Jack Rosenberg 


Sam Wood 


Jack Coogan, Sr 
Jack Coogan, Jr. 


Joe J. Graff 


F. D. Langton 


John Russell 


Sol M. Wurtzel 


Harold Goodwin 


Edward Lawrence 


Andrew Kisch, Jr. 


Charles F. West 


F. Heath Cobb 


Archie Gottler 


Frank Lloyd 


Frank Richardson 


L. Witte 


Con Conrad 


Huntley Gordon 


J. Lustig 


Irving G. Ries 


Keith Weeks 


Harry Collins 


Chester Gore 


Jeff Lazarus 


Gene Ruggerio 


Robin Walker 


L. H. Creber 


Oliver B. Garver 


C. L. Lewis 


Ford Sterling 


William White 


Jack Cunningham 


Al Greene 


W. E. Lewis 


Don Swedstrom 


J. F. Westerberg 


Edwin Carewe 


M. H. Golden 


E. J. Litton 


George Stevens 


Gilbert E. Wright 






Frank Yaconelli 



22 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 




Robert DeLacey, LeRoy Mason, Edwin Carewe. Frank Lloyd. 



Sol Wurtzel, Archie Gottler, Lloyd Browfield, Con Conrad. 




A. E. Loafea, C. Freshwater, Winter Hall, H. Depew. 



Henry Clark, Jim Hum, H. Crist, Jack Nelson. 



24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 





Conway Tearle and Virginia Valli in a scene from Tiffany- 
Stahl's "The Lost Zeppelin," which is one of the three T-S 
pictures which will have Broadway runs. "Woman to 
Woman," with Betty Compson, will open at #2 top and will 
be followed by "Mister Antonio" with Virginia Valli and Leo 
Carrillo. Ricardo Cortez has a prominent role in "The lost 
Zeppelin." 



Jeanne Eagels died last Thursday, Oct. 3, from an overdose of sleep- 
ing powder. She had been under a doctor's care for some time and 
recently underwent a minor sinus operation. She scored her greatest 
success in "Rain" and "Her Cardboard Lover." She played opposite 
John Gilbert in M G M's "Man, Woman and Sin" and most recently 
starred in "The Letter" for Paramount. She was 35 years old. 





Director Charles J. Hunt and company at work on "Howdy, 
Broadway," a Raytone-Rayart picture, produced by W. Ray 
Johnston and nearing completion at the Metropolitan studios, 
Fort Lee, N. J. Assisting Hunt are Charlie Feinberg and Ed 
Hurley. Several well known stars from the legitimate stage 
will be featured in this Raytone picture. 




Listening to his master's voice, in 1929 style, is this "pup" who has 
dispensed with victrolas and has gone "sound." Alexander Gray is the 
master and it is his picture projected on the screen, behind which is 
the speaker of the play-back machine of the Vitaphone recorder. Grey 
has a prominent role in "No, No, Nanette," a F N production. 



Leila Hyams and Johnny Mack Brown in a scene from Co- 
lumbia's "Hurricane." Many of the sequences were "shot" on 
a sailing vessel "Bohemia," which was the home of the stars, 
extras, director, technical staff, cameramen and crew for sev- 
eral days. Ralph Ince was the director. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



25 





Pauline Blair, who appeared in "My Girl Fri- 
day," and Donald Dilloway, juvenile lead, in a 
scene from "Romany Lass," an all talking and 
dancing Photocolor production. Bradley 
Barker, former Pathe and Tiffany-Stahl direc- 
tor, has been signed by the Photocolor corpo- 
ration as supervising director of the com- 
pany's pictures. 



Right — Tea for two in an icebox. Eddie 
Nugent and Loretta Young indulging in an 
old English pastime in a thoroughly American 
style, between shots of "Loose Ankles," a 
First National Vitaphone production. Douglas 
Fairbanks, Jr., has the leading male role. 



Vitaphone's location camp at the foot of Mount Whitney, California, where 400 people 
from the Warner studio lived for several weeks while the first talking epic, "Song 
of the West," was in production. In the cast are Joe E. Brown, John Boles, Ruby 
Cameron, Eddie Gribbon, Marie Wells, Sam Hardy and Robert Perry It is an all-color 
production and was directed by Ray Enright. 






What is said to be the largest set in the world is being erected at Universal City 
for Paul Whiteman's "The King of Jazz Revue." John Murray Anderson is on 
his way to the coast to put on this production which will be his debut in moving 
pictures. The set is for a cafe sequence and will be covered with mirrors which 
will give an effect indescribable, except by a camera. 



Graham McNamee, famous NBC radio an- 
nouncer, will be heard in a new Pathe Sportlight, 
a football picture, soon to be released, entitled 
"Gridiron Glory," and which is being produced 
by Grantland Rice, well known sports expert. 



26 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



Television Aid to Newsreels 



(Continued from page 13) 
diet how far away the comer may be, for 
the most eminent technical workers in that 
field balk at definite prediction. But _ we 
are all confident that television is coming. 
It seems as certain as fate. 

Radio to Borrow from Screen 

It is my conviction that, just as the films 
have utilized the resources of radio science 
to give the screen a voice, so it is rea- 
sonable to assume that radio broadcasting 
will eventually borrow from the master 
minds and facilities of motion pictures in 
the presentation of visual radio entertain- 
ment. Whether we will broadcast the 
images of radio performers from the 
studios, motion picture performers off film 
strips synchronized with sound, or theatrical 
presentations from stages, I am not pre- 
pared to say. Possiblv all three types of 
presentation will furnish television its sub- 
jects along with great news events, sport- 
ing matches and the like. 

What will be the effect of the merging 
of theatrical and radio interests, already 
noted, on the economic structure of the en- 
tertainment business? 

Theatre Will Flourish 

Does the prospect of television carry a 
threat against the thousands of theatres 
throughout the world by promising visual 
entertainment in the home in addition to 
the audible entertainment already available? 

I have already sought to answer the first 
of these questions, partially at least, by my 
opening references to the gregarious in- 
stincts of the people. As for the second, 
I am one of those who, while thoroughly 
expecting that the almost inconceivable 
maeric of visual reception will be accom- 
plished within my lifetime, still believe just 
as profoundly that the theatre will survive 
and flourish. 

Questions like these naturally arise when 
we are faced with the prospect of new and 
revolutionary changes in any line of en- 
deavor. Yet pause and consider. Does not 
science, like nature, always strike a balance? 
New Inventions Help the Old 

Scientific advancements, suddently as they 
sometimes come, seldom destroy the things 
they presumably replace. Usually new in- 
ventions simply make old ones more useful. 

In many quarters only a few years ago 



it was felt that radio broadcasting would 
spell doom to phonographs. Instead, radio 
provided the phonograph industry with elec- 
trical recording and reproducing and with 
new conceptions of tone qualities and vol- 
ume. A vast new market was opened, a 
market was expanded considerably "when 
the radio manufacturers began to combine 
phonographs with radio receiving sets. At 
least one great merger of radio and phono- 
graph interests has occurred within the 
year. Far from driving out the phono- 
graph, radio stimulated it to new useful- 
ness. 

Theatre Attendance Increases 

The coming of radio broadcasting also 
brought fears to the minds of some that 
the public would prefer to stay at home 
to listen to radio programs and that the 
motion picture business would suffer as a 
result. The groundlessness of these fears 
is proved by the fact that attendance at 
film houses has increased consistently year 
by year. New and larger theatres are con- 
stantly being built. Radio itself gave the 
screen voice, music and the multitudinous 
sounds of natural activity. 

The progress of science was not destruc- 
tive to the entertainment industry. It sim- 
ply gave the public the right to demand 
more for its money. 

Even when television is perfected 
on a commercial scale and televised 
subjects are broadcast for reception 
directly in millions of homes, the mo- 
tion picture theatre will continue to 
thrive as the gathering place of enter- 
tainment-seeking multitudes. Again I 
am theorizing, but the history of the 
theatre and the radio would seem to 
bear me out. 

When television comes, whether it be in 
five years or a score, it will play a large 
part in the operation of the very theatres 
that some feel it threatens. Our imagina- 
tions can run riot when we speculate upon 
the illimitable possibilities of television in 
relation to motion picture theatres. 

Big Field in Newsreels 

Consider what can be done in the field 
of newsreels alone! Imagine seeing flashed 
upon the screen in simultaneous sight and 
sound a news event of major importance 
as it is taking place! Visualize world series 
baseball games, football games, automobile 
and horse races, transported the instant 
they occur on supersized, natural-color 
steroscopic screens! 

Perfections in the projection of motion 
pictures will play a large part in making 
television applicable to theatre rather than 
home presentation. We have not seen the 
cheap and popular use of filming cameras 
and projecting machine affect the motion 
picture industry perceptibly. 

The home can hardly be expected to be 
transformed into a modern theatre having 
all the perfected devices and appurtenances 
available to the theatre. A glimpse of a 
few of these devices, some not yet being 
exploited, suffices to illustrate. 

Someone Must Foot Bill 

The supersized screen, one that occupies 
a full stage. will soon be used, especially 
for the musical shows that are becoming 
regular offerings in the "talkies." Experi- 
ments are being conducted with stereo- 
scopic motion pictures, pictures having a 
third or "depth" dimension. Increasing 
use of color is being made in current film 
productions. The combination of these ele- 
ments with spoken dialog, music and natural 
sounds will set a standard for screen enter- 
tainment that audiences will naturally ex- 
pect and demand when television becomes 



a commercial practicability. Moreover, 
someone will have to foot the bill for home 
television, and it is hard to conceive of 
an advertising sponsorship of the filmed 
efforts of Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford 
and Douglas Fairbanks. 

The motion picture industry realizes that 
our technical and performer talent must 
be interchanged. Several of the largest film 
organizations have already engaged, more 
or less, in radio broadcasting, Paramount 
has joined forces with Columbia, which 
serves a major chain of broadcasting sta- 
tions, extending all the way from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific coast. 

New Developments Can Be Used 

These stations, formed into a network 
by telephone-line connection, virtually 
"cover" the United States with our socalled 
"chain" programs. Our merger of inter- 
ests places Paramount and its subsidiary, 
Publix Theatres, in a strategic position in 
the entertainment world. Any new develop- 
ments in screen, stage and radio fields can 
be adapted in the fullest measure. 

One of the most important phases of the 
Columbia-Paramount affiliation — and one 
that shows how their joint facilities can be 
put to immediate advantage — is the fact 
that the film organization now has a ready 
outlet for intimate contacts with the mil- 
lions of American homes. The great stars 
of the film world can make an audible 
appeal to radio listeners and thus stimulate 
theatre attendance. 

Motion picture stars must now possess 
that vague quality known as "radio per- 
sonality," for the "radio personality" is 
really a concomitant of the "talkie person- 
ality." In word and song, the voice of 
the great of filmdom now will be heard 
regularly by millions of potential theatre- 
goers sitting at their own firesides. 

Hollywood Calm, Efficient 

I visited Hollywood recently, and I was 
amazed at the calm, smooth, efficient man- 
ner in which the hundreds of elements that 
enter_ into the making of a talking picture 
function. We have heard much about ex- 
citement that enveloped the film colony 
with the advent of sound films, but if this 
ever was the case no evidence of it remains 
in Hollywood today. 

Film-making has become an exacting, 
efficient and marvelously organized business 
with many great minds guiding its destinies. 
Among the best minds in the film produc- 
ing art today are the scores of sound tech- 
nicians who have been attracted from the 
electrical and radio laboratories. 

These experienced engineers are proving 
invaluable in the recording and other tech- 
nical phases of talking picture production. 
They will still be speaking the langauge of 
radio when television comes. 



So the New Words 
Must Be a Big Hit 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

SEATTLE, Oct. 8.— Members of 
the Seattle Censor board felt that it 
was necessary to not only view but 
to review the film "The Cock Eyed 
World," Movietone all talking film 
at the Fox theatre which called forth 
the following local editorial: 

"Dear Chief Censor Dave Himel- 
hoch: What's this about some new 
'cuss words' in 'The Cock-Eyed 
World'? It's hard to believe! The 
film was run for a week to packed 
houses 'as is'." 



Seventh Day Adventists 
Operate Sunday Show 

(Sbecial to the Herald-World) 
KANSAS CITY, Oct. 8.— Here's 
one way of operating a motion pic- 
ture theatre on Sundays. In Hoising- 
ton, Kan., lives W. S. Wilkinson, 
owner of the town's only theatre. 
There has been a rigid campaign 
under way recently to enforce the 
ancient Sunday labor law, so Wilkin- 
son has not attempted to show on 
Sundays. This week, however, he hit 
upon an idea. Wilkinson, who is 
mayor, as well as theatre manager in 
Hoisington, has two sons who are 
Seventh Day Adventists. He pro- 
ceeded to lease the theatre to them 
on Sundays. According to their re- 
ligion/'Sunday is not Sunday." There- 
fore, the sons are within the law. 
They are being assisted in the oper- 
ation of the theatre by A. B. Krause, 
another Seventh Day Adventist. And 
Hoisington is enjoying Sunday 
shows, much to the envy of other 
nearby towns. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



27 



Costs LESS 

in the long run 

Western Electric quality in sound 
equipment assures trouble-proof 
operation and increased box-office 



TT'XHIBITORS know that 
satisfaction with Sound 
depends largely on reliable re- 
producing equipment. 2600 
large and small theatres, West- 
ern Electric equipped, are 
proving this every day through 
stimulated box office receipts. 
Western Electric pledges 




This policy is to the interest 
of every element of the in- 
dustry. It would be useless for 
the producer to continue im- 
proving Sound pictures if such 
improvements are not properly 
reproduced in theatres. 

Equip your theatre to show 
Sound pictures at their best! 
itself to continue providing apparatus of high The financing plan available makes the carry- 
standard and to make no compromise on qual- ing charges light — readily paid out of your 
ity in order to meet a price. increased receipts. 

Sound will bring patrons — only quality will hold them 



The only laboratory in the world 
devoted exclusively to improving 
the quality of Sound Picture 
apparatus — the new 3 -story 
addition to Bell Telephone 
Laboratories. 



Westen 



SOUND 




lectric 



SYSTEM 




Distributed by 

Electrical Research Products inc. 

250 West 57th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Member of Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, Inc Will H. Hays, President 



28 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



SOUND PICTURES 



THE BLUEBOOK SCHOOL 

QUESTION No. 21: What should always he done to a broom before using 
it to sweep a projection room? What tool should the exhibitor supply for 
cleaning the projection room and why? Will it pay to provide such a tool, and 
why? 

FREQUENCY and TONE 

Answering Question No. 17 



ANSWER TO QUESTION No. 17. The 
Question: "How many possible variations 
in frequency are there between the highest 
and the lowest sound? As frequency is 
raised or lowered, what is the effect upon 
sound? What frequency would you con- 
sider as producing a tone of moderate 
quality?" 

/ T*HIS seems to have stumped most of the 
men. Only six made an answer which 
might be considered as even fairly satis- 
factory, and that out of more than 800 at- 
tempts, one of which caused a smile when 
he said: "Gee, Rich, I'm sure stuck fast 
on the third section of that question, but 
anyhow I'll go down with the flag nailed 
tight to the upper magazine and the show 
proceeding, even though the projectionist 
is in a near dead faint!" 

Those who made a good stagger at an- 
swering correctly were W. C. Budge, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Thomas E. Dringe, Hous- 
ton, Texas; L. L. La Grange, Winnipeg, 
Man.; G. T. Baldy, Grand Prairie, Alta.; 
A. D. Henley, Seattle, Wash.; Karl Fried- 
rich, Bellefonte, Pa.; Frank Dudiak, Fair- 
mont, W. Va. 

I have selected brother Friedrich's answer 
for publication because of the interesting 
points raised and the interesting things con- 
tained therein. So far as my own informa- 
tion goes, brother Friedrich's answer is 
correct, except that, as he says, the calcu- 
lations are approximate only. I had in- 
tended submitting it to acoustical authori- 
ties for checking, but found that through 
error it had not yet been done when it 
was too late lo follow that plan. If any 
of you believe anything therein contained 
is subject to just criticism, why go to it, 
making your criticism constructive, how- 
ever. 

Friedrich says: 

"The possible variations in frequency be- 
tween the highest and lowest sounds are 
quite considerable. Most persons can hear 
tones whose pilch is between 25 and 25,000 
vibrations or cycles per second, but while 
a low organ pipe may produce as low as 
16 cycles per second, and a piccolo as high 
as 4,800 cycles, the practical range of music 
may be said to lie between 40 and 4,000 
cycles. Insofar as the human voice is con- 
cerned, an exceptional bass might go as low 



By F. H. RICHARDSON 

as 60 cycles, and an exceptional soprano 
go as high as 1,300 cycles or vibrations per 
second. From the foregoing we can see 
that the low frequencies produce the low 
notes and as the frequency is raised the 
pitch is also raised. 

"Now for the last part of the question. 
If the word 'quality' were not in the ques- 
tion I would dismiss it by saying that the 
note 'A,' which vibrates at a frequency of 
435 cycles per second, would be a moderate 
tone. But the quality, which may be said 
to be the difference between the way this 
'A' sounds when played by a cornet or a 
violin, or when sung by the human voice, 
is determined by the number and intensity 
of overtones present. These overtones are 
additional frequencies that sound at the 
same time as the fundamental sounds. For 




Tone of Moderate Quality 



the balance of this discussion we will deal' 
with the fundamental tone of 435 cycles. 

"The frequency of these overtones is- 
usually a multiple of the fundamental. A_ 
musician would say harmonics of the fun- 
damental. An ordinary tuning fork pro- 
duces no overtones. The average musical, 
instrument produces five overtones. For 
convenience let us assume that these over- 
tones are successive harmonics, having fre- 
quencies of 870, 1305, 1740, 2175 and 2610^ 
cycles. All these frequencies sounded at 
the same time may be said to produce a 
tone of moderate quality. 

"And now, Mr. Editor, I got curious and. 
wondered what kind of a groove the little 
needle would have to follow to produce the 
above mentioned tone of moderate quality. 
The following was figured out with a slide 
rule, and is therefore only approximately 
correct. 

"Selecting a portion of the record where • 
same is 15 in. diameter, I obtained the - 
following data: 

"Diameter of groove, 15 in. 

"Circumference, 47.11 in. 

"R. P. M., 33 1/3. 

"Needle travel per minute, 1425 in. 

"Needle travel per second, 23.8. 

"Length of grove for one cycle at 435 - 
cycles, .0548 in. 

"Amplitude assumed as .0005 in. 

"From the above data I prepared a set: 
of sine curves to scale. The length was 
multiplied by 100 and the height or ampli- 
tude by 2,000. 

"Curve 'A' represents the fundamental ' 
tone of 435 cycles. 

"Curves B, C, D, E and F represent the 
overtones of 870, 1305, 1740, 2175 and 2610 ^ 
cycles. 

"Curve G represents the algebraic sum • 
of the displacements of the preceding six 
curves, and therefore represents our tone • 
of moderate quality, that is to say, one • 
cycle of our tone of moderate quality." 

After some thought I have decided to 
print also what brother Budge has to say 
on this subject, because it seems _ to me 
there are things which are of both interest 
and value. He says: 

"I have just returned from an organ fac- 
tory near my home town, where I had 

(Continued on page 32) 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



29 



Electrical Research 
Will Open Nine More 
Offices by January 1 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— To adequately 
maintain the growing demands made upon 
its distributing and servicing departments 
Electrical Research Products, Inc., will have 
opened nine more district headquarters by 
the end of the year, according to an an- 
nouncement made by H. M. Wilcox, oper- 
ating manager. The total number at that 
time, will be 37. 

District headquarters now operating are 
located in Atlanta, Boston, Buffalo, Char- 
lotte, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dallas, 
Denver, Des Moines, Detroit, Hollywood, 
Jacksonville, Kansas City, Memphis, Minne- 
apolis, New Orleans, New York, Oklahoma 
City, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Portland, 
San Francisco, Scranton, Seattle, Spokane, 
St. Louis and Washington, D. C. 

The new offices to be opened during the 
remainder of the year will be located at: 
Milwaukee, Providence, New Haven, Al- 
bany, Newark, Brooklyn, Lansing, Indiana- 
apolis, and San Antonio. 



First Picture with 
Jewish Dialog Ready 
For General Release 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— The first picture 
with Jewish dialog is ready for general re- 
lease, with an English version, according 
an announcement from Max Cohen. 

The production is entitled "Ad Musae," 
meaning the eternal prayer, and features 
Schmilekel, the famous twelve year old boy 
Cantor together with a selected cast of the 
Jewish Art Theatre group. The picture in 
both versions is being distributed in Greater 
New York and Northern New Jersey by 
Hollywood Pictures corporation. 



British Filmcraft to 
Start Audien Picture 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

LONDON, Oct. 8.— (By Mail)— British 
Filmcraft will start production on its first 
dialog picture this month, at Walthamstow 
studios under the direction of Captain 
George Banfield. 

The picture will be entitled "The Lure," 
which is taken from a well known stage 
play. Hilda Bayley and Cecil Humphreys 
will have leading roles with Margaret Ban- 
nerman as the star. Others in the cast are 
Gibb McLaughlin and Pat Aherne. 



Zeller Appointed as 
RKO Representative 

R. H. Zeller, who for the past three months 
has acted as manager of the Granada, Indian- 
apolis, has accepted a position as special rep- 
resentative of the Chicago office of RKO. 
In his new capacity Zeller will visit various 
houses in the middle west. He is a resident 
of South Bend and graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame in 1925. He has been 
with the company four years and has man- 
aged theatres in Kansas City, Sioux City and 
Chicago. 



Hollywood Needs Brains, Skin Deep 
Beauty Should Stay Home: DeMille 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8. — Hollywood needs more brains and skin-deep beauty 
should stay at home, according to Cecil B. De Mille, producer. In discussing 
the production standards of the present day and talking pictures he stressed 
the point that a high school education should be a minimum requirement for 
screen aspirants and that education is no longer just an asset but a necessity. 
"In the first rush to place talking pic- the screen. I set a high school education 



tures on the market," stated the director, 
"there was a tendency on the part of some 
to take the easiest way, and simply put on 
the screen stage plays exactly as they were 
done on the legitimate boards. 

"This is not fair to the stories thus 
treated. Stage technique was evolved to 
fill the needs of direct contact with an audi- 
ence, and to overcome the obstacles of the 
necessarily cramped physical confines of 
stage settings. 

"Screen technique, on the other side, was 
built up to cover the lack of a direct audi- 
ence, of direct physical contact with the 
players, and also to make the most of the 
greatest advantage of the screen, far 
greater facility in shifting from one scene 
to another, and back again. 

Audiens Present Personality 

"Talking pictures are a new, a third art, 
of dramatic expression. They will have a 
distinct technique all their own. But that 
technique will always have much in it that 
pertains to the screen, because talking pic- 
tures, like the silent screen, present per- 
sonality without the player concerned being 
actually in the theatre, in the flesh. Photo- 
graphed plays will leave out of the telling 
of a story much of the novelty and added 
charm possible to picture technique. Let 
us not handicap this new development by 
overlooking any possibilities." 

De Mille, who made "Dynamite" as his 
first talking picture under his new affilia- 
tions with M G M, believes that a _ high 
school education will now_ be a minimum 
requirement for screen aspirants. 

Education Is Necessary 

"The voice, either by its timbre, or by its 
mispronunciations reveals basic character 
unerringly," said the producer. "Education 
is no longer just an asset; it is a necessity 
without which no aspirant should approach 



as a minimum, but a good stiff college 
course, dealing particularly in literary and 
dramatic essentials and voice culture, is 
more valuable. 

"We need far more talented people than 
we are getting. There is no place that 
offers more opportunity to beauty plus 
brains than the Hollywood of 1929. There 
is no place more discouraging to a girl 
possessing nothing but beauty. 

"The main reason why we are overloaded 
in Hollywood with girls who have nothing 
but a fine Grecian profile, is the unthinking 
praise of home-town friends. 

"I can't explain charm, but you know it 
the minute you contact it. And pictures 
need charm far more than beauty. There 
is many a girl in Hollywood with irregular 
features whom 'fans' call beautiful, just be- 
cause the girl grips them with her per- 
sonality. Skin-deep beauty has no place in 
Hollywood and should stay at home." 




Gordon Bostock Arrives in England 

NEW YORK. — Gordon Bostock, producer of Vari- 
ety series of Pathe all talking comedies, arrived in 
England October 3 on a special business trip. 



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MELLAPHONE CORPORATION 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Territory Available for Dealers 




30 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



Better Presentation Urged 



{Continued from page 15) 

according to the report. Latin America 
continues to be the largest consumer with 
• Europe next. 

Film Exports Increase 

A more recent report indicates an in- 
crease in total film exports for the first 
six months of 1929, which is accounted for 
largely by the demand for positive prints 
in Europe. The totals are 121,810,453 lineal 
feet for 1929, as compared with 112,752,169 
for 1928. Imports of raw films for the first 
six months of 1929 amounted to 251,000,000 
lineal feet, compared with 117,000,000 lineal 
feet for 1928. Imports of finished film ran 
about the same as in 1928, 1,750,000 million 
feet of negative, and 2,750,000 million feet 
of positive film. 

Nearly 3,000 more American-made projec- 
tors (both 35 mm. and 16 mm.) were exported 
in 1928 than in 1929. Almost 6,000 were 
shipped out to seventy-one countries, the re- 
port stated. 

Industrial Growth in Russia 

In dealing with the Russian end of things, 
the progress committee report said : 

"Sovkino now owns 10,000 square meters of 
space near Moscow, and 1929 production 
schedules call for 86 long feature-pictures. 
About 85,000 people are engaged in film pro- 
duction. Building programs up to 1932 call 
for the erection of 2,000 new theatres and 8,000 
transportable projection outfits for use in vil- 
lages. Neither cameras nor films were manu- 
factured in Russia previous to September, 
1928, but about 2,000 stationary and 8,000 port- 
able projectors are now made annually. Every- 
one of the 400 workers' clubs in Moscow is 
said to be equipped with projection facilities. 
Leningrad boasts a theatre seating 3,000, and 
plans are underway for the construction of 
several others of similar capacity. Theatres 
devoted to special presentation of scientific 
films are popular. 

"The exhibition branch of the motion picture 
industry uses nearly half of all the man power 
employed in motion pictures, or 110,000 of the 
235,000 engaged in all branches. Production 



employs 75,000; distribution 20,000; and other 
branches of the industry 30,000. 

21,150,000 Seats in World 

"The world's 52,000 motion picture theatres 
have a combined seating capacity of 21,150,000 
for the 1,793,000,000 people of earth. Labora- 
tories process 1,500,000,000 feet. Amateur 
'movie' makers use upwards -of 20,000 miles of 
16 mm. film every year and have purchased 
more than 175,000 amateur cameras and pro- 
jectors in the United States alone. Of the 
11,000 extras registered at the Hollywood 
Central Casting Office, only 4,000 receive work 
regularly and less than 400 can speak in for- 
eign tongues or with the foreign accent neces- 
sary for the foreign parts in the 'talkies.' " 

The program is replete with papers, many 
of them written by men of high standing in 
the engineering side of the motion picture in- 
dustry. These papers cover a wide range of 
subjects. 

Bus Rides and Banquet 

The entertainment has been well taken care 
of. The Canadian government is giving all the 
delegates a three-hour bus drive around 
Toronto Wednesday afternoon. Wednesday 
evening there will be the usual semi-annual 
banquet to be held in the beautiful main con- 
vention hall of the Royal York hotel, which, 
by the way, I will say, in common justice, has 
the finest arrangement and equipment for con- 
ventions this writer has evei in ad his experi- 
ence seen. That statemen; ii not intended as 
an advertisement but merely as a word of well 
merited appreciation. 

On Monday evening a preview of forth- 
coming sound pictures was held. In fact, tak- 
ing everything into consideration, the conven- 
tion at this writing has every indication of be- 
ing as successful as one could wish. At this 
meeting a general election of officers will be 
held, the results of which we will announce 
to you next week. 



Like Mother, Like Daughter 

NEW YORK.— While her mother, Nora Cecil, vet- 
eran character actress, has been playing in "Medals" 
in support of Gary Cooper, Dorothy Cecil, 19, has 
been making her screen debut in another Paramount 
production, "The Vagabond King," in support of 
Dennis King. 



Singapore Theatre to 
Install WE System 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— The Capitol theatre 
at Singapore will install Western Electric 
sound system, according to P. L. Palmerton, 
foreign manager of Electrical Research 
Products. 

This will be the first W E device on the 
Malay peninsula, the one nearest that point 
being in India, where five systems have been 
installed. 



Kiley Signed to Write 
Dialog for Universal 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— Jed Kiley, reputed 
to be the best known American in Paris, 
has signed to write dialog for Universal 
audiens. Kiley is well known in Chicago 
newspapers circles and at the close of the 
World War, he remained in Paris and 
started a night club with an American band 
and American dancing. 

It was at this night club that visiting 
society leaders and the Prince of Wales 
trooped to the kitchen and cooked and 
served their own food during a sudden 
waiters' strike. 

Inside Shot of "Los Angeles 99 
Recorded by Movietone News 

The first sound pictures to be made in- 
side the giant dirigible Los Angeles on a 
flight from Lakehurst and over New York 
City are presented in a current issue of Fox 
Movietone News, allowing the public to 
view and hear what goes on in the huge 
bag and on the "cat walk." There are also 
birdseye scenes of Broadway shot from the 
dirigible. 

Other aviation shots are sights and 
sounds of the J. G. Bennett balloon race 
which started from St. Louis. Of the eight 
entries from six nations the United States 
entry was the winner. 



Erlanger in Philadelphia 

Installs RCA Equipment 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— The Erlanger 
theatre, Philadelphia's foremost legitimate 
playhouse, has arranged for the installation 
of R C A Photophone sound picture repro- 
ducing equipment of the "C" type, it is an- 
nounced by Sydney E. Abel, general sales 
manager of R C A Photophone, Inc. 

Seating 2,000, the Erlanger now enters 
the lists as a talking picture house with 
long run feature attractions to be shown 
under the new policy. The first audien to 
play at the Erlanger will be "Rio Rita." 



Hearst Metrotone News Opens 
At Loew's State, New Orleans 

Hearst Metrotone News, produced by 
William Randolph Hearst and distributed 
by M G M, made its bow to New Orleans 
theatre-goers last week at Loew's State 
theatre. Patrons of the Canal street play- 
house who saw the first release were loud 
in their praise of it. Hearst has both spoken 
and printed titles, a running follow-up of 
appropriate explanatory conversation on in- 
teresting and varied assortment of inter- 
national topics. 



Dezel Opens Chicago Office 

Albert Dezel has opened offices in Chicago's 
Film Row for the handling of "Damaged 
Goods," which he has re-issued with a syn- 
chronized score. 



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October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



31 



Paul Larsen Resigns 
RCA Factory Post; 
Joins Ph ono -Kin ema 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— Paul Larsen has 
resigned R C A to accept the position of 
vice president and chief engineer of Phono- 
Kinema, according to Louis C. Pedlar, 
president of that company. He will take up 
his new duties Oct. 10. 

Phono-Kinema sound equipment is being 
built under the Nakken patents and in- 
cludes a recording and reproducing equip- 
ment. Four recorders have already been 
sold and promised for delivery in December 
and a dual device comprising sound-on-film 
and disc, deliveries on which will begin 
November 1. Fifty of the sound-on-film 
reproducing attachments are now in pro- 
duction as are four recorders. 

Larsen has been associated with RCA 
for the past 11 years, having joined them 
in 1918, during which time he was in the 
research division and was appointed factory 
production manager about two years ago. 
Larsen's early traning was received in the 
College of Technology, Newark, N. J., and 
the City College of New York. 



Century Opens with Sound 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

MINNEAPOLIS, Oct. 8.— The Century 
theatre, formerly the Garrick, has opened 
with Western Electric sound equipment. 
The house has been completely remodeled 
and new equipment installed throughout. 
Walter Broos is the manager and Fay 
Tyler is director of publicity. 



40 Photophone Installations a 
Month in British Theatres: Heyl 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8. — British theatres are installing Photophone sound sys- 
tems at the rate of 40 a month and it is expected that a total of 200 houses will 
have been wired by the close of 1929, according to E. O. Heyl, foreign vice presi- 
dent of RCA Photophone, who is visiting in America. 
"The popularity of sound pictures in scientiousness of the highest order toward 



Europe is now unquestioned," Heyl de- 
clared. "The theatre going public there 
is as avid for the talk and music of the 
sound screen as are our American audiences. 
In England especially, where many Ameri- 
can talking films are shown, the common 
bond of language has insured the success 
of sound pictures. 

"England has also been active in produc- 
ing its own sound pictures. The recording 
by British International Pictures and 
Gainsborough-Gaumont enterprises is all by 
the RCA Photophone system, elaborate 
sound studios having been established at 
Elstree, and one of the finest talking films 
made is an English production, "Blackmail." 

The English theatre field, prominently 
represented by the great Gaumont group of 
theatres and the John Maxwell-controlled 
ABC circuit, has had installed in each of 
these enterprises RCA Photophone sound 
reproducers. Operating out of the London 
Film House offices of RCA Photophone, 
an original group of ten American sound 
engineering have built up an organization 
of 120 British installation engineers for the 
operation and maintenance of these sound 
equipments. 

"These British engineers," declares Heyl, 
"exhibit a British thoroughness and con- 



their craft, resulting in a real contribution 
to quality reproduction. 

"The farthest outpost of the United 
Kingdom, Australia, will have more than 
100 RCA Photophone installations by Feb- 
ruary 1, 1930, and 50 equipments have al- 
ready been shipped to the Antipodes. In- 
stallations in foreign lands now include 
theatres in India, Egypt, China, the Philip- 
pines, Australia, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, 
Belgium, Russia, France and England, be- 
sides many in South and Central America," 
he said. 




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32 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



FREQUENCY and TONE 

Answering Question No. 17 

(Continued from page 28) 



quite some discussion with one of the fac- 
tory officials concerning sound frequency. 

"When our editor placed the word 'tone' 
in this question he opened up a rather 
vast field for discussion. Tone is a subject 
which scientists discuss and then re-discuss 
(sometimes without the 'dis.' — Ed.). Sound 
is one thing. Tone is quite another. Any 
sound is made up of frequencies, but tone 
is made up of frequencies which are bal- 
anced with overtones. 

"The voice of the late Caruso, which was 
one of the richest voices the world has ever 
known, was said to contain seven overtones. 
The usual good singing voice contains be- 
tween four and five overtones. 

"What causes some tones to be different 
from others? I mean tones of the same 
frequency. We play an air on a violin and 
then we play the same air on a trumpet. 
Now both these tones contain the same 
frequencies (Maybe that's right — maybe not. 
I don't know. — Ed.). The difference in the 
tones is caused by the different overtones. 
In some instruments the overtones are very 
subdued, while in others they are very 
prominent. We find as many as eleven 
overtones in some instruments, so that when 
we consider that human voices have but 
four to five, it is seen that there may be 
and is a great possible range in or variety 
of tone. 

"The question asks: 'What frequency 
would you consider as producing a tone of 
moderate quality?' Now this would depend 
upon whether you liked a violin or a cello 
in instruments, or a soprano or tenor in 
voices. 

"The cello runs from 65 to 1,000 or more 
frequencies; the violin from 200 to 8,000, 
counting the harmonics all these frequencies 
enjoy. The tempered scale on the piano 
— in other words, where the piano tuner 
starts — runs from 261 to 523 vibrations or 
frequencies. This is about the middle of 
the instrument, and you might say those 
tones are of moderate quality. 

"There are organs with frequencies as 
low as eight and as high as 16,000. There 
is no theatre amplification system which 
will handle such frequencies. Even the 
trained ear of the master musician cannot 
hear such high frequencies. He will hear 
a sound, but cannot say that it is a tone. 

"The organ factory official with whom I 
talked complained that he could not hear 
the pedal notes in our theatres. By this he 



means the very low frequencies, such as 
the pedal notes of our organs, or the lowest 
notes of the contra bass viol. 

"The pedal notes of an organ may go 
as low as sixteen vibrations, while the bass 
vio! goes down to about forty. These 
low notes are missing in our present theatre 
outfits. 

"The very best possible care that a pro- 
jectionist can take of our present ampli- 
fying system is none too good, as the 
system itself is imperfect. There are fre- 
quencies that the microphone picked up all 
right, but which are not heard in the the- 
atre. Whether or not these frequencies 
are recorded, I am unable to say. Whether 
the reproduction apparatus will not handle 
them I am unable to say, but this much I 
know, namely, if we attempt to force them 
through we set up distortion through the 
middle range of frequencies. 

"Our amplifying systems are a marvel- 
ous invention, but they are not yet perfect, 
so it is up to us to handle them with the 
greatest possible care. Science is making 
great advancement and soon we may have 
a perfect amplifying system. 

$ Jfc # 

"We are told that one Russian bass singer 
is able to go as low as 65 vibrations, and 
still it may be called a tone. Usually when 
the human voice gets down that low it 
is merely a noise. Some female singers 
can go as high as 1,500 vibrations without 
it becoming a screech, but the general run 
of human voices becomes merely a noise 
when it passes 1,100 vibrations. It ceases 
to be a tone. 

"In the theatre our great difficulty lies 
in reproducing tone. Sound will take care 
of itself, all right, but tone is something 
else again." 

"There, gentlemen, possibly that is not 
exactly a categorical answer to the ques- 
tion, but just the same it contains a lot 
of stuff you may well think over. I am not 
personally high enough up in sound to 
pass judgment upon the correctness of all 
that brother Budge has said, but on the 
other hand I do know that much of it is 
at least approximately correct." 

4e ' $ * 

Frank Dudiak, Fairmont, W. Va., also 
sent in quite an answer. It carried us 
into frequencies of a mere four quintillion 
(4,000,000,000,000,000,000). In part Dudiak 
says: 

"The hearing range is from 20 to 16,000 
frequencies, according to J. C. Steinberg of 




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the Society of Motion Picture Engineers. 
From the hearing range it is found that 
nothing further is known of frequencies 
until we get to 33,500,000 and from that 
number to 34,000,000,000 we have electricity, 
though that must not be confused with the 
cycle of alternating current, which is quite 
another matter. What I have reference to 
is the fundamental cause of electricity. 

"From 34,000,000,000 we know nothing of 
the frequencies until they reach 70,000,000,- 
000,000, when we have the beginning of 
heat, which lasts to 562,000,000,000,000. 
Also, at this figure the red light starts. As 
the frequencies increase we have different 
colors of light until 1,000,000,000,000,000 is 
reached, at which point light can no longer 
be seen through human eyes. Again we 
know nothing of the frequencies until they 
reach the figure of 288,000,000,000,000,000, 
which is the beginning of the X-ray, which 
passes away at 4,000,000,000,000,000,000. 

"Incidentally, speaking of light, roughly 
from 300,000,000,000,000 to 1,000,000,000,- 
000,000, light travels at the rate of 186,000 
miles per second of time — just idles along, 
as it were." 

This editor raises both hands as high as 
he can, standing on tiptoe at that. What 
will these modern projectionists be hurling 
at my poor old head next. I guess what 
brother Dudiak says is all right. Anyhow, 
we'll let it go at that. 




George Pearson 



British Industry Needs 

American Cooperation 

Says George Pearson 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— The British 
motion picture industry needs American 
cooperation is the view of George Pearson, 
of Welsh Pearson 
Elder Ltd., which, 
with Gainsborough 
Productions, is inter- 
ested with Tiffany- 
Stahl in the making 
of "Journey's End." 

Pearson, who is 
on his way to the 
West Coast studios 
to confer with Grant 
L. Cook, executive 
vice-president of T- 
S, said that the Eng- 
lish theatre goers are 
more than enthusi- 
astic over American- 
made pictures, and 
added: 

"The industry is at somewhat of a stand- 
still in England at present. It is just where 
you were during the change from silent to 
sound and talking pictures. But it will not 
take the English producers long to turn 
out their all-talking product, and English 
theatres soon will be equipped with talking 
and sound apparatus. 

"We of the British film industry cer- 
tainly need American cooperation and I 
believe American picture men need the 
British producers as well as theatre own- 
ers. We have sent many splendid picture 
stars to your country. You in turn are 
giving us magnificent pictures." 

Regarding "Journey's End," Pearson said 
he was convinced it should not have a 
woman character in it. Before entering 
the field of pictures, Pearson, an Oxford 
graduate, was a public schoolmaster. 

RCA System in Stanley 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— Following the in- 
stallation of R C A Photophone sound re- 
producing equipment in the Earl Carroll 
theatre for the world premiere of "Rio 
Rita," RCA Photophone announces the 
equipping of another famous Broadway 
cinema landmark, the Stanley, at 42d Street 
and Times Square. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



35 



THE STUDIO 



When the Stars Met 
For Laurels 



TT might cost a lot of money to belong to 
a golf club, but the splendid turnout at 
the Herald- World Third Annual Golf Tour- 
nament afforded a lot of picture folk the 
opportunity to rub golf bags with their 
"brother executives, directors, players, writ- 
ers, cameramen and technicians, not to 
leave out the box office-exhibitors and 
■exchangemen. 

* * * 

AL JOLSON arrived on the course at 1:30 
(p. m.) ready to match gags, drives and 
puts with J. L. Warner, but J. L. was late 
arriving. He made his appearance on the 
first tee two hours late only to find Al 
gone but not forgotten. With Jolson out of 
the way, Jack Warner had no trouble in 
winning one of the beautiful cups. The 
Jolson cup, one of the largest prizes 
awarded, was a beautiful piece of silver 
workmanship. 

* t- * 

/^OLFING is good for the health but it 
ruins one's mathematics. Huntly-Gor- 
don tried to add up one out-of-bounds, one 
drive, one brassie, two mid-irons, three 
niblicks and four puts, and called it seven. 

* ^ ❖ 

TLOYD BROWNFIELD, sporting editor 
of the Hollywood News, played in a 
foursome with SOL WURTZEL. Before 
the tee-off, Lloyd asked 'Who Is Wurtzel?" 
Then he asked how he played. After the 
game Lloyd reported in his paper that he 
hoped Wurtzel is as good an executive as 
he is a golfer. Sol is good at both jobs. 
■<■• * * 

BEFORE making the shot the players 
were expected to "address" the ball. 
RICHARD ARLEN found his ball under a 
thorn bush and his salutation is not fit to 
print. 

* # ❖ 

/~\NE of the most important things in golf 
^ is to "follow through." We saw a whole 
mob follow through the locker room at the 
heels of FRANK LLOYD who had playing 
cards and other implements used at the 
nineteenth hole. 

PEW players were up to their standard 
Most of them were "off their game," as 
they called it when they continued playing 
badly. 

^ ^ # 

DAOUL WALSH was overheard to say 
■L^- that if his game ever went anywhere 
near par, he would instruct his broker to 
sell. There were more good stock market 
profiteers on the course than there were par 
golf players. 

>:= * % 

ONE foursome was holding a revival 
meeting at the thirteenth hole. EDWIN 
CAREWE said, "In counting the strokes of 
your opponent and yourself, verily it is 
more blessed to give than to receive; for, 
unlike votes, the man who gets the fewest 
wins." 



Colvin Brown and Sam Rork in 
New Producing and Selling Firm 

Fine Arts Enter Field — Hoffman Directs Dowling — Warners Plan 

Operetta — Gibson Starts — R K 0 Launches Expansion Program 

— Fox Has 11 Units Working — Independents Busy 

By DOUGLAS HODGES 

HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 8. — The organization of Fine Arts Pictures this week 
marks the entry of Colvin W. Brown and Sam Rork into a new production 
and distributing company. 

Renaud Hoffman has started production on Sono Art's "Blaze o' Glory" 
at the Metropolitan studios. Eddie Dowling is featured. 

There are 11 pictures in production at the Fox studios. Cummings and 
Borzage are on location. George O'Brien is completing "The Lone Star 
Ranger." Benjamin Stoloff is directing "New Orleans Frolic." 
Construction will start immediately at the and Romberg were placed under contract some 



Metropolitan studios for buildings to house 
the Fine Arts company until plans for their 
own studios are completed. It is understood 
that Colvin Brown is to be executive vice- 
president. Rork is to be vice-president and 
general manager. 

Brown is a former executive vice-president 
of Pathe Exchanges. Sam Rork was a promi- 
nent First National producer. After a meet- 
ing of the board of directors in New York, 
complete production plans will be announced. 
Billy Leyser, director of publicity and adver- 
tising, states that the company has completed 
all plans for the first picture. 

Hoffman and Dowling 

Renaud Hoffman is the author of "Blaze 
o' Glory." George Crone, who was to direct 
"A Year and a Day," which was postponed 
for "Glory," was first mentioned as director. 
Crone will now assist in every way in the 
direction of Hoffman and later will direct 
another story. 

Production has started. Betty Compson 
comes sooner than planned from Warner 
Brothers because of the postponement of her 
current picture. Henry McCarty wrote the 
adaptation on "Blaze o' Glory." 

O'Brien and Erickson 

_ George O'Brien is rapidly nearing comple- 
tion of his role in "The Lone Star Ranger." 
Buddy Erickson is directing. Frank Borzage 
is one of the 11 units working under the Fox 
banner. _ He is directing the John McCormack 
audien in Ireland. The company will return 
to Hollywood shortly. 

Benjamin Stoloff is directing "The New 
Orleans Frolic," which will have in the cast 
every prominent Fox player. This picture was 
started some time ago with Norman Taurog 
directing. Irving Cummings is on location 
with several hundred players directing "Cameo 
Kirby." Raoul Walsh is directing "Sea Legs." 
Victor McLaglen and Fifi Dorsay are fea- 
tured. 

Warners Operetta 

Plans for the production of an original 
operetta as one of the big roadshows of the 
season has been announced by Warner Broth- 
ers. Joseph Jackson will collaborate with 
Oscar Hammerstein II and Sigmund Romberg 
in preparing the screen version. Hammerstein 



time ago. Jackson wrote the dialog on "Say 
It with Songs" and "Mammy." 

Curtiz Adds More Players 

Michael Curtiz is still adding players to Al 
Jolson's picture "Mammy." The cast now 
consists of Hobart Bosworth, Lois Moran, 
Louise Dresser, Noah Beery, Lowell Sherman, 
Lee Moran, Tully Marshall, Stanley Fields 
and Jack Curtis. The story is by Irving Ber- 
lin. Curtiz is directing. 

Hoot on Location 

Production began this week at Mojave on 
Hoot Gibson's latest audien, "The Ridin' Kid 
from Powder River." The unit will remain 
there ten days. Arthur Rosson is directing. 
Louise Lorraine has the feminine lead. The 
story is by Henry H. Knibbs. 

Milestone Prepares at U 

Lewis Milestone, Maxwell Anderson and 
Del Andrews are putting the final touches to 
the screen story of Universal's forthcoming 
production, "All Quiet on the Western Front." 
Production will start late in October. Mile- 
stone will direct. Anderson is doing the 
dialog and Andrews is writing the continuity. 
No cast has been chosen. 

RKO Is Building 

The huge expansion program at RKO got 
under way this week with a three story ad- 
ministration building started. A new cafe and 
sound stage are next. The Rudy Vallee com- 
pany is the only unit working. There are 
seven other productions preparing and will 
start within two weeks. 

These include the Bebe Daniels and Richard 
Dix units. Olive Borden will start "Dance 
Hall," with Arthur Lake featured. Mel Brown 
will direct. Luther Reed is to direct "Hit the 
Deck." Herbert Brenon will make "The Case 
of Sergeant Grischa." "Dixiana" is the name 
of the Bebe Daniels audien. 

Tec Art Is Busy 

Two companies resort activities this week 
at the Tec Art studios. The Colorart Syn- 
chrotone Productions are ready to start pro- 
duction on "Mamba." Al Rogell will direct. 
Jean Hersholt has the leading role. The pic- 
ture will be made in color. 

The Jesse Weil Productions are preparing 
(.Continued on page 36) 



34 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



NEW YORK SHOWINGS 



"Sunny Side Up" 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8— The premiere of 
"Sunny Side Up" proved to be a sen- 
sation of the early season. The Gaiety 
theatre was packed with an excited and 
happy throng, which applauded the players 
and found the picture superlative entertain- 
ment. 

William Fox, producer of the picture, was 
not personally present, though he had been 
expected to make his first public appear- 
ance since the motor car accident he suf- 
fered some months ago. However, he got 
an eye-witness account of the event over 
the telephone after the performance from 
Winfield Sheehan, his close friend and ad- 
visor, who sails for Europe Wednesday. 
Al Smith Attends 

Among those present were Al Smith, 
former governor of New York and still so 
popular a figure that he was nearly mobbed 
in the lobby by admirers seeking his auto- 
graph, Charlie Farrell, one of the stars, and 
the famous team of DeSylva, Brown and 
Henderson, who were responsible for the 
new musical romance. Other celebrities, 
too numerous to mention, were also present. 

The picture brought further applause to 
Janet Gaynor and Farrell, co-starred. Both 
talked and sang and Miss Gaynor even 
danced a few steps. They were admirable 
in their parts, which were drawn from the 
familiar Cinderella theme, she a waif of the 
East Side and he a scion of the American 
aristocracy. Their voices, fresh and youth- 
ful and rather wistful, if lacking in profes- 
sional finish, were perfectly suited to their 
parts. 

The story of the picture was hardly new 
or ingenious, but it was handled with such 
grace and simplicity that it was entirely 
satisfactory. Furthermore, it was made so 
amusing by the hilarious antics of Marjorie 
White and Frank Richardson and by the 
deft clowning of El Brendel, that its suc- 
cess was emphatic. 

Grand Entertainment 

The picture made grand entertainment. 
Well directed by David Butler, it went along 
with a fast swing. Its music, as all who 
know DeSylva, Brown and Henderson ex- 
pected, was first-rate. Ziegfeld's "Follies" 
or White's "Scandals" would have been glad 
to have the score and you can bet your life 
you'll hear "Sunny Side Up," "Turn on the 
Heat," "If I Had a Picture of You" and 
"I'm a Dreamer, Aren't We All?" till you're 
blue in the ears. 

The big moment of the picture made the 
hottest number seen in pictures, or for that 
matter on the stage, since anyone can re- 
call. It made the famous "Digga Digga 
Do" number of "Blackbirds," the colored 
show that held New York's attention for 
more than a year and then captured Paris, 
look like a back-seat. 

The scene — which, by the way, is shown 
on the enlarged screen — shows a society 
entertainment at Southampton. On a mag- 
nificent stage set in the middle of a pool 
you see a chorus of girls dressed as Eski- 
mos singing "Turn on the Heat," and danc- 
ing. They stand in front of icy igloos with 
the midnight sun shining at them from be- 
hind. 

A Smash Hit 

As the dance gets hot, the igloos begin 
to melt. The girls begin to shed. Hotter 
and hotter it gets, until the igloos are 
melted away entirely. It grows so warm 
that foliage begins to appear. Palm trees 
spring up. More than that! Little vol- 
canoes pop through, and finally things get 
so hot as the result of this amazing danc- 



ing and singing that the whole scene catches 
fire — and the girls dive off into the pool 
to escape. Some number. 

It would be hard to make a picture with 
more entertainment value in it than "Sunny 
Side Up." This is undoubtedly one of the 
smash hits of the season. — P. V. 

"Rio Rita" 

DINNER jackets predominated at the 
distinguished Sunday night opening of 
Radio's first big picture, "Rio Rita," at the 
Earl Carroll theatre here this week. There 
were no sunlight arcs on rumbling trucks 
to pale the faces of first nighters nor was 
there any evidence of the ballyhoo usually 
attendant on a Broadway talking picture 
premiere. And, in spite of it, or because 
of it, the crowd was the best dressed, the 
most quietly enthusiastic to attend a film 
opening in many months. The big men in 
pictures were there. 

"Rio Rita" is almost a literal juxtaposi- 
tion of an exceptionally popular operetta 
from stage to screen. The principals, John 
Boles and Bebe Daniels, are a pleasure to 
hear. This is Miss Daniels' first talking 
film. Her conversational voice is pleasant 
and her singing voice is lovely. 

Luther Reed, director, deserves much 
credit. Song cues are hardly noticeable, 
are never dragged in by the ears; dance 
routines are difficult and good; groupings 
are appealing to the eye, stage direction, 
for the most part, faultless. 

The second part of the picture is a smash 
in technicolor with stage effects that are 
very beautiful. Once more there is room 
for what is now becoming an old criticism. 
Not nearly enough use is made of motion 
picture technicolor. Only twice were there 
shots out of the ordinary and not once did 
the producers call on the marvels of trick 
photography. 

Radio is to be congratulated on two 
other matters seldom evidenced at Broad- 
way premieres. Patrons were shown to 
their seats as they arrived and the curtain 
rose promptly. More than that, there were 
no preliminaries to detract attention from 
the picture itself. Radio believes that "Rio 
Rita" is big enough to stand on its own 
feet. And Radio happens to be right. 
— D. F. 

* * * 

"Disraeli" 

4' ISRAELI," as a talking picture, 
•L/ stands close to the top in spite of 
onlv fair photography and a continuity that 
is somewhat sketchy— largely, to our mind, 
because of George Arliss, who plays the 
role of the great British statesman to in- 
imitable perfection. 

There is this criticism to make. The film 
stays too closely by the confines of the 
stage, does not utilize the scope which is 
itsown. 

For the other players, Mrs. Arliss has 
the part of Lady Beaconsfield, wife of the 
Prime Minister, and she plays it well; Joan 
Bennet as Clarissa is lovelier than ever and 
spirited, too; Anthony Bushell gives a 
splendid performance as the reactionary 
Oxonian, typical of his class. There is a 
remarkable reproduction of the interior of 
the House of Commons and a brief touch 
of pageantry for the preliminaries to the 
opening of Parliament when "Dizzy," his 
wife, and the court pay homage to the 
Queen. 

"Disraeli" opened last week at the Warn- 
er's theatre on Broadway to a large and 
appreciative audience. Unfortunately, the 



Warners had to precede the feature with a 
series of Vitaphone acts which were not 
only poorly done but out of date with the 
present trend in pictures. It seemed a pity 
to preface "Disraeli" with someone's "Cali- 
fornians." 

But, to go back to the picture itself, 
"Disraeli" is a film that any company can 
be proud of, a picture that can be shown 
in any country, an effort for which its 
sponsors can justly say: "It's good." — 
D. F. 

* * * 
"The Trespasser" 

<ITHE TRESPASSER," Gloria Swan- 
J- son's first venture in screen dialog, 
is an interesting picture because no matter 
how much irrelevant material is dragged 
into it, no matter how involved the story 
becomes, she, one of the greatest actresses 
the screen has ever known, still holds your 
attention, still retains the ability to key 
you to a pitch. 

"The Trespasser" was previewed to the 
trade here last week. When it will be given 
a Broadway showing has not yet been an- 
nounced. It is reported to have done well 
in London where it had its premiere. 

Miss Swanson's voice is pleasant. Her 
singing, which was agreeable, was dragged 
in by the ears. 

Her first performance in sound convinces 
us, however, that in the new medium Miss 
Swanson will soon be a greater light than 
she ever was in the old one. — D. F. 

* ♦ ♦ 

"Young Nowheres" 

PEOPLE who still have some illusions 
left about the youth of this hard and 
fast age will enjoy the performances of 
Marion Nixon and Richard Barthelmess in 
First National's "Young Nowheres," which 
opened for a Broadway run at the Central 
theatre last week. 

No night clubs lend their noise to this 
picture nor do villains enter in. Gang wars 
and chorus girls have no place in it. It is 
something that Barrie might have written 
and is played charmingly and convincingly 
by the principals. 

Bert Roach should be congratulated on 
an amusing performance. He knows his 
bottle and he knows it nicely. 

There were two other things about the 
premiere to which attention should be 
called. The first picture was what is known 
as an act. In consisted of three men play- 
ing guitars, something which might have 
been diverting two or three years ago, but 
which, today, has no place in a Broadway 
first run house. The program in submit- 
ting the cast listed Albert Whalen as Mr. 
Richard Barthelmess, Annie Jackson as 
Miss Marion Nixon and so forth. In this 
First National is to be congratulated. There 
is just as much dignity attached to a role 
in a talking picture as there is to a part 
on the legitimate stage and it is high time 
that this be realized. — D. F. 

* * * 

"Why Bring That Up?" 

PARAMOUNT opened "Why Bring That 
Up?" with Moran and Mack, at the Rialto 
last week before an appreciative audience 
in which there was a large sprinkling of 
motion picture people. 

The larger and better part of this picture 
consists of repetitions of what the Two 
Black Crows have already done on the stage 
and recorded for the phonograph compa- 
(Continued on page 36) 



October 12. 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



35 



News Notes 



HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 8. 
LAUREL and HARDY will play important 
roles in the M G M picture "Rogues 
Song," Lawrence Tibbett, opera star has 
the leading role. This will be the first time 
that the comedians have worn special 
costumes. 

RUTH ROLAND will return to the screen. 

She will make her first talking picture for 
Sono Art. Miss Roland recently signed a 
contract for one picture. No announce- 
ments have been made as to story and cast. 

AL HERMAN, Darmour RKO director, 
has been appointed an honorary director 
of public safety at Studio City. His new 
position gives him the privilege of handling 
out tickets for speeding-. It also prevents 
him from being served with one within the 
city limits. 

FRANK DEXTER, technical director of 
the Darmour RKO studios, has pre- 
sented plans to Larry Darmour for the new 
school house which is to be built on the studio 
grounds. The school will be used for the 
Darmour juvenile group which at the 
present time numbers 28 children. 

WINIFRED REEVE, author, recently 
completed the dialog version of "The 
Phantom of the Opera" for Universal. She 
also wrote "The Spy," an original story 
for Joseph Schildkraut. 

DOROTHY MACKAILL will make 
"Green Stockings" as her next picture 
for First National. John Adolfi will direct. 
Miss Mackaill recently started production 
on "The Jazz Queen." William Seiter is 
directing. 

JACK RICHARDSON is playing a menace 
role in "The Dude Wrangler" at the 
Metropolitan studios. Mrs. Wallace Reid 
and Richard Thorpe are directing. Francis 
X. Bushman and Julia Swayne Gordon 
have the leading roles. 

LARRY DARMOUR, president of the 
Darmour RKO studios, is considering 
the production of a revue at the end of 
the present season. It will include as prin- 
cipals, all the performers in his comedies. 

JULES WHITE and ZION MYERS are 

directing "College Hounds" at MGM. 
It is the second of the dog pictures. Human 
voices will be synchronized with the action 
of the dog players. JigRs, Buster and Oscar 
have leading roles. 

GARY COOPER, RICHARD ARLEN and 
MARY BRIAN appear together > in the 
Paramount picture "The Virginian." It is 
the first time that the trio has been united 
in one picture. 

JOE E. BROWN has an idea for a tech- 
nicolor picture. The story could be writ- 
ten by Rupert Hughes and directed by Al 
Green. Alice White, Monte Blue and Law- 
rence Gray would have the leading roles. 
To complete the color list, Joe would also 
have an important part. 
GEORGE THOMAS, of the First Na- 
tional publicity department, is handling 
the exploitation and publicity of the new 
Warner Brothers Downtown Theatre in 
Los Angeles. It was formerly the Pantages 
theatre. 

LORETTA YOUNG has renewed her con- 
tract with First National. Miss Young 
has plaved featured roles in six films. A 
raise in salary was also given. 

LOUIS E. HEIFETZ, publicist, has re- 
turned from the hospital after several 
weeks illness. Heifetz is publicizing Holly- 
wood song writers. 



Henley Puts Hecht's Story in 
Work at PFL's Eastern Studio 

Renewed Activity Evidenced Elsewhere Also — Le Maire Starts 
Another — Sound Studios Releases First of "Schoolday Frolics" 
Series — Warners' Vitaphone Plant Maintains Its Schedule 

By DOUGLAS FOX 

NEW YORK, October 8. — Ben Hecht's untitled story featuring Helen 
Morgan, Charles Ruggles and Fred Kohler with Clayton, Jackson and Durantt 
goes into production this week at Paramount's Astoria studio under the direc- 
tion of Hobart Henley, who directed that clever picture, "The Lady Lies." 

Victor Schertzinger expects to take another week with "The Laughing 
Lady" so that, for a time, two features will be in production at once, some- 



thing rather unusual in Eastern circles. 

Signs of renewed activity in the East are 
evidenced elsewhere. George LeMaire told 
us that he was putting his next comedy in 
front of the camera and microphone this 
week at Sound Studios. The picture is 
called "Love, Honor and Oh, Baby!" Louis 
Simon, Evalyn Knapp, James Mullen and 
Kay Mallory have been assigned the leads. 
Marc Connelly, fresh from Europe, is mak- 
ing the last of his contracted series for 
Radio at the Gramercy plant. It's about 
an American at a Continental hotel who 
gets too much service, the menials expect- 
ing an exorbitant pourboire, and is as yet 
untitled. 

Sound Studios Release 

Sound Studios have released the first of 
the series of "Schoolday Frolics." Last 
week it played the Brooklyn Strand. The 
thought back of this series, Captain Noble 
tells us, is to depict the happenings in a 
country school, a school of all grades, and 
to bring out points of natural juvenile 
humor rather than resort to slapstick gags. 
The children themselves depend on their 
own vocal and instrumental efforts for any 
approval they may get from the audience. 

Of the child cast the youngest is Jessue 
Cosumano, 5, musical prodigy who wangles 
a violin. The Delite Twins, 6, do an adagio 
•(though we don't know what place that 
would have in a country school); Renee 
Schultz, 7, sings and dances; Maxine Ram- 
beau, 10, seasoned trouper, has appeared 
over the Keith time; Buddy Raymond, 12, 
is another vaudevillean as are Buddy Man- 
gan, 10, and Evalyn Smith, 8. The three 
Do-Dads, 6, 8 and 9, are radio broadcasters 
by profession. 

To go back to Paramount for a moment, 
E. Lloyd Sheldon has arrived in New York 
to join the production staff of the Long 
Island Studio as an associate producer, tak- 
ing immediate charge of one of the units 
now engaged in preparing a story for pro- 
duction. 

Vitaphone Schedule Maintained 

Warner Brothers Eastern Vitaphone 
Studio still is maintaining its production 
schedule. Four big acts of the legitimate 
and vaudeville stages have just been fea- 
tured in Vitaphone Varieties. 

Fred Keating, master magician, at pres- 
ent appearing in John Murray Anderson's 
"Almanacs" as magician and master of cere- 
monies, has just completed a Variety, titled 
"Illusions," directed by Murray Roth. 
Keating performs several unusual and in- 
tricate sleight-of-hand and card tricks, for 
which he has become famous. Keating ad- 
mits that he has been interested in magic, 
professionally, since he was 13 years old, 
when he ran away from the Peekskill Mili- 
tary Academy and joined a troup of Chinese 
magicians on the stage. 

Horace Heidt and His Californians have 
completed another. This is their second 
appearance under the "mike." 

Paula Trueman, of Grand Street Follies 



fame has made a short called "A Glimpse 
of the Stars." Miss Trueman is presented 
in a series of her impersonations of stage 
and screen stars. She made her debut on 
the stage as a dancer in Paris revues, and 
upon her return to America she joined the 
Neighborhood Playhouse group. 

Arthur Hurley directed George Rosener in 
"A Fallen Star." Rosener is perhaps as well 
known on the stage, both here and abroad, 
as playwright of several successful plays, al- 
though his histrionic ability has won him 
many laurels. He made his debut in the 
show business as a circus clown. Many 
years ago he was a writer, director and 
actor for the Lubin pictures, and he wrote 
the first moving picture that contained a 
story," The Great Train Robbery." This 
was in 1900. Before that continuity in a 
motion picture was not considered neces- 
sary. 



McCormick in Seattle; 
Schools Request Speech 

( Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 8.— Colleen Moore 
and her husband, John McCormick, have ar- 
rived in Seattle, McCormick's home town. He 
is an alumnus of the Broadway high school 
there. Upon his arrival he is understood to 
have received an immediate request to appear 
before and address ten of the leading high 
schools in that city. They arrive in New 
York this week. 



Equity Plans Hospital 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 8.— Actors Equity As- 
sociation plans the erection of a hospital for 
stage and screen actors to be built here. 
Money for the project will be supplied by the 
repayment of money advanced to actors in the 
recent battle. 




RENAUD HOFFMAN 

now DIRECTING 
HIS own ORIGINAL story 
"Blaze O' Glory" 
starring Eddie Dowling 
with Betty Compson 
for Sono-Art 



36 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



Two Qala Premieres Qive Hollywood 
Theatre Crowds a Busy Week 

Hal Skelly Is a Favorite After "Dance of Life" Opens — "Great Gabbo" 
Is Found Big Picture — Other Productions Well Liked 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
T OS ANGELES, Oct. 8. — Hal Skelly is one of Hollywood's new favorites 
as a result of the performance he did in "The Dance of Life" at its 
* ^ premiere this week at the United Artists theatre. It was one of the 
two gala premieres that kept the theatre crowd on its toes this week. Be- 
cause both were downtown openings there was a little less noise, promenading, 
dress and booming lights, but there was no curtailment in enthusiasm. 

S KELLY'S part was the same as his part in The story deals with the early Spanish Cali- 
"Burlesque," the stage play from which fornia days before the golden state was ad- 



NEW YORK SHOWINGS 
OF NEW PICTURES 



KELLY'S part was the same as his part in 
"Burlesque," the stage play from which 
this picture was made. Supporting him was 
Nancy Carroll, a youngster, who had a tough 
role but got away with it. 

He worked his way through the picture. 
He was on the screen practically all the time 
and portrayed almost every kind of emotion 
while he was there. He is a dancer and a 
clown, perhaps by nativity. Sympathy, drama, 
humor, anger, fear and ballyhoo are some of 
the characteristics that were in his part. 

He starts the show as a burlesque performer 
who has big ambitions. He also has a sweet- 
heart who is a dancer. Finally his big oppor- 
tunity with Ziegfeld arrives and he makes 
good. Temporarily. Wine, women and song 
nearly ruin him. Then his wife (Miss Car- 
roll) comes back to his rescue. The show 
ends with the couple doing a turn in a bur- 
lesque show again. 

* * * 

BEN HECHT gets credit for "The Great 
Gabbo." Whether he actually wrote the 
story that appears on the screen is hard to tell. 
He may have. It seems to me to be an excel- 
lent story. 

It's subtle in places. The ending is espe- 
cially fine. There are three main characters 
in a story that is as much a character study 
as it is anything. Yet it has plot. One of the 
main characters is a dummy. It is "Otto." 
Regardless of the fact that it is a lifeless doll 
James Cruze has given it enough of a part 
that it becomes an object of sympathy in sev- 
eral places in the story. 

Erich Von Stroheim, a mean, crafty heavy, 
also twists his characterization well enough 
to become the object of pathos. Betty Comp- 
son does. But it is easy for her because of 
her sympathetic role. 

The laboratory work that Cruze, Inc., em- 
ployed is the most critical part of the picture. 
It is a little grainy and fuzzy. To most peo- 
ple that is one of the most important details 
in making a picture. Paramount and First 
National have always stood in the highest 
class for good sharp production. 

Again Jimmie Cruze proves he is one of the 
foremost directors. He is up-to-date. Dia- 
log and color mean no obstacles to him. He 
has conquered them both. He has resorted, as 
all others have, to a big stage show for his 
big punch in putting the picture over. But 
that is because he has the box office in mind 
constantly. 

He has had fine support in making this pic- 
ture. But it has taken courage for these sup- 
porters to do it. Henry Meyer has spent a for- 
tune to give Jimmie Cruze a chance to make a 
big picture. It is a big picture. 

* * * -}f f 

AND here are reports on a few other pic- 
l\ tures that two of the Herald-World's re- 
doubtable lieutenants have brought in. The 
first one is : 

"THE SENOR AMERICANO" 

Ken Maynard's third talking Western 
moves along with a fast tempo and can be 
classed as fine entertainment. It is full of 
action, good music and songs. 

"Senor Americano" is the final title of 
this Western which was made under the 
working title of "The Golden Bridle." 



mitted in the Union and shows Ken Maynard 
in the role of a Lieutenant in the United 
States Army, assigned to the duty of protect- 
ing the Spanish senors from the villains who 
schemed to take away their valuable land 
grants just prior to the admission of 
California. 

Kathryn Crawford is suitably cast as the 
daughter of the Spanish land owner and 
pleases with several songs in Spanish and Eng- 
lish. Her favor is eagerly sought by Ken 
Maynard and a Spanish captain. The latter 
loves her because of his machinations with the 
villain who plans the stealing of the land 
grants. 

J. P. McGowan as the villain is adequate. 

Maynard does his usual excellent riding with 
Tarzan, his educated horse, and displays his 
ability in riding stunts, sword play and fight- 
ing to the tune of many thrills, always coming 
out on top in his encounters with the many ob- 
stacles that stood in his way of winning the 
hand of the Spanish senorita. 

First acting honors go to Ken Maynard 
and his Spanish amigo, played by Frank Ya- 
conelli, the latter supplying the comedy relief 
with very fine touches. Gino Corrado as the 
Spanish captain, and Frank Beale as the girl's 
father were well cast. 

Harry J. Brown directed "Senor Ameri- 
cano" and he has done a fine job, combining 
his long picture directing experience with his 
former stage experience, but not permitting 
staginess to creep into his direction. He has 
made a Western talking picture that is en- 
hanced with the judicious use of song, music 
and dialog. 

The excellent dialog and titles go to the 
credit of Lesley Mason. 

Photography by Ted McCord. Adaptation 
by Bennett Cohen and story by Hjalmar Berg- 
man and Henry McCarty. "Senor Americano" 
is a Ken Maynard Production released by 
Universal Pictures in 6,400 feet. 

— L. A. U. 

* * * 
And the next one is this: 

, "KIBITZER" 

One doesn't have to know what a kibitzer 
is to enjoy this film. Credit goes to Edward 
Sloman and Harry Green for the splendid 
manner in which this successful stage comedy 
is brought to the screen. It is better than the 
stage version. 

Harry Green, a newcomer to pictures, steals 
the film. Neil Hamilton does well as the boy 
and has great ambitions but never puts them 
to use. Mary Brian is sweet. Edward Slo- 
man directed. The story is from the stage 
play by Jo Swerling and E. G. Robinson. The 
dialog is by Marion Dix and the scenario by 
Viola Brothers Shore and Sam Mintz. Al 
Gilks is credited with the photography. 

— T. J. H. 



(Continued from page 34) 

nies. It is amusing as ever. The audi- 
ence indicated that it wanted even more 
of it. 

Abbott Does Good Directing 

George Abbott, who directed, knows how 
to portray his theatre and gives his audi- 
ence some good backstage stuff. 

The same sort of thing (song or gag) has 
been done in "Sonny Boy," "Mother's Boy," 
"Melody Lane," and a host of other talking 
films. 

On the whole, though, "Why Bring That 
Up?" is good. The amusing parts far tran- 
scend a few awkward moments at the end. 
Harry Green and Evelyn Brent, the hard" 
boiled lady, give excellent performances, 
recording is good, sets are nice, and there 
is no kick coming about the photography. 
— D. F. 

3§s a|c afe 

"Three Live Ghosts" 

tiTHREE LIVE GHOSTS," now playing 
-*- at the Rivoli, is one of the most de- 
lightfully human talking pictures we have 
seen in some months. The weaknesses of 
human nature are portrayed with an under- 
standing sympathy that brings many a 
chuckle from the audience and, what is get- 
ting to be rather rare nowadays, sends that 
audience home with an exceptionally pleas- 
ant "taste in its mouth." 

What is more, the actors are particularly 
suited to their roles. The lines are excel- 
lent and the photography is uniformly good, 
nor is there anything wrong with the re- 
cording. 

"'Three Live Ghosts" was presented as a 
stage play in New York nine years ago. 
Beryl Mercer and Charles McNaughton, 
who played Mrs. and Jimmy Gubbins in the 
original, star in the talking picture version. 
Claude Allister, the "Algy" of "Bulldog 
Drummond" gives a repetition of his amus- 
ing performance in the earlier picture. Joan 
Bennett and Robert Montgomery have the 
romantic leads. 

If you prefer chuckles to belly laughs, see 
this picture. — D. F. 



Audientone, Inc., Incorporates 

SEATTLE, WASH. — Audientone, Inc., has been 
incorporated here by Ervin F. Dailey, A. M. Prather. 
They will deal in sound reproducing equipment. 



Colvin Brown and Rork 
In New Producing Firm 

(Continued from page 33) 

"Maid to Order." Julian Eltinge will have 
the leading role. The story is by Doris Denbo. 
Elmer Clifton will direct. Production will 
start soon. 

Sally Blane in "Hell's Angels" 

Sally Blane, R K O contract player, will 
have the feminine role in "Hell's Angels" for 
Caddo. She has the role Greta Nissen played- 
in the silent version. Lena Malena has also 
been added. Ben Lyon and James Hall have 
the same roles. 

Immediately on finishing the air epic, Lyon, 
will move over to R K O, where he will have 
the lead opposite Bebe Daniels in a picture 
as yet untitled. Lyon was signed for Miss 
Daniels' current audien, "Dixiana," but post- 
poned it on account of the additional work 
on the Howard Hughes picture. 

Kaliz Signs for Tour 

Armand Kaliz has been signed for a six- 
teen weeks' RKO vaudeville tour. He opens 
at the Palace theatre in New York in "A 
Night in Cairo." Agnes Ayres and other, 
screen players are in the cast. Kaliz recently- 
finished important roles in "Gold Diggers' of 
Broadway" and "Children." Upon his return 
to Hollywood he plans to produce the act in 
a two reel picture. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



37 



THE SHORT FEATURE 




WEEK OF OCTOBER 13 
EDUCATIONAL — "Untitled," Mack Sennett Talking 
Comedy, two. 

PATHE— "Fairways and Foul," Golden Rooster com- 
edy, two; "Sound Fable," two-thirds; Pathe Audio 
Review No. 26; Pathe Disc News and Pathe Disc 
Review. 

UNIVERSAL — "Cold Turkey," Oswald comedy, one; 
"The Delicatessen Kid," Benny Rubin, one; "Love 
Birds," Rooney Family, two; "Man of Daring," 
Western Featurette, Carson, two. 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 20 

EDUCATIONAL — "Hunting the Hunter," Raymond 
McKee, Jack White talking comedy, two. 

PATHE — "Gentlemen of the Evening," George Le- 
Maire, two; "Topical Licks ? " one-third; Pathe 
Sound News, Pathe Audio Review, Pathe Disc News 
and Pathe Disc Review. 

UNIVERSAL— "Cracked Wedding Bells," Re-issue, 
Chuck Reisner, one; "Too Many Women," Sid Sav- 
ior, two; "A Sagebrush Vagabond," Featurette, two. 
"Ace of Scotland Yard," No. 4, Kent, two. 
WEEK OF OCTOBER 27 

EDUCATIONAI "The Talkies," Collins-Dent, Mer- 
maid, two. 

PATHE: — "The Smooth Guy," Checker comedy, two; 

"Pathe Audio Review," No. 28, one; Pathe disc 

Review, No. 221. 
UNIVERSAL — "Snow Use," Oswald, one; "Pilgrim's 

Papa's," Benny Rubin, one; "Marking Time," 

Rooney Family, two; "The Kid Comes Through," 

Featurette, Nelson, two. 

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 3 
PATHE — ''Pathe Review," No. 45, one; "In and 

Out," Buck & Bubbles, two; "Sound Sportlight," 

No. 12, one; "Sound Topics," No. 17, one-third; 

Pathe Audio Review, No. . 29, one; "Pathe Disc 

News," No. 123, one; "Pathe Disc Review," No. 

222, one. 

UNIVERSAL — "Be My Guest," Snappy comedy re- 
issue, one; "Dead or Alive," Ace of Scotland Yards, 
series No. 6, Kent, two; "No Boy Wanted," Sunny 
Jim, two; "The Flying Eagle," Featurette, Law- 
rence, re-issue, two. 

"Dangerous Females" and 
"Brown Gravy" Started at 
Paramount Christie Lot 

Production has started on two of the 
Paramount-Christie Talking Plays; Marie 
Dressier and Polly Moran in "Dangerous 
Females," and "Brown Gravy," by Octavus 
Roy Cohen, with an all-colored cast. 
"Dangerous Females," which is by the 
well known playwrights, Florence Ryerson 
and Colin Clements, is a sketch dealing 
with two spinster sisters, played by Marie 
Dressier and Polly Moran, the pair who 
scored such a tremendous hit in M G M's 
"Hollywood Revue." Frank Rice, who 
played the sheriff for Christie with Louise 
Fazenda in "Faro Nell or In Old Californy," 
has been signed for a role and William 
Watson is directing. 

Another picture launched is a novelty in 
the negro series, "Brown Gravy," based on 
an Octavus Roy Cohen story. This will 
feature a chorus of 30 famous Georgia Ju- 
bilee Singers, who have been engaged to 
sing a number of negro spirituals. Whereas 
the last Octavus Roy Cohen story, "The 
Lady Fare," was of the dancing and cabaret 
type, this new picture will present another 
popular variety of entertainment for which, 
the colored people are most noted. 

Production has just been completed on 
two other pictures; Buster West, with John 
West and Walter Long in "The Dancing 
Gob" and Ford Sterling, with Bert Roach 
and Will King in "The Fatal Forceps." 



Sennett Completes 12 of the 30 
Comedies on Educational Contract 

Mack Sennett has just completed 12 of the 30 comedies which he has con- 
tracted to make for Educational release and is now busy lining up material for 
the remaining 18. It was just one year ago that production got under way on 
"The Lion's Roar," which was EducationaFs first all talking comedy as well as 
Sennett's, and since then the short features have made unprecedented advances, 
and the comedy has won for itself a regular position on the programs of the 
leading theatres. 

Sennett will use in many of his coming Educational, he is searching for real ideas 
comedies the three players he has under con- around which to build lively comedy — an en- 
tract, Harry Gribbon, Andy Clyde and Thelm'a tirely different method from the one em- 
Hill, supplemented by performers from the ployed in the old silent days when gags were 
stage and screen, selected for their partial- often strung together "on the lot." 

lar suitability to the cast requirements. For 

that reason Sennett is not maintaining a stock 
company as he feels he is obtaining better re- 
sults by casting each role individually. 

In "A Hollywood Star," which has just been 
completed, for example, Marjorie Beebe, who, 
for many years, has been a featured come- 
dienne, was selected for a comedy role which 
was perfectly suited to her style. This com- 
edy, cofeaturing Harry Gribbon and Andy 
Clyde, is a satire both on the old time west- 
ern melodrama and on the talking picture. It 
depicts the agonies suffered by a talking pic- 
ture star, attending the premiere of his first 
talking picture. The picture is out of syn- 
chronization, with the result that he appears to 
be neighing, while his horse seems to be 
talking. 

"A Hollywood Star" and "The Golfers," 
which is a comedy on the pasture game, as 
well as many of his earlier comedies, indicate 
the trend toward definite modern ideas in 
comedies which Sennett is following. For 
the rest of the series he is producing for 



Sound Puts Kick Into 
Rice's Football Story 

Under the title of "Gridiron Glory" Grant- 
land Rice is producing a short picture for 
Pathe that will reproduce footballs thrills,, 
college songs and music, and a snappy talk 
by Rice himself on the fine points of the 
amateur sport which of all others draws" 
the most public attention. . ■ 

Which reminds us that in the silent films 
showing football games there always 
seemed to be something lacking. It was the 
rhythmic cheering of the college partisans,- 
the blare of the undergraduate bands, and 
the excited cries of the spectators, all of 
which combined to create an emotional at- 
mosphere which was lost in the films. Ricels 
Sportlight picture will supply the missing 
ingredients. 





Lupino Lane in "Fire Proof," an Educa- 
tional-Lupino Lane comedy now being 
released through the Educational ex- 
changes. 



KINOGRAMS NO. 5540.— Six nations compete at St. 
Louis in International balloon race — Mussolini re- 
views fledgling fascists — Salmon battle their way to 
headwaters — Holland's Queen rides in state to open 
Parliament — Army cadets defeat Boston University 
26 to 0. 

PATHE NEWS NO. 82.— New York University opens 
football season with victory over Vermont university 
—45,000 veterans hail Mussolini as comrade — Bike 
riders hit fast clip in 39-mile race from Elgin to 
Chicago — Nine balloons soar in Gordon Bennett 
race at St. Louis — German inventor makes car that 
can be assembled in 4 minutes. 

MGM INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL NO. 15.— 
Florida again hit by tropical storm — Big field of 
cyclists in mad whirl for title at New York — Rus- 
sian children mass in martial field drill — Largest 
flying boat built in United States visits Niagara on 
first hop — Miller Huggins borne to rest as thousands 
pay their last homage. 

HEARST METROTONE NEWS NO. 203.— American 
legion war veterans parade 25,000 strong at Louis- 
ville — Hunt season opens on Long Island — Metro- 
tone travels the Romany trail — University of Penn- 
sylvania is off with victory. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS NO. 18.— Hurricane hits Flor- 
ida, homes and stores torn apart — Eckener wel- 
comed home by German friends — British arrest 
Arabs — Lindy links continents — Coolidge's start on 
honeymoon. 

PATHE SOUND NEWS NO. 58.— Colleges open 1929 
football season — Mrs. Herbert Hoover opens girl 
scout drive— College girls get bike craze — Canada 
reaps big grain crop. 



38 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



FitzPatrick 



PEOPLE BORN IN SEPTEMBER: Horoscope, obtainable on 
disc and film. For release August 26. One reel. 

BARCELONA TO VALENCIA: Traveltall;, on disc only. 
For release August 26. One reel. 

LABOR DAY : Holiday short. Obtainable on film only. 
For release August 2G. 

PEOPLE BORN IN OCTOBER: On film and disc. For re- 
lease September 14. One reel. 

VALENCIA TO GRANADA: Traveltall;. On film and disc. 
For release September 21. One reel. 

COLUMBUS DAY: Holiday short. On disc only. One reel. 
For release September 21. 

PEOPLE BORN IN NOVEMBER: Horoscope. On film and 
disc. For release October 3. One reel. 

GRANADA TO TOLEDO: Traveltall;. On film and disc. 
For release October 15. One reel. 

ARMISTICE DAY: Holiday short. On disc only. For re- 
lease October 15. One reel. 

THANKSGIVING DAY: Holiday short. On disc only. For 
release October 15. One reel. 

PEOPLE BORN IN DECEMBER: Horoscope. On film and 
disc. For release October 28. One reel. 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW: Holiday short. Disc only. For 
release November 9. One reel. 

IN OLD MADRID: Traveltall;. Film and disc. For release 
November 15. One reel. 

PEOPLE BORN IN JANUARY: Horoscope. Film and disr 
For release Dec. 1. One reel. 

Metro Movietone Acts 

GEORGE LYONS (79). Numbers: a. "Beloved"; b. "Ah. 
Sweet Mystery of Life"; c. "Don't Be Like That": d. 
"St. Louis Blues"; e. ,r Rainbow "Round My Shoulder. 
64S feet. For release August 3. 1929. 

CECIL LEAN AND CLEO MAYFIELD (80). Number: "His 
Lucky Day." 1.735 feet. For release August 10. 1929. 

GEORGIE PRICE (81). Numbers: a. "The One That I 
Love Loves Me": b. "I'm Marching Home to You. ' 714 
feet. For release August 17. 1929. 

PHIL SPITALNY and His Pennsylvania Orchestra (82). 
Numbers: a. "Medley of Musical Comedy Hits"; b. "Fare- 
well Blues." 701 feet. For release August 24. 1929. 

VAN AND SCHENCK (83). Numbers: a. "That's How You 
Can Tell They're Irish": b. "Rainbow 'Round My Shoul- 
der": c. "Ramona": d. "The Dixie Troubadours. 838 
feet. For release August 31. 1929. 

GEORGE DEWEY WASHINGTON (84). Numbers: a. "Just 
Be a Builder of Dreams": b. "Down Among the Sugar 
Cane." 632 feet. For release September 7. 1929. 

TITTA RUFFO (85) in "Credo" from "Othello." 525 feet. 
For release September 14. 1929. 

METRO MOVIETONE REVUE— "Bits of Broadway" (86) 
For release September 21. 1929. 

MADAME MARIA KURENKO (87). Numbers: a. "The 
Jewel Song," from Faust, b. "II Bacio"; c "The Last 
Rose of Summer." 840 feet. For release September 23. 
1929 

KELLER SISTERS AND LYNCH (88). Numbers: a. "How 
D*Ta Do": b. "Ka Krazy for You": c. "If I Had You" 
727 feet. For release October 5. 1929. 

VVETTE RUG EL (89). Numbers: a. "Paradise Lost": b. 
"Marie"; c. "The Parting." 713 feet. For release Octo- 
ber 12. 1929. 

BILTMORE TRIO (90). Number: "Jail Birds." 860 feet. 
For release October 19. 1929. 

CLYDE DOERR (91). Saxophone act. Numbers: a. "Saxo- 
phone March"; b. "Sunny South": c. "Technicalities"; 
d. "Bye. Bye. Sweetheart." 795 feet. For release Octo- 
ber 26. 1929. 

TOM WARING (92). Numbers: a. "Glad Rag Doll": b. 
"Just a Garden": c. "I'm Marching Home to You." 565 
feet. For release November 2, 1929. 

TITTA RUFFO (93). Number: "L'Africaine." 620 feet. 
For release November 9. 1929. 

EARL AND BELL (94). Numbers: a. "La Spagnola"; b. 
"Kiss Me Again": c. "Blue Hawaii": d. "Just a Mel- 
ody." 700 feet. For release November 16. 1929. 

DUCI DE KEREKJARTO (95). Numbers: a. ' Serenade" : b. 
"Witches' Dance." 622 feet. For release November 23. 
1929 

IRVING AARONSON'S COMMANDERS (96). Numbers: a. 
"She's Nobody's Sweetheart Now": b. "The Sailor's Sweet- 
heart": c. "I'll Get By." 696 feet. For release Novem- 
ber 30. 1929. 

JIMMY HUSSEY (97). Number: "Uneasy Street." 841 feet. 

For release December 7, 1929. 
ROY EVANS (assisted by Al Belasco) (98). in comedy 

sketch. Exclusive Columbia artist. 795 feet. For release 

December 14, 1929. 
THE REVELLERS (99). Numbers: a. "I'm Looking Over 

a Four Leaf Clover": b. "Rose of Waikiki": o. "Breezing 

Along With the Breeze." 607 feet. For release December 

21 1929 

MADAME MARIA KURENKO (100). Numbers: a. "Shadow 
Song" from "Dinorah": b. "Song of India." 714 feet. 
For release December 28. 1929. 

WALTER C. KELLY (101). in "The Virginia Judge." 803 
feet. For release January 4. 1930. 

VAN AND SCHENCK (102). Numbers: a. "Everything's 
Going to Be AU Right": b. "Ain't Got Nothln' Now": 
o. "St. Louis Blues." 799 feet. For release January 11. 
1930. 

CLYDE DOERR (103). Saxophone act. Numbers: a. "Wed- 
ding of the Painted Doll": b. "If I Had You"; c. 
"Original Music." 572 feet. For release January 18. 1930. 

BILTMORE TRIO (104) In "College Romeos." 853 feet 
For release January 25. 1930. 

Pathe Sound Act Releases 

AT THE DENTIST'S (0501) George LeMaire and Louis 
Simon. Scene: Dentist's office. Louis Simon, suffering 
from a toothache goes to George LeMaire for treatment. 
For release March 24. 1929. 2 reels. 

DANCING AROUND: (0502) George LeMaire and Joe Phil- 
lips. Scenes: Exterior and cabaret. George LeMaire and 
Joe Phillips take girls out for big time. Ivan BrunneJJ's 
Montrealers play "My Album of Dreams" and Vivienne 
Johnson sings "Marie." For release April 21. 1929. 2 
reels. 

HER NEW CHAUFFEUR: (0511) Louis Simon. Veree Teas- 
dale, Averill Harris. Veree Teasdale thinks Louis Simon 
is her new chauffeur, while he thinks Veree is his bride- 
to-be. For release May 19. 1929. 2 reels. 

WHAT A DAY: (0512) Louis Simon. Kay Mallory. What 
a picnic he had when he started to take his family on a 
picnic. For release June 16. 1929. 2 reels. 

GO EASY, DOCTOR: (0503) George LeMaire. Louis Simon. 
George LeMaire as the bone-breaker — Louis Simon as the 
nut — and howl For release July 14, 1929. 

THE SALESMAN: (0531) Frank T. Davis. Helyn Eby-Rock. 
Frank T. Davis sells a car to Helyn Eby-Rock. For re- 
lease July 21. 1929. 2 reels. 

HARD BOILED HAMPTON: (0513) Harry Holman. Evalyn 
Knapp. Doris McMahon, Alice Bunn. Andy Jochim. Hol- 
man is a hard boiled lawyer with a fast line. For re- 
lease July 28. 1929. 2 reels. 



SOUND ACT 
RELEASES 

[Where exact date of release is not 
stated, the list of acts is compiled in 
order of release, the most recent release 
being listed first. Number of release fol- 
lows name of act.] 



BEACH BABIES: Charles Kemper, Evelyn Knapp. Naomi 
Casey. Charles Kemper tries to shine in the eyes of 
Evalyn Knapp while Naomi Casey makes him appear ridicu- 
lous. For release August 4. 1929. 2 reels. 

GARDEN OF EATIN': (0561) James Gleason. Lucille Web- 
ster Gleason. The story of Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie's beanery 
that tried to become ritzy — and what happened whenl 
Orchestra plays "Pouring Down Rain." For release Aug- 
ust 11, 1929. 2 reels. 

THE PLUMBERS ARE COMING: (0504) George LeMaire 
Louis Simon. LeMaire and Simon, two burglars, trying to 
act like plumbers. For release August 18. 1929. 2 reels. 

TURKEY FOR TWO: (0532) Frank T. Davis. William 
Frawley. Noel Francis. Two escaped convicts with a fond- 
ness for turkey eome to a Westchester inn at Thanks- 
giving. Jack LeMaire's Golden Rooster Orchestra features 
"I'll Say She's Pretty." For release August 25. 1929. 2 
reels. 

HAUNTED: (0552) Bob Millikin. Evalyn Knapp. Charles 
Kemper. Mystery comedy embodying all the thrills of 
"The Cat and the Canary," "The Gorilla," "The Bat," 
and others. For release September 1. 1929. 2 reels. 

SYNCOPATED TRIAL: (0571) Morgan Morly. Lew Sey- 
more. A musical mock trial. Eddie Elkins Orchestra and 
Ed. Prinz Dancers feature. For release September 8. 192s) 
2 reels. 

BLACK NARCISSUS: (0521) Buck & Bubbles. Wildcat is 
enmeshed in the wiles of a siren while trying to rescue 
his pal Demmy from matrimony with another dusky 
charmer. Southern songs featured. For release September 
15. 1929. 2 reels. 

FANCY THAT: (0541) William Frawley. Earle Dewey. What 
a party would look like if two hobos suddenly became 
millionaires. Frawley sings "Dearest One." For release 
September 22. 1929. 2 reels. 

END OF THE WORLD: (0553) Alexander Carr, Lorin Rakftj. 
Marcia Manning. A wealthy Hebrew, believing the world 
is about to end, gives his son thousands and his consent 
to the latter's marriage to an Irish maid. For release 
September 29. 1929. 2 reels. 

BIG TIME CHARLIE: (0514) Lew Hearn. Dick Lancaster, 
Evalyn Knapp. A hick comes to New York to make 
whoopee on New Year's Eve. Eddie Elkins Orchestra plays 
in night club sequence. For release October 6. 1929. 2 
reels. 

RKO All-Talking Shorts 

RCA Shorts 

THE BURGLAR (0801). Released Aug. 11. 1929. Two Reels. 
ST. LOUIS BLUES (0802). Released Sept. 8. 1929. Two 

TWO GUN GINSBURG (0803). Released Oct. 13. 1929. 
Two reels. 

Record Breakers 

THE CAPTAIN OF HIS ROLL (0601). Alberta Vaughn-AJ 
Cooke. Released Sept. 8. 1929. Two reels. 

AS YOU MIKE IT (0602). Alberta Vaughn-Al Cooke. Re- 
leased Sept. 22. 1929. Two reels. 

MEET THE QUINCE (0603). Alberta Vaughn-Al Cooke. Re- 
leased Oct. 6. 1929. Two reels. 

LOVE'S LABOR FOUND (0604). Alberta Vaughn-Al Cooke. 
Released Oct. 20, 1929. Two reels. 

Mickey McGuires 

MICKEY'S MIDNIGHT FOLLIES (0701). Mickey McGulre. 

Released Aug. 18. 1929. Two reels. 
MICKEY'S SURPRISE (0802). Mickey McGulre. Released 

S6pt. 15 1929 Two rc6ls 
MICKEY'S Mix-up (0703). Mickey McGulre. Released Oct. 

13. 1929. Two reels. 

RCA Novelties 

HEAOWORK (0901). Released Sept. 15. 1929. One reel. 
GODFREY LUDLOW AND N. B. C. ORCHESTRA (0902) 
Released Nov. 10. 1929. One reel. 

RCA Marc Connelly's 

THE TRAVELER (0907). Released Aug. 18. 1929. Two 

reels. 

THE BRIDEGROOM (0908). Released Oct. 13. 1929. Two 
reels. 



Universal 

Sound Version Only 



THE ROYAL PAIR (A 204), Special, with Rooney Family. 

Two reels. Released Sept. 30. 
INCOME TACT (A 102). Special, with Benny Rubin. One 

reel. Released Sept. 30. 

Sound and Silent 

ACE OF SCOTLAND YARD No. 2 (A 2202). Adventure pic- 
ture. "Cry in the Night," Craufurd Kent. Two reel*. 
Released Oct. 7. 

WHOSE WIFE (A 4643), Universal comedy. All-star cait. 
Tw» reels. 



Vitaphone Acts 



HER PRIVATE LIFE: Score (3459-3466). Synchronized 
score by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3459 to 
3466 inclusive. Reels 1 to 8. First National-Vitaphone 
talking production. 

HEARTS IN EXILE: Trailer (3364). Dolores Costelio 
Grant Withers, singing theme song "Like a Breath of 
Springtime." scenes of hardships suffered by prisoners In 
Siberia. Warner Bros, and Vitaphone talking picture. 

GOLD DIGGERS OF BROADWAY: Trailer (3070). Conway 
Tearle as master of ceremonies, with chorus of 100 Holly- 
wood beauties, plus songs of Winnie Lightner. dancing of 
Ann Pennington, crooning of Nick Lucas, comedy of Lilyan 
Tashman. Gertrude Short and Albert Gran. 100 per cent 
natural color. Warner Bros, and Vitaphone talking picture. 

IN THE HEADLINES: Trailer (3010). Edmund Breese. as 
the city editor in a newspaper office, talks things over with 



Grant Withers. Marian Nixon, Pauline Gardon and Frank 
Campeau. who appear as reporters. The beginning of a 
murder mystery is built up and audience left in suspense. 
Warner Bros, and Vitaphone talking picture. 
SKIN DEEP: Trailer (2999). John Davidson, as district 
attorney, introduces cast as inmates of a prison. Cast 
Includes Betty Compson. Alice Day and Davey Lee. To 
climax act. Monte Blue is shown in the bizarre make-up 
he uses in the picture. Warner Bros, and Vitaphone talk- 
ing picture. 

DAVE APOLLON AND HIS RUSSIAN STARS (875). Scene: 
Band set. Comedian-musician and recent Broadway star, 
producing revue for Vitaphone. His "Russian Stars" turn 
out to be Filipinos in Scotch kilties playing American 
jazz. Feminine lead. Isabelle Washington, crooning "Mean 
to Me." Numbers: a. "If I Had You"; b. "Louise"; 
c. "Mean to Me": d. "Boo Boo Blues" 

GRACE JOHNSTON AND THE INDIANA FIVE (863). 
Scene: Band set. Radio star and Brunswick artist, solos, 
while the Indiana Five blow hot and cold, chasing the 
blues with blues. Also quintet of jazzmaniacs who have 
just completed radio, vaudeville and dance palace appear- 
ances, playing the "Box Office Melody". Numbers: a. 
"Bashful Babv"; b. "Clarinet Marmalade": c. "Glad Rag 
Doll". 

HURST AND VOGT (8G7) in ''Before the Bar." Scene: 
Street. Comedians of variety stage. Frank Hurst and 
Eddie Vogt. 

JOHN T. MURRAY and VIVIEN OAKLAND (849) In 

"Satires." Living room. Fast moving satire on mystery 
plays. Laughing spooks and spooky laughter. Two comedy 
stars of screen, stage and vaudeville. Number: a. "Hi- 
celsior". 

MEL KLEE (826). Scene: Drawing room. Mel Klee. black- 
face "prince of wails," in offering of songs and stories 
Headlined vaudeville bills from coast to coast. Hauls off 
the laugh honors with a highly spiced monologue that 
winds up with a composite imitation of Al Jolson and Ted 
Lewis. Numbers: a. "Rum Turn": b. "Maybe Who Knows". 

MADAME FRANCES ALDA (805). Scene: Drawing room. 
Diva offers two popular selections, accompanied by Frank 
LaForge, concert artist, at the piano. Numbers: a. "The 
Last Rose of Summer": b. 'Birth of Morn". 

ALBERT SPALDING (800). Scene: Drawing room. A 
foremost American violinist, known for his concert work 
and phonograph recordings. Numbers: a. "Liebesleid" ; b. 
"Cavatina". 

THE ISLE OF LOST SHIPS: Trailer (3363). Virginia ValU 
Jason Robards and Noah Beery introduce "The Isle of 
Lost Ships." A First Nation.il-Vitaphone talking produc- 
tion. „ 

SO LONG LETTY: Trailer (3090). Charlotte Greenwood 
sings "My Strongest Weakness Is You.' and Grant With- 
e.s and Marlon Byron follow with some vo-do-deo-do har- 
mony. A Warner Brothers-Vitap.'ione talking picture. 

SAY IT WITH SONGS: Trailer (3068). Al Jolson gives a 
monologue. A Warner Brothers-Vitaphone talking picture. 

CARLENA DIAMOND (864). Scene: Drawing room. Car- 
lena Diamond sings, dances and plays the harp, and cli- 
maxes her act by doing all three at the same time. 
Numbers: a. "Tura Lura Lura": b. "Mighty Lak a Rose"; 
c. Doll Dance": d. "Nola": e. "Harp Dance." 

MILLER AND LYLES (862) in "They Know Their Gro- 
ceries." Scene: Grocery store. Numbers: a. "Shuffle 
Along"; b. "Rang Tang": c. "The Great Temptations" 
and "Running Wild." 

KRAFT AND LAMONT (847) In "Rarin to Go." Scent: 
Ranch. Jack Kraft attempts some rope throwing and Elsie 
Iamont dances. Numbers: a. "Cowboy": b. "When We 
Get Together In the Moonlight"; c. "I'm Not a 
Romeo." 

FRANCES SHELLEY and THE FOUR ETON BOYS (846). 
Scene: Drawing Room. Frances Shelley, known in musi- 
cal comedy and on the radio as "The Girl With the Gui- 
tar." does her best vo-do-deo-doing with "If I Were You. 
I'd Fall in Love With Me." The Eton boys assist her in 
songs, a. "Finding the Long Way Home": b. "If I Were 
You. I'd Fall in Love With Me"; c. "Am I Blue." 

EDISON AND GREGORY (845). Scene: Roadway. Edison 
and Gregory are the college boys who coax tunes from 
automobile tires, saws, balloons and pumps. They've ap- 
peared with Sousa's Band. Paul Whiteman and Ted Lewis. 
Numbers: a. "Stars and Stripes"; b. "Together": c. "Let 
a Smile Be Your Umbrella": d. "Sweet Adeline." 

JACK WHITE and HIS CHATEAU MADRID CLUB EN- 
TERTAINERS (844). Scene: Band Set. Jack White with 
His Chateau Madrid Orchestra and Jeanne Fayal. Num- 
bers: a. "Am I Blue": b. "Kansas City Kitty"; c. "Then 
We Canoe-dle Ooodle": d. "Senorita." 

JAMES J. CORBETT & NEIL O'BRIEN (842). Scene: 
Drawing Room. James J. Corbett. professional of the 
prize ring. Has been starred in Ziegfeld's "Follies." Win- 
ter Garden Revues, musical comedy and vaudeville. 

GEORGIE PRICE (841) in "Don't Get Nervous." Scene: 
Vitaphone Studio. Georgie Price of "Artists and Models." 
"A Night in Paris." "The Song Writer." "A Night In 
Spain." and Victor records, in the role of a camera-shy 
actor In the screening of a Vitaphone picture In the mak- 
ing. Numbers: a. "Hello Sunshine, Hello"; b. "Swee»- 
heart's Holiday." 

THE BIG PARADERS (840). Scene: Full stage. Tiny and 
Jack Waltes. Elsie Thiel. Charlotte Conrad. Edna Howard 
and Ben Wise present a song and dance revue. Numbers: 
a. "Broken Hearted Blackbird": b. "Prelude In C Sharp 
Minor": c. "Doln' the Raccoon." 

JUST LIKE A MAN (839). Scene: Kitchen. Husband takes 
wife's place at home. 

THE INTERVIEW (838). Three Scenes. Hugh O'ConneU. 
as the veteran reporter, presents the second serio-comic 
sketch in the Russell Crouse newspaper series. 

HARRY ROSENTHAL and HIS BATH AND TENNIS CLUB 
ORCHESTRA (836). Scene: Band set. Harry Rosenthal, 
composer. Dare and Belmonte, tango dancers. Ziegfeld 
beauties. Cornel Smelser, accordionist, and the Bath and 
Tennis Club Orchestra present songs and dances. Numbers: 
a. "Was It Love"; b. "Ida": c. "Twelfth Street Rag": 
d "If I Could Get a Break With You." 

BILLY "SWEDE" HALL & CO. (835) in "HILDA." 
Scene: Hotel Lobby. Billy impersonates a Scandinavian 
chambermaid 

THE OPRY HOUSE (834). Scene: Theatre. Lew Hearn. 
Broadway comedian and featured player in "The Royal 
Box": Doris Walker, vaudeville and Vitaphone songstress; 
and The Mound City Blue Blowers, phonograph, radio 
and musical comedy stars. Numbers: a. "I Ain't Got 
Nobody": b. "Let Me Call You Sweetheart"; c. "My 
Gal Sal." 

CORA GREEN (825). Scene: Drawing Room. Cora Green 
singing a. "Brother-In-Law Dan"; b. "Travelln" All 
Alone": c. "I'll Tell the World." 

CHARLES C. PETERSON (815). Scene: Club Room. 
Charles Peterson's magic cue performs billiard miracles. 

ALBERT SPALDING (797). Scene: Drawing Room. Al- 
bert Spalding, violinist, playing a. "Ave Maria"; b. "Waltz 
In A." 

FRED ARDATH (786) in "These Dry Days." Scene: Park 
Fred Ardath. as a happy vagabond, roaming the highways. 

SESSUE HAYAKAWA (761-762) in "The Man Who 
Laughed Last." Five scenes. Sessue Hayakawa in a 
fast-moving drama of Oriental love and vengeance In "The 
Man Who Laughed Last", by Edgar Allan Wolf. 

SMILING IRISH EYES: Trailer (3410). Irish songs. 
Irish scenes and an Irish Fair. Colleen Moore's first 
talking appearance. First National Vitaphone talking pro- 
duction. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



19 



HER PRIVATE LIFE: Trailer (3365). A glimpse of "Her 
Private Life." Billie Dove. Walter l'idgeon, Montagu Lore, 
Thelma Todd and Holmes Herbert enacting several thrill- 
ing moments from the picture. Outdoor scenes, dramatis 
sequences, romance and a song number by Walter l'idgeon. 
First National Vitaphone talking production. 

DARK STREETS: Trailer (3349). Double exposure picture 
with Jack Mulhall in two roles, gangster and policeman 
seen and heard talking in the same scenes — in fact, two 
characters engage in dialog. First National Vitaphone 
talking production. 

THE ARGYLE CASE: Trailer (3059). Thomas Meighan 
speaks and sells the public. Warner Bros. Vitaphone talk- 
ing picture. 

HONKY TONK: Trailer (3049). Sophie Tucker croons a 
few bars from several of the "Honky Tonk" song hits. 
Sophie and entire cast shown in night club scene. Wamer 
Bros. Vitaphone talking picture. 

THE HOTTENTOT: Trailer (2269). Comedy sketch in it- 
self with Edward Everett Horton in extremely funny 
struggles with an electric horse and Patsy Buth Miller 
opposite him. Warner Bros. Vitaphone talking picture. 

SYMPATHY (803). Five scenes. Hen-pecked husband out 
on a spree despite orders of the "ball and chain." A 
night of wine, women and whoopee ends with hubby in 
a hospital cot as his wife and his sweetheart wreak their 
vengeance. Succession of hilarious situations. Cast headed 
by Hobart Cavanaugh, Eegina Wallace. Harry Shannon 
and Wynne Gibson, who played with Richard Dix in 
'•Nothing but the Truth." 

HARRY TATE (778-779) in "Selling a Car." Scene: Garage 
exterior. Harry Tate gives an exhibition of his comedy 
power in this two reeler, with an equally talented support- 
ing cast. 

HARRY TATE (754-755) in "Motoring." Scene: Country 
road. Harry Tate, assisted by his company of boisterious 
clowns in a burlesque on motoring. Two reel comedy 
sketch. 

WILLIE AND EUGENE HOWARD (750-751) in "My Peo- 
ple." Five scenes. Two reels of songs and dances worked 
into a powerful human interest story of an actor who 
has to choose between his Ghetto friends and Broadway 
stardom. Numbers: a. "The Volga Boatman"; b. "Blue 
Grass"; c. "My People." 

WILLIE AND EUGENE HOWARD (722-723) in "The Music 
Makers." Scene: Music salon. Former musical comedy 
stars in their first two reel comedy. Willie gives his 
famous imitations of Al Jolson. Eddie Cantor and Gallagher 
and Shean. Numbers: a. "Gallagher and Shean"; D 
"It's Kay Ray Raining"; c. "Baby Curls." 

CARELESS AGE: Trailer (3079). Holmes Herbert, as 
master of ceremonies, introduces Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., 
l,oretta Young and Carmel Myers. Miss Myers sings 
"Melody Divine" the theme song. 

HARD TO GET: Trailer (3078). An introductory play- 
let followed by a scene in a night club with vocal and 
orchestral renditions of the theme song. Dorothy Maokaill. 
Louise Fazenda, Charles Delaney, Jack Oakie and Edmund 
Burns head the cast of this all-star trailer. 

THE MAN AND THE MOMENT: Trailer (3069). Billie 
Dove and Rod LaRocque tell about this picture with the 
theme sons "Just a Lucky Moment" sung as a musical 
background. 

HARRY FOX AND BEE CURTIS (829). in "The Fox and 
the Bee." Scene: Drawing room. Of musical comedy 
stage. Harry Fox has an excellent foil for his lightning- 
like chatter in Beatrice Curtis, beautiful songstress. Dance 
interlude by Miss Curtis. Numbers: a. "Underneath the 
Wabash Moon." b. "Love Baby." 

HARRY FOX AND HIS SIX AMERICAN BEAUTIES (828). 
Scene: Drawing room. Star funster of musical comedv 
with his six ludicrous chamber maids in a piece of travesty 
on the modern chorus girl. Musical numbers and breezy 
monologue by Fox. Numbers: a. "Half Way to Heaven": 

b. "Belles of Hotels." 

NORMAN THOMAS QUINTETTE (827). in "Harlem Mania." 
Scene: Drawing room. Colored entertainers singing and 
dancing. Also acrobatic drummer. Numbers: a. "Sleep. 
Baby, Sleep": b. "Listen to the Mocking Bird": o. 
"Melody in F." 

SEGAR ELLIS AND HIS EMBASSY CLUB ORCHESTRA 
(823). Scene: Band set. Night club entertainer and 
record "name" is the star of this combination of vocal 
and instrumental numbers, supported by orchestra. Each 
player contributes a snappy solo bit in novel arrangement of 
"Am I Blue" the song hit from "On With the Show." 
Numbers: a. "How Can I Love Again"; b. "Am I Blue": 

c. "I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling." 

GUY ROBERTSON (813). In "High Water." Scene: Draw- 
ing room. Known as Broadway's "hit maker." Offering 
a rendition of a song poem of the floods that devastate 
the southland. Flood scenes have been double exposed 
over the artist's figure. 

THE GAY NINETIES or "The Unfaithful Husband" (811). 
Scene: Living room and cafe. Burlesque of the plays of 
the "gay nineties." Numbers: a. "McSorley's Twins": b. 
"We Never Speak as We Pass By"; c. "Up in a Balloon." 

THE FAMILIAR FACE with Hugh O'Connell (807). Scene: 
Newspaper office and speakeasy. Atmosphere of metro- 
politan newspaper office, with disgraced reporter w innin g 
fame and fortune through the accidental capture of a 
notorious bank robber. Story from the pen of Ruseel 
Crouse, national known columnist and players picked 
from casts of current Broadway shows. 

ALBERT SPALDING (798). Scene: Drawing room. Two 
performances from this master of the violin. Numbers: 

a. "Minuet in D" — Mozart, b. "Liebesfreud" — Kreisler. 
THE OUT-LAW IN-LAW (782). Comedy of mother-in-law. 

Hubby having a hectic time with "mother" staying at the 
house, until he hires a circus strong woman to act as an 
antidote. Speedy farce with a cast of featured player* 
and directed by Bryan Foy. 
BROADWAY BABIES: Score (3351-3359). Synchronized 
by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3351 to 3359 
inclusive. Reels 1 to 9. First National Vitaphone talk- 
ing productions. 

ON WITH THE SHOW: Score (3321-3332). Synchronized 
by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3321-3332 
inclusive. Reels 1 to 12. Warner Bros. Vitaphone talk- 
ing picture. 

CAREERS: Score (3311-3320). Synchronized by Vitaphone 
Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3311 to 3320 inclusive. Reela 
1 to 10. First National Vitaphone talking productions. 

GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE. THE: Score (3301-3308). 
Synchronized by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 
3301 to 3308 inclusive. Reels 1 to 8. First National Vita- 
phone talking productions. 

DRAG: Trailer (308). Scene from the musical show fea- 
tured in the picture and cast sings "My Song of the 
Nile" the theme song. Richard Barthelmess then appears 
to introduce the cast. First National Vitaphone talking 
production. 

DOOLEY AND SALES (824) in "Dooley's the Name." Scene: 
Drawing room. Winter Garden stars in gay presentation 
of mirth and melody, deliver rollicking repartee and laugh- 
able songs, plus a dance interlude. Numbers: a. "Oh, Mr. 
Dooley"; b. "Polly-Molly-0." 

FRANK X. S4LK (819) in "The Man About Town." Scene: 
Drawing room. Tramp comedian of burlesque and vaude- 
ville. Clever monologue with droll songs put over in 
excellent tenor voice. Numbers: a. "The Millionaire Song"; 

b. "Ohl Ohl OH! What a Night." 



ALL GIRL REVUE, THE (818). Scene: Band set. All 
singing and all dancing show. Cast includes Betty Lou 
Webb, a Paul Ash discovery; Lillian Price, the comedienne; 
Ellen Bunting with DePaco and Kazviki. acrobatic dano- 
ers; and Jean Rankin's Bluebell's orchestra. Numbers: 

a. "That's Her Now"; b. "I'm an Indian"; c. "Chrysan- 
themums"; d. "My Pet." 

KATE SMITH (817). Scene: Drawing room. Offers red 
hot songs with a red hot voice. Known as "The Songbird 
of the South." Numbers: a. "Carolina Moon": b. "Bless 
You, Sister." 

RAY AND DOT DEAN (816) in "He's a Devil." Scene: 
Exterior of cottage. Well known vaudeville team. Ray 
doing rube characterizations. 

OKLAHOMA BOB ALBRIGHT and His Rodeo Do Flappers. 
Scene: Drawing room. Bob Albright, baritone, assisted by 
Rodeo Do Flappers who sing and dance with him. Num- 
bers: a. "My Pony Boy"; b. "Chloe": c. "Lodel"; d. 
"Salter Dog." 

HARRY TATE (767) in "The Patent Office." Scene: Office. 

England's laughing fool. Harry Tate and his troupe of 

fun makers in comedy riot. 
BABY ROSE MARIE (809). Scene: Drawing room. Four 

year old child singing these numbers: a. "Heigh Ho": b. 

"Who Wouldn't Be Jealous of You"; c. "Don't Be Like 

That." 

THE BLUE RIDGERS with Cordelia Mayberry (795). 
Scene: Interior of mountain cabin. Four mountaineers 
an a "gal from th' feud county" sing, dance and play 
syncopation as it exists in the mountain country of the 
South. Numbers: a. "Trail of the Lonesome Pine"; b. 
"Oh Susanna"; c. "Medley." 

EL BRENDEL AND FLO BERT (789). in "Beau Night" 
Scene: Living room. Comedian of "Wings," "The 
Campus Flirt" and other stage and screen successes in 
short sketch. 

TWIN BEDS: Trailer (3020). Jack Mulhall. Patsy Ruth 
Miller and Zasu Pitts introduce picture in novel bedroom 
scene. A First National-Vitaphone talking production. 

SQUALL, THE: Score (3251-3261). Synchronized by Vita- 
phone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3251 to 3261 in- 
clusive. Reels 1 to 11. First National-Vitaphone talk- 
ing production. 

THE TIME. THE PLACE AND THE GIRL: Score (3208- 
3214). Synchronized by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. 
Numbers 3208 to 3214 inclusive. Reels 1 to 7. Warner 
Bros. -Vitaphone talking picture. 

ON WITH THE SHOW: Trailer (3060). Initial all-color, 
all-singing, all-talking, all-dancing trailer. Sam Hardy 
introducing stars of picture. Warner Bros. -Vitaphone talk- 
ing picture. 

BROADWAY BABIES: Trailer (3008). Alice White sing- 
ing a number from the picture. Also Broadway Babies 
strutting their stuff. First National-Vitaphone talking pro- 
duction. 

CAREERS: Trailer (2980). Entire cast discusses whether a 
woman is justified in ruining her reputation to aid her 
husband's career. Billie Dove speaks from the scroen. 
First National-Vitaphone talking production. 

GAMBLERS. THE: Trailer (2970). Entire oast talks in 
this advance agent. Warner Bros. -Vitaphone talking pic- 
ture. 

THE VARSITY THREE (804) in "Blue Streaks of 
Rhythm." Scene: Drawing room. Phonograph and vaude- 
ville stars. Babe, Bob and Jack Hauser singing and 
dancing. Numbers: a. "That's What I Call Sweet 
Music"; b. "I Used to Love Her in the Moonlight"; c. 
"Baltimore." 

ALBERT SPALDING (801). Scene: Drawing room. Con- 
cert hall violinist playing his own composition "Alabama" 
first time on screen, also "Valse In G Flat" by Chopin. 

BUD HARRIS AND FRANK RADCLIFFE (783) In "At 
the Party." Scene: Street. Negro melodies and comics. 
Numbers: a. "St. Louis Blues"; b. "She's Mine." 

GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE. THE (2989). Trailer. 
Loretta Young plays the girl in a motion picture box office 
and Carroll Nye Is her chatty boy friend. 

ROY SEDLEY AND HIS NIGHT CLUB REVUE (796). 
with Roy Sedley as master of ceremonies, assisted by 
Beth Miller, blues singer, and Billy Smith, eccentric 
dancer. Scene: Night club. Numbers: a. "Blue Grass": 

b. "I Ain't Takin' Orders from No One": c. "Sonny Boy." 
MR. AND MRS. JACK NORWORTH (787) in "Odds and 

Ends." Scene: Drawing room. Norworth of musical 
comedy fame and Dorothy Adelphi, his wife, in patter and 
songs of Northworth's own composition. Numbers: a. 
"Honey Boy"; b. "The Man and the Monkey"; c. "My 
Boy." 

IRENE FRANKLIN (777). "The American Comedienne.' 
Two oomedy characterizations. Scenes: Restaurant and 
nursery. Numbers: a. "The Waitress"; b. "The Flapper 
Mammy's Lullaby." 

NINETY-NINTH AMENDMENT,.. THE (776): Comedy. 
Three Broadway stars, Charles Kichman, Veree Teasdale 
and Hugh McConnell appear as supporters of an anti- 
gambling amendment. Scene: Living room. 

LEO REISMAN AND HOTEL BRUNSWICK ORCHESTRA 
(770) in "Rhythms." Scene: Band set. Shadowgraph 
silhouettes synchronized with music. Numbers: a. 
"Mooche"; b. "Waters of Perkiomen"; c. "If I Had You": 
d. "Hyo Mio"; e. "Milenberg Blues"; f. "Lonely"; g. 
"Some of These Days." 

MACK AND PURDY (2795) in "An Everyday Occurrence" 
Scene: Parkway. A smart guy gets himself entangled 
after a few words with a smart lady. 

CECILIA (CISSIE) LOFTUS (792) in "Famous Impersona- 
tions." Scene: Drawing room. Imitation of Sophie 
Tucker and othere. Numbers: a. "Gonna Get a Girl"; 
b. "Mama Goes Where Papa Goes": c. Yiddish version of 
"Mama Goes Where Papa Goes." 

FRED ARDATH (785) in "The Singing Bee." rustic comedy. 
Scene: Rustic home. Was rube comedian of the Follies. 
Numbers: a. "I Pagliacoi" : b. "Finiculi-Finicula" ; c. 
"Bring Back My Bonnie to Me." 

PALM BEACH FOUR, THE: (794). night club quartet. 
Scene: Garden. Stars of Helen Morgan Club. Club 
Deauville. and European clubs. Numbers: a. "Some 
Sweet Day"; b. "Poo-Poo-Paroop" : c. "Nobody's Fault 
But Your Own." 

JACK WHITE AND HIS MONTREALERS (791) in a 
number from his own act at the Frivolity Club. Scene: 
Night club. His own orchestra and two pretty accom- 
panists. Numbers: a. "I'm Karazy for You"; b. "Mean 
to Me": c. "Goodby Broadway: Hello Montreal": d. 
"Finiculi-Finicula"; e. "Laugh. Clown Laugh": f. "1 
Pagliaccl"; g. "Over There"; h. "Anvil Chorus": L "Rose 
of No Man's Land." 

BOBBY FOLSOM (788). In "Typical Types." Scene: Draw- 
ing room. Ziegfeld beauty and leading lady of variety 
stage, doing Imitations. Numbers: a. "Two Little Girls"; 
b. "Tess"; c. "I Lost My Stockings." 

TINY TOWN REVUE (74). Scene: Stage set. A pageant 
of the Lilliputians. Dancing and singing by midgets. 
Numbers: a. "Tiny Town Opening": b. "The Only One to 
Be"; c. Miss Annabelle Lee"; d. "I Scream. You Scream. 
We All Scream for Ice Cream." 



GEORGE BROADHURST AND COMPANY (780), in "Three 
o'clock In the Morning." Scene: Cabaret. Drunken sailor 
in night club. Numbers: a. "Anvil Chorus"; b. "Wobbly 
Walk." 

DESERT SONG OVERTURE (2930). Played by Vitaphone 
Symphony Orchestra. 

HOT STUFF: Score (3181-88). Synchronized by Vitaphone 
Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3181 to 3188, inclusive. 
Reels 1 to 8. A First National-Vitaphone talking pro- 
duction. 

HOUSE OF HORRORS: Score (3161-07). Synchronized by 
Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3161 to 81<1? 
inclusive. Reels 1 to 7. First National-Vitaphone talk- 
ing production. 

DESERT SONG, THE: Score (3141-54). Synchronized by 
Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra, including exit march. 
Numbers 3141 to 3154, inclusive. Reels 1 to 13. 3154 Is 
exit march. 

HOUSE OF HORRORS: Trailer (2990). Louise Fazenda and 
Chester Conklin at ouija table in spooky looking house. 
First National-Vitaphone talking production. 

DIVINE LADY: THE: Score (3031-40). Synchronized score 
played by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3031 
to 3040 inclusive. Reels 1 to 10. First National-Vita- 
phone production. 

SONNY BOY: Trailer (3000). Presents Davey Lee. juvenile 
star. 

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN: Trailer (2098). Grant Withers, 
male lead, discourses on this Maxwell Anderson picture. 
Flashbacks show some scenes. First National- Vitaphono 
production. 

HOT STUFF: Trailer (2977). Billy Bakewell. Juvenile ]<-ad. 
and Alice White and Louise Fazenda tell about this 
picture. First National-Vitaphone production. 

WHY BE GOOD: Trailer (2900). Jack Mulhall givea 
glimpses of this Colleen Moore picture. Flashback shown. 
First National-Vitaphone production. 

FROM HEADQUARTERS: Trailer (2867). Henry B. 
Walthall, in jungle hut and wearing U. S. Marine uniform, 
explains situation and introduces Monte Blue. star. 

ROBERT EMMETT KEANE (2849-50) in "Gossip." Scene: 
Hotel parlor. Star of legitimate stage is supported by 
John Miljan. Warner Brothers player, and Claire Whitney, 
screen and stage player. 

DAVE BERNIE AND ORCHESTRA (2796) in "Here Comes 
the Showboat." Scene: Showboat. Numbers: a. "Here 
Comes the Showboat"; b. "Oh. You Have No Idea"; c. 
"High, High, High Up on a Hilltop"; d. "Constantinople." 

MADONNA OF AVENUE A: Trailer (2718). Grant 
Withers, male lead, as master of ceremonies introduces 
Dolores Costello, Louise Dresser and other featured play- 
ers. Shows one of the sets in reproduction. 

RUDY VALLEE AND HIS CONNECTICUT YANKEES (771). 
Band set. Vallee's radio band. Numbers: a. "Down 
the Field"; b. "Deep Night"; c. "Cutside." 

CLARENCE TISDALE (766). Scene: Southern plantation. 
Tisdale, negro singer, presents these numbers: a. "The 
Sweetness of Your Song"; b. "Bye and Bye"; c. "Oh. 
Didn't It Rain." 

HARRY HORLICK AND GYPSIES (763). Scene: Baud 
set. Horlick and his A. & P. Gypsies, are on a national 
radio hook-up weekly. Numbers: a. "Two Guitars"; 
b. "Black Eyes"; c. "Chiquita"; d. "March of the 
Toys"; e. "Gypsy Love Song." 

RAYMOND HITCHCOCK (760) in "An Evening at Home 
with Hitchy." Scene: Living room. Number: a. "Here 
Comes the Groom." 

BERNIE CUMMINS AND ORCHESTRA (752). Scene: 
Band set. Cummins and his Biltmore orchestra present 
modern songs. Numbers: a. "Come On Baby"; b. "If 
I Had You"; c. "Here Comes the Ball and Chain." 

MAX SCHMELING (745). Scene: Gymnasium. Heavyweight 
champion of Germany skips rope, shadow boxes and en- 
gages in one-round bout. 

PAUL TREMAINE A/ID ARISTOCRATS (742). Scene: 
Band set. Jazz band of variety stage. Numbers: a. 
"I've Been Working on the Railroad": b. "On the Itoad 
to Mandalay": c. "Chinese Dream"; d. "Fanfare"; » 
"Here Comes the Showboat"; f. "Medley." 

FANNIE WARD (721). Scene: Living room. Sixty-two 
year old flapper in two numbers: a. "Flapper Fannie"; b. 
"Radio Widow." 

THREE BROX SISTERS, THE (2888) in "Headin' South." 
Scene: Pullman drawing room. Harmonizing of Southern 
songs. Numbers: a. "Doin' the Raccoon"; b. "Imagina- 
tion": c. "Way Down South." 

ELEANOR PAINTER (746). Scene: Salon. Lyric soprano 
of musical comedy and opera. Presents these numbers: 

a. "Love Is Best of All"; b. "Habanera"; c. "How About 
Me." 

WHITING AND BURT (741). in "Song Sayings. " Scene: 
Drawing room. Vaudeville and Ziegfeld's Follies players. 
Assited at the piano by Edmund J. Weber, composer, 
who arranged act. Numbers: a. "What Did You Say'"; 

b. "The Frog Song"; c. "That's My Idea of Heaven." 
HOPE HAMPTON (740) in the Fourth Act of Massenet's 

Opera. "Manon." Scene: Salon. Former motion picture 
star is assisted by four principals, chorus and the Vita- 
phone Symphony Orchestra. 

MISS MARCELLE (716). Scene: Drawing room set. Vaude- 
ville comedienne, in brown-face makeup, renders syncopated 
songs in southern dialect. Numbers: a. "Shine"; b. "If 
I Never See You Again"; c. "My Troubles Are Over." 

LOVE AND THE DEVIL: Score (3111-17). Synchronized 
by Vitaphone Symphonv Orchestra. Numbers 3111 to 3117 
inclusive. Reels 1 to 7. First National-Vitaphone produc- 
tion. 

DAVE BERNE (2797). Scene: Drawing room set. Directs 
own orchestra. Numbers: a. "Happy-Go-Lucky Lane": b. 
"Down Where the Sun Goes Down"; c. "St. Louis Blues", 
d. "San." 

HOLLI NGS WORTH AND CRAWFORD (2753). in "Bed- 
time." Scene: The family boudoir. Short sketch of 
sleepy husband and nagging, jealous wife. 

TAL HENRY (732). Scene: Band set. With His North 
Carolinians Orchestra. Has played at college proms and 
over the radio. Renders these numbers: a. "Come On 
Baby"; b. "Shame On You"; c. "Milenberg Joys." 

M AL HALLETT (730). Scene: Band set. Furnishes jaza 
program with his "Way Down East Orchestra." Num- 
bers: a. "Lots of Mama"; b. "Mother Machree"; c. "War 
Medley." 

GREEN'S FAYDETTS (710). Scene: Band set. "Green's 
Twentieth Century Faydetts" from vaudeville. Numbers: 

a. "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"; b. "Sweet 
Mystery of Life": c. "Changes." 

CHILDREN OF THE RITZ: Score (3071-77). Synchronized 
score by Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. Numbers 3071 
to 3077. inclusive. Reels 1 to 7. First National-Vitaphone 
production. 

GUIDDO DEIRO (2968). Scene: Living room. Piano- 
accordionist in these numbers: a. "Romeo aud Juliet"; 

b. "Drigo's Serenade." 

DIVINE LADY, THE: Trailer (2967). Milton Sills makes 
introductory remarks and shots from the picture are shown. 
Corinne Griffith, the star, also speaks. First National- 
Vitaphone production. 



40 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



SERVICE TALKS 



Incorporated in this department of the Herald-World, which is a department containing news, in- 
formation and gossip on current productions, is the Moving Picture World department, "Through 

the Box Office Window." 



I 



CARD OF THANKS 



THANK you, Paramount, Warner Brothers 
and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, for a perfect pic- 
ture week made up of perfectly balanced pic- 
tures that I recommend in this preamble as a 
perfect four-day diet for anyone and everyone 
who may yet doubt that the talking pictures are 
better than the silent ones ever were. And now, 
having notified my eager readers in advance 
that this page contains nothing but good news 
and therefore you needn't read it, to get about 
the morning's work. 



T. 



"THE LADY LIES' 



HIS picture, ladies and gentlemen, is far 
too good for most of your theatres. It was, in 
fact, so much too good for Chicago theatres 
that the censors snipped and clipped it down 
as nearly to their mental level as they were 
capable of doing. Fortunately, so great was 
the original stature of the production, they did 
not succeed; and so even the Chicago print is 
excellent entertainment. (Why, Messrs. Bala- 
ban & Katz, don"t you hire these censor folk 
for spare time work and over-pay them into 
activity?) 

"The Lady Lies" is modern, sophisticated 
comedy-drama. It sets before you the problem 
of an eminently just and human father of two 
motherless modern children and outlines the 
conflict between his personal and paternal af- 
fections. It depicts, also, the contrast between 
old-fashioned and modern moral concepts. It 
relates a story that is being enacted daily in 
every community, large or small, but is ad- 
mitted to only in the large ones. It draws no 
conclusion, but it gives you plenty of basis to 
form your own. It is excellent modern fiction 
excellently narrated. 

Mr. Walter Huston is the father, and even 
the old ladies in Grundy 'Center who bemoan 
his fictional philandering must applaud his 
superb acting. And that of Miss Claudet Col- 
bert, the lady of the title, whom I herewith 
pronounce the screen's most important acquisi- 
tion of this busy year. Also that of Mr. Charles 
Ruggles, whose sophisticated drunk is perfect, 
and that of Betty Gorde, his matchless compan- 
ion in gin. And not even the chairwoman of 
the local W. C. T. U. chapter can fail to cheer 
for Tom Brown and Patricia Deering as the 
children in the case. These six people do the 
finest acting I've witnessed in this perfect week 
of cinema. If you miss" it, don't blame me. 

"The Lady Lies" is, perhaps I should state, 
a stage play produced with practically no 



By T. O. Service 

change. There are hells and damns in it, punc- 
tuating plain speaking and accenting plain 
facts. I am not, as you know, a disciple of 
profanity for its own sake, but I am a disciple 
of realism, and these are the words that the 
characters in this picture would use at the 
times the actors use them. I mention them 
only because I know that some of you boys 
and girls are not fans for realism. 



I 



"THE UNHOLY NIGHT" 



TAKE back all I said about murder mys- 
teries, for the moment, and pronounce this one 
not only worth while but worth anything else 
you have loose around the showshop. It is a 
more complex mystery than most of them, it is 
a more colorful plot than any that I recall, 
and it is only a little less logical than several 
of those you have stamped with your thrilling 
approval. It is the first of these things that I 
have positively enjoyed. 

It's a story about surviving officers of a Brit- 
ish war regiment who have been singled out 
for death under mysterious circumstances. Four 
have been killed; fourteen remain alive; one 
of them has invited the others to his home so 
that they may find defense in numbers. 

Roland Young (you remember him in "Her 
Private Life") has in this the central role, and 
I suppose all the Hollywood employers are 
fighting for his services from now on. He's 
great. Ernest Torrence, Dorothy Sebastian, 
George Cooper, Polly Moran and Claude Flem- 
ing are among some twenty others who con- 
tribute notably to the success of the entertain- 
ment. As to the excellence of it, I have uttered 
the greatest praise I know when I say it is the 
best mystery picture I have ever seen. 

"SAY IT WITH SONGS" 

_^^LL right, youse guys, dis is a lousey story. 
And de guy wot scribbled it on the cuff of his 
megaphone was fit to be tied before he learned 
how to push a pencil. And de t'ings dat hap- 
pen in "Say It With Songs" couldn't happen 
anywhere else since "Way Down East" and "On 
the Bridge at Midnight" became a couple of 
dumb gags in vaudeville. But who cares 
whether Al Jolson and Davey Lee have a story, 
anyway? Dey ain't actors; dey's people — and 
Baby, dis is one of dose kinda pictures. 

To which verbal depths I have descended 
merely so that I could be understood by the 



sort of person who criticizes an Al Jolson pic- 
ture on any and all save tonal grounds. Be- 
cause I've heard "Say It With Songs" panned 
a plenty. And I've never heard Jolson, or any- 
body else, say it was anything it isn't. And 
what it is is a bang-up song show with Al 
killin' 'em just as he used to at the Winter 
Garden, just as he did in "The Singing Fool," 
and just as he will so long as the old pipes 
last, and they seem to be doing right well up 
to date. 

Call it art if art you must have, call it hokum 
if you prefer to be like that, but you've got to 
call it singing, too, and personality. Al stands 
up and sings a lot of blah lyrics, and a lot of 
others too, and I sit with three or four thou- 
sand other fairly experienced adults in a big 
modern theatre and weep about nothing in the 
world except Al's singing and Davey Lee's 
peculiarly labial enunciation of words every kid 
that ever lived has used in the same way. The 
story doesn't mean anything, it hasn't even a 
moral, but I claim a thing's got to be good to 
make me cry like a kid and that makes "Say 
It With Songs" a classic. Be as honest about it 
as I am and you'll agree all the way. 



"IN THE HEADLINES" 



I 



'VE told you before about Grant Withers, 
but in "In the Headlines" he's so much better 
that it's news again; the guy is perfect. You've 
been told, too, about Edmund Breese being one 
of the few remaining big shots in the acting 
business, but until you've seen him as the 
City Editor in this you haven't seen him at all. 
And I should have told you. when writing of 
"Say It With Songs," that Marion Nixon was 
great in it, but if I had done so I would only 
have to add that she is greater in this. All are 
approximately perfect and so is the picture. 

"In the Headlines" is a newspaper story and 
no smart newspaper reviewer is going to rise 
up this time and tell you it isn't according to 
Hoyle. It is, plus your favorite daily sheet. 
Withers is the reporter, Breese his boss, Miss 
Nixon the girl friend. They solve a double 
murder, but that's pretty much beside the 
point. They have a great time doing it, work- 
ing out their private destinies incidentally, and 
if you don't have a great time watching them 
do it I guess you'd better go tell it to the 
Marines, because I can't do anything for you. 
# * # 

Thus, boys and girls, a perfect picture week. 
Hoping you've had the same. I am, etc. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



41 



w 



THE THEATRE 



Enlist Civic Clubs and Tell Truth in Ads 
Say HOE Club Charter Members 



(Continued from page 19) 
often dependent upon the amount and 
method of exploitation employed. 

Sound Accentuates Need 

Introduction of sound on such a wide 
scale as the past year has witnessed, has 
accentuated the need of sound exploitation, 
particularly for the theatre which has not 
wired as yet. To compete with the sound 
theatre, the management of such a house 
must indeed be on its toes. 

In view of these factors, then, The HOE 
Club is organized to give exhibitors service 
to the fullest degree that its membership 
will offer. 

It's Open to Everybody 

This service is for all exhibitors, small 
or large. Just as the House Organ Ex- 
chane numbers in its membership many 
chain managers as well as independent thea- 
tre owners, so The HOE Club is open to 
all, with benefits for all. 

And just as "What the Picture Did for 
Me" is record of what pictures have done 
at the box office, so The HOE Club re- 
ports a record of methods used to put over 
pictures. 

Membership Cards 

Each member of The HOE Club who 
sends in a campaign or campaign idea, and 
his photo, will receive a membership card 
bearing his portrait. 

When the suggestion of launching such 
a club was presented to a few exhibitors, 
one of the first to reply was Carl Dunlap, 
of the Gem theatre at Kinmundy, 111. And 
in the letter was enclosed his first report 
to "What the Picture Did for Me." 

Ideas or Campaigns Wanted 

Dunlap writes that campaigns have not 
been put on in his town because it has 
only 600 inhabitants. We hasten to com- 
ment that the word "campaign" does not 
necessarily involve an elaborate and costly 
project to put over a picture. An exploita- 
tion idea will serve. We are confident that 
Dunlap will find in the suggestions from 
other exhibitors in this issue alone will 
more than repay him for his investment in 
The HOE Club (the investment consists 
solely of filling out the application blank 
and agreeing to send in suggestions for put- 
ing over pictures). 

Another of the charter members is W. J. 
Shoup of the DeLuxe theatre at Spearville, 
Kan. Shoup offers as a suggestion that 
tying up with community organizations 
keeps the public coming to the theatre. 
Read his letter farther on. 

Truth in Advertising 

Then there is Julius W. Schmidt of the 
Grand theatre at Breese, 111. Schmidt is 
an avowed exponent of truth in advertising. 
Schmidt explains this way: 

"If I don't know the picture is good, say 
nothing, but if I know it's good I tell them 




Meet Carl Dunlap, folks. He is owner of the Gem theatre at Kinmundy, III., and one of 
the charter members of The HOE Club, who, through the HERALD-WORLD, are cooperat- 
ing in offering to one another their exploitation ideas in return for the benefits each will 
receive from the contributions of all the others. Dunlap, comparatively a newcomer in 
exhibition circles, says he'll greatly appreciate information regarding the methods, both old 
and new, of putting over a picture. So come in with your ideas, members, and the more 

members the better. 



through local and county newspapers, pro- 
grams and handbills. And don't forget to 
remind the public once in a while that 'we 
never give you anything for nothing, but 
we do give you all the entertainment possi- 
ble for the admission asked.' " 
Likes the Club Idea 

One exhibitor writes: "Town too small 
to put on campaign and am alone, and so 
must pass up this. But I like the idea." 

To this exhibitor we repeat that no mat- 
ter how small the town, exploitation will 
bring better attendance, and exploitation 
does not have to expensive to be effective. 
We predict that as the comment rolls in 
from new members, this exhibitor will be 
more than glad to add his suggestions to 
the many offered. 

Remember that all that is required for 
membership is to agree to offer suggestions 
on exploitation that you believe will help 
sell pictures to the public. For that bit, 
your returns will be a hundredfold. 
Praises Picture Reports 

Dunlap writes as follows: 

"I am sending in my first report on 
'What the Picture Did for Me,' today. 

"In December, 1928, I bought the Gem 
theatre here in Kinmundy and as it was 
my first business venture I knew I would 



need some kind of a guide I could depend 
on, so I subscribed for the Herald-Worlb. 

"I see where this act saved me money. 
When a film salesman comes along and 
says, 'This picture will raise your bank 
account 200 points,' or 'This one will pack 
your house any day in the week,' now do 
I buy? I go back several issues and if the 
majority of exhibitors rate it high I buy it. 
If they don't, I figure that he is selling 
just another picture, and I leave it alone. 
Enrolls in HOE Club 

"I am asking membership in The HOE 
Club, although I have never put on a cam- 
paign. In fact, there never has been any 
put on here, on account of the town being 
so small, only about 600 people. 

"But I would like to hear of the other 
exhibitors in the small towns and the cam- 
paigns they put over. I am a young fel- 
low, 21 years old, and have a lot to learn 
in this game, and the ways both old and 
new used in putting over a picture are 
greatly appreciated." 

Shoup first explains that "the camera 
blew up when they last tried to take my 
picture. Am afraid to send an old one — 
might break your press. I may try another 
camera, as I would certainly like to see 
(Continued on next page) 



42 EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD October 12, 1929 




get one of the refrigerators or have one 
, in a household through another member 
of the family, or bestowed on a friend or 
relative, held a vigorous appeal, judging 
from the capacity audiences at every show 
in the Strand. 



Here is what the Greater Palace theatre, Dallas, did to advertise the cool air inside the 
theatre. The entire background of the display is light blue with a cloud effect. Large 
matinee business) was had by this theatre all summer and the refreshing display on the 
outside of the house no doubt helped in bringing in many patrons. 

They Make Ice Cream in Lobby 
As Refrigerator Tieup Feature 

A novel exploitation idea was used recently, in a tieup with an electric re- 
frigerator manufacturer, by the Strand theatre in Boston, a Publix owned house. 
The tieup was educational in the fact that the lobby was devoted to displays of 
the manufacturer where the people could actually see and have explained the 
working of ice machinery for home use. Nearly every one has seen electric ice 
boxes but yet so few really know or understand the principles involved. 

Through the tieup with the refrigerator 
firm, the lobby was used in part for a 
show which was handled by employes of the 
manufacturer. The big feature of this show 
was the making of ice cream by the electric 
refrigeration equipment. This was made 
right in the lobby. Other frozen desserts 
in which ice cream, frozen pudding, sher- 
bet, played parts, were also made in the 
theatre entrance. 

The show lasted one week, and each after- 
noon and night during that period, samples 
of the ice cream were given away to patrons 
as they filed into the lobby from the audi- 
torium of the theatre. Thus the theatre 
had something more tangible as a business 
stimulant than the show itself, which was 
very interesting, the processes of refrigera- 
tion with the electrically operated equip- 
ment being clearly explained by employes 
of the company and fully illustrated by the 
equipment. 

A third feature as a draw for the theatre 
in the tieup was a popularity competition. 
Patrons of the theatre were eligible for this 
contest, as competitors and in the voting, 
the number of votes hinging on the number 
of tickets bought, during the period. The 
prize offered for the winner of the popu- . warn 

larity contest was a new electric refrig- Examiner Selects KFWB 

erator such as shown and demonstrated in LOS ANGELES.— The Los Angeles Examiner has 
tV.P 1nKTw The- qwqi-H urac fr^m the- selected Warner Brothers radio station as its official 

the lODDy the award was made trom the broadcasting headquarters, according to J. L. Warner. 
Stage Of the theatre. Ihe opportunity to vice president of Warner Brothers. 



Two Color Newspaper 
Ad Proves Profitable 

A two colored newspaper ad proved 
profitable for the Fox Broadway theatre in 
Portland when that theatre played M G M's 
"Thunder" with Lon Chaney. 

The novel ad was three columns wide 
by seven inches deep and part of the copy 
was done in red ink. At the top of the ad 
the theatre's name and street location was 
in red ink and in the center of the ad was 
"Lon Chaney-Thunder" in red. The artist 
had made the word "Thunder" appear as 
if it was part of a railroad train. The dis- 
play was outstanding on the page and the 
considerable increase in attendance was 
credited to it. 



Enlist Civic Clubs, 
Tell Truth in Ads, 
Club Members Say 

(Continued from preceding page) 
your efforts to make an attractive card with 
my portrait on it." 

Shoup Gets Societies' Aid 

Getting into the value of community tie- 
ups, Shoup writes: 

"We find that we can put over a picture 
well if we get the Daughters of Isabella 
behind it, and give them a percentage of 
the net. It is a rather expensive adver- 
tisement, but we believe it helps to keep 
them going to the show. Am working this 
pretty hard now and can tell better after 
two or three months. 

"I am going after the Methodist Ladies' 
Aid and will see if their efforts will bring 
results as the Catholic Ladies have. 
Ladies Gather Ads 

"The Catholic Ladies gather ads from the 
advertising merchants of town, and in so 
doing they help greatly with the expenses 
of the picture advertising. 

"We have a great many stunts that we 
try once in a while and will write about 
them sometime." 

We'll be glad to hear about the other 
ideas, Shoup. 

Schmidt Tells 'Em 

Truth in advertising is the theme of 
Julius W. Schmidt in his letter. He says: 

"Here are the details of my campaign 
on selling entertainment to the public. It 
is simple, but I stay at it, and never vary 
from the following: 

"Never lie in my advertising. If I don't 
know it's good I say nothing, but if I know 
it's good I tell them through local and 
county newspapers, programs and handbills. 
Don't forget to remind the public every 
once in a while: 'We never give you any- 
thing for nothing, but we do give you all 
the entertainment possible for the admis- 
sion asked.' 

Thanks Brother Exhibitors 

"We have been sroing since 1914 in this 
little coal camp. Had competition in the 
past who had a grocery store night, vaude- 
ville and different prices of admission. But 
they have gone now — say four or five years 
ago — and we are still at our regular admis- 
sion, 10 and 20 always, specials only, 15 
and 25. 

"We show pictures only, with a lad at 
the piano who knows music. Am not inter- 
ested in sound in any form, and we still 
have a nice little deposit in the bank. And 
for this last item I want to thank my 
brother exhibitors for their good advice, 
for I read everything that comes from them 
and then I try and do profit from it." 



Illusion Mirrors Used 
In "Illusion" Ballyhoo 

Sometimes the least elaborate exploitation 
stunt is the most effective and the cheapest. 
Manager Leon Levy of the Granada, San 
Francisco, found this the case when "Illu- 
sion" was presented at this house. He 
borrowed a couple of concave and convex 
mirrors, the kind that make you look long 
and skinny, or short and fat, depending on 
which one you are looking in, and installed 
one on each side of the lobby entrance. 
Almost everyone who came along were led 
to stop a moment and many of them 
stepped right up to the box office. 



HIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 43 




A ballyhoo to exploit ''The Hottentot," a Warner Brothers picture, at the Capitol theatre 
in Passaic, New Jersey. A small booth, similar in appearance to a bookmaker's stand at 
a racetrack, was built on the sidewalk in front of the theatre. From the stand a man 
exhorted the passersby to lay their bets on "The Hottentot," announcing as he did so, the 
time that the next show would start. During the engagement of the picture the ushers were 

dressed as jockeys. 



October 12, 1929 EX 



ROYAL TOPICS 

PublaW VctUy by <ht Ro, J Huh Im ML AlwU 


VOL Lk 11 


WEEK BEGINNING SEPTEMBER 2\D 










WHO IS WHO III BQVIEUND 


R. D. Sheffield 






<»...-.„, 




&t b=l «*™ti wta™. I ^ tl " IO 








SAT DIAL 

Rnt 137 tmuiftil 




TBOtlCBTWL I— 


Sun « Hdu>cI7B 

Amboknte Service 






Uewefljfii's Bakery 






Jensen's Garage 












ft* b»« i Mr tqvep. 












ptd ihjf.- wuh iKc Li 






H CIO UEWELLTH 












G. W. WEST & SON 


W.J. Hopkins 


Dance 










C-O-A-L 


Labor Day 
























BO.VITS r.HlHEimU 

























Royal Topics, a weekly house organ pub- 
lished by the Royal theatre, Innisfail, Al- 
berta, Canada, is a four page folder 12x9 
inches in size and this issue carried 30 
advertisements, other than the theatre's 
announcements. Its make up is very good 
and H. O. E. members should put the 
Royal on their lists. Ben]. Shnitka is the 
manager. 

"S. P. S. Night" Is 
Featured During Run 
Of Lon Chaney Story 

In connection with the showing of Lon 
Chaney in "Thunder," manager Floyd Max- 
well of the Fox Broadway held three spe- 
cial nights, which he named "S. P. S. Night," 
and had that company's 20-piece band in 
concert in front of the theatre; on the sec- 
ond evening they were seen on the stage 
introduced by Sam Jack Kaufman as master 
of ceremonies. The second night was 
desiginated Southern Pacific night, and the 
third night the Union Pacific band of 35 
pieces, put on their special concert includ- 
ing a feature number, "Portland Limited," 
a march specially written for them. 

On each special evening the employes' 
organizations were in charge, and house 
records were again broken. Picture was 
further enhanced with Fanchon & Marco's 
"Watermelon Blues," under the personal 
supervision of James Rice. 



Bowles Fetes Winners 
Of Essay Contest to 
Tour of New Broadway 

So much interest was taken recently in an 
essay contest on the constitution of the United 
States, sponsored by the San Francisco Chron- 
icle, that A. M. Bowles, manager of the 
Northern California division of Fox West 
Coast Theatres, Inc., extended to the win- 
ners an invitation to visit the new Fox theatre. 

This invitation was accepted and the the- 
atre party made a feature of the program, 
which included the presentation of the prizes 
at the City Hall, with both events coming in 
for much publicity. There were 44 winners 
in all and the theatre party included not only 
the regular program, but a full inspection of 
the house, from back stage to the projection 
room and the mysteries above the great domed 
ceiling. 



Munns Calendar Puts Pep 

Into Box Office at Palace 

Otho E. Munn, manager of the Palace at 
Brady, Texas, issues the first of each 
month, a calendar listing the coming at- 
tractions at the Palace. This calendar is 
a two page folder which, when opens, forms 
a sheet similar to an ordinary calendar. 
Its makeup is also similar to a calendar and 
for each day of the month is listed the 
attractions at the Palace. 

In a letter to "The Theatre" Munn stated 
that the reports in the Exhibitors Herald- 
World tells him how and when to book and 
his monthly calendar put pep into the box- 
office receipts. Brady, Texas, is a town of 
about 4,000 inhabitants and perhaps Munn 
will send "The Theatre" a snapshot of him- 
self and theatre, anyway we'll all look for- 
ward to hearing more from him and his 
ideas. 

Mystery Girl on Sign 
Boosts Warner Picture 

Al Haynie, manager of the Terrace theatre, 
Danville, 111., staged a novel stunt to put over 
Warner's "On With the Show." He erected 
a platform on top of the theatre's electric sign, 
where during the run of the picture, a mys- 
terious girl lived for eight days. She was 
dressed in a bathing suit and during the day 
dropped dodgers and handbills to the people 
on the street. 

She also used a mirror to reflect the sun 
in people's eyes and attracting their attention 
to the marquee display on the picture. On 
several street corners, in view of the theatre, 
telescopes were placed for the people to get a 
better view of the girl and try to name her. 
At night the display was lighted with spots 
and floods. According to Haynie the picture 
had a most successful run. 



B&K and Newspaper 
Arranges Hook Up for 
World Series Returns 

Balaban and Katz, Chicago theatre oper- 
ators, have arranged a hook up with the 
Herald and Examiner to furnish returns 
from the World Series games at each of 
their theatres. All the games will be re- 
produced on mechanical scoreboards, erect- 
ed on the canopies of the theatres, and a 
special radio device will add realism with 
reproduction of the noises of the crowd and 
an announcer describing each play. 

A special radio receiving set will be 
located in various sections of the city and 
broadcast the returns of each game as re- 
ported over station KYW. A special auto- 
mobile has been equipped with such a set 
and will move slowly through remote sec- 
tions of the city. This car is one of 13 
which Publix theatres have purchased to 
be used in various key cities, not only for 
reporting baseball returns but news of other 
interest. 

The theatres in the B&K group which 
will have mechanical reproducers on their 
canopies are the Uptown, Paradise, Tivoli, 
Harding and Chicago. 



"Rest at the Capitol" Is 

Slogan of Ontario House 

Manager R. S. Roddick of the Capitol the- 
atre, London, Ont, adopted a special policy 
for the theatre during the annual fall fair 
week when he urged out of town visitors to 
attend the special 11 A. M. shows, and also 
stressed the slogan of "Rest at the Capitol." 
He picked "On With the Show" as a special 
treat during the week. 




44 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 




The living sign, exploiting "The Great Gabbo" which New York officials barred and termed 
a nuisance because it blocked traffic on Broadway. James Cruze Productions carried the 
case to courts and the Judge ruled lluit the sign was an attraction to Broadway and helped 
to draw- tourists to the famous thoroughfare. 

Living Sign Barred, Wins Court 
OK as Attraction to Broadway 

James Cruze Productions recently went to court to prevent certain officials of 
New York City closing a mammoth living sign, atop the Childs building, ad- 
vertising "The Great Gabbo." The city officials claimed that the sign was block- 
ing traffic on Broadway but the Judge ruled that it was an attraction to Broad- 
way and helped to draw tourists to the thoroughfare from all parts of the world. 

Every night from eight to eighty thirty minurfs, Judge Cotillo ruled that- the living 

sign was not a violation of the city ordi- 
nance and that the motion picture company 
could continue its operation. In giving his 
decision, he pointed out the fact that Broad- 
way had become famous for its gargantuan 
display of mazda signs and that these elec- 
trical advertisements helped to draw tour- 
ists to the thoroughfare from all parts of 
the world. The addition of flesh and blood, 
he said, did not change basicly the founda- 
tions upon which Broadway and its business 
was laid, he regarded "The Great Gabbo's" 
dancing girls not as a nuisance, but an 
added attraction to the fabulous thorough- 
fare. 

James Cruze Productions continued the 
sign for one week following Judge Cotillo's 
ruling and discontinued the living models 
and open air show only when "The Great 
Gabbo" moved on Monday from the Selwyn 
theatre to the Globe, next door to which 
the sign is erected. The sign and its out- 
door show cost $400 a night to run, just a 
small item in "The Great Gabbo's" ballyhoo. 

The intrepid young women who braved 
the elements and a drop of 150 feet in the 
path of taxis below were thirty Chester 
Hale girls whose performance coincided 
with that of the adagio dancers and Holly- 
wood dancing girls in Erich von Stroheim's 
first talking picture. 



and eleven to eleven thirty at theatre hour, 
thousands of people jammed Broadway to 
witness the first complete free show ever 
held on a Broadway roof to advertise a 
screen spectacle. But the delight of the 
multitude was short lived as the police, with 
their night sticks, kept moving the mobs 
and notified the James Cruze Productions, 
who had built and equipped the sign at a 
cost of $12,000, to discontinue the show 
which was obstructing traffic and a public 
nuisance. 

The motion picture company promptly 
went to court for an injunction to restrain 
the police from interfering with their bally- 
hoo and Supreme Court Judge Salvatore 
Cotillo withheld decision until he could see 
the living sign for himself, at the same time 
issuing an injunction to prevent interference 
with the sign for a period of seven days. 

Later the judge held court at the Motion 
Picture Club at 729 Seventh Avenue from 
the windows of which he could watch the 
twenty show girls at work on the sparkling 
spider web and the ten ballet dancers along 
the roof's edge, duplicating a portion of 
the film in mid-air. Representing the city 
were assistant corporation counsels Crow 
and Dunn. Harry L. Reichenbach, repre- 
sented the interests of the James Cruze 
Productions. 

After watching the show for twenty-five 



Sticker Headlines on 
Daily Paper Creates 
Interest in U Picture 

Frank Dau, manager of the Downer the- 
atre, Milwaukee, pulled a clever exploita- 
tion stunt recently in connection with the 
picture "The Love Trap," featuring Laura 
La Plante and Neil Hamilton. Frank had 
stickers printed which were the exact width 
of a daily newspaper. Big headlines read- 
ing "Beautiful Girl Found in Love Trap" 
were on the poster. 

These posters each carried a box on each 
end which read "Extra" and were pasted 
over the main headlines of about 500 copies 
of the Wisconsin News and distributed in 
the neighborhood of the Downer. They 
created a lot of interest and Frank had no 
trouble in filling his theatre that evening. 
All of which goes to show what can be done 
by a good exploitation stunt. After a per- 
son bought a paper with the headline pasted 
over it he could not help but read a small 
bit of copy below the "Extra" box which 
said, "For full particulars see Laura La 
Plante & Neil Hamilton in "The Love 
Trap" at the Downer Theatre. 

It was not difficult to secure the permis- 
sion of the newspaper to do this as it was 
also good publicity for the periodical. A 
break which Frank got in the stunt was 
that there happened to be a picture of a 
beautiful girl on the front page, and peo- 
ple reading the attached headline naturally 
thought she was the girl referred to in the 
picture. 



Ham rick Celebrates 
Music Box Birthday 
With Midnight Dinner 

John Hamrick, operator of a chain of houses 
in Portland, Seattle and Tacoma, celebrated 
the first birthday of his Music Box theatre 
in Portland by giving a midnight banquet to 
his Portland employes. 

The theatre celebrated the event with War- 
ner's "Gold Diggers of Broadway" and "On 
With the Show" was offered at the Blue 
Mouse theatre. 



65,000 Heralds Used 

In Campaign to Exploit 

"Dance of Life" Picture 

Heralds may be an old way of adver- 
tising a picture but Don Alexander, pub- 
licity director at the State theatre, Minne- 
apolis, gave them new life when "The 
Dance of Life" showed at the house. 

A special edition of State Theatre News 
was gotten out, 65,000 copies in all, and 
distributed with copies of Liberty that were 
sold during the week. The pamphlet was 
profusely illustrated with half-tones and line 
drawings of Nancy Carroll and Hal Skelly 
and carried news stories very similar to 
those which might be carried in a news- 
paper. 

Another move was the announcement of 
a contest to be conducted in cooperation 
with Witt's Market House. Those who 
could make the most words out of Witt's 
Market House and State Theatre were 
awarded money prizes of $25.00, $15.00 and 
$10.00. 

These two stunts were the highlights of 
a very successful advertising campaign that 
put the picture over big. In addition there 
were the usual tieups, announcements at 
the restaurants, over the radio, window tie- 
ups and, in one case, a real girl was dressed 
up to represent Nancy Carroll, and did a 
dance in the window of one of the stores. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



45 



MUSIC AND TALENT 



All Song Firms Making 



STAGE SHOWS 



Ted Leary 



Philadelphia Fox 

Week Ending October 5 

Fanchon & Marco's "Fiesta Idea" at the Fox the- 
atre this week ie as entertaining' and delightful as 
any bill could well be. The Spanish atmosphere of 
the production, which is maintained throughout, is 
artistic and colorful. The unit is composed chiefly 
of the Romeros, three brothers and three sisters, all 
of whom can dance and sing and who are a whole 
show in themselves, with Eddie Hill acting as master 
of ceremonies. 

The act is beautifully staged, the scene being laid 
in a Spanish hacienda, with glimpses of distant blue 
mountains seen through flower-draped Moorish arches 
and floating clouds overhead. The girls are very 
pretty in their wide, brilliantly colored Spanish 
gowns with high headdresses of lace, and how they 
can dance and sing, too. 

After a spirited dance to the music of castanets, 
Jose Mercado is heard in a beautiful baritone solo 
that is very well received. The six Romeros give 
several marvelous Spanish dances, the flowing capes 
of the men and the billowing skirts of the girls 
forming a picture of old Castilian grace and beauty 
that held the audience spellbound as the performers 
kept time to the click of castanets. 

One of the highlights of the act is the singing of 
Armanda Chirot, a Mexican operatic star, who made 
her debut with the San Francisco Opera Company. 
She is a coloratura soprano and sang the well known 
aria from "La Traviata." Her voice is well con- 
trolled, the tones pure and flexible, though her head 
tones are inclined to be slightly nasal in quality. 
Her phrasing is well defined and in the final bars 
her shading from sotto voice to fortissimo was par- 
ticularly noteworthy. She was given repeated en- 
cores and was forced to make a curtain speech. 

Two of the Romero Brothers, John and Oscar, con- 
tribute a fast and intricate staircase dance that is a 
most unusual combination of tap and soft shoe 
dancing that almost stopped the show. 

Eddie Hill is a plump and jovial master of cere- 
monies who is bubbling over with good humor and 
who keeps things moving along at a rapid tempo. 
His songs are original and really funny and he makes 
a hit with the audience. 

Jane Worth is a bundle of muscle with apparently 
no bones at all and her acrobatic dancing is some- 
thing to marvel at. She is graceful and dexterity 
personified and the co-ordination of her hands and 
feet in a series of acrobatic 6tunts roused the audi- 
ence to enthusiastic appreciation of her difficult feats. 

The Fox Grand Orchestra scored a hit with the 
overture "Sicilian Vespers," with William A. Kraut h 
conducting. On the whole, the bill was one of the 
best that has been given in Philadelphia for some 
time. 

Chicago Granada 

Week Ending October 4 

This week's stage offering is a campus caper en- 
titled "Collegiate," and with Benny Meroff giving 
excellent interference, the available talent hits the 
line for dear old Granada in ail-American fashion. 
It was no show of stars, but one of teamwork, and 
to the final whistle, it had a lot of wham, dash and 
pow — if that means anything to you. 

The curtain goes up on the band playing behind a 
row of scenic schoolbooks, and Hes 3 and Bailee of 
lirauman, Hess & Bailee, come out for a song and 
tap dance, during which members of the ballet step 
out of trigonometry, psychology, etc., for incidental 
dancing. This prelude is followed by Grauman in 
{Continued on page 47) 




Above is a likeness of Ted Leary, that popu- 
lar master of ceremonies who can tell a story 
and really hold your interest to the finish. 
Ted made his first big hit in Chicago at the 
Stratford theatre and the writer noticed and 
is sure there were a good many people that 
came to his opening at the Avalon theatre 
last week that were regular patrons of the 
Stratford. After viewing his first perform- 
ance at the Avalon where he opened, and 
hearing the acclaim the audience tendered 
him, there is little danger of his leaving for 
a long time. Leary will rotate between the 
Capitol and Avalon with Charlie Crafts. 




"The Man Who Put Community 
Singing on the Map" 



Film Tieups 

14 Publishers 
Put Out Music 
Of Pathe Alone 

Herald-World Prediction in May 
Of Value of Hookups 
Comes True 

By W. S. RUSSELL 
Music publishers have seen the 
light and now practically every com- 
pany of consequence has its direct 
tieup with motion picture producers, 
with tremendous benefit to the pub- 
lishers as well as to the makers of 
film productions. 

14 Firms in Pathe Tieups 

No better illustration of this fact could 
be found than in the instance of Pathe's 
hookups under which no less than fourteen 
leading music companies are publishing 
songs featured in Pathe film productions. 

Following is a list of publishers of Pathe 
songs: 

DeSylva, Brown & Henderson; Green and 
Stept, Inc.; Shapiro, Bernstein and Co.; 
Ager, Yellen and Bornstein; Bibo-Lang, 
Inc.; Spier and Coslow, Inc.; Al Piantadosi; 
Leo Feist, Inc., Irving Berlin, Inc.; Water- 
son, Berlin and Snyder, Inc.; M. Witmark 
and Sons; Sherman Clay and Company; 
Villa Moret, and Mills Music, Inc. 

Six Hits in One Picture 

DeSylva, Brown & Henderson, latest to 
sign for Pathe songs, has some six hits 
in "Red Hot Rhythm," a story of success 
in the song writing field featuring Alan 
Hale, Walter O'Keefe and Bobby Dolan 
have provided these numbers: "Red Hot 
Rhythm," "At Last I'm in Love," "My Idea 
of Heaven," "Out of the Past," "When 
You're a Part of Me" and "The Night That 
Elmer Died." Kathryn Crawford and Wal- 
ter O'Keefe sing these numbers assisted in 
several sequences by a chorus. The scenes 
are in color. The music house also has 
"Little by Little," an O'Keefe-Dolan num- 
ber sung by Eddie Quillan and Sally O'Neil 
in "The Sophomore." The firm will pub- 
lish "One Never Knows," written by the 
Pathe hit team for "Rich People," starring 
Constance Bennett. 

Green & Stept, Inc., is the publisher of 
most of the numbers sung by Morton 
Downey in "Lucky in Love" and "Mother's 
Boy." "Love Is a Dreamer," "For the 
Likes o' You and Me" and "When They 
Sing the Wearing of the Green (in Synco- 
pated Blues)" comprise the trio of songs 
in "Lucky in Love." Three songs in 
"Mother's Boy" are "I'll Always Be Moth- 
er's Boy," "There'll Be You and I" and 
"There's a Place in the Sun for You." All 



46 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



VAGABOND 




I LIFT UP NIY FINGER. 

AND SAV 



TWEET TWEET 



-*fiS ■ 





*2 New Songs Iri Rio Rita"- R-KO Picture. 

YOU'RE ALWAYS IN MY ARMS* 
SWEETHEART, WE NEED. 
EACH OTHER 




six numbers mentioned were written by 
Bud Green and Sam H. Stept. 

Comedy and Theme Songs 

Shapiro, Bernstein and Company is pub- 
lishing "Love Found Me When I Found 
You," the featured number in "Oh, Yeah!" 
the railway feature comedy with Robert 
Armstrong and James Gleason. George 
Waggner and George Green wrote the 
number. This firm also has "The World 
Is Yours and Mine," a Green and Stept 
number in "Mother's Boy," and "Shady 
Lady," theme song of the Phyllis Haver 
starring vehicle of the same name. "Cock- 
a-Doodle-Oodle-Oodle-Oo," the screen sig- 
nature song opening Pathe talking com- 
edies, "Dearest One," featured in "Fancy 
That," and "After You Say 'I Love You' " 
in "So This Is Marriage," both Folly com- 
edies, are all sponsored by Shapiro, Bern- 
stein and Company. The last two numbers 
are by Billy Curtis and Larrv Conley. 
"Shady Lady" was written by Josiah Zuro, 
Francis Gromon and Howard Johnson. 

Ager, Yellen and Bornstein has numbers 
all written by George Green and George 
Waggner, in two Pathe features. "Colleen 
O'Kildare" is sung by Owen Moore in 
"High Voltage," starring William Boyd. 
"If I Had My Way" is sung by Marie 
Prevost in "The Flying Fool," another 
Boyd vehicle, and "I'm That Way About 
Baby" is rendered by Earl Burtnett's trio. 

Number Widely Recorded 

Bibo-Lang, Inc., is the publisher of "My 
Annapolis," theme song of "Annapolis." 
This number has been recorded 100 per 
cent by the record companies. "Captain 
Swagger" is another number released by 
this house. Charles Weinberg and Irving 
Bibo wrote both songs. 

Spier and Coslow, Inc., has a Roy Fox 
composition, "Pouring Down Rain," in "The 
Garden of Eatin'," a Golden Rooster comedy 
with the Gleasons, wherein Jimmy is a com- 
edy orchestra leader. 

Al Piantadosi is sponsoring "I'll Say She's 
Pretty," the number inspired by the Pathe 
Pretties in the talking comedies and first 
introduced by Jack LeMaire's Orchestra in 
"The Salesman," produced by George Le- 
Maire. Charles Weinberg, Jack Stanley and 
Forrest Woods did this fox trot. 

Leo Feist, Inc., is issuing numbers used 
in two Pathe features — "High Up on a Hill 
Top," in "Ned McCobb's Daughter," and 
"Your Heart Looked Into Mine" in "The 
Spieler." 

More and Still More 

Irving Berlin, Inc., is publishing the 
theme songs for Cecil B. DeMille's "The 
Godless Girl" and "Geraldine," in both of 
which Eddie Quillan distinguishes himself. 
"Love, All I Want Is Love," a Charles 
Weinberg-Josiah Zuro composition, is the 
theme in the former, and "Geraldine," by 
Charles Tobias and El Kay, the theme of 
the latter. 

Waterson, Berlin and Snyder, Inc., has 
numbers in "The Leatherneck," starring 
William Boyd, and "Mother's Boy," with 
Morton Downey. "Only for You" in the 
former is by Charles Weinberg, Francis 
Gromon and Josiah Zuro. "Come to Me" 
by Green and Stept is in the Downey pic- 
ture. 

M. Witmark and Sons publishes "Singa- 
pore Sal," theme song in "Sal of Singapore," 
Phyllis Haver's starring vehicle. 

Sherman Clay is the publisher of "You're 
Wonderful," by Paul Ash, Buddy Fields and 
Jack Gordon, the love theme song in "Cap- 
tain Swagger." 

Villa Moret, Inc., is the publisher of 
"Peculiar," in "Geraldine." Paul Corbell, 
Larry Yoell and Nat Gouldstein are re- 
sponsible for the piece. 

Mills Music, Inc., has "Singapore Sal's 
Lullaby," written by Charles Wynn for "Sal 
of Singapore." 

The majority of the numbers in the Pathe 
singing, talking pictures have been recorded 
and many have attained radio fame. 




RUSSELL 
SAYS 



MUSIC oK* 1 TALENT 
CHICAGO 



Happenings this week and last. . . . Charley Kaley 

the much married Chicago master of ceremonies 
broke the newspapers last week with a story of his 
being engaged to Gwen Lee 1928 Baby Wampas star. 
This story however, has been denied by Gwen Lee in 
Hollywood. . . . Ted Leary is again back in the har- 
ness as master of ceremonies and stage band leader 
and if I am not mistaken there were many of his 
old admirers in the audience at the Avalon. . . . Well, 
I see Chicago's old 6tandby, Abe Lyman, will again 
be with us this time in the roll of master of cere- 
monies at the Oriental theatre. Good luck, Abe, I'm 
sure you'll wow them there as you did at the Dells 
two and three years ago. . . . When you are looking 
for either AI Beilan or Milton Weil, first go to 
Coffee Dans and if they are not there then go to 
their offices. Coffee Dans is fast becoming one of 
the most popular places in the loop for the theatrical 
profession, when near the Rialto drop in and pay 
them a visit. . . . Charlie Agne is now vacationing in 
the East and expects to be back in Chicago soon. 
This is his first vacation in about three or four yeare, 
enjoy yourself. Charlie, see you soon. . . . Billy Ran- 
kin popular cafe producer will soon have every cafe 
in town at present he is producing at the Frolics, 
Club Royale and the Beau Monte. He expects to 
produce the show at the Rainbo when it opens. . . . 
Cecil Davidson with an orchestra of nine men will 
open at the Symphony theatre on the sixteenth of 
the month. . . . Al Copeland will move to the Palace 
theatre in Cicero, there is a possibility that the or- 
chestras will rotate between theatres. . . . "Lonely 
Troubadour" new hit song of Santly Brothers has 
been recorded by Ted Lewis, Rudee Vallee, Ben 
Bernie, Gene Austin, Nick Lucas and Irving Kaufman. 
Nice record eh. Jimmy Cairns will have everybody 
playing it shortly and they won't be sorry either. 
. . . Incidently I forgot to mention that Abe Lyman 
will play for his band number "Pagan Love Song" 
the first week. . . . Dick Fraser and his Recording 
orchestra are now playing an engagement at the 
Triangle cafe in Forest Park. Ray Reynolds I un- 
derstand is acting as master of ceremonies at the 
same establishment. . . . Maurie Sherman has re- 
turned to The Golden Pumpkin with his orchestra, 
Glyde Walton master of ceremonies and the dance 
team of Walton and Synder. . . . Hank Lishin has 
opened the Varsity Cafe formerly the Club Lido and 
is billed as Hank Lishin and His Varsity Crew direct 
from Pleasure Bound, musical comedy. . . . Evelyn 
Nesbit opened last Monday with her Atlantic City 
Beauties at the Club Alabam. . . . Arthur Fay is 
the featured organist at the White City Roller 
Skating rink. . . . Lew Lewis and his Royal Vaga- 
bonds at Al Tearney's Club Metropole are broadcast- 
each evening over KYW. . . . Last week Charlie 
Crafts was guest star at the Pershing Ballroom and 
made a big hit. Ted Leary will be the star next week 
in a "Welcome Home" fete to be given by manager 
George O'Hare. . . . Zelaya, pianologist is in Chi- 
cago pleasing the public in Mothers Surprise Party 
Unit. . . . Don Cordon organist for Chicago Fox 
theatres will be permanently featured at the Sheridan 
theatre, since the discontinuance of the Fanchon and 
Marco Ideas. . . . Ramon Berry is etil I the only fea- 
ture in the flesh at the Alamo theatre. . . . Tommy 
Sacco is now booking the Aztec theatre in San An- 
tonio, Texas. . . . Lynn Cowan, composer, is now 
master of ceremonies at the Fox theatre in St. Louis. 
. . . Frank Fay Broadway star has been signed to 
star in Vitaphone productions for Warner Brothers. 
. . . Morton Downey 6tar of stage and screen ap- 
peared last week at the Palace theatre in New York 
singing the songs from hi6 latest Pathe picture 
"Lucky in Love". . . . John Murray Anderson has 
been selected to produce and devise "The King of 
Jazz" starring Paul Whiteman and has already 
left New York for the West Coast. . . . Gene Sheldon 
has just completed a successful six months as master 
of ceremonies at the Minnesota theatre in Minne- 
apolis and opened at the Chicago theatre with his 
regular act. . . . Zizz Black of Loa Angeles has 
been named as master of ceremonies to succeed 
Sheldon. Zizz is the brother of Ben Black who 
opened the new Loew House in New Jersey last week. 
. . . Roxy has announced that the opening day for 
new productions at the Roxy theatre has been 
changed from Saturday to Friday of each week. 




LEO. FEISTk 

231 w. 40 th sT, New York,™ 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



47 



REMICK 



Music /°bnp. 
BODIES \JIARM 



STAGE SHOWS 



(Continued from page 45) 

acrobatic dancing, and at the close of his well re- 
ceived number, he is joined by his partners for a 
good finish. 

The headliner then makes her initial bow. She's 
Sally Sweet, heroine of a recent honky-tonk fire in 
Detroit. Meroff works slick with her in a cute song, 
and Sally takes a bow. But, alas. Sally should have 
been an acrobat, for the two equilibrists who follow, 
.Les Gezzis, inspire fully 62 per cent of all the 
applause meted out during the presentation. (Your 
reporter cannot help reflecting here on the number 
of times he has seen strong-armed guys squeeze 
great amounts of appreciation from the patrons of 
this house. How explain it in a swell neighborhood 
like this one?) 

The following number is smart. The insertion of 
silvery wings of arboreal pattern, and use of a deep 
blue flood, change the campus scene to that of a 
garden, and members of the ballet in white plumed 
costumes are introduced in a straight toe dance, 
which is preliminary to a ballad by Marie Austin. 
Dropping back behind the girls, she is followed by 
a talented member of the ballet, aided by two other 
girls as foils, in a well-arranged toe dance. This 
number, closing with Marie Austin singing the last 
lines of the song, achieves a big hand. 

Comedy relief follows, offered by Montrose & Key- 
nolds. The gags are almost as funny as the lady, 
so the customers chortle and ultimately clap their 
hands. 

The Sweet girl comes on for the finale, and to her 
peppy song, the ballet fox trots on to the stage 
dressed as co-eds, each girl hugging to her a col- 
legiate young man. The boys are dummies, of course, 
but since their feet are attached to those of the gals, 
few know the difference. Show closes with every- 
body present, the back drop rising to reveal pretty 
girls in a setting symbolic of the local universities. 



St. Louis Fox 



Week Ending Sept. 19 

Lynn Cowan, the Hollywood Joy Boy, made his 
debut as master of ceremonies and got away to a 
very nice start. If he continues in the same stride 
he should become a permanent fixture at this big 
house which from its very outset, apparently, has 
been endeavoring to strike upon just the kind of 
show that will bring St. Louisians and visitors to 
the city in sufficient numbers to fill the 5,200 seats 
in the auditorium. 

Most of Cowan's career has been carved out on the 
Pacific Coast where his comedy and melodies won 
for him his very attractive title. The Fanchon and 
Marco stage revue offered this week was entitled 
"Beach Nights." The cast included Kitaros, Reed 
and Levere, Davis and La Rue, Bradley and Evian, 
Maxine and Doyle and the new Ensemble Girls. 

The Fox Jazzamanians under the direction of 
William A. Parsons dispensed their own particular 
brand of jazz. 

Tom Terry was at the organ. 



San Francisco Fox 

Week Ending Sept. 26 

Music runs riot in this week's stage act and it 
would take a follower of the classics and one with 
a retentive ear for theme songs to catalogue the 
many and varied selections. The Fanchon and Marco 
Idea is called "Sereenland Melodies," and into this is 
woven much of the music that has made its appear- 
ance through the medium of the audien screen. 

The grand concert offering is selections from Saint 
Saens' "Samson and Delilah," with Rube Wolf offer- 
ing the ever lovable "My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice" 
as a trumpet solo. The vocal ensemble of twenty-one 
plays its usual prominent part. 

The stage act proper commences with the appear- 
ance of Rube before the curtain with the announce- 
ment that the rest of the musical program would be 
built up around theme songs, and challenging anyone 
to recognize all of them. The curtain goes up reveal- 
ing a stage suggestive of a Spanish fiesta, with the 
Sunkist Beauties going through a lively Spanish 
dance. 

Robert Guzman, a young Mexican tenor, who has 
been heard in vaudeville, sings "Estralita" in Spanish 
and the strains of "Ramona" are heard in the dance 
music that follows. 

Jack and Betty Willing, introduced as Hollywood 
high school kids, offer an acrobatic dance. If this is 
a sample of Hollywood high school talent, the mov- 
ing picture capital must be some rough and tumble 
place, as Jack certainly does wipe up the floor with 
Betty. 

Rube leads the orchestra through a novelty number, 
"Sweet Seventeen," and sing3 the words, with mem- 



bers of the organization following with glowing de- 
scriptions of their girls, making use of well-known 
screen names. 

Pauline Alpert, Brunswick recording artist, is in- 
troduced as the flapper piano player and flips her 
way through some numbers that require speed and 
dexterity. She is followed by Roy Rogers, who proves 
the hit of the show with his athletic dancing and 
bibulous clowning. Rogers has a real understanding 
of comedy and at his hands an exhibition of over- 
indulgence is really funny. He is a marvel of sup- 
pleness for one of his rotund build and gets round 
after round of applause for his efforts. He has a lot 
of jokes, too, and one has to laugh when he tries 
to light his cigar with Scotch matches, which are 
without tips, and when he confesses that he had a 
couple of drinks of "the spirits of '76." His Lindy 
Hop, a dance in which he imitates an airplane in 
flight, is a wonder. 

A back curtain goes up and reveals girls con- 
cealed behind huge feather fans and they come forth 
and dance while one sings "You Were Made for 
Me," concluding with "The Wedding of the Painted 
Dolls." Other curtains go up in succession, revealing 
scenes that suggest screen hits, with the orchestra 
playing the accompanying theme songs. "The Pagan" 
was especially well received, with a couple in South 
Sea costumes presenting a native dance to the music 
of the "Pagan Love Song." 

The act comes to a close with all on the stage and 
each of the specialty performers get a hand as they 
present a tabloid version of their number. "Big 
Time" is the screen attraction and it is also "big 
time" stuff on the stage. 



Kansas City Pantages 

Week Ending Sept. 27 

"Keep Moving," a number which has some good 
music with it, and which is billed along with the 
sub-title, "Pep, and Lots of It," features Jinnette 
Vallon and Helen Ward at the Pantages Theatre. 
The number fully lives up to its exploitation as the 
company works much harder than really is necessary 
and leaves its audiences in a highly receptive mood 
at the end. 

The stage program, which is cut short because of 
added film attractions, closes with Al Walton and 
Byron, who are featured in a number titled "Tell 
Tales," which also includes the Exposition Jubilee 
Four, who know their high and low notes well enough 
to satisfy any critical audience. The entire number 
contains pleasing variety and hasn't one minute of 
monotony. Frequent encores throughout the week 
left no doubt as to how auidences regarded the num- 
ber. 

Louis Charninsky and his Pantages Orchestra of- 
fered a medley of popular selections as the overture. 



Pittsburgh Enright 

Week Ending October 4 

Dick Powell, m. c, during this week celebrated 
his 500th consecutive performance at this house and 
the stage offering was labelled "Dick Powell's Jubi- 
lee." A very colorful and entertaining attraction 
from beginning to end. 

Vestoff and Vaughn have a dance act which 
sparkles with class. Mighty fast steppers and go 
over O. K. Eleanor Terry, personality girl, can't 
sing so well, but the old personality stuff puts her 
over in a big way. 

Henry Regal and Cecil in a comedy acrobatic act 
just about stopped the show at every performance. 
The pair do some real comedy tumbling and close 
their act with a sensational thrill. 

A beautiful production number took place about 
half way through the act. Dick crooned "Counting 
the Stars Alone," while the girls did an exceptionally 
pretty ensemble. The back drop lifted, disclosing 
(Continued on next page) 



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AUDIENCES ARE DEMANDING 
THESE SONG HITS 

WHERE THE SWEET 
FORGET-ME-NOTS 
REMEMBER 
BY THE WAY 
I'LL CLOSE MY EYES 

(To the rest of the world.) 

WHEN YOU'RE SEEING 

SWEETIE HOME 
THERE WAS NOTHING 

ELSE TO DO 
THEN YOU'VE NEVER 
BEEN BLUE 



ATTENTION MANAGERS 

Tie-Up With Your Local Music 
Dealers When You Run the 
Following Pictures: 

The PARAMOUNT PICTURE 

ILLUSION 

FEATURING 

WHEN THE REAL 
THING COMES 
YOUR WAY 

REVOLUTIONARY 
RHYTHM 

WARNER BROS. LATEST 
RELEASE 

FOOTLIGHTS 
and FOOLS 

FEATURING 

IF I CAN'T HAVE YOU 

(If you can't have me.) 

YOU CAN'T BELIEVE 

MY EYES 
PILLY P OM PO M PLEE 

WARNER BROS. 
PRODUCTION 

FEATURING 

SKIN DEEP 

I CAME TO YOU 

Write for Advertising and 
Display Material to 



48 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



STAGE SHOWS 



(Continued from preceding page) 

several huge silver spotlighted etar-shaped carriers, a 
girl sitting in each one of them. 

The band scored with a number called "Etiquette." 
during which several of the members sang comedy 
60los regarding matters of just how to act when 
eating in polite society. Dick crooned "I'll Get By" 
(the number he first sang at this house many months 
ago), and got away with about five encores at every 
performance. 

New York Paramount 

Week Ending October 10 

The C. A. Niggemeyer production, "Shanghai 
Jesters," is the featured stage-chow this week. In 
addition, Charlie Davis, the popular master of cere- 
monies, formerly of the Indiana Theatre, Indian- 
apolis, is now featured at this house for an inde- 
finite run. This show opens to a scene of a pagoda 
in front of which Seed and Sustin, offer a few 
comedy gags and an introduction of Charlie Davis, 
who enters as the curtain rises and introduces Mme. 
Serova's Chinese Rosebuds, who, in Chinese costume, 
offer a novel dance routine, which they finish, with 
a solo on miniature xylophones which are attached 
to each of their backs. 

Bemis and Brown, a young man and girl, intro- 
duced by Davis as two Collegiate Boweryites, do a 
novel tap routine while seated on a bench, and fol- 
low this with a very well done dance which is an 
incorporation of collegiate and bowery dancing. For 
this they are very well received. A band number, 
"True Blue Lou" is next played by the orchestra 
and led, in a pleasing manner, by Davis. Davis 
rendered a very well played cornet solo of this 
number, with a good response from the audi- 
ence. "You Were Meant for Me" played by the boys 
on bottles gets some good laughs and a fine hand. 
A curtain, back and above the orchestra parts, dis- 
closing (presumedly) Electa Havel, in a Chinese cos- 
tume, with eight girls posed around her. She sings, 
in a pleasing manner, three or four oriental num- 
bers as the ballet do a well routine toe dance. 

The William Sisters, two peppy and nice appearing 
girls sing pleasingly, "Am I Blue," then do a com- 
edy dance which earns them an encore and a fine 
hand. Seed and Sustin (Sustin straight Seed, the 
comedian) offer their specialty of gags and other 
hokem that gain some good laughs. The finale con- 
sists of the beautiful Chinese scene with the Serova 
Girls posed about in beautiful costume as the entire 
ensemble enter and do bits of their specialties. 



Kansas City Mainstreet 

Week Ending October 5 

The Pantages stage show proved to be a fast 
moving series of entertainment this week with the 
"California Peaches" being given a prominent place 
on the program. The revue is a musical version of 
all types of songs with girls graduated from ex- 
tremely small in 6ize to the other extreme, but all 
of them step very nimbly. 

Cholet and Jones have a number with Miss Jackie 
Jones doing most of the comedy, her comedy being 
produced with a shrill voice and a bustle. Her work 
is rewarded by considerable applause, as she never 
ceases trying for one minute to please the audience. 

Victor, Geraldine and Victoria have an acrobatic 
act which receives much more than the ordinary 
notice because of the fact that "Pop" Renard, old 
time acrobat and originator of most of the acrobatic 
material used on the stage today, turns out to be 



Charles Williams 

Featured Organist 

LOEWS 
STATE THEATRE 

Times Square 
New York City 



the mysterious individual who calmly hands things 
to the acrobats as they go about their work. That 
in iteelf would mean nothing if it were not for the 
fact that "Pop" gets a press notice in virtually every 
town he plays. He winds up the act by doing a 
little turn himself and receives a big hand. 

Layton and May, who have an entertaining number 
which includes about as much variety as one would 
desire, conclude the bill. Their act is comprised of 
a bit of comedy, a vocal number, then a bit more 
comedy. 



Boston Metropolitan 

Week Ending October 9 

Frank Cambria's revue. "The Song Shop," featured 
Hal Sherman, eccentric comedy dancer. He holds 
the audience spellbound with his antics and through- 
out the act does not speak one word. He was called 
back for three encores by the hearty applause given 
him. His dance is of an interpretive nature. 

Maureen and Sunny entertain with a short dance 
full of pep and vigor. Carlton and Bellew stage a 
brief slapstick comedy singing act. The Dave Gould 
Girls are one of the highlights with two dances, 
being dressed in blue and pink spangles during the 
first and old fashioned long dresses in the second. 
Clever dance steps feature. 

The revue closes with a trio from Faust, with 
Gladys St. John. Amund Sjovik and Harold Hanson 
comprising the trio. The final 6tage effect of the 
devil taking the human to the land below was the 
most effective of the entire revue, which fell far 
below the usual standard. 

Alex Keese, as master of ceremonies, conducted 
the Met Syncopators, which featured with Gersch- 
win's "The American Fantasy." 

Dave Rubinoff, conductor of the Grand Orchestra, 
presented "Romberg Melodies" with selections from 
"The Student Prince," "The Desert Song," "Blossom 
Time," and "My Maryland." 

The revue paled before the vaudeville talents of 
Sophie Tucker in "Honky Tonk." the feature picture, 
in which 6he sings many songs, including "I Don't 
Want to Get Thin," "I'm Doing What I'm Doing 
for Love," "I'm the Last of the Red Hot Mammas," 
"Some of These Days" and "He's a Good Man to 
Have Around." 



Elizabeth, N. J., Ritz 

Week Ending October 4 

The stage-band policy, inaugurated by the popu- 
lar Jay Mills, in this house last week, has taken 
this town by storm and increased the popularity of 
the already popular Jay Mills. This show opens to 
a novel setting of playing cards and enormous chips, 
in front of which Lew Kessler and his eight ballet 
girls sing and dance the introduction. They are 
followed by Jay Mills, who enters to a very good 
reception, and introduces, Lenoff who offered many 
fine selections on his accordion. 

Brooks and Rush, a girl harmony duo, please, im- 
mensely with their singing of "Painting the Clouds 
With Sunshine" and earn an encore in which they 
sing "Blackbirds," to a fine ovation. Jay Mills then 
announces a special arrangement of "Louise" which 
his orchestra play very well. Jay receives a good 
hand for his vocal chorus of this number. 

The Kessler Girls follow with a fairly well routined 
"Tiller" dance, with Lew Kessler entering at the 
finish and singing, "She's Got Great Ideas," which he 
follows with a good acrobatic tap dance. Mills then 
sings a chorus of "Baby, Where Can You Be," and 
then follows with a very well played violin solo of 
the same number. 

Iris (or Doris) May next offers a very clever and 
difficult Russian, acrobatic routine that is very well 
received. Ina Williams and Jimmy Delaney, comedy 
team, please with their comedy dancing and singing. 
The eight Kessler Girls, followed by the entire en- 
semble, offer a rope skipping routine for the finale. 

Portland Fox 

Week Ending October 2 

Fanchon and Marco sent up a real stage treat in 
their idea "Watermelon Blues" which opened with 
a peppy number by the 16 line boys and girls 
with "Sing a Little Love Song" going over nicely. 
This was quickly followed by the appearance of 
Sam Jack Kaufman, the popular m. c. who directed 
his troubadors in the "Huge Melon." Then he in- 
troduced his personality girls, Lois Reese, very easy 
to look at. Vera Knight and George Jaeger trip 
lightly to fast music with a background of chorus 
men and girls singing "Sing a Little Love Song" 
which they do, and how. The chorus is without 
doubt the most perfectly trained ever seen here. 

Ted Ledford, well known baritone on the circuit, 
in his usual blackface was welcomed back, singing 
"At the End of the Road." From here on the 6how 
is stolen by Mammy and Her Picks, the three negro 
boys step on it hot and return for a half dozen 
repeats and the large colored lady sings crooningly 
of the Southland and also steps a few herself. The 



band's rendition of "Dixie" which includes both 1915 
jazz and symphonic arrangements, is one of the 
good features. The act is staged with the usual 
F. & M. striking colors, pink and green predominat- 
ing. The act is under the personal management of 
James Rice, formerly a well-known theatre manager 
of Portland, and who will carry it on to eastern 
centers. 

Chicago Capitol 

Week Ending October 3 

When Paul Ash left the Oriental a few years ago 
there was a tremendous ovation for him. When 
Lindbergh left Chicago millions came out to wish 
him well. But, when Charlie Agnc left the Capitol 
not much as a flower was handed him. Charlie 
might not be as much as Ash, or Lindbergh, but in 
this neighborhood, he ought to mean the same. In 
his nine months as band leader he made many 
friends. But over and over we wanted to say that 
the patrons around the Capitol are different than 
any other place in the world. They're stingy with 
applause and National Playhouse would have to 
bring the moon down on the stage to make them 
wake up. Actors and actresses need that little ap- 
plause as much as a baby needs its mother, and 
when they don't get it and really deserve it, well, 
something should be done. Charlie Agne left any- 
way, what he intends to do is a decision of several 
offers he has to make. Good luck, Charlie and may 
the patrons in your next territory appreciate your 
real ability. 

Lubin, Lary and Andre, the one man act, was here 
this week. Why we say one man act is Lubin, stands 
out and does everything. He has that funny stut- 
tering talk that keeps one in an uproar. It's a fine 
act but didn't receive its value in applause. 

Frank Sterling, the boy harmonica player, gave 
some hot tunes on all 6ize instruments. Frank pos- 
sesses real talent and as reported time and again in 
this department, he still is a hit. 

One act that didn't get much, and didn't deserve 
what it did get, was Paul Olsen. A six-foot fellow 
dancing around the stage with a dummy doll tied 
to his legs (some of Tommy Wonders stuff). And 
to make it worse the boy uses a load of disgusting 
actions with the roll. Make your stuff original and 
clean Olson and maybe you'll click. 

The orchestra gave a selection of different melo- 
dies much to the appreciation of the audience. Rizzo, 
the accordian player and Agne offered a duet with 
Agne playing the xylophone. It was very well done 
and well liked. 

The Ballet girls this week were very attractive. 
There were 10 and everyone boasted a mean figure. 
Their dancing was very original. 

The overture received the applause. It went over 
with a bang. We may add that it was well played 
and deserved the applause it received. Armin Hand 
has a wonderful following on the South Side. 

San Antonio Aztec 

Week Ending October 4 

One of the biggest stage shows since the opening 
of the Aztec theatre is presented at this popular play- 
house this week. It is a lavish production entitled 
"The Winter Garden Revue." 

It offers on the stage 45 artists with a bevy of 
pretty girls, a wonderful array of vaudeville acts 
including The Crystal Girl, Olga and Mischa of The 
Imperial Russian Ballet and many others. 

On the screen is shown "Half Marriage," starring 
Olive Borden. A talking news-reel and a good 
comedy make up the silver sheet entertainment. 

Larry J. Pico, The "Pep" organist, has an un- 
usual novelty to offer the organ fans. 

Ralph Pollock, the popular m. c. is playing his 
last week in San Antonio, having been transferred 
to a theatre on the west coast. 

San Francisco Fox 

Week Ending October 3 

The Hollywood Beauties are back this week, fol- 
lowing an eleven months' tour of the United States, 
and are at the Fox in a Fanchon and Marco Idea 
of the same name. The ensemble is almost the same 
as that seen almost a year ago at the Warfield, but 
the girls show some new tricks picked up on Broad- 
way and offer a more finished performance than 
when they left California. 

The show opens with a number presented by the 
orchestra and vocal chorus from the elevated pit, 
this being in the form of selections from modern 
operattas by Youmans, Rodgers, Gershwin, Romberg 
and Friml, melodious hits from "Hit the Deck," "The 
Desert Song," "The Vagabond King," and the like. 

Rube Wolf appears before the curtain and makes a 
neat speech, telling of the accomplishments of the 
Hollywood Beauties and suggests that they be given 
a real California welcome, which they soon re- 
ceived, responding with a fine drill and dance. 

Charles Rozelle is introduced and plays on a novel 
instrument resembling a lamp post. Disappearing 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



49 



in the wings for a moment he returns in an out- 
landish Scotch costume and gives a good imitation of 
a bagpipe. 

Rube then puts on a contest for members of his 
band, soloists offering their hottest selections, with 
the clarinet, saxophone, cornet, piano, trombone, 
banjo, piccolo and drums especially featured. Each 
gets a good measure of applause, but Rube says the 
audience must stay for the next show to hear the 
final decision. The Hollywood Beauties offer a sun- 
tan back number and a pair of dancers enliven 
things in between inspections of bronzed backs. 

The Three Gobs are brought out and prove to be 
three colored lads with educated feet. They offer 
an ensemble number and then each goes through 
some solo steps which are vigorously applauded. 

The feature of the 6how is the Aztec ceremonial' 
dance that follows, this being an Indian prayer for 
rain. John Vali sings "Flower of Delight" and the 
girls in appropriate costume go through Indian steps 
and poses. A curtain at the rear rises on a 
magnificent Aztec scene and girls with enormous 
feather headdresses come slowly to the stage and 
engage in the mystic dance, to the strains of In- 
dian music. This feature is a brilliant spectacle 
and serves as a fitting climax to the 6how. 



Cumberland Maryland 

Week Ending October 5 

The Mellinger Brothers, managers and owners of 
the Maryland theatre, this city, who have been stag- 
ing plays and offering the theatre goers legitimate 
attractions since 1902, in the Academy of Music and 
Maryland theatre, whose motto "The Product of 
Old Cumberland," have won them repute in Mary- 
land and elsewhere, offer to the picture patrons a 
diversified lineup of entertainment weekly, maintain 
a capacity house business with The Night Club 
Revue, a musical company of twenty-two people, 
which closes its engagement here October 5. 

The Night Club Revue, composed of well known 
stage players, present a series of vaudeville skits, 
with special stage settings, scenery, costuming and 
electrical effects. To balance the daily program 
the showing of Laura LaPlante's "Red Lips" and a 
weekly, bring the combination up to a standard 
rarely offered to the theatre goers. 

"With Al Jolson in "Say It With Songs" at the 
Liberty Theatre doing capacity business and a mid- 
night performance Sunday night, and Alice White 
in "Broadway Babies" at the Strand theatre pulling 
in 100 per cent talkie goers, the two speaking stage 
houses here are boosting the array of offerings to 
the extent that the theatre fan is surely getting 
double value for his admission with a large variety 
of entertainment to choose from. 

Cumberland Garden 

Week Ending October 5 

The speaking stage theatre presentation bug seems 
to have bitten another silent picture theatre man- 
ager in this city, when the local newspapers carried 
the blackface type announcement that Manager Frank 
A. Magruder of the Garden theatre, six hundred 
seat capacity, will, beginning Monday, September 
30, for one week's duration, offer direct from New 
York City, the great Doctor Karr, rewnowned hypno- 
tist, company of fifteen, along with the special return 
showing of Lon Chaney in "West of Zanzibar." Dr. 
Karr's "A Night in Spiritland" staged with scenery 
and electrical effects, with an outside free demon- 
stration of a man buried alive, brings to the patrons 
of the Garden theatre a well arranged modern silent 
picture theatre, a stage presentation that, for the 
first time, brings into play the stage equipment 
thoughtfully procured by Manager Magruder, who is 
both owner, designer and manager of this popular 
no-sound-picture playhouse. Manager Maguder, who 
heretofore did not employ any theatre musicians, 
using Electric-Radio Record installation, has added 
to his theatre staff experienced musicians, for this 
week's stage and picture presentation. 

Trio of New Songs to Be 
Used in Two Vitaphone 
Productions 

A new method of introducing song numbers from 
the screen will be undertaken by Warner Bros, soon 
in behalf of three compositions which M. Witmark 
& Sons will publish. The songs will be used in two 
Vitaphone productions, "Under a Texas Moon" and 
"On the Border," the tie-up being made because 
both stories have the same locale. The numbers to 
be played and sung in both of these new pictures are 
"Under a Texas Moon" and "I Want a Bold Cabal- 
lero" and "Esta Noche De Amor." 



Songs of 
Hollywood 



HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 8.— The talking pic- 
ture by any other name would be just as noisy, 
says Charlie Chase anent the search for a new 
and dignified name for the dialog film. 

* * * 

Because Robert Armstrong showed signs of 
real singing talent in "Oh, Yeah," he will be 
permitted to break forth into song in his next 
picture "The Champ." Billy Rose is writing 
the music. 

* * * 

Harry Tierney is writing the musical num- 
bers for the R K O audien "Dixiana." It is 
the first operetta written directly for the 
screen. Tierney wrote "Irene," "Kid Boots" 
and three editions of Ziegfeld's Follies. Bebe 
Daniels will have the lead in "Dixiana." 
, * * * 

There are four song writers preparing 
original melodies for the Warner audien 
"Minstrel Days." The short feature has over 
40 colored entertainers in the cast. Eddie 
Ward and Al Bryan wrote "Dancing to 
Heaven." The other tunes are being written 
by Harry Akst and Grant Clarke. 

* * * 

Al Dubin and Joe Burke have received 
scores of letters and telegrams congratulating 
them on the success of their songs in "Gold 
Diggers of Broadway." 

* * * 

The three musketeers of the musical world, 
Herb Magidson, Michael Cleary and Ned 
Washington are writing several originals for 
the Warner short feature "Night Club Baby." 
They recently completed several numbers in 
"The Show of Shows." 

* * $ 

Van and Schenck will introduce six new 
numbers in their forthcoming picture for 
M G M. The songs, written by Milton Ager 
and Jack Yellen are "Ain't You Baby," "Har- 
lem Madness," "Me and My Buddy," "There 
Will Never Be Another Mary" and "Does My 
Baby?" Jack Conway is directing the picture. 
Bugs Baer wrote the dialog. 

* * * 

Two catchy songs for a fox trot stand out 
among the numbers of First National's tin pan 
alley. One is "Why Can't You Love That 
Way." It will be sung by Alice Day. Bourse, 
Val and Creamer are the composers. The 
other is "Pretty Little You" and was written 
by Violinsky and Ryan. It will be heard in 
"The Son of the Gods." 

Harry Stoddard and Marcy Klauber, writ- 
ers of "I Get the Blues When It Rains" and 
other songs, have been signed by the Halperin 
Brothers. They will write the music for the 
forthcoming Halperin picture to be released 
through Tiffany-Stahl. At present the team 
is working at the Fox studios where they are 
writing , the numbers for the "New Orleans 
Minstrels." 

MADAME OCTAVE. 

Jolson to Introduce Seven 
New Song Numbers 
in "Mammy" 

Al Jolson will introduce seven new song hits in 
"Mammy," the Vitaphone production which he is 
now making at the Warner Studio. All of these com- 
positions have been written especially for the star by 
Irving Berlin, who is now in daily production con- 
ferences with Jolson and his director, Michael Cur- 
tiz. "Mammy" will be the first Al Jolson picture to 
be made entirely from the comedy angle, his first 
three productions, all having been given dramatic 
treatment. ' 



Sid Lorraine Made Tieups 
That Counted With 
Sophie Tucker 

Sophie Tucker turned song plugger de luxe dur- 
ing her recent personal appearances with her 
"talkie," entitled "Honky Tonk" in Chicago, St. 
Louis and Kansas City. Determined to do every- 
thing to put across the songs which Jack Yellen 
and Milton Ager wrote for her picture, Sophie 
made personal appearances at sheet music and rec- 
ord stores, autographing copies and records of her 
songs. In one Chicago store she even went behind 
the counter and 6ang for the customers. When it 
became known that Sophie Tucker was singing in 
the store, the jam became so great that police had 
to be called to control the mob. It was the energetic 
Sid Lorraine, western manager for Ager, Yellen & 
Bornstein, who prevailed upon Miss Tucker to make 
these personal appearances which resulted in greatly 
boosting the sales of the Tucker songs, particularly 
"I'm Doing What I'm Doing for Love," 

Stage Band Presentations 
Will Be New Earle 
Theatre Policy 

On Friday, September 27, the new policy of stage 
band and stage band presentations went into effect 
at the Earle Theatre, which was the first time 
that Atlantic City had had the pleasure of being 
entertained with this sort of a show. This will be 
augmented with picture 6hows which Stanley execu- 
tives promise are to be of the highest sort. For the 
master of ceremonies, Benny Ross, the inimitable 
young man who has been setting the metropolitan 
cities agog, has been secured. This young man has a 
mighty fine voice which he uses to excellent advan- 
tage. His method of introducing acts is very clever 
and in every city where he has worked he has been 
a sensation. In addition to the stage band, the pres- 
entations will consist of the best talent available. 

"Shannons of Broadway" 
To Have Theme Song 

"The Shannons of Broadway," James Gleason's 
comedy hit, being made into an all talking picture 
by Universal, is to have a theme song on the screen. 
In fact, it is to have three songs, all originals and 
written especially for the production by Ray Klagea 
and Jess Greer, of the Universal musical depart- 
ment. The theme song is "Someone to Love Me" 
which is sung by John Breeden, the juvenile, to 
Mary Philbin, his sweetheart in the picture, and 
played on the piano by Gleason, who, with Lucille 
Webster Gleason, have the title roles. 

Mastbaum to Inaugurate 
Radio Hour Each Week 

The Mastbaum this week is inaugurating "Greater 
Mastbaum Hour" over the air. Stuart Barrie, mas- 
ter of ceremonies at the Mastbaum, will alternate 
with Harry Rose, master of ceremonies at the Earle, 
while Charles Previn will have charge of the music. 
The finest acts from the stage shows together with 
the best in classical and popular music will be 
given during this hour, from H to 12 p. m. every 
Monday night. 



Mabel 

WALZER 

Eddie 

DYER 

Featured Comedians in the 
Publix Unit 

"Circus Cabaret" 

This Week — Paramount, Omaha 
Next Week — Paramount, Des Moines 

Direction Wm. Morris Aganey 



UNIFORMS COSTUMES Sf™« BROOKS iVSr 



50 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



SIDSAYS p| 

SONGS 




BEST SELLERS 
Week Ending October 5 

No. / 

"Am I Blue" (M. Witmark & Sons). 
"When My Dreams Come True" (Irv- 
ing Berlin). 

No. 2 

"My Song of the Nile" (M. Witmark 
& Son). 

No. 3 

"Little Pal" (DeSylva-Broivn & Hen- 
derson). 

No. 4 

"Pagan Love Song" (Robbins Music 
Corp.). 

No. 5 

"I'm Just a Vagabond Lover" (Leo 
Feist). 

"Sleepy Valley" (Harms, Inc.). 
No. 6 

"Singing in the Rain" (Robbins Music 
Corp.). 

"Wedding of the Painted Doll" (Sher- 
man Clay). 

No. 7 

"Where the Sweet Forget Me Nots 
Remember" (Remick Music Corp.). 

"If You Believe in Me" (DeSylva- 
Brown & Henderson). 

"True Blue Lou" (Spier & Co slow). 

"Congratulations" (Green & Stept). 

"Piccolo Pete" (Jenkins). 

"I Get tlu> Blues When It Rains" 
(Forster). 

"Let Me Have My Dreams" (M. Wit- 
mark & Sons). 

"Breakaway" (DeSylva - Brown & 
Henderson). 

No. 8 

"Love Me" (Leo Feist). 
"Old Virginia Moon" (Milton Weil). 
"Ain't Misbehavin " (Mills Music 
Corp.). 

* * * 

'TWAS NOT SO LONG AGO— (Harms, Inc.)— The 

hit song of the new Hammerstein production SWEET 
ADELINE, that is already one of the biggest hits 
in the East. It's a very clever 6ong written by two 
men that have many musical comedy hite to their 
credit. Book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein, 2nd, 
music by Jerome Kern. 

"OVER AND OVER AGAIN"— (Harms, Inc.)— A 

beautiful melody and lyric that has both orchestra 
and professional value6. Also looks real commercial. 
Words and music by Bert Kalmer and Harry Ruby. 

* * * 

"SPAIN" — (G. Schirmer, Inc.) — A high class num- 
ber that has both English and Spanish lyrics. It's a 
beautiful song of the standard type and will no doubt 
sell for a long time. By Clara Edwards. 

LONELY TROUBADOUR— (Santly Bros., Inc.)— 
This song introduced by and dedicated to the well 
known RUDY VALLEE is a real good song. The 
lyric is excellent and the melody on a par with same. 
Words, and music by John Klenner. 

* * * 

THEN I'LL KNOW WHY— (Sherman Clay & Co.) 
—The theme eong of the UNITED ARTISTS thriller 
ALIBI. One of the best pictures of the year. 
Should play all the best theatres in the country and 
will of course sell a lot of copies of this song. By 
Paul Tits worth and Lynn Cowan. 

* * * 

THERE'S TOO MANY EYES (That "Wanna" 
Make Eyes) — (Davis, Coots & Engel) — A trick title 
that is well written with a clever melody. Great for 
the little girl who works with the master of cere- 
monies. By Benny Davis, J. Fred Coots and Steve 
Nelson. 



ORGAN SOLOS 



Henri Keates (Chicaga Oriental) put over a com- 
munity song-fest which was delightful to all and 
got a big hand. The theme of his program 
was based on "Making Whoopee" and he featured 
such numbers as "Song of the Nile." "Miss 
You," "You're a Real Sweetheart," "I'll Always 
Be in Love with You," "Some Sweet Day" and "I 
Get the Blues, When It Rains." Between each of 
these numbers he used comedy slides with special 
words to the tune of "Making Whoopee." The audi- 
ence sang lustily and called for more. 



Jesse Crawford (New York Paramount) offers an- 
other of his pleasing organ concerts, in which he 
featured four well known numbers. The numbers, 
Crawford played in his own inimitable way were ; — - 
"Same Old Moon," "Little Pal," "Singin' in the 
Rain" and "Song of the Nile." Crawford used Ben 
Gordon, who sang a pleasing vocal chorus of "Sing- 
in' in the Rain," Robbins Music Corporation's hit 
song, from, "Sketch Book." Crawford was given his 
usual fine reception. 



Arlo Hults (Oil City, Pa., R K O Drake) Hults is 
the featured organist at the Chester Theatre, New 
York City, but for the past month has been guest 
organist at this new theatre. Hults conceived an 
original community song-fest in his solo, which he 
called "Oil City Blues." In this, he incorporated a 
number of "Blues" songs together with some popular 
songs, which everyone sang. Hults uses a "mic" 
attached to the organ and connected to the loud- 
speakers back stage, to announce each number. This 
is an innovation in this city and Hults song-fests 
created so much comment that he has received many 
favorable comments in the local papers. Hults, in 
his masterly manner, offered "Big City Blues," "Am 
I Blue," "Here We Are" and "Pagan Love Song" 
for this well received solo. 



Leonard Smith (Chicago Avalon) This young organ- 
ist is receiving his daily applause each day here re- 
gardless of the "talkies" or anything else that might 
attempt to push off the organist. Smith's solo this 
week consisted of a very selected list of songs. He 
received a flattering applause and took a share of 
the cake. "Am I Blue," "When My Dreams Come 
True," "My Song of the Nine," "Miss You" and 
"Making Whoopee" were numbers used. 



THEME SONGS 



Five special singing numbers which are said to 
mark the closest approach of the sound screen to 
music of the operatic type have been prepared for 
Lawrence Tibbett's "The Rogue's Song," by Her- 
bert Stothart, with Clifford Gray acting as lyricist. 
"The Rogue's Song" will contain several interpola- 
tions from the music of Franz Lehar, composer of 
"The Merry Widow," and is being directed by 
Lionel Barrymore. 



Dolores Costello will sing in her next Vitaphone 
production, "Second Choice," now under way at the 
Warner Studio. The number she will introduce is 
"Life Can Be So Lonesome," which has been com- 
posed especially for the picture by Al Dubin, M. K. 
Jerome and Joe Burke. M. Witmark & Sons will 
publish the sheet music. Howard Bretherton is di- 
recting Miss Costello in "Second Choice." The cast 
includes Chester Morris, Jack Mulhall and Edna 
Murphy. 

Two special numbers have been added to the orig- 
inal score of "Song of the West," Warner Bros. 
Vitaphone version of the operatic success, "Rain- 
bow." Both of these numbers are the work of Ray 
Perkins, head of the theme eong department at the 
Warner studio, and will supplement the music of the 
stage piece composed by Vincent Youmans. "I'll 
Bless That One Sweet Day," a waltz to be sung by 
Vivienne Segal, is one of the new 6ongs. The other 
is "John Barleycorn" which Robert Guzman will 
sing. 




state 5918 



54W.Qj/>do/ph St 
A/cpj OCttino RUMORS 




Hello, Everybody. — The rumor about town, for the 
past week of the merger of Leo Feist, Inc., and 
R K O has been emphatically denied by all executives 
of both companies, but the rumor persists in being 
broadcast. 

Will Rockwell, the well-liked professional manager 
of Harms, Inc., has just returned from his trip to 
the west coast where he supervised the placing of 
the music score in Rudy Vallee'6 first feature picture, 
"The Vagabond Lover." Incidently, Rudy has 
practically completed the picture, and will return to 
New York about the 18th of this month to again 
preside as master of ceremonies at the Paramount 
Theatre. 

Billy Berkes (the Fixer) is again sending out slides 
to the organists, from Remick'6 after serving on a 
jury for the great state of New York, for the past 
two weeks. 

* * * 

Sam Serwer, the wide-awake publicity director for 
Warner-Witmark's has conceived a clever stunt to 
exploit the Warner Bros, picture, "Golddiggers of 
Broadway." He has had lipsticks made, to resemble 
book-matches, to hand out to the ladies, attending 
the show. 

* * # 

Harms, Inc., have published, "Over and Over 
Again," by Bert Kalmar and Harry Rubey, and it is 
in the Moran and Mack picture, "Why Bring That 
Up," which opened last Saturday at the Rialto the- 
atre, New York. 

Rocco Vocco, well known Chicago representative of 
Leo Feist was in town for a few days. Rocco is one 
of the most popular men in the music business. 

Archie Fletcher, general manager of Joe Morris 
Music Co., is back in town for the winter after be- 
ing in Atlantic City for the past two months. 

J. Paul Fogarty, Ted Fiorito and Guy Lombardo 

have written a new collegiate fox trot colled, "Joe 
College" which Leo Feist are publishing. Others of 
the new numbers this firm are publishing are : — 
"Beautiful Thing," a fox tr6t by Walter Hirsch and 
Donald Murray, "When You're Counting the Stars 
Alone," a "Blue Heaven" type of ballad, by Vincent 
Rose, Jack Murray and Ben Russell, "My Victory" 
by Ned Miller, Jules K. Stern and Carmen Lombardo. 

* * # 

Paul Ash, at the Brooklyn Paramomnt, featured 
"Am I Blue" as a special band number last week, 
and it met with so much response that he is again 
featuring it this week. Abe Lyman and his Cali- 

fornians are also repeated the same tune in their 
band number. 

* * * 

"Roxy" was so pleased with the presentation, by 
the Roxyettes, of their "Dance of the Paper Dolls" 
in last week's show, that it continues to be a feature 
of this week's program. The girls, as paper kewpees. 
in pastel colored paper costumes, offer their dance 
to the tune of M. Witmark's "Dance of the Paper 
Dolls." 

* * » 

Wilford White, well known song writer for Harms, 
Inc., has just had published by this firm his latest 
tune, which he has titled "Scotchie." Paul White- 
man was the first to introduce it. Vincent Lopez, 
at the St. Regis Hotel, featured this number with a 
special bag-pipe arrangement that was so good that it 
received many fine comments. 



Will Rockwell, the ever genial and hard working 
professional manager of Harms, Inc., has just re- 
turned from his trip west, where he went to super- 
vise the arranging (and whatever else was necessary) 
for Rudy Vallee's picture, "The Vagabond Lover." 
Incidentally, Harms has the entire score for this 
picture. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



51 



Fast But Wholesome Is 
Pace of Hollywood, Says 
Pitkin on Return to East 

Write 'Em Clean, Because Dirt Is 
Not Wanted, Declares 
Professor 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— The pace of Holly- 
wood is fast, "dizzily fast," but it is the 
speed of a wholesome activity that gives the 
lie direct to the misconceptions aroused by 
misinformed or deliberately falsifying sen- 
sationalists, says Professor Walter B. Pitkin 
of the Columbia University School of Jour- 
nalism, after four months' work at one of 
the large studios as a story supervisor. 

Other conclusions of the professor of short 
story writing, after his Coast visit, include 
these : 

The motion picture industry is 
benefiting from "self-discipline and 
co-ordination not paralleled in any 
previous form of organized human 
activity." 

Possibilities of sound pictures 
have not even been scratched. 

Sound is bringing a new form of 
art which will overshadow the stage, 
novel and short story within a 
decade. 

Of the high-speed working schedules of 
the studios and the false pictures of Holly- 
wood painted by sensation-mongers, Profes- 
sor Pitkin says: 

"It is no unusual occurrence for an execu- 
tive to be on the lot 36 hours at a time. Every 
dinner hostess puts a question mark opposite 
the name of any director she invites, and all 
social engagements are tentative. 

"I do not believe anybody in that busy city 
realizes the ridiculous misconception of Holly- 
wood life which sometimes infiltrates itself 
into news. The stranger, as he steps off the 
train, expects to meet a wild horde of thugs, 
perverts, dope addicts, and miscellaneous luna- 
tics. This is strangely like the European tour- 
ist who looks for Indians and cowboys along 
the New York waterfront, shooting at his in- 
coming steamer. 

"Truth is, Hollywood is a factory town just 
as Pittsburgh and Akron and Detroit are. 
Everybody there is a factory worker. And, 
like most other factories, the workers are 
picked because they can handle their jobs and 
stick to them. All in all, it is one of the 
least exciting places on earth, once you re- 
cover from the myths about it. Indeed, it is 
too much of a factory town. This brings me 
to my one serious criticism of the place. 

"Romance is naturally one of the major 
themes for metion pictures. Dirt is not 
wanted in Hollywood. There are a few people 
in the United States who believe the moon is 
made of green cheese and a few with abnor- 
mal interest in sex. Every picture maker 
knows that he would go bankrupt if he catered 
to such minorities. To the would-be author 
of motion picture scenarios my primary ad- 
vice is, 'Write 'em clean.' " 



Sale of Emelka to U F A 
Denied; Aim Is to Keep 
Foreigners' Hands Off 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— Reports to the effect 
that Ufa was going to buy up the Emelka 
concern have recently been circulated in the 
press. This report is misleading as it stands. 
It is true that a conference took place between 
the directors of these companies, but the ne- 
gotiations were merely conducted to find ways 
and means for preventing a further reduction 
of the German film production and to avoid 
that the majority of shares of the Emelka be 
transferred to foreign hands, as this would 
involve the loss of the Emelka theatre-chain 
as an important basis for the German film 
production, says a Ufa statement. 




Here are the principals of the Tiffany-Stahl frunchise meeting held last week in Butte, 
Mont. Top row, left to right: A. L. Selig, director of publicity and advertising for T-S; E. 
P. White from Livingston; Al Steffes of the Allied States Association; and F. A. Boedicker, 
president of the Montana exhibitors association. Bottom row, left to right: Oscar R. Han- 
son, general sales manager of T-S; Merle Davis, Broadway theatre, Butte; John Gavin from 
Butte and Feinstein from Salt Lake City. 



100,000,000 Attend 
Theatres Each Week, 
De Bra Tells Bankers 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— Nearly 100,000,000 
people attend the theatre each week, according 
to figures quoted at the Bankers' Industrial 
Exploitation by Arthur H. De Bra, assistant 
secretary of the M P P D A. 

De Bra also commented on the great serv- 
ice to American export trade which the mo- 
tion picture renders. "In every American 
picture shown in a foreign country there are 
always several articles, typically American, 
which appeal to the foreign audience," De Bra 
explained. "An estimate has placed the value 
of American exports due to the influence of 
films at $1 for every foot of film shown 
abroad." 



Audiens Combine Worst 
Features of Plays and 
Pictures, Says Clift 

Script Should Be Written for the 
Ordinary Picture With 
Dialog Inserts 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— "The present day 
talking pictures are neither pictures or 
plays but a combination of the worst fea- 
tures of both," said 
Denison Clift, mo- 
tion picture director, 
dialog _ writer and 
playwright. 

Clift has just re- 
turned from Eng- 
land where he 
completed "The 
City of Play" which 
he calls an impor- 
tant picture of con- 
tinental amusement 
park life. Sequences 
were filmed in Ber- 
lin and Vienna. 
"Scotland Yard," his 
play, has just 
opened at the Sam Harris theatre. 

Clift says that script for talking pictures 
should be written as for an ordinary pic- 
ture and dialog sequences should be in- 
serted in such a manner that the essential 
action of the piece would not be slowed 
down. 

After the premiere of "Scotland Yard" he 
left for California where he will write two 
plays for Al Woods. 




Denison Clift 



Audiens Finding Favor 
For Public Addresses 
And Convention Talks 

Jimmie Walker Is Campaigning with 
the Aid of Talking 
Pictures 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Oct. 8.— Secretary of Com- 
merce Thomas W. Lamont last week used a 
talking picture to address members of the 
American Electrical Railway Association, as- 
sembled in convention at Atlantic City. La- 
mont was unable to attend the convention in 
person. He used the screen to put himself 
and his argument over. 

Others who did likewise for the same event 
were Lord Ashfield of London and Ernst 
Reuter of Berlin, both electrical railway kings. 

At the same time the Bankers' Industrial 
Exposition in New York was celebrating mo- 
tion picture day. Bankers were told : "Banks 
build their advertising propaganda on mes- 
sages of self-preservation and economic se- 
curity. They achieve their effects by the 
quality of the idea. The screen is effective 
in the development of the right ideas, talking 
pictures lend themselves to banking publicity 
. . . banks seem to have realized this very 
definitely." 

Motion pictures in industry and politics are 
not new. They are being replaced by talking 
pictures. The Stanley Advertising Company 
has a truck carrying a screen and portable 
reproducing equipment which, in a few days, 
will move about the city showing LaGuardia 
making a campaign speech. Jimmie Walker 
is also campaigning with the aid of talking 
pictures. 

The audible screen has demonstrated its 
advertising and educational value. Portable 
equipment is being sold in many industries, 
is going into schools, colleges and churches 
the country over. 



Chicago Intimate Theatre 
For Gold Coast Opened; 
Plan Vitaphone Act Tests 

Chicago's "intimate theatre for the Gold 
Coast" opened its doors Friday, October 4, 
when the 800-seat Dearborn, remodeled Lub- 
liner & Trinz house, reopened as a sound 
theatre. It is on Division street west of Clark. 

Each Thursday night, after the first show, 
there will be two hours of vaudeville screen 
tryouts for Vitaphone acts. 

It is understood that very soon the ten 
L & T houses.now called "Greater Talkie The- 
atres," will be known as either Publix or 
Balaban & Katz theatres. 



52 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 









QUICK REFERENCE PICTURE CHART 



Amkino 



FLAMES ON THE VOLGA, or Bulat Batyr: Anna Wozjlk. 

Yaroslavtsev. (L) 7000f. (R) Mar. 30, 1929. 
KATORGA (D): A. ZhiUnsky, V. Taskin, V. Popov. (R) 

June 1. (L) 7500f. 
KRASSIN: Special cast. (L) 7000f. (R) Feb. 19, 1929. 
LASH OF THE CZAR, THE: Kachalov, Meyerhold. Stenn. 

(L) 6800f. (R) Feb. 9, 1929. 
MOSCOW TODAY (D): Special cast. (R) April 11. ( L) 

600Uf. 

NEW BABYLON (D) : Sophia Magarill, Sergei Gerasimow, 
Peter Sobolewski, Elena Kusmina. (R) June 29. (L) 

800f)f. 

PRISONERS OF THE SEA: O. Knipper, Tschechowa. N. 

Kutusow. (R) Apr. 13. 1929. 
SHANGHAI DOCUMENT. A (Travelogue): Special cast. 

(L) 5000f. IR) Oct. 13. 1928. 
TEN DAYS THAT SHOOK THE WORLD: Special cast. 

(L) 7600f. (It) Oct. 13. 1928. 
THREE COMRADES AND ONE INVENTION: Olga Tratla- 

kova. (L) 6000f. (R) Oct. 13. 1928. 
TWO DAYS: F. E. Samytschkowsky. (L) 6500f. (R) Feb. 

1. 1929. 

YELLOW PASS. THE: Anna Stenn. (L) 6600f. (R) Dec. 
8. 1928. 



Key to 
Abbreviations 



PASSION SONG, THE: Noah Beery and Olmstead. (L) 

5100f. (R) Oct. 20. 1928. 
PENNY PRINCESS: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
ROSES OF PICARDY: (R) Apr. 15. 1929. 
WRECKERS. THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 



Artclass 



UNMASKED (D-AT): Robert Warwick. Sam Ash, Milton 
Krims, Lyons Wickland. Susan Corroy, William Corbetu 
Charles Slattery. Kate Roemer. Waldo Edwards, Roy Byron. 
Clyde Dillson, Helen Mitchell, Marie Burke. (L) Talk- 
ing. 5449f. 



Chesterfield 



ADORABLE CHEAT (D): Lila Lee, Cornelius Keefe, Burt 
Mcintosh. Reginald Sheffield, Gladden James. Harry Allen. 
Alice Knowland. Virginia Lee. (L) 6400f. (R) Aug. 15. 

1928. (NP) June 9. 1928. 

BELOW THE DEADLINE (D-TJnderworld) : Barbara Worth. 
Frank Leigh, J. P. MacGowan. Walter Merrill, Arthur 
Bankin, Virginia Sale. "Tiny" Ward, Lou Gory. Fred 
Walton. Bill I'atton, Charles Hickman. Mllte Donlin. (L) 
6500f. (R) May 1. 1929. (NP) May 25. 

CAMPUS KNIGHTS (CD): Raymond McKee, Shirley Palm- 
er. Marie Quillen. Jean Laverty. (R) June 15. 1929. 

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE: Helen Foster, Cornelius 
Keefe. Alice Lake. Charles Gerrard. Ray Hallor. (L> 
6200f. (R) Jan. 15. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 

HOUSE OF SHAME (D) : Creighton Hale. Virginia Brown 
Faire. Lloyd Whitlock, Florence Dudley. Fred Walton. 
Carlton King. (L) 6300f. (R) Sept. 15. 1928. (NP) 
Oct. 13. 1928. 

HOUSE OF SECRETS (AT-D) : Marcla Manning. Joseph 
Striker. Elmer Grandin, Herbert Warren. Francis M. Verdi, 
Bichard Stevenson, Harry H. Southard, Edward Bingham. 
(L) 6,100. Sound only. 

JUST OFF BROADWAY (M) : Donald Keith. Ann Christy. 
Larry Steers. DeSacia Mooers, Jack Tanner, Syd Saylor. 
Beryl Roberts. Albert Dresden. (L) 6200f. (R) Feb. 15. 

1929. (NP) Mar 2 1929 

PEACOCK FAN. THE (M) : Lucien Preval, Dorothy Dwan, 
Tom O'Brien. Rosemary Theby. Carlton King, Gladden 
James, David Flndlay, James Wilcox, Fred Malatesta, Alice 
True, Spencer Bell, John Fowler. (L) 5300f. (B) Mar. 
15. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23, 1929. 

SOUTH OF PANAMA (D): CarmeUta Geraghty. Lewis Sar- 
gent. Philo McCullough, Edouardo Raquello, Marie Mes- 
singer, Carlton King, Harry Arras, Joe Burke, Fred Wal- 
ton. (L) 5800f. (R) Nov. 15. 1928. 



Columbia 



ACQUITTED: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

APACHE, THE (D) : Margaret Livingston. Warner Rich- 
mond. Dan Alvardo. Phil McCullough. (L) 5818f. (R) 
Nov. 19, 1928. (NP) Mar. 2, 1928. 

BACHELOR GIRL, THE (D-TME): William Collier, Jr., 
Jacqueline Logan, Edward Hearn. Thelma Todd. (R) May 
3. 1929. (NP) June 22. (L) Talking. 5967f; silent, 6245f. 

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS (My): Virginia Valli. Gaston 
Glass, Otto Matiesen. Andre De Segurola. Fanny Midgley, 
Torben Meyer, Broderick O'FarreU, Otto Hoffman. (L) 
6897f. (R) Feb. 24. 1929. (NP) June 15. 1929. 

BROADWAY HOOFER, A: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

COLLEGE COQUETTE (CD-AT) : Ruth Taylor. John Hol- 
land. William Collier, Jr.. Jobyna Ralston. Edward Piel, 
Jr. (L) Talking, 6149f: silent. 5566f. Recording on fllm 
and disc. (R) Aug. 5. 1929. 

DONOVAN AFFAIR, THE (D-AT): Jack Holt. Agnes Ayres. 
Dorothy Bevier, William Collier, Jr., John Roche, Fred 
Kelsey, Hank Mann, Wheeler Oakman. Virginia Brown 
Faire. Alphonse Ethier. Edward Hearn. Ethel Wales, John 
Wallace. (L) Talking. 7140f: silent. 7189f. (B) Apr. 11. 
1929. (NP) May 18. 

DRIFTWOOD (D): Don Alvarado. Marceline Day. Alan 
Roscoe, J. W. Johnson, Fred Holmes. Frltzl Brunette. 
Nora Cecil. Joe Mack. (L) 6267f. (E) Oct. 15. 1928. 
(NP) Nov. 17. 1928. 

ETERNAL WOMAN. THE (D): Olive Borden. Ralph 
Graves. Ruth Clifford. John Miljan, Nena Quartaro. Josepn 
Swickard. Julia Swayne Gordon. (L) 5812f. (R) Mar. 18. 
1929. (NP) Apr. 6. 1929. 

FAKER, THE (D) : Jacqueline Logan. Charles Delaney. 
Warner Oland. Charles Hill Mailes. Gaston Glass, Flora 
Finch, David Mir, Lon Poff. Fred Kelsey. (L) 6651f. 
(R) Jan. 2. 1929. (NP) Feb. 9, 1929. 
FALL OF EVE, THE (CD-AT): Patsy Ruth Miller. Ford 
Sterling. Jed Prouty. Gertrude Astor, Arthur Rankin, Betty 
Farrington. Fred Kelsey. (L) Sound, 6245f. (R) June, 
1929. (NP) July 20. 
FATHER AND SON (D-AT): Jack Holt. Dorothy Revier. 
Helene Chadwick. Mickey McBan. Wheeler Oakman. (L) 
Talking. 6765f; silent. 6310f. (R) Apr. 22. 1929. (NP) 
May 18. 1929. 

FLYING MARINE. THE (D-TME): Ben Lyon. Shirley 
Mason, Jason Robards. (NP) June 29. (L) Talking. 695ir; 
silent. 5736f. 

GREEN EYES: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

GREENWICH VILLAGE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 



C — Comedy F — Farce 

D — Drama M Melodrama 

R— Romance W Western 

MC— Musical Comedy O — Operetta 
My Mystery 

SOUND 

AT All Talking T — Talking Sequences 

M Musical Score E Sound Effects 

S Singing 

Th» foregoing abbreviations follow Immediate- 
ly after the title. As an example, CD-TME 
signi6es "comedy-drama with talking sequences, 
musical score and sound effects/* 

OTHER ABBREVIATIONS 



L— Length 

NP New Pictures 



R Release 

TOS T. O. Service 



HURRICANE (AT-D): Hobart Bosworth. Johnny Macs 
Brown. Lelia Hyams. Allan Roscoe. Tom O'Brien. Leila 
Mclntyre. Joe Bordeaux and Eddie Chandler. (NP) Sept. 
21. Forthcoming 1929 release. 

LIGHT FINGERS (D-AT): Ian Keith. Dorothy Revier. Car- 
roll Nye. Ralph Theodore. Tom Rickets. (L) Talking. 5700f. 
(R) July 29. 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. (L) Silent 5578f. 
Sound 6700f. 

LONE WOLFFS DAUGHTER (TME) : Lytell and Olmstead. 

(L) 6214f (R) Jan. 13. 1929. 
LOVE CAPTIVE, THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
NOTHING TO WEAR (CD): Jacqueline Logan. Theodore 

Von Eltz Bryant Washburn, Jane Wlnton, Willliam Irving, 

Edythe Flynn. (L) 5701f. (R) Nov. 5 1928. (NP) 

Mar. 9. 1929. 

OBJECT ALIMONY (D) : Lois Wilson. Ethel Grey Terry. 

Douglas Gilmore. Roscoe Karns, Carmellta Geraghty, Dickey 

Moore. Jane Keckley. Thomas Curran. (L) 6266f. (R) 

Dec. 22. 1928. (NP) Jan. 12, 1929. 
POWER OF THE PRESS. THE (D) : Douglas Fairbanks. 

Jr.. Jobyna Ralston, Mildred Harris, Philo McCullough. 

Wheeler Oakman, Robert Edeson. Edward Davis, Del 

Henderson. Charles Clary. (L) 6465f. (R) Oct. 31. 

1928. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 
QUITTER. THE (D): Ben Lyon. Dorothy Revier. Fred 

Konler. Charles McHugh. Sherry Hall. Jane Daly, Henry 

9'*S- plaire McDowell. (L) 5671f. (R) Apr. 1. 1929. 

(NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 
REDEMPTION: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
RESTLESS YOUTH (D): Marceline Day. Ralph Forbes. 

Norman Trevor. Robert Ellis. Mary Mabery. Gordon Elliott. 

Coy Watson. (L) 6085f. (R) Nov. 30. 1928. (NP) 

Dec. 22, 1928. 

SIDESHOW. THE (D) : Marie Prevost. Ralph Graves, "Lit- 
tle Billy." Alan Roscoe. Pat Harmon. Texas Madesen. 
Martha McGruger. Esteban Clemento. Janet Ford, Paul 
Dismute. Bert Price, Chester Morton, Jacques Ray. (L) 
5999f. (R) Dec. 11, 1928. (NP) Feb. 16. 1929. 

SINNERS PARADE (M) : Victor Varconi, Dorothy Revier, 
John Patrick, Edna Marlon, Marjorie Bonner, Clarissa 
Selwynne. Jack Mower. (L) 5616f. (R) Sept. 14. 1928. 
(NP) Oct. 20, 1928. 

STOOL PIGEON (M) : Olive Borden. Charles Delaney. Lucy 
Beaumont. Louis Natheaux, Ernie Adams. Al Hill, Robert 
Wilber, Clarence Burton. (L) 6792f. (R) Oct. 25, 1928. 
(NP) Nov. 17. 1928. 

STREET OF ILLUSION (D) : Virginia Valll. Ian Keith. 
Harry Myers. Kenneth Thomson. (L) 5988f. (R) Sept. 
3. 1928. (NP) Mar. 2. 1929. 

SUBMARINE (D-ME) : Jack Holt. Dorothy Revier, Ralph 
Graves, Clarence Burton. Arthur Rankin. (L) Synchro- 
nized. 8374f; silent. 8192f. (R) Nov. 12, 1928. (NP) 
Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Dec. 1. 1928. 

TRIAL MARRIAGE (D-ME) : Norman Kerry. Sally Eilers. 
Jason Robards, Thelma Todd, Charles Clary. Naomi Child- 
ers. Rosemary Theby. Gertrude Short. (L) Talking, 6639f; 
silent, 6506f. (R) Mar. 10. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 
(TOS) Apr. 20, 1929. 

WICKED ANGEL. THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

YOUNGER GENERATION, THE (D-TM) : Jean Hersholt. 
Lina Basquette, Rosa Rosanova, Ricardo Cortez, Rex Lease. 
Martha Franklin. Julanne Johnston, Jack Raymond. Sydney 
Crossley. Otto Fries. Julia Swayne Gordon, Donald Hall, 
Bernard Siegel. (L) Synchronized. 7866f; silent. 7246f. 
(R) Jan. 24. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) Apr. 
13. 1929. 



Excellent 



BROKEN BARRIERS: Helene CosteUo. (L) 5974f. (R) 

Dec. 1. 1928. 

CLEANUP, THE: Delaney and Blake. (L) 6660f. (R) 

Jan. 25, 1929. 

CONFESSIONS OF A WIFE: Helene Chadwick. (L) 6047f. 

(R) Dec. 10. 1928. 
DREAM MELODY: Riche and Thelby. (L) 5050f. (R) 

Jan. 20. 1929. 
DAVID VALLORY: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
FANNY HAWTHORNE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
LIFE'S CROSSROADS: Hulette and Hamilton. (L) 5355f. 
HEARTS AND MODELS: Forthcoming 1929 releaae. 

(It) Oct. 20. 1928 
MASQUERADE MARRIAGE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
MELLOWING MONEY: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
ONE SPLENDID HOUR: Viola Dana. George Periolot. Allen 
ORCHID WOMAN. THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

Simpson. Lewis Sargent, Jack Richardson, Lucy Beaumont, 

Florence Cooper, Ernie Adams. Hugh Saxon. Charles 

Hichman. (L) (U29f. (R) May 1. 1929. 



First Division 



LINDA (ME-D): Warner Baxter, Helen Foster. Noah 
Beery. Mitchell Lewis. (L) 6775f. 



First National 



BARKER, THE (D-TME) : Milton Sills. Douglas Fairbanks. 
Jr., George Cooper. John Erwin, S. S. Simon, Dorothy 
Mackaill, Betty Compson, Sylvia Ashton. (L) 7137f. (B) 
Dec. 30. 1928. (NP) July 14. 1928. (TOS) Dec. If. 

1928 

BROADWAY BABIES (M-TME) : Alice White. Charles 
Delaney, Fred Kohler, Tom Dugan. Bodil Rosing. Sail? 
Eilers, Marion Byron, Jocelyn Lee. Louis Natheaux. Maurice 
Black. (L) 8067f. (B) June 30. 1929. (NP) June 22. 

BUTTER AND EGG MAN. THE (CD): Jack Mulhall. Grata 
Nissen, Sam Hardy, William Demarest. Gertrude Astor. 
(L) 6467f. (R) Sept. 2. 1928. (NP) June 30, 1928. 
(TOS) July 28. 1928. 

CALIFORNIA MAIL (W) : Ken Maynard. Dorothy Dwan. 
Lafe McKee, Paul Hurst, C. E. Anderson. Fred Burns. 
(L) 5446f. (R) Apr. 7. 1929. (NP) Apr. 20. 1929. 

CAREERS (D-AT): Billie Dove. Antonio Moreno. Thelma 
Todd, Noah Beery. Holmes Herbert. Carmel Myers. Robert 
Frazer. Sojin. (L) 8435f. (Rj June 2. 1929. (NP) June 
22. (TOS) June 29. 

CARELESS AGE, THE (CD): Douglas Fairbanks. Jr., Lor- 
etta Young, Carmel Myers. Holmes Herbert. Kenneth Thom- 
son, George Baxter. Wilfred Noy, Doris Lloyd, Ilka Chase. 
Ravmond Lawrence. (NP) Aug. 17. 

CHEYENNE (W): Ken Maynard. Gladys McConnell. James 
Bradbury, Jr., Tarzan. William Franey. Charles Whlttakar. 
(R) Feb. 3. (L) 5,944f. 

CHILDREN OF THE RITZ (ME-CD) : Dorothy MackalU. 
Jack Mulhall, James Ford. Eddie Burns. Lee Mora*. 
Kathryn McGuire. Evelyn Hall. Dorris Dawson, Aggie Her- 
ring, Frank Crane. (R) Mar. 3. (L) Sound. 6565f. 
Silent. 6287f. (TOS) Mar. 2. 

COMPANIONATE MARRIAGE (D): Betty Bronson. Alec B. 
Francis, William J. Welsh, Edward Martlndel. Sarah Pad- 
den. Hedda Hopper. Richard Walling. Arthur Rankin. June 
Nash. (L) 6227f. (R) Oct. 21. 1928. (NP) Mar. 16. 
1929. 

CRASH. THE (D-M) : Milton Sills. Thelma Todd. Wade 
Boteler, William Demarest. Fred Warren. Sylvia Ashton, 
DeWitt Jennings. (L) 6225f. (R) Oct. 7. 1928. (NP) 
Sept. 20. 1928. (TOS) Nov. 24, 1928. 

DANCING VIENNA (D): Lya Mara. Ben Lyon, Herman 
Picha. Kurt Garron. Olga Engl, George Burghardt. GusUT 
Charle. Julius Falkenstein. Arnold Korff. Eugene Burg. 
Albert Paulig. (R) Jan. 1. (L) 5,C83f. 

DARK STREETS (D-AT): Jack Mulhall. Llla Lee. Aggie 
Herring. Earl Pingree. Will Walling. E. H. Calvert. Maarlce 
Black. (NP) Aug. 10. 

DIVINE LADY. THE (D-TME): Corlnne Griffith. Victor 
Varconi. H. B. Warner. Ian Keith. Marie Dressier. Doro- 
thy Cummlngs, William Conklin. Montague Love. Julia 
Swayne Gordon, Michael Vavitch. (L) 9036f. (R) Mar. 
31. 1929. (NP) Apr. 6. 1929. (TOS) May 11. 1929. 

DO YOUR DUTY (CD): Charlie Murray. Lucien Llttlefleld. 
Doris Dawson. Charles Delaney. Ed Brady. Washington 
Blue Aggie Herring. George Pierce. (L) 6027f. (R) Got. 
14. 1928. (NP) Oct. 13. 1928. 

DRAG (D-TME): Richard Barthelmess. Lucien Llttlefleld. 
Katherine Ward. Alice Day, Tom Dugan. Lila Lee. Mar- 
garet Fielding. (L) 7642f. (R) July 21. 1929. (NP) 
July 13. (TOS) August 10. 

FAST LIFE (D-AT): Douglas Fairbanks. Jr.. Loretta Young. 
Chester Morris. William Holden, Frank Sheridan. Bay 
Hallon. John St. Polis. (L) Talking. 7541f. (R) Sept. 29, 
1929. (NP) Aug. 31. (TOS) Oct. 6. 

GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE. THE (D-TME): Loretta 
Young, Carroll Nye. Matthew Betz. Lucien Llttlefleld, Ralph 
Lewis, George Stone, Julia Swayne Gordon, Majel Colsman. 
Charles Sellon. Robert Haines. (R) June 22. 1629. (NP) 
June 15. (L) Talking. 7159f: silent, 6706f. 

GLORIOUS TRAIL, THE (W): Ken Maynard. Gladys Mo- 
Connell. Frank Hagney, Les Bates, James Bradbury, Jr., 
Billy Franey. Chief Yowlache. (L) 6886f. (It) Oot. 18. 
1928. (NP) Sept. 29, 1928. 

GREAT DIVIDE (AT-MD) : Dorothy Mackaill. Ian Keith. 
Lucien Littlefleld, Ben Hendricks. Myrna Loy. Frank 
Tang, Creighton Hale. George Fawcett. Jean LavertJ. 
Claude Gillingwater. Roy Stewart, James Ford, Jean Lor- 
raine and Gordon Elliott. (NP) Sept. 21. 

HARD TO GET (CD-AT): Dorothy Mackaill. Jimmle Fln- 
layson. Louise Fazenda. Jack Oakie, Edmund Bonn 
Clarissa Selwynne, Charles Delaney. (NP) Aug. 10. (TOS) 
Sept. 28. 

HAUNTED HOUSE. THE (MY-ME) : Chester Conklin. Larry 

Kent. Thelma Todd. Montague Love. Flora Finch. William 
V. Mong, Barbara Bedford, Eve Southern. Edmund Braue. 
(L) 5755. (R) Nov. 4. 1928. (NP) Oct. 27. 1928. 
HER PRIVATE LIFE (T-D) : Billie Dove, Walter Pldgeon, 
Holmes Herbert. Montagu Love. Roland Young. Thelma 
Todd. Mary Forbes. Brandon Hurst and Zasu Pitts. (NP) 
Sept. 21. 

HIS CAPTIVE WOMAN (D-TME): Milton Sills. Dorothy 
Mackaill. Gladden James. Jed Prouty, Sidney Braoey. 
Gertrude Howard. Marion Byron. George Fawcett, William 
Holden, Frank Reicher. August Tollaire. (L) 8305f. (B* 
Apr. 7. 1929. (NP) Mar. 2. 1929. 

HOT STUFF (CD-TME): Alice White. Louise Faztnda. 
William Bakewell. Doris Dawson. Ben Hall, Cbarlea Sel- 
lon, Beddy Messinger. Andy Devlne, Larry Banthim. (L) 
6774f. (R) May 5. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 

HOUSE OF HORROR (MyC-ME): Louise Fazenda. Charter 
Conklin, James Ford, Thelma Todd. William V. Mong, 
Emile Chautard, William Orlamoud. Dale Fuller. Tenaa 
Holtz. (L) 6919f. (R) Apr. 28. 1929. (NP) Apr. IS. 
1929. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



53 



ISLE OF LOST SHIPS, THE (D): Jason Robards, Vir- 
ginia Valli. Clarissa Selwynne. Noah Beery, Robert 
O'Connor. Harry Cording, Margaret Fielding, Katherine 
Ward, Robert Homans, Jack Ackroyd and Sam Baker. 
(P) Sept. 21. 

LAWLESS LEGION, THE (W): Ken Maynard, Nora Lane. 
Paul Hurst. J. P. McGowan, Prank Rice, Howard Trues- 
dell, Tarzan. (R) Mar. 3. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 

LILAC TIME (D-ME): Colleen Moore, Gary Cooper, Eu- 
genie Besserer, Burr Mcintosh, Kathryn McGuire, Cleve 
Moore, Jack Stone. Emile Chautard, Arthur Lake. (L) 
8967f. (R) Nov. 18, 1928. (NP) June 2, 1928. (TOS) 
Aug. 18, 1928. 

LOVE AND THE DEVIL (D-ME): Milton Sills, Marl* 
Corda, Ben Bard, Nellie Bly Baker, Amber Norman. (L) 
6431f. (R) Mar. 24, 1929. (NP) June 29. 

MAN AND THE MOMENT, THE (D-TME) : Billie Dove. 
Rod LaRocque. Gwen Lee, Robert Schable. Charles Sellon, 
George Bunny. (L) Talking. 7086f; silent 6539f. (R) June 
23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. (TOS) August 3. 

MOST IMMORAL LADY. A (D-TS) : Leatrice Joy, Walter 
Pidgeon, Sidney Blackmer, Montague Love. Josephine 
Dunn. Robert Edeson, Donald Reed. Florence Oakley. Wil- 
son Benge. (NP) September 28. 

NAUGHTY BABY (CD-ME): Alice White. Jack Mulhall, 
Thelma Todd. Doris Dawson. James Ford, Natalie Joyce. 
Frances Hamilton. Fred Kelsey. Rose Dione. Fanny Midgely, 
Benny Rubin, Andy Devine, George Stone, Raymond Tur- 
ner. Larry Banthim. (L) 6406f. (U) Dec. 16, 1928. 
(NP) Dec. 8, 1928. (TOS) Feb. 9, 1929. 

NIGHT WATCH, THE (D-ME) : Billie Dove, Paul Lukas. 
Donald Reed. Nicholas Sousanin, Nicholas Bela, George 
Periolat, William looker. Gus Partes. (L) 6612f. (B) 
Sept. 9, 1928. (NP) Oct. 13. 1928. 

OUTCAST (D-ME): Corinne Griffith. James Ford, Edmund 
Lowe, Huntly Gordon, Kathryn Carver, Louise Fazenda, 
Sam Hardy, Patsy O'Byrne. Lee Moran. (L) 6622f. (R) 
Nov. 11. 1928. (NP) Oct. 27. 1928. (TOS) Dec. 1, 1928. 

PRISONERS (D-TME): Corinne Griffith. James Ford. Bela 
Lugosi, Jan Keith, Julanne Johnston. Ann Schaeffer, Baron 
Hesse, Otto Matieson, Harry Northrup. (L) 7800f. (B) 
May 19, 1929. (NP) July 20. 

ROYAL RIDER. THE (W) : Ken Maynard. (L) 5957f. (R) 
May 5. 1929. 

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN (D-TME): Corinne Griffith, 
Grant Withers. Albert Conti, Alma Tell. Lucien Littlefleld. 
Charles Lane. Ann Schaeffer. Marcia Harris. (L) 7950f. 
(B) Apr. 14. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) May 25. 

SCARLET SEAS (D-ME): Richard Bartheimess. Betty 
Compson, Loretta Young. James Bradbury, Sr., Jack Cur- 
tis. Knute Erickson. (L) 6237f. (R) Dec. 9. 1928. (NP) 
Dec. 1. 1928. (TOS) Feb. 2. 1929. 

SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN (MT-ME) : Creighton 
Hale, Thelma McNeill, Thelma Todd, Sheldon Lewis, Wil- 
liam V. Mong, Sojin. Laska Winters, Ivan Christy, De- 
Witt Jennings, Nora Cecil, Kala Pasha, Harry Fitzgerald. 
Alonzo Rositto, Harry Tenbrooke. (L) 5405f. (R) Feb. 
17. 1929. (NP) March 9, 1929. 

SHOW GIRL (CD-ME) : Alice White, Donald Reed. Lee 
Moran, Charles Delaney, Richard Tucker, Gwen Lee, 
Jimmie Finlayson, Kate Price, High Roman, Bernard Ran- 
dall. (L) 6133f. (R) Sept. 23. 1928. (NP) Sept.. 15. 
1928. (TOS) Dec. 15, 1928. 

SMILING IRISH EYES (D-TS): Colleen Moore. James HaU. 
Claude Gillingwater, Robert Homans, Aggie Herring, Betty 
Francisco. Julanne Johnston, Robert O'Connor, John Beck, 
Edward Earl. Tom O'Brien, Oscar Apfel, Fred Kelsey. Otto 
Lederer. (L) 8550f. (R) July 31, 1929. (TOS) Sept. 
T. (NP) July 27. 

SQUALL, THE (D-AT) : Myrna Loy, Alice Joyce, Richard 
Tucker, Carroll Nye, Loretta Young. (L) 9629f. (R) 
May 26, 1929. (TOS) June 29. 

SYNTHETIC SIN (D-ME): Colleen Moore, Antonio Moreno, 
Kathryn McGuire, Edythe Chapman, Montague Love, Ger- 
trude Astor, Gertrude Howard, Ben Hendricks, Jr., Eay- 
mond Tucker. (L) 6852f. (R) Jan. 6. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 2, 1929. 

TWIN BEDS (C-AT): Jack Mulhall. Patsy Ruth Miller. 
Armond Kaliz, Gertrude Astor. Knute Erickson, Edythe 
Chapman, Jocelyn Lee, Nita Martan, ZaSu Pitts, Eddie 
Gribbon. Ben Hendricks, Jr., Carl Levinnes. Alice Lake. 
Bert Roach. (R) July 14. 1929. (NP) July 20. (L) 
Talking, 7266f. 

TWO WEEKS OFF (CD-TME): Dorothy MackaiU. Jack Mul- 
hall. Gertrude Astor, Jimmy Finlayson, Kate Price, Jed 
Prouty. Eddie Gribbon, Dixie Gay, Gertrude Mesainger. 
(L) 8017f. (R) May 12. 1929. (NP) May 11. 1929. (TOS) 
June 8. 

WARE CASE. THE IMS) : Stewart Rome. Betty Rome. Ian 
Fleming, Wellington Briggs. Cynthia Murtagh. Patrick 
Stewart, Cameron Carr, Syd Ellery. Patrick Ludlow. (L) 
6185f. (R) Nov. 25, 1928. (NP) Mar. 3. 1929. 

WATERFRONT (CD-ME) : Dorothy MackaiU. Jack Mulhall. 
James Bradbury. Jr., Knute Erickson. Ben Hendricks, Jr., 
William Norton Bailey, Pat Harmon. (L) 6142f. (B) 
Sept, 16, 1928. (NP) Sept. 22. 1928. (TOS) Oct. 6. 
1928 

WEARY RIVER (MD-TME) : Richard Bartheimess, Betty 
Compson, George Stone, William Holden, Louis Natheaux, 
Raymond Turner, Robert O'Connor. (L) 7976f. (R) Feb. 
10. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) May 18. 

WHIP, THE (D-ME) : Dorothy Mackalll. Ralph Forbes. 
Anna Q. Nllsson. Lowell Sherman, Albert Gran, Marc 
McDermott, Lou Payne, Arthur Clayton. (L) 6058f. (R) 
Sept. 30. 1928. (NP) JJuly 14. 1928. 

WHY BE GOOD (CD-ME): Colleen Moore. Neil Hamilton. 
Bodil Rosing, John Sainpolis, Edward Martindel, Eddie 
Clayton, Lincoln Stedman, Louis Natheaui. Collette Merton, 
Dixie Gay. (L) 7507f. (R) Mar. 17, 1929. (NP) Mar. 
9, 1929. (TOS) Mar. 30. 1929. 



Fox 



AIR CIRCUS, THE (MD-TME): David Rollins. Arthur 
Lake, Sue Carol. Charles Delaney. Heinie Conklin. Louise 
Dresser. Earl Robinson. (L) 7702f. (R) Sept. 30. 1928. 
(NP) Oct. 20, 1928. (TOS) Jan. 5. 1929. 

BEHIND THAT CURTAIN (My-AT): Warner Baxter, Lois 
Moran. Gilbert. Emery, Claude King, Philip Strange. Boris 
Karloff, Jamiel Hassen, Peter Gawthorne, John Sogers. 
Montague Shaw. Finch Smiles, Mercedes De Valasco, E. L. 
Park. (L) 8300f. (E) June 30, 1929. (TOS) Aug. 31. 
(NP) July 6. 

BIG TIME (AT-CD): Le e Tracy. Mae Clarke. Daphine Pol- 
lard, Josephine Dunn, and Stepin Fetchit. Directed by 
Kenneth Hawks. (NP) Oct. 5. 

BLACK MAGIC (D-ME): Josephine Dunn, Earle Foxe, John 
Holland. Henry B. Walthall, Dorothy Jordon, Fritz Feld. 
Sheldon Lewis, Ivan Lindow, Blue Washington. (L) 5835f. 
Silent, 5855f. (R) June 2. 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. 

BLACK WATCH, THE (R-AT): Victor McLaglen, Myrna 
Loy, David Torrence, David Percy, Joseph Diskay, Joyzelle, 
David Rollins, Lumsden Hare, Roy D'Arcy, Mitchell Lewis. 
Cyril Chadwick, Francis Ford, Walter Long, Frederick 
Sullivan. Richard Travera, Pat Somerset. Claude King. 
(L^ 8487f. (E) May 26, 1929. (NP) June 15. (TOS) 

BLINDFOLD (D-M) : Lois Moran, George O'Brien, Earl 
Foxe, Don Terry, Maria Alba, Fritz Feld, Andy Clyde, 
Craufurd Kent, Robert E. Homans, John Kelly, Philips 
Smalley. (L) 5598f. (R) Dec. 9, 1928. (NP) Dec. 8, 
1928. 

BLUE SKIES (CD-M): Helen Twelvetrees, Frank Albertson. 
Rosa Gore, William Orlamond, Claude King, Carmencita 
Johnson, Freddie Frederick, Ethel Wales. Adele Watson. 
Jerome Eddy. L) Silent. 5367f. ; sound, 5408f. (R) Mar. 
7. 1929. (NP) Apr. 6. 1929. 



CAPTAIN LASH (D-M): Victor McLaglen, Claire Windsor. 

Arthur Stone, Albert Conti, Clyde Cook, Jean Laverty. 

Frank Hagney. Boris Charsky, Jane Winton. (L) 6453f. 

(R) Jan. 6. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 
CHASING THROUGH EUROPE (D-TME): Sue Carol, Nick 

Stuart, Gustav von Seyffertitz, Gavin Gordon, E. Alyn 

Warren. (L) Silent, 5622f. : sound, 5581f. (R) June 9. 

1929. (NP) Aug. 10. 
CHRISTINA (D): Janet Gaynor. Charles Morton, Rudolph 

Schlldkraut. Lucy Dorralne. Harry Cording. (L) 6955f. 

(R) Mar. 30. 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. 
COCK-EYED WORLD, THE (D-AT) : Lily Damita, Victor 

McLaglen. Edmund Lowe. Lelia Karneliy. Bobby Burns, 

Jean Bary, Joe Brown. (L) 10,611f. (NP) Sept. 7. (TOS) 

Oct. 5. 

DRY MARTINI (D-M): Mary Astor, Matt Moore, Jocelyn 
Lee. Sally Eilers, Albert Gran, Albert Conti, Tom Rickets. 
Hugh Trevor, John T. Dillon, Marcelle Corday. (L) 7176f. 
(R) Oct. 7. 1928. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS) Dec. 1, 
1928. 

EXALTED FLAPPER, THE (CD-ME): Sue Carol, Barry 
Norton. Irene Rich, Albert Conti, Sylvia Field, Stuart 
Irwin, Lawrence Grant, Charles Clary. Michael Vlsaroff, Don 
Allen, Landers Stevens. (R) May 26. 1829. (NP) June 22. 
(L) 5806f. 

FAR CALL, THE (D-ME): Charles Morton. Leila Hyams. 
Ulrich Haupt, Stanley J. Sanford, Warren Hymer, Arthur 
Stone, Charles Middleton, Pat Hartigan. Ivan Linow. Dan 
Wolheim, Randolph Scott, Charles Gorman, Bernard Siegel, 
Willie Fung, Harry Gripp. Frank Chew. Sam Baker. (L) 
Sound, 5313f; silent, 5285f. (R) Apr. 28, 1929. (NP) 
June 1. 

FAZIL (RD-M): Charles Farrell, Greta Nissen, Mae Busch, 
Vadim TJraneff, Tyler Brooke. Eddie Sturgis. Josephine 
Borio, John Bole9. John T. Murray, Erville Alderson, Dale 
Fuller. Hank Mann. (L) 7217f. (R) Sept. 9, 1928. (NP) 
Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Dec. 1, 1928. 

FOUR DEVILS (D-TME): Janet Gaynor. Mary Duncan. 
Charles Morton. Barry Norton. Farrell MacDonald, Nancv 
Drexel. (L) 6500f. (NP) July 20. 

FOUR SONS (D-ME): Margaret Mann, James Hall. Franc's 
X. Bushman. Jr., Charles Morton, George Meeker, June 
Collyer, Wendell Franklin. Earle Foxe. Albert Gran. August 
Tollaire, Frank Reicher. Jack Pennick. Hughie Mack, Ruth 
Mix. (L) 8962f. (R) Sept. 2, 1928. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 
(TOS) Jan. 12. 1929. 

FOX MOVIETONE FOLLIES (MC-ATS) : Lola Lane. Frank 
Richardson, David Percy, Sue Carol, Dixie Lee, David 
Rollins, Sharon Lynn. John Breedon. Stepin Fetchit. (L) 
8291f. (R) May 25. 1929. (NP) June 15. (TOS) June 29. 

FUGITIVES (MD-M): Madge Bellamy, Don Terry, Arthur 
Stone, Earle Fox, Matthew Betz, Lumsden Hare. Hap 
Ward, Edith Torke, Jean Laverty. (L) 5356f. (R) Jan. 
27, 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 

GHOST TALKS, THE (My-TME) : Special cast. (B) Mar. 
30. 1929. (L) 6482T. 

GIRL FROM HAVANA (AT-D): Paul Page, Lola Lane. 
Natalie Moorhead. Kenneth Thomson. Warren Hymer, 
Joseph Glrard and Adele Windsor. Directed by Benjamin 
Stoloff. (NP) Sept. 21. 

GIRLS GONE WILD (CD-M): Sue Carol, Nick Stuart, 
William Russell, Roy D'Arcy. Leslie Fenton, Hedda 
Hopper, John Darrow, Matthew Betz, Edmund Breeze, 
Minna Ferry, Louis Natheaux. Lumsden Hare. (L) Talk- 
ing. 5332f. (R) Feb. 24. 1929. (NP) March 23, 1929. 

GREAT WHITE NORTH. THE (D-M): H. A. and Sidney 
Snow's Arctic expedition. (L) 5560f. (R) Dec. 30. 1928. 
(NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 

HEARTS IN DIXIE (AT-D): Stephin Fetchit. Clarence 
Muse, Eugene Jackson, Dorothy Morrison. Bernice Pilot. 
Clifford Ingram. Mildred Washington, Zach Williams. Ger- 
trude Howard, Vivian Smith, Robert Brooks, A. C. H. 
Billbrew, Richard Carlysle. (R) Mar. 10. (L) Sound. 
7463f. Silent. 6444f. (TOS) May 25. 

HOMESICK (F): Sammy Cohen, Harry Sweet. Marjorie 
Beebe, Henry Armetta. Pat Harmon. (L) 5153f. (R) 
Dec. 16. 1928. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 

IN OLD ARIZONA (D-TME): Warner Baxter, Edmund 
Lowe. (L) 8724f. (E) Jan. 20. 1929. (TOS) Mar. 23. 
1929. 

JOY STREET (CD-M): Lois Moran. Nick Stuart, Eex Bell, 
Jose Crespo, Dorothy Ward. Ada Williams. Maria Alba. 
Sally Phipps. Florence Allen, Mabel Vail, John Breedon. 
(E) Apr. 7. 1929. (L) Silent, 5754f. Sound. 5748f. 
(NP) May 11, 1929. 

LUCKY STAR (D-T) : Charles Farrell. Janet Gaynor. 
Hedwiga Eeicher. Guinn (Big Boy) Williams, Paul Fix, 
Gloria Grey. Hector V. Sarno. (L) Talking. 8895f; 
silent. 8725f. (R) Aug. 18. 1929. (TOS) Sept. 28. 

MAKING THE GRADE (CD-M): Edmund Lowe, Lois 
Moran, Albert Hart. Lucien Littlefleld, James Ford. Sher- 
man Ross. John Alden, Glno Conti. Roife Sedan, Ida 
Tora, Mary Ashley. (L) Talking. 5903f; silent. 5024f. (E) 
Feb. 10. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 

MASKED EMOTIONS (D-TME): George O'Brien, Nora Lane. 
Farrell MacDonald, David Sharpe, Edward Pell, Sr.. Frank 
Hagney. (L) Silent. 5389f. Sound, 5419f. (E) May 19. 
1929. (NP) June 15. (L) 6419f. 

MASQUERADE (CD): Alan Birmingham, Leila Hyams. 
Clyde Cook. Farrell MacDonald, Arnold Lucy, George 
Pierce, Eita Le Eoy, John Breeden, Jack Pierce, Pat 
Moriarity, Jack Carlisle, Frank Richardson. (N) July 27. 
(L) Talking. 5643f. 

ME, GANGSTER (D-M): June Collyer, Don Terry, Anders 
Randoff, Stella Randoff, Al Hill, Burr Mcintosh, Walter 
James. Gustav Von Seyffertitz. Herbert Ashton. Harry 
Cattle. Joe Brown. Arthur Stone, Nigel De Bruller. Carol 
Lombard, Bob Percy. (L) 6042f. (R) Oct. 14. 1928. 
(NP) Nov. 3. 1928. (TOS) Dec. 8, 1928. 

MOTHER KNOWS BEST (D-TME): Madge Bellamy. Louise 
Dresser, Barry Norton, Albert Gran, Joy Auburn. Stuart 
Edwin. Lucien Littlefleld, Dawn O'Day. Annette De Kirby, 
Aaron De Kirby. (L) 10.116f. (R) Oct. 28, 1928. (NP) 
Nov. 17, 1928. (TOS) Nov. 3, 1928. 

MOTHER MACHREE (D-M): Belle Bennett. Phillippe De 
Lacy, Pat Somerset, Victor McLaglen, Ted McNamara, 
Eulalie Jensen, Constance Howard, Rodney Hildebrand, 
Neil Hamilton, William Piatt, Ethel Clayton, Jacque Rol- 
lens. Joyce Wirard. (L) 6807f. (R) Oct. 21. 1928. (NP) 
Mar. 9, 1929. 

NEW YEAR'S EVE (D-M): Mary Astor, Charles Morton. 
Arthur Stone. Helen Ware, Freddie Frederick, Florence 
Lake. Sumner Getchell, Virginia Vance. Stuart Erwin. 
(R) Feb. 24, 1929. (L) Silent. 5959f. Sound. 5984T. 
(NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 

NOT QUITE DECENT (D-TM) : June Collyer, Louise 
Dresser, Allan Lane. Oscar Apfel, Paul Nicholson, Marjorie 
Beebe, Ben Hewlett, Jack Kenney. (L) Talking. 4965f: 
silent. 4653f. (R) Mar. 24, 1929. (TOS) June 22. (NP) 
May 18. 1929. 

ONE WOMAN IDEA, THE (D-ME): Rod La Rocque, 
Marceline Day, Sharon Lynn, Sally Phipps, Shirley Dorman. 
Ivan Lebedeff, Douglas Gilmore, Gino Corrado, Joseph W. 
Girard, Arnold Lucy, Frances Rosay, Guy Trento. Daniel 
Hasson. Tom Tamarez, Cov Watson. (L) Talking. 6111f; 
silent. 6106f. (R) June 2. 1929. (NP) June 22. 

PLASTERED IN PARIS (C-M): With Cohen. Pennick and 
Linow. (L) 5640f. (R) Sept. 23. 1928. 

PLEASURE CRAZED (D-AT): Marguerite Churchill, Ken- 
neth Macenna, Dorothy Burgess, Campbell Gullan, Douglas 
Gilmore, Henry Kolker. Frederick Graham, Rex Bell 
Charlotte Merriam. (R) July, 1929. (NP) July 20. (L) 
Talking. 5560f. 

PREP AND PEP (CD-M): David Rollins, Nancy Drexel. 
John Darrow. E. H. Calvert, Frank Albertson. (L) 6086f. 
(R) Nov. 18. 1928. (NP) Nov. 3. 1928. 



PROTECTION (MD-ME) Dorothy Burgess, Robert Elliott, 
Paul Page. Ben Hewitt, Roy Stewart, Dorothy Ward. Wil- 
liam H. Tooker, Joe Brown, Arthur Hoyt. (R) May 12. 
(L) 6,511. 

RED DANCE, THE (MD-M): Dolores Del Rio, Charles 
Farrell, Ivan Linow, Boris Charsky, Dorothy Revler, Andre 
Segurola, Dimitri Alexis. (L) 9250f. (R) Dec. 2. 1928. 
(NP) Sept. 22. 1928. (TOS) Mar. 9, 1928. 

RED WINE (CD-M): June Collyer, Conrad Nagel, Arthur 
Stone, Sharon Lynn, E. Alyn Warren, Ernest Hilliard, 
Ernest Wood. Marshal "Babe" Ruth, Dixie Gay, Margaret 
La Marr. (L) 61«4f. (R) Dec. 23, 1928. (NP) Mar. 
9. 1929. (TOS) Jan. 26. 1929. 

RILEY THE COP (CD-M): J. Farrell MacDonald. <L) 
6132f. (R) Nov. 25, 1U28. 

RIVER, THE (D): Charles Farrell. Mary Duncan, Ivan 
Linow, Margaret Mann. Aldredo Sabato. (L) 7313f. (NP) 
July 20. 

ROMANCE OF THE UNDERWORLD (D-M): With Astor 
and Boles. (L) 6162f. (R) Nov. 11, 1928. (TOS) Jan. 
19 1929. 

SALUTE: (AT-D) : George O'Brien, William Janey, Frank 
Albertson, Helen Chandler, Joyee Compton, Clifford Demu- 
sey, Lumsden Hare, Stephin Fetchit, David Butler, Bex 
Bell. John Breeden. (NP) Sept. 7. 

SIN SISTER, THE (CD-M): Nancy Carroll, Lawrence Gray, 
Josephine Dunn, Myrtle Stedman, Anders Randolf, Rich- 
ard Alexander. Frederick H. Graham. George Davis, David 
Callis. (L) 6072f. (R) Feb. 3. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 
1929. (TOS) Apr. 27. 1929. 

SPEAKEASY (CD-AT): Paul Page, Lola Lane, Henry B. 
Walthall. Helen Ware, Warren Hymer. Stuart Erwin, 
Sharon Lynn, Erville Alderson, James Guilfoyle, Helen 
Lynch, Marjorie Beebe, Sailor Vincent, Joseph Cavrthome, 
Ivan Linow. (L) 6775f. (1!) Mar. 24, 1929. (NP) Apr. 
6. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 27. 1929. 

STRONG BOY (D-M): Victor McLaglen, Leatrice Joy. Far- 
rell MacDonald, Slim Summerville. Kent Sanders, Tom 
Wilson, Jack Pennick, Robert Ryan, David Torrence, 
Dolores Johnson. (L) 6567f. (R) Mar. 3. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS) May 4. 1929. 

SUNRISE (D-M): George O'Brien, Janet Gaynor, Bodil 
Rosing, Margaret Livingston, Farrell MacDonald, Ralph 
Sipperly, Jane Winton, Arthur Housman, Eddie Boland, 
(L) 8393f. (R) Nov. 4, 1928. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) 
July 21, 1928. 

TAKING A CHANCE: With Rex Bell. (L) 4876f. (B) 

Nov. 18. 1928. 

THEY HAD TO SEE PARIS (AT-CD): Will Rogers. Irene 
Rich, Marguerite Churchill. Fill Dorsay, Owen Davis. Rex 
Bell, Ivan Lebedeff. Christiane Tves. Edgar Kennedy. 
Marcelle Corday, Marcia Manon, Theodore Lodi, Bob Kerr. 
Andre Cheron. Gregory Gay. (NP) Sept. 21. 

THROUGH DIFFERENT EYES (D-AT): Mary Duncan. 
Edmund Lowe. Warner Baxter. Earle Foxe. Donald Gal- 
lagher, Florence Lake. (R) Apr. 7, 1929. (L) 5166f. 
(NP) May 11. 1929. (TOS) June 8. 

TRENT'S LAST CASE (My-M-M): Raymond Griffith. Ray- 
mond Hatton, Marceline Day. Donald Crisp, Lawrence 
Gray, Nicholas Soussanin, Anita Gravin, Ed Kennedy. 
(R) Mar. 31, 1929. (L) Silent, 6809f.; sound. 5834f. 
(NP) May 18, 1929. 

TRUE HEAVEN (D-M): George O'Brien, Lois Moran. Phillip 
Smalley, Oscar Apfel. Duke Martin. Andre Cheron, Don- 
ald MacKenzie. Hedwig Reicher, Will Stanton. (L) B531f. 
(R) Jan. 20. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 
6. 1929. 

VALIANT, THE (D-AT): Paul Muni and Churchill. (B) 

Apr. 21. 1929. (L) 5537f. 
VEILED WOMAN, THE (D-M): Lia Tora. Paul Vlncentl, 

Walter McGrail, Josef Swickard, Kenneth Thompson, Andre 

Cheron, Ivan Lebedeff. Maude George. (L) Silent. 5185f. 

Sound. 6192f. (It) Apr. 14. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 
WORDS AND MUSIC (AT-CD): Lois Moran. David Percy. 

Helen Twelvetrees, William Orlamond. Elizabeth Patterson. 

Duke Morrison, Frank Albertson, Tom Patrirola, Bubbles 

Crowe]]. Biltmore Quartet. (NP) Sept. 7. (TOS) Sept. 21. 



General Pictures 



BACHELORS CLUB, THE (D) : Richard Talmadge, Barbara 
Worth. Edna Murphy. Edna Ellsmere, V. Talbot Henderson, 
Herbert Hayes, Barry Palmer. (L) 5600f. (NP) June 15. 

BACK FROM SHANGHAI (D): Vera Reynolds. Sojin, 
Joseph W. Girard. Henry Sedley. (L) 5400f. (R) Mar. 15. 

HEROIC LOVER (D) : Leonard St. Leo. Stuart Holmes, 
Barbara Bedford. Ted Snell. Hugh Metcalf. William Franey 
(R) Feb. 5. (L) 5500L 



Gotham 



FATHER AND SON (AT): Noah Beery. Noah Beery. Jr. 
Forthcoming 1929 release. 

HEAD OF THE FAMILY, THE: Virginia Lee Corbin. (L) 
6250f. (R) October. 1928. 

KNEE HIGH: Virginia Corbin. (B) October. 1929. 

MODERN SAPPHO, A (T): Betty Bronson. (B) Septem- 
ber, 1929. 

RIVER WOMAN, THE (D-ME): Jacqueline Logan, Lionel 
Barrymore, Charles Delaney, Harry Todd. Mary Doran. 
Sheldon Lewis. (L) 8 reels. (E) April, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 30. 1929. 

TIMES SQUARE (CD-T): Alice Day, Eddie Kane, Emile 
Chautard, John Miljan, Natalie Joyce, Joseph Swickard. 
(L) lO.SOOf. (R) March. 1927. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. 

THROUGH THE BREAKERS: Livingston and Herbert. (L) 
6420f. (B) September, 1928. 



Edward L. Klein 



ADVENTURES OF MAYA: (L) Silent, 5400f. (E) Apr. 
28 1929 

PRESIDENT, THE (D) : Ivan Mosjoukine. Suzy Vernon, 

Nikolai Malikoff, Heinrich Schroth, Luigi Servant! (L) 



8100f. 



Ernest Mattsson 



IN DALARNA AND JERUSALEM (D): Hanson and Veldt. 
(L) 14.000. Forthcoming 1929 release. 

Metr o - G ol d wy n-May er 

ALIAS JIMMY VALENTINE (M-TME) : William Haines. 
Lionel Barrymore. Leila Hyams, Karl Dane, Tully Mar- 
shall, Howard Hickman. Billy Butts. Evelyn Mills. (L) 
8.000f. (B) Jan. 26, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) 
Mar. 9 1929. 

ALL AT SEA (C): Karl Dane, George K. Arthur, Josephine 

Dunn. Herbert Prior, Eddie Baker. (L) 5345f. (B) Feb. 

9. 1929. (NP) Feb. 23, 1929. 
BELLAMY TRIAL, THE (D-TME): Leatrice Joy. Betty 

Bronson. (L) 7524f. (E) Mar. 2, 1929. (NP) Sept. 29. 

1928. (TOS) Apr. 13. 1929. 
BEYOND THE SIERRAS (W): Tim McCoy. Sylvia Beecher. 

Roy D'Arcy, Polly Moran, Bichard E. Neil], J. Gordon 

Russell. (L) 5896f. (R) Sept. 15, 1928. (NP) Aug. 

18. 1928. 

BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY, THE (D-ME): Lily Damita, 
Ernest Torrence, Raquel Torres. Don Alvarado. Duncan Ri- 
naldo. Henry B. Walthall. Mikhail Vavitch, Emily Fitzroy, 
Tully Marshatt. (L) 7880f. (B) Mar. 30, 1929. (NP) 
May 18. 1929. 

BROADWAY MELODY. THE (MC-TSM) : Anita Page, Bes- 
sie Love, Charles King, Jed Prouty. Kenneth ThomsoiL Bd- 
ward Dillon, Mary Doran, Eddie Kane. J. Eminett Beck, 
Marshall Euth, Drew Demarest. (R) Mar. 9. 1929. (L) 
Sound, 9372f. ; silent. 5943f. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. (TOS) 
Apr. 20, 1929. 



54 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



BROTHERLY LOVE (C-TE): Karl Dane. George K. Ar- 
thur, Jean Arthur, Richard Carlyle. Edward Connelly, Mar- 
cia Harris. (L) 6053f. (R) Out. 13, 1928. (NP) Oct. 
13. 1928. 

CAMERAMAN, THE (C) : Buster Keaton. Marceline Day, 

Harold Goodwin. Sidney Bracy, Harry Gribbon. (L) 6995f. 

(R) Sept. 15, 1928. (NP) Sept. 15. 1928. 
CHINA BOUND (CD): Karl Dane, George K. Arthur, Jose- 

pfaioe Dunn, Polly Moran, Hatty Woods, Carl Stockdale. 

(L> 6000f. (R) May 18. 1929. (NP) May 11, 1929. 
E5ANC1NG DAUGHTERS (D-M) : Joan Crawford. (L) 7652f. 

(It) Sept. 1, 1928. (NP) June 30, 1928. (TOS) Sept. 22. 

1928. 

OESERT NIGHTS (D) : John Gilbert. Ernest Torrence, Mary 

Noiam. (L) 6177f. (R) Mar. 9. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 

1929. (TOS) Mar. 16. 1929. 
OESERT RIDER. THE (W): Tim McCoy, Raquel Torres. 

Bert Roach. Edward Connelly. Harry Woods. Jess Cavin. 

<R> May 11. 1929. (L) 4943f. (NP) June 22. 
QREAM OF LOVE (D) : Joan Crawford. Nils Asther. Aileen 

Pringle. Warner Oland. Carmel Myers. Harry Reinhardt. 

Harry Myers, Alphonse Martell, Fletcher Norton. (L) 

7987f. (R) Dec. 1. 1928. (NP) Dec. 22. 1928. (TOS) 

Dec. 8. 1928. 

EJUKE STEPS OUT. THE (CD-TME) : William Haines. 
Joaa Crawford. Karl Dane, Tenen Holtz. Eddie Nugent. 
Jack Roper. Delmer Darts. Luke Cosgroye, Herbert Prior. 
(L) Silent-«210f. Sound-6206f. (R) Mar. 16. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 30, 1929. 

EXCESS BAGGAGE (D-ME) : William Haines. Josephine 
Ouna. Neely Edwards. Kathleen Clifford. Greta Grandstedt. 
aicardo Cortez. Cyril Chadwick. (L) 7180f. (R) Sept. 8. 

1928. (NP) June 23. 1928. (TOS) Sept, 8. 1928. 
FLTCMI! FLEET. THE (D-M): Ramon Novarro. Ralph 

<Sri#e9, Anita Page. Edward Nugent. Carroll Nye. Sumner 
<Setcfcell. Gardner James. Alfred Allen. (L) 9044f. (R) 
Sum. 19. 1929. (NP) Feb. 9. 1929. (TOS) Jan. 19. 1929. 

QdRL ON THE SHOW, THE (T-CD): Bessie Loye. Ford 
Sterling. Raymond Hackett. (TOS) Aug. 31. 

65ALLE10JAH (D-ATS) : Nina Mae McKinney. William 
SVsantaiQe. Daniel L. Haynes. Harry Gray. Fannie Bell 
©e Knight. Everett McGarrity, Victoria Spivey. Milton 
©icSsarson. Robert Couch. Walter Tait. Dixie Jubilee Sing- 
ers. <L) Talking. 9650f. 

HOLLYWOOD REVUE. THE (MC-ATS): Bessie Loye. 
C&acfles King, Marion Davies. Norma Shearer. William 
Hai»es. Gus Edwards. Joan Crawford, John Gilbert, Marie 
©reseller, Polly Moran. Broi Sisters. Anita Page. Buster 
Keattsra. Albertina Ballet. (L) Talking. 11.669f. 

HONEYMOON (CD). Polly Moran. Eddie Gribbon. Bert 
Roaoh. Flash. (L) 4823f. (R) Dec. 22. 1928. (NP) Mar. 
9. 1529. 

6®LE RICH. THE (D-AT) : Conrad Nagel. Bessie Love. 

■Leita Hyams, Robert Ober, James Neill, Edythe Chapman, 

Paal Krucer. Kenneth Gibson. (L) 7351f. (R) June 15. 

1923. (NP) June 8. (TOS) June 22. 
LADY OF CHANCE. A (D-M): Norma Shearer, Lowell 

Sherman. Gwen Lee, John Mack Brown, Eugenia Besserer. 

BuMy Messinger. (L) 7126f. (R) Dec. 22, 1928. (NP) 

Mar. 9, 1929. 

LAST OF MRS. CHEYNEY, THE (D-AT): Norma Shearer. 
Basin Rathbone, George Berraud, Herbert Bunston, Hedda 
Hopper, Moon Carrol, Madeline Seymour, Cyril Chadwick. 
<Qeorge K. Arthur (in sound print only). Finch Smiles, 
Maude Turner. (NP) July 20. (L) Talking. 8651f; silent. 
««8«. 

LOVES OF CASANOVA (D) : Ivan Mosoujkine. Diana 
Kereaae. Suzanne Bianchetti, Jenny Jugo. Rina de Llguoro. 
Nina Kochitz. Olga Day. Paul Guide. Decoeur, Bouamerane, 
Ru<!oif Klein-Rogge. (L) 6179f. (R) Feb. 16. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 9. 1929. 

MADAME X (D-AT) : Lewis Stone. Ruth Chatterton. Ray- 

motKl Hackett, Holmes Herbert, Eugenie Besserer, John P. 

Edington. Mitchell Lewis. Olrich Haupt. Sidney Toler. 

Eicttard Carle. Claud King. Chappell Dossett. (L) 8806f. 

<Nl») June 29. (TOS) Aug. 17. 
MAN'S MAN. A (CD-ME) : William Haines, Josephine 

Dunn. Sam Hardy. Mae Busch. (L) 6683f. (R) May 25. 

1929. (NP) June 22. (TOS) June 22. 

MARIANNE (CD-AT) : Marion Danes. Oscar Shaw, Robert 
Castle, Scott Kolk, Emil Chautard. Mack Swain. Oscar 
Apfel, Robert Ames. Recorded on film and disc. (R) July 
30. 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. 

MASKS OF THE DEVIL, THE (D-M): John Gilbert. Alma 
Rubens, Theodore Roberts. Frank Reicher. Era Von Berne, 
Ralph Forbes. Ethel Wales, Polly Ann Young. (L) 6575f. 
<R) Nov. 17, 1928. (NP) Nov. 17. 1928. (TOS) Nov. 
24. 1928. 

MORGAN'S LAST RAID (W) : Tim McCoy. Dorothy Se- 
bastian. Wheeler Oakman. Allan Garcia, Hank Mann. Mon- 
tague Shaw. (L) 5264f. (R) Jan. 5. 1929. (NP) Mar. 
9. 1929. 

NAPOLEON (D): Waldimir Roudenko. Albert Dieudonne. 
Alexandre Koubitzky, Harry Krimer. Edmond Van Daele. 
Antonio Artaud, Gina Manes, Nicholas Koline. (L) 6893f. 
<R) Oct. 27. 1928. (NP) Oct. 27, 1929. 

OUR MODERN MAIDENS AT-D): Joan Crawford. Rod 
La. Rocque, Douglas Fairbanks. Jr.. Anita Page, Edward 
Nugent. Josephine Dunn. Albert Gran. (NP) Sept. 14. 

OVERLAND TELEGRAPH. THE (W) : Tim McCoy. Doro- 
thy Janis. Frank Rice. Lawford Davidson. Clarence Geldert. 
•Chief Big Tree. (L) 4815f. (R) Mar. 2. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. 

PAGAN. THE (D-SME): Ramon Novarro. Renee Adoree. 
Dorothy Janis. Donald Crisp. (L) Siient-7250f. Sound- 
7359f. (R) Apr. 27. 1929. (NP) May 25. 1929. 

SHOW PEOPLE (CD-TE): Marion Davies, William Haines. 
Dell Henderson, Paul Ralli, Tenen Holtz. Harry Gibbon, 
Sidney Bracy. Polly Moran, Albert Conti. (L) 7453f. 
<R) Oct. 20, 1928. (NP) Sept. 29. 1928. (TOS) Oct. 
27 1928 

SINGLE* MAN, A (CD): Lew Cody. Aileen Pringle. Mar- 
oeline Day, Edward Nugent, Kathlyn Williams, Eileen 
Manning. (L) 5596f. (R) Jan. 12, 1929. (NP) Feb. 9. 
1929. 

SINGLE STANDARD. THE (D): Greta Garbo. Nils Astbe-. 
John Mack Brown. Dorothy Sebastian. Lane Chandler. 
Robert Castle. Mahlon Hamilton. Kathlyn Williams. Zef- 
ne Tidbury. (NP) Aug. 17. (L) 6569f. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

SIOUX BLOOD (W): Tim McCoy, Robert Frazer. Marlon 
Douglas. Clarence Geldert, Chief Big Tree. Sidney Bracy, 
(L) 4811f. (R) Apr. 20. 1929. (NP) Apr. 27. 1929. 

SPEEDWAY (T-CD) : William Haines, Anita Page, Ernest 
Itorrenee. Polly Moran, Karl Dane, John Miljan. (TOS) 
Sept. 14. (NP) Sept. 14. 

8PIES (M): Rudolph-Klein-Rogge. Greda Maurus, Lien 
Deyers. Louis Ralph, Craighall Sherry, Willy Fritsch. Lupu 
Pick. Fritz Rasp. (L) 7999f. (NP) June 15. 

SPITE MARRIAGE (CD-M) : Buster Keaton. Dorothy Se- 
bastian, Edward Earle. Leila Hyams. William Bechtel. 
John Byron. (L) 7047f. (R) Apr. 6, 1929. (NP) Apr. 27. 
1929. 

THUNQER (D-TME): Lon Chaney. James Murray. Phyllis 
Haver, George Duryea. Francis Morris, Wally Albright. 
(L) 7783f. (R) June 25, 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. (TOS) 
Aug. 17. 

TIDE OF EMPIRE (D-M): Renee Adoree and Duryea. (L) 

6552f. (R) Mar. 23. 1929. 
TRIAL OF MARY DUGAN (D-AT) : Norma Shearer. Lewis 

Stone. H. B. Warner. Raymond Hackett. Lilyan Tashman. 

Olive Tell. Adrienne D'Ambricourt, Mary Doran. Dewitt 

Jennings. Wilfrid North. Landers Stevens, Charles Moore. 

Claud Allister. (NP) May 25. (L) 10,000f. (R) June 8. 

<TOS) July 13. 



TRAIL OF '98, THE (D-ME): Dolores Del Rio. Ralph 
Forbes. Harry Carey. Tully Marshall. Emily Fitzroy. Tenen 
Holtz, Russell Simpson, Karl Dane, Cesare Gravina, George 
Cooper. John Down, E. Alyn Warmer. (L) 8799f. (R) 
Jan. 5. 1923. (NP) Dec. 29, 1928. (TOS) Mar. 23. 
1929. 

VIKING, THE (D-ME): Donald Crisp. Pauline Starke, 
LeRoy Mason. Anders Randolph. Richard Alexander, Harry 
Lewis Woods, Albert MacQuarrle. Roy Stewart, Torben 
Meyer, Claire MacDowell. Julia Swayne Gorden. (L) 8176f. 
(NP) Mar. 9. 1929. All in technicolor. 

VOICE OF THE CITY, THE (D-M) : Robert Ames. Willard 
Mack. Sylvia Field. James Farley, John Miljan. Clark 
MarshaU. Duane Thompson, Tom McGulre, Alice Moe. 
Beatrice Banyard. (L) Smind-7427f. (R) Apr. 13, 1929. 
(NP) Apr. 27. 1929. (TOS) May 18. 

WEST OF ZANZIBAR (D-M): Lon Chaney. Lionel Barry- 
More. Warner Baxter, Mary Nolan. Jane Daly, Roscoe 
Ward. Kalla Pasha, Curtis Nero. (L) 6150f. (R) Nov. 
24. 1928. (NP) Dec. 8. 1928. 

WHERE EAST IS EAST (D-TME): Lon Chaney. Lupe 
Velez. Estelle Taylor. Lolyd Hughes. Louis Stern. Mrs. 
Wong Wing. (L) 6500f. (R) May 4. 1929. (NP) June 22. 
(TOS) June 15. 

WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS (M-ME) : Lon Chaney (L) 
7448f. (R) Sept. 29. 1928. (TOS) Oct. 20. 1928. 

WHITE SHADOWS OF THE SOUTH SEAS (D-TME): 
Monte Blue, Raquel Torres. Robert Anderson. (L) 7965f. 
(R) Nov. 10, 1928. (NP) July 7. 1928. (TOS) Dec. 1, 
1928. 

WILD ORCHIDS (D) : Greta Garbo. Lewis Stone. Nils As- 
ther. (L) 9235f. (R) Feb. 23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 2, 1929. 
(TOS) Feb. 23. 1929. 

WOMAN OF AFFAIRS (D-M): Greta Garbo, John GUbert. 
(L) 8319f. (R) Dec. 15. 1928. (TOS) Feb. 16. 1929. 

WONDER OF WOMEN (D-TME): Lewis Stone. Leila Hyams. 
Peggy Wood. Harry Myers. Sarah Padden. George Fawcett. 
Blanche Frederici, Wally Albright. Jr.. Camencita Johnson. 
Anita Louise Fremault, Dietrich Haupt. Ullric Haupt. Jr. 
(L) Talking. 8796f: Silent. fi835f. (R) July 31. 1929. 
(NP) July 27. (TOS) Aug. 17. 



Paramount 



ABIE'S IRISH ROSE (CD-TME-) : Charles Rogers, Nancy 
Carroll. Jean Hersholt. J. Farrell McDonald. Bernard 
Gorcey. Ida Kramer. Nick Cogley. Camlllus Pretal. Rosa 
Rosanova. (L) Silent, 10.187f. Sound. 10.471f. (R) Jan. 
5, 1929. (NP) Nov. 3. 1928. (TOS) Feb. 2. 1929. 

AVALANCHE (W): Jack Holt, Doris Hill. Baelanova. John 
Darrow. Guy Oliver. Richard Wlnslow. (L) 6099f. (NP) 
Dec. 1. 1928. 

BEGGARS OF LIFE (M-ME): Wallace Beery, Louise 
Brooks, Richard Arlen. Edgar Blue Washington, H. A. 
Morgan. Andy Clarke. Mike Donlin. Roscoe Karns. Robert 
Perry. Johnnie Morris. George Kotsonaros. Jacque Chapin, 
Robert Brower. Frank Brownlee. (L) 7805f. (R) Sept. 
15. 1928. (NP) July 7. 1928. (TOS) Oct. 20, 1928. 

BEHIND THE GERMAN LINES (D) : Foreign cast. (L) 
Sound. 8254f. (R) Jan. 12, 1929. 

BETRAYAL (D-ME): Emil Jannings, Gary Cooper, Esther 
Ralston. Jada Weller. Douglas Haig. Bodil Rosing. (L) 
Silent. 6492f: sound. 6614f. (R) May 11. 1929. (NP) Apr. 
27. 1929. (TOS) June 1. 

CANARY MURDER CASE. THE (My-AT) : William Powell. 
James Hall. Louise Brooks, Jean Arthur, Gustav von 
SeyHertitz, Charles Lane, Eugene Pallette, Lawrence Gray. 
Ned Sparks, I.ouis John Bartels. E. H. Calvert. (L) Talk- 
ing, 71711: silent. 5943f. (R) Feb. 16. 1929. <NP) June 15. 

CARNATION KID. THE (C-AT) : Douglas MacLean. Fran- 
cis Lee, William B. Davidson, Lorraine Eddy, Charles HiL 
Mailes. Francis McDonald. Maurice Black. Bert Swor, Jr., 
Carl Stockdale. (L) Silent, 6290f; sound. 7267f. (R) Feb. 
23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 

CASE OF LENA SMITH. THE (D) : Esther Ralston, James 
Hall, Gustav von Seyffertitz, Emily Fitzroy, Fred Kohler. 
Betty Aho, Lawrence Grant, Leone Lane. Kay DesLys, 
Alex Woloshin. Ann Brody. Wallv Albright, Jr.. Warner 
Klinger. (L) 7229f. (R) Jan. 19. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 
1929. (TOS) Jan. 26. 1929. 

CHARMING SINNERS (D-TME): Ruth Chatterton, Clive 
Brook, Mary Nolan. William Powell, Laura Hope CreW9, 
Florence Eldridge. Montagu Love, Juliette Crosby, Lorraine 
Eddy, Claude Allister. (L) 6164f. (R) July 6. 1929. 
(NP) Aug. 10. (TOS) Aug. 3. 

CHINATOWN NIGHTS (D-AT): Wallace Beery. Florence 
Vidor. Warner Oland. Jack McHugh. Jack Oakie, Tetsu 
Komai, Frank Chew. Mrs. Wing. Peter Morrison, Freeman 
Wood. (L) Silent, 7145f; sound. 7081f. (R) Mar. 23 
1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 6. 1929. 

CLOSE HARMONY (CD-AT): Charles Rogers, Nancy Car- 
roll, Harry Green, Jack Oakie. Richard (Skeets) Gallagher, 
Matty Roubert. Ricca Allen, Wade Boteler. Baby Mack, 
Oscar Smith, Greta Grandstedt. Gus Partos. (L) Sound. 
6271f. (R) Apr. 13. 1929. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. (TOS) 
Apr. 13. 1929. 

COCOANUTS, THE (MC-ATS): Four Man Brothers. Mary 

Eaton, Oscar Shaw, Katherine Francis, Margaret Dumont, 

Cyril Ring, Basil Ruysdael. Sylvan Lee, Gambv-Hale Gills. 

Allan K. Foster Girls. (L) 8613f. (R) May 23. 1929 

(NP) July 13. (TOS) July 20. 
DANCE OF LIFE, THE (D-AT): Nancy Carroll. Hal Skelly. 

John. May Boley. Oscar Levant. Gladys DuBois, James T. 

Dorothy Rarter. Ralph Theador, Charles D. Brown, Al St. 

Quinn. James Farley. George Irving. (Talking, 10.619f. 

(P) Sept. 14. Silent, 7488f. (TOS) Sept. 21. 
DANGEROUS CURVES (D-AT): Clara Bow. Richard Arlen, 

Kay Francis, David Newell, Anders Randolph, May Boley, 

T. Roy Barnes. Joyce Compton, Charles D. Brown, Stuart 

Erwin. Jack Lude. (R) July 13. 1929. (NP) Aug. S. 

(L) Talking. 7278f; silent. 6539f. (TOS) July 20. 
DANGEROUS WOMAN, A (D-AT): Baelanova, Clive Brook. 

Neil Hamilton, Clyde Cook. Leslie Fenton. Snitz Edwards. 

(L) Sound, 6643f. (R) May 18, 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 

1929. (TOS) May 18. 
DIVORCE MADE EASY (CD-AT): Douglas MacLean. Marie 

Prevost, Johnny Arthur, Frances Lee, Dot Farley, Jack 

Duffy. Buddy Watles. Hal Wilson. (R) July 6. 1929. 

(NP) July 13. (L) Talking, 5380f . : silent. 5270f. (TOS) 

July 6. 

DOCKS OF NEW YORK, THE (D) : George Bancroft. Betty 
Compson, Baelanova. Clyde Cook, Mitchell Lewis, Gustav 
von Seyffertitz. Guy Oliver. May Foster, Lillian Worth. 
(L) 7202f. (R) Sept. 20. 1928. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 
(TOS) Oct. 27. 1928. 

DOCTOR'S SECRET. THE (D-AT): Ruth Chatterton. H. B 
Warner, John Loder, Robert Edeson, Wilfored Noy. Ethel 
Wales, Nancy Price. Frank Finch-Smiles. (L) Sound. 
5823f. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Feb. 16. 1929. 

DUMMY. THE (D-AT): Ruth Chatterton. Frederic Marcn. 
John Cromwell. Fred Kohler, Mickey Bennett. Vondell 
Darr, Jack Oakie, Zasu Pitts, Richard Tucker, Eugene 
Pallette. (L) Sound. 5357f. (R) Mar. 9. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS) Mar. 6, 1929. 

FASHIONS IN LOVE (D-AT): Adolphe Menjou. Fay 
Compton, Miriam Seegar. John Miljan. Joan Standing. 
Robert Wayne, Russ Powell, Billie Bennett. Jacques 
Vanaire. (L) Talking. 6325f: silent. 6024f. (R) June 29. 
1929. (NP) July 13. (TOS) July 6. (NP) July 13. 

FAST COMPANY (AT-CD) : Jackie Oakie. Skeets Gallagher. 
Evelyn Brent. Gwen Lee. (TOS) Sept. 7. 



FIRST KISS. THE (D) : Fay Wray. Gary Cooper. Lane 
Chandler, Leslie Fenton, Paul Fix, Malcolm Williams. 
Mouroe Owsley. (1,) 6134f. (R) Sept. 25, 1928. (NP) 
Aug. 4. 1928. (TOS) Sept. 1. 1928. 

FLEET'S IN, THE (CD): Clara Bow. James Hall. Jack 
Oakie, Bodil Rosing. (L) 6918f. (R) Oct. 13. 1928. (NP) 
Sept. 22. 1928. (TOS) Sept. 15, 1928. 

FORGOTTEN FACES (M) : Clive Brook, Mary Brian. Olga 
Baelanova, William Powell, Fred Kohler, Jack Luden. 
(L) 7640f. (R) Sept. 11. 1928. (NP) Aug. 4. 1928. 
(TOS) Aug. 4. 1928. 

FOUR FEATHERS (SE) : Richard Arlen. Fay Wray. Wil- 
liam Powell, Clive Brook. Theodore von Eltz. Noah Beery. 
Zack Williams. Noble Johnson, Harold Hightower, I'hllllpe 
de Lacey. Edward Ratcliffe. George Fawcett. Augustine 
Symonds. (L) Sound, 7,472f. Silent, 7472f. (TOS) 
Sept. 14. 

GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS (D-AT): Walter Huston. 
Katherine Francis. Charles Ruggles, Betty Lawford. Nor- 
man Foster, Duncan Perwarden, Lawrence Leslie. (L) 
Sound. 7176f. (R) May 4. 1929. (NP) Apr. 13. 1929. 

GREENE MURDER CASE, THE (My-AT): William Powell. 
Florence Eldridge. Dlrich Haupt, Jean Arthur. Eugene 
Pallette. E. H. Calvert, Gertrude Norman. Lowell Drew. 
Morgan Farley, Brandon Hurst, Augusta Burmester. Marcia 
Hariss. Mildred Golden. Mrs. Wilfred Buckland. Helena 
Philiphs. Shep Camp. Charles E. Evans. (NP) July 10. 
1929. (L) Talking. 6383f. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

HOLE IN THE WALL. THE (MyM-AT) : Claudette Colbert 
Edward G. Robinson, David Newell. Nelly Savage, Donald 
Meek, Alan Brooks, Louise Closser Hale, Katherine Em- 
met, Marcia Kagno, Barry Macollum. George Miljuarrle, 
Helen Crane. (L) Sound, 5850f. (R) Apr. 27, 1929. (NP) 
Apr. 6. 1929. 

HOMECOMING (D) : Lars Hansen. Dita Tarlo. Gustav 
Frohlich. (L) 8156f. (R) Feb. 16. 1929. (NP) Feb. 
9 1929 

HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY (D-TME): A Ufa picture. Lll 
Dagover. Willy Fritsch. Dita Parlo, Fritz Grelner. Glsella 
Bathory. Erich Kaiser Tietz, Leopold Kramer. (NP) 
Aug. 3. (L) 6165f. 

ILLUSION (D-AT): Buddy Rogers, Nancy Carroll. June 
Collyer, Knute Erickson, Eugenie Besserer, Kay Francis, 
Maude Turner Gordon, Regis Toomey, William McLaughlin, 
Katherine Wallace, William Austin. Frances Raymond 
Eddie Kane. Michael Visaroff. Bessie Lyle, Emelie Melville. 
Carl Lukas, Col. G. L. McDonnel. (L) 7536f. Silent 
7538. (NP) July 27. (TOS) Sept. 28. 

INNOCENTS OF PARIS (R-ATM) : Maurice Chevalier. 
Sylvia Beecher. Russell Simpson. George Fawcett. Mrs. 
George Fawcett, John Miljan, Margaret Livingston, David 
Durand, Johnny Morris. (I) Silent-7816f. Sound-6148f. 
(R) Mav 25. 1929. (NP) May 4. 1929. (TOS) June 15. 

INTERFERENCE (D-AT): William Powell. Evelyn Brent. 
Clive Brook, Doris Kenyon. Tom Rickets. Brandon Hurst. 
Louis Payne. Wilford Noy, Donald Stuart. Raymond Law- 
rence. (L) Silent-6643f. Sound-7-'87f. (R) Jan. 5. 1829. 
(NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Feb. 9. 1929. 

JEALOUSY (AT-D): Jeanne Bagels. Frederic March. Halll- 
well Hobbes, Blanche Le Clair. Henry Daniell. nilda 
Moore. (NP) September 28. 

KIBITZER (CD): Harry Green, Mary Brian. Nell Hamil- 
ton. David Newell. Lee Kohlmar. Henry Fink. Tenen Holtz. 
Guy Oliver. Albert Gran, Eddie Kane. (NP) Aug. 17. 

LETTER. THE (D-AT): Jeanne Eagels. O. H. Reggie. 
Reginald Owen. Herbert Marshall. Trene Brown. Lady 
Tsen Mel. Tamaki Toshiwara. (L) Silent-5490f. Sound- 
5778f. (R) Apr. 13. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS» 
Mav 18. 

LOOPING THE LOOP (D-ME): Werner Kraus. Jenny Jugo. 
Warwick Ward. Gina Manes. (L) Sllentn076r. Sound- 
67fi9f. (Rl Mar. 16. 1929. (NP) Mar. Ifi. 1929. 

LOVE DOCTOR (T-CD): Richard Dix. .Tune Collyer. Mor- 
gan Farley Mirian Seegar. Winifred Harris. Lawford David- 
son. Gale Henry. (NP) September 28. 

LOVE PARADE. THE (CD) : " Maurice Chevalier. JeanutU 
MacDonald. Lupino Lane. Lillian Roth. Edgar Norton. 
Lionel Belmore. Robert Roccardi. Carletnn Stockdale. F.uoene 
Pallette. Russell Powell. Margaret Fealy. Virginia Bruce. 
(NP) Aug. 8. 

LOVES OF AN ACTRESS (D-M): Pola Negri. Nils Asther. 

May McAlister. Richard Tucker. Philip Strange. Paul 

Lukas. Nigel de Bruller. Robert Fischer. Ilelene Giere. 

(LI 7434f. (Rl Sept. 18. 1928. (NP) June 23. 1928. 
MAN I LOVE. THE (R-ATI : Richard Arlen. Mary Brian. 

Baelanova. Harry Green. Jack Oakie. Pat O'Malley. Leslie 

Fenton, Charles Sullivan. William Vincent. (It) Mav 

25. 1929. (L) 6669f. Silent 6524. (NP) Apr. 6. 1929. 

(TOS) Mav 25. 
MARQUIS PREFERRED (F) : Adolph Menjou. Nora Lane. 

Chester Conklin. Dot Farley. Mischa Auer. Alex Melesb. 

Michael Visaroff. (L) 6506f. (R) Feb. 2, 1929. (NP) 

Mar 16. 1929. 

MIGHTY. THE (AT-D): George Bancroft. Esther Riilslon. 

Warner Oland. Raymond Hatton. Dorothy Rcvier. Morgan 

Farley. O. P. Heggie. Charles Sellon, E. II. Calvert, John 

Cromwell (NP* Sent. 14. 
MODEL FROM MONTM ARTE, THE (D) : Nlta Naldi. Iva» 

Uetrnvltch. Louise LaOrange. Maurce de Cononge. (L) 

5941f. (R) Sent. 22. 1928 (NPi Sept. 15. 1928. 
MORAN OF THE MARINES (CD): Richard Dix. Rutb 

Elder. (L) 5444f. (R) Oct. 27. 1928. (TOS) Oct. 20. 

1928. 

MYSTERIOUS DR. FU MANCHU. THE (My-OT): Warner 
Oland. Jean Arthur. Neil Hamilton. O. P. Heggio. William 
Austin. Claude King. Charles Stevenson. Noble Johnson. 
Evelvn Selbie. Charles Giblyn. Donald Mackenzie. Lawford 
Davidson. Lask Winter. Charles Stevens. Channel Dnsset. 
Tnllv Marshall. (NP) July 27. (L) Talking. 7663'. 
(TORI July 20. 

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH (CD-AT): Richard Dix. 

Berton Churchill. Louis John Bartels. Ned Sharks. Wynne 

Churchill. Helen Kane. Dorothy Hall. Madeline Grey. 

Nancy Ryon. (L) Sound-7256f. (R) Apr. 20. 1929. (NP) 

Apr. 20. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 27. 1929. 
PATRIOT. THE (D): Emil Jennings. Florence Vidor. Lewis 

Stone. Vera Voronlna. Neil Hamilton. Harry Cording. (L) 

10.172f. (R) Sept. 1. 1928. (NP) Sept. 8. 1928. (TOS) 

Sept. 22, 1928. 

RAINBOW MAN. THE (SR-TS) : A Sono-Art picture. Eddie 
Dowling. Marian Nixon. Frankle Darro. Sam Hardy. Lloyd 
Ingraham. George Hayes. (L) Talking. 8500f. (R) May 
18. 1929. (NP) June 22. (TOS) June 22. 

REDSKIN (R-ME): Richard Dix. Gladys Belmont, Jane 
Novak. Larry Steers, Tully Marshall. Bernard Suegel. George 
Rigas. Augustina Lopez, Noble Johnson. Joseph W. Girard. 
Jack Dunne. Andrew J. Callahan. Philip Anderson. Lo- 
raine. Rivero. George Walker. (L) Silent-7204f. Sound- 
7643f. (R) Feb. 23. 1929. (NP) Feb. 16. 1929. (TOS) 
Feb 2 1929. 

RIVER OF ROMANCE, THE (CD-AT): Charles (Buddy) 
Rogers. Mary Brian. June Collyer. Henry B. Walthall. 
Wallace Beery, Fred Kohler, Natalie Kingston, Mrs. George 
Fawcett. Anderson Lawler. George Reed. (L) Talking. 

7009f; silent 7028f. (R) July 20. 1929. (NP) June 29. 
(TOS) Aug. 3. 

SATURDAY NIGHT KID, THE (T-D) : Clara Bow. James 
Hall. Jean Arthur. Charles Sellon. Ethel Wales. Fran* 
Ross. Edna May Oliver. Heymen Meyer. Eddie Dunn. 
Leone Lane. Jean Harlow. (NP) Sept. 28. 

SHOPWORN ANGEL (CD-S) : Nancy Carroll. Gary Cooper. 
Paul Lukas. (L) Silent-7112f. Sound-7373f. (R) Jan. 
12. 1929. (NP) Feb. 9. 1929. (TOS) Jan. 19. 1929. 

SINS OF THE FATHERS (D-M): Emil Jennings. Ruth 
Chatterton, Barry Norton. Jean Arthur, Jack Luden. Zasu 
Pitts. Matthew Betz. Harry Cording. Arthur Housman. 
Frank Reicher. (L) 7761f. (R) Dec. 29. 1928. (NP) 
Oct. 20. 1928. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



55 



SOMEONE TO LOVE (CD): Charles Bogers. Mary Brian. 
William Austin, Jack Oakie, James Kirkwood, Mary Alden. 
Frank neither. (L) 6323f. (NP) Dec. 29, 1928. (TOS) 
Dec 22 1928 

STAIRS OF SAND (W) : Wallace Beery! Jean Arthur, 

Phillips B. Holmes, Fred Kohler, Chester Couklln, Guy 
Oliver, Lillian Worth, Frank Rice, Clarence L. Sherwood. 
(L) 49iiUf. (10 June 8. 1929. (NP) May 18, 1929. 

STUDIO MURDER CASE. THE (My-AT) : Neil Hamilton, 
Warner Oland, Frederic March, Florence Eldridge. Doris 
Hill, Eugene Pallette. Chester Conklin, Lane Chandler, 
Gardner James, Guy Oliver. E. H. Calvert, Donald Macken- 
zie. (L) Talking. 6500f; silent, G070f. (B) June 1, 1929. 
(NP) June 8. (TOS) June 22. 

SUNSET PASS (W): Jack Holt, Nora Lane. John Loder. 
Christian J. Frank, Pee Wee Holmes, Chester Conklin, 
Pat Harmon. Alfred Allen, Guy Oliver. (L) 5862f. (B) 
Feb. 9. 1929. (NP) Feb. 23, 1929. 

SWEETIE (CD): Nancy Carroll, Stanley Smith. Helen Kane. 
Joseph Depew, Jack Oakie. William Austin, Stuart Erwln. 
Wallace MacDonald. Aileen Manning. (NP) Aug. 17. 

THREE WEEK ENDS (CD): Clara Bow. Neil Hamilton. 
Harrison Ford, Lucille Powers, Julia Swayne Gordon, 
Jack Raymond, Edythe Chapman, Guy Oliver. William 
Holden. (Li 5962f. (NP) Dec. 22. 1928. 

THUNDERBOLT (D-AT): George Bancroft. Bichard Arlen. 
Fay Wray. Tully Marshall, Eugene Besserer, James Spotts- 
wood. Fred Kohler, Mike Donlin, S. S. B. S. Stewart. 
George Irving, William Thorne, E. H. Calvert, King Tut. 
(L) Talking, 857 If; Silent, 7311f. (B) June 22, 1929. 
(NP) June 1. (TOS) Aug. 3. 

VARSITY (CD): Charles Rogers. Mary Brian. Chester 
Conklin, Phillips B. Holmes. Bobert Ellis. John West- 
wood Princeton university undergraduates. (L) 6349f. (B) 
Oct. '27. 1928. (NP) Aug. 4. 1928. (TOS) Nov. 3. 1928. 

VIRGINIAN, THE (D-AT): Gary Cooper, Walter Huston, 
Bichard Arlen, Mary Brian. Chester Conklin, Eugene Pal- 
lette, E. H. Calvert, Helen Ware. Victor Potel, Tex Young, 
Charles Stevens. (L) 8717f. (NP) July 20. 

WEDDING MARCH. THE (D) : George Fawcett. Maude 
George, Erich von Stroheim, George Nichols. ZaSu Pitts. 
Hugie Mack, Matthew Betz. Cesare Gravina. Dale Fuller. 
Fay Wray. Syd Bracey. (L) 10.400f. (R) Oct. 6, 192S. 
(NP) Oct. 27. 1928. (TOS) Jan. 26. 1929. 

WHAT A NIGHT (CD): Bebe Daniels, Neil Hamilton, Wil- 
liam Austin, Wheeler Oakman, Charles Sellon, Hill Mailes. 
Ernie Adams. (L) 5378f. (R) Oct. 6. 1928. (ND) 
Jan. 12, 1929. „ „ ^ 

WHEEL OF LIFE, THE (DAT): Richard Dix. Esther 
Ralston, O. P. Heggie, Arthur Hoyt. Myrtle Stedman. 
Larry Steers, Eegis Toomey, Nigel de Brulier. (L) 5153f. ; 
silent 53f'5f. (R) June 22, 1929. (NP) Apr. 27, 1929. 
(TOS) July 6. 

WILD PARTY. THE (CD-AT) : Clara Bow. Frederio March, 
Marceline Day, Shirley O'Hara, Jack Luden. Jack Oakie, 
Arthur Rankin, Lincoln Stedman, Joyce Compton, Ben 
Hendricks. Jr., Jack Redmond, Adrienne Dore, Jean Lor- 
raine. Virginia Thomas, Kay Bryant. Alice Adair, Amo 
Ingram, Renee Whitney, Marguerite Cramer. (L) Silent- 
6036f. Sound-7167f. (R) Apr. 6. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23, 
]92n. (TOSi Apr. 13. 1929. 

WOLF OF WALL STREET, THE (D-AT): George Bancroft. 
Barlanova. Paul Lukas, Nancy Carroll. Lane Chandler. 
Brandon Hurst. Paul Guertsman. Craufurd Kent. (L) 
Silent-6396f. Sound-68Mf. (R) Feb. 9. 1929. (NP) Mar. 
9, 1929. (TOS) Mar. 16, 1929. 

WOLF SONG (R-TM): Lupe Velez, Gary Cooper, Louis 
Wolheim. Constantino Romanoff. Michael Vavitch. Russell 
Colombo. Augustine Lopez, George Eigas. (L) Silent, 6060f. 
Sound, 6769f. (R) Mar. 30, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 
(TOS) Apr. 6. 1929. 

WOMAN FROM MOSCOW, THE (D-ME): Pola Negri. Nor- 
man Kerry. Otto Matiesen. Lawrence Grant. Maude George, 
Paul Lukas. Bodil Rosing, Mirra Rayo, Martha Franklin, 
Jack Luden. Tetsu Komai. (L) 6938f. (B) Nov. 3, 1928. 
(NP) June 19. 1928. 

WOMAN TRAP (M-AT): Hal Skelly. Evelyn Brent. Chester 
Morris. Leslie Fenton. Erne Ellsler. William B. Davidson. 
Guy Oliver, Charles Giblyn. Wilson Hummell. (L) 6168f. : 
silent 6384f. (NP) July 20. (TOS) Sept. 28. 



Parthenon 



WILD HEART OF AFRICA. THE (Animal Picture): (NP) 
June 22. 



Pathe 



ANNAPOLIS (CD-T): Allan, Brown. Loir. (L) 7008r. (R) 
Nov. 18. 1928. 

AWFUL TRUTH, THE (D-AT): Ina Claire. (L) 6129f. 

(R) Aug. 10. 1929. (TOS) Sept. 7. (NP) Sept. 7. 
BACHELOR'S SECRET, A (CD-AT): Allan Hale. (R) Mar 

1. 1930. 

BIG NEWS (My-AT): Robert Armstrong. Carol Lombard. 
Tom Kennedy, Warner Richmond, Wade Boteler. Sam 
Hardy. Charles Sellon, Robert Dudley. (L) Talking, 6028f. 
Recorded on film and disc. (B) Sept. 7. 1929. (NP) 
Sept. 7. 

BIG SHOT, THE (D-T) : (R) Nov. 30. 1929. 
BLACK ACE. THE (W) : Don Coleman. (L) 5722f. (R> 
Sept. 2. 1928. 

BORDER PATROL (W) : Harry Carey. (L) 4598f. (B) 
Dec. 23. 1928. 

BURNING BRIDGES (W) : Harry Carey. (L) 4846f. (B) 
Sept. 30. 1928. „ „ , 

CAPTAIN SWAGGER (D-ME) : Rod La Eocque. Sue Carol. 
Richard Tucker. Victor Potel. TJlrich Haupt. (L) 6312f. 
(R) Oct. 14, 1928. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 

CELEBRITY (D): Armstrong. (L) 6145f. (R) Oct. 7. 

CLOTHES (D-AT) : Constance Bennett. (R) Feb. 15, 1930. 
CRASHING THROUGH (D-AT): William Boyd. (R) Jan. 
18. 1930. 

DEVIL'S TWIN (W): Leo Maloney. 

FLYING FOOL. THE (D-AT): William Boyd, Marie Prevost. 
Tom O'Brien. Russell Gleason. (L) Talking, 6746f; silent. 
«7«0f. (NP) July 27. 

FORBIDDEN LOVE (D) : Lila Damita. (L) 6787f. (R) 
Oct. 28. 1928. „ . „ 

.45 CALIBRE WAR (W) : Don Coleman. Ben Corbett, Al 
Hart, Edward Jones, Duke R. Lee. Floyd Ames, Jeanette 
Loff. Murdock MacQuarrie. Orrin Jackson. (R) Feb. 17. 
1929 (1,) 4790f. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 

GERALDINE (CD-TME): Eddie Quillan. Marian Nixon. 
Albert Gran, Gaston Glass. (L) 5587f. (B) Jan. 20, 1929. 
(NP) May 25. 1929. „ „ ' 

GODLESS GIRL. THE (D-TME) : Lina Basquette, Mane 
Prevost. George Durvea. Noah Beery. Eddie Quillan, Mary 
Jane Irving, Julia Faye, Viola Louie, Emily Barrye. Clar- 
ence Burton, Dick Alexander. Kate Price. Hedvrig Beicher. 
(L) Talking. 9328f; silent, 9019f. (R) Mar. 31, 1929. 
(NP) June 1. .„ .„„ 

GRAND PARADE. THE (MC) : (R) Nov. 16. 1929. 

GREENWICH VILLAGE FOLLIES (MC) : (R) Nov. 2. 1929. 

HAWK OF THE HILLS (W): Allene Ray. Robert Chandler. 
Jack Ganzhorn, Frank Laclrteen. Paul Panzer, Wally Oct- 
tel. Harry Semels, Walter Miller. Jack Pratt. Parky Jones, 
Frederick Dana, John T. Prince, Chief White Horse. 
Georee Magrill. Evangeline Russell, Chief Yowlache. (L) 
4840f. (R) Mar. 17. 1929. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. 

HER PRIVATE AFFAIR (D-AT): Ann Harding. Harry 
Bannister. (R) Sept. 28, 1929. (NP) Oct. 5. (TOS) 
Oct. 5. _ . ' 

HIGH VOLTAGE (D-AT): William Boyd. Owen Monre, 
Carol Lombard. Diane Ellis. Billy Bevan. Phillips Smalley. 
(T,l 57iSf. (NP) Tune 29. 

HIS FIRST COMMAND (D-AT): William Boyd. (R) Oct. 
26, 1929. 



HOT AND BOTHERED (CD-AT): Eddie Quillan. (R) 
Mar. 8. 1930. 

KING OF KINGS (D-ME): H. B. Warner, Jacqueline Lo- 
gan, Dorothy Curnroing, Ernest Torrence, Joseph Schild- 
kraut, Robert Edeson. Sidney D'Albrook, Rudolph Scbild- 
kraut, Sam DeGrasse, Victor Varconl, William Boyd, Matt 
Muore Julia Faye, Kenneth Thomson, Alan Brooks. (L) 
13.500f. (If) Sept. 30, 1928. (TOS) Mar. 10. 1928. 

LEATHERNECK, THE (D-T): William Boyd. Alan Hale. 
Robert Armstrong. Fred Kohler. Diane Ellis, James Al- 
dine. Paul Weigel, Jules Cowles. Wade Boteler, Philo 
McCullough, Joe Girard. Michell Lewis. (L) 6898f. (R) 
Feb. 24. 1929. (NP) Apr. 20. 1929. (TOS) June 1. 

LOVE OVER NIGHT (CD): Rod La Rocque. Jeanette Loff. 
Richard Tucker, Tom Kennedy, Mary Carr. (L) 7530f. 
(R) Nov. 25. 1928. (NP) Sept. 8. 1928. 

LUCKY IN LOVE (D-AT) : Morton Downey. Betty Dawford, 
Colin Keith-Johnson, llalliwell Hobbes. J. M. Kerrigan, 
Richard Taber, Edward O'Connor, Mary Murray, Mackenzie 
Ward. Louis Sorin, Sonia Karlov, Tyrrell Davis, Elizabeth 
Murray (L) 687l)f. (R) Aug. 17. 1929. (NP) July 27. 

MARKED MONEY (D): Coghlan. (L) 5506f. (R) Nov. 
4. 1928. 

MAN-MADE WOMEN (D) : Leatrice Joy. (L) 5762f. (E) 

Sept. 9. 1928. 

MOTHER'S BOY (D-TME): Morton Downey. Beryl Mercer, 
John T. Doyle. Brian Donlevy, Helen Chandler. Osgood 
Perkins. Lorin Baker, Barbara Bennett, Jennie Moskowitz, 
Jacob Frank, Louis Sorin. Robert Glecker. Tyrrell Davis. 
Allan Vincent. Leslie Stowe. (L) 7423f. (NP) Apr. 6. 
1929. 

NED McCOBB'S DAUGHTER (D-ME): Irene Rich. Theo- 
dore Eoberts, Robert Armstrong, George Barraud, Edward 
Hearn, Carol Lombard, Louis Natheaux. (L) 6070f. (R) 
Dec. 2. 1928. 

NEGLIGEE (D AT) : Ina Claire. (R) Jan. 4. 1930. 

NOISY NEIGHBORS (CD-TME): Eddie Quillan, Alberta 
Vaughn, Quilan Family. Theodore Roberts, Bay Hallor, 
Russell Simpson, Robert Perry, Mike Donlin, Billy Gil- 
bert. (L) 5737f. (R) Jan. 27, 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 
1929. 

OFFICER O'BRIEN (D-AT): William Boyd. (E) Nov. 
30 1929 

OFFICE SCANDAL (CD-TME): Phyllis Haver. Leslie Fen- 
ton, Raymond Hatton. Margaret Livingston, Jimmy Adams. 
Jimmy Aldine. (L) 6511f. (E) Mar. 3, 1929. (NP) 
May 25. 1929. (TOS) July 27. 

OH, YEAH I (D-AT): Robert Armstrong. James Gleason. 
Zasu Pitts, Patricia Caron. (R) Oct. 5, 1929. (NP) 
Oct. 5. 

PARIS BOUND (D-AT): Ann Harding, Frederic March, 
George Irving, Leslie Fenton, Hallam Cooley, Juliette 
Crosby, Charlotte Walker, Carmelita Geraghty, Ilka Chase. 
(L) Talking, 6.684f. (R) Aug. 3. 1929. (NP) July 20. 
(TOS) Aug. 10. 

POWER (CD): William Boyd, Alan Hale. Jaquellne Logan, 
Jerry Drew. Joan Bennett. Carol Lombard, Pauline Cur- 
ley. (L) 6092f. (R) Sept. 23. 1928. (NP) Oct. 13. 
1928. 

SAILORS' HOLIDAY (CD): Allan Hale. Sally Eilers, 

George Cooper, Paul Hurst, Mary Carr, Charles Clary. 

(NP) Sept. 21. (R) Sept. 14. 
SAL OF SINGAPORE (D-T): Phyllis Haver. (L) 6804f. 

(It) Nov. 11. 1928. 
SHADY LADY, THE (D-TME): Phyllis Haver, Robert 

Armstrong, Louis Wolheim, Russell Gleason. (L) Talking. 

6132f; silent. 5808f. (R) Jan. 20. 1929. (NP) June 1. 
SHOW FOLKS (CD-T): Eddie Quillan. (L) 6581f. (R) 

Oct. 21. 1928. 

SIN TOWN (CD): Elinor Fair, Ivan Lebedefl, Hugh Allan, 
Jack Oakie. (L) 4554f. (R) Jan. 20. 1929. (NP) June 1. 

SOPHOMORE. THE (OD-AT) : Eddie Quillan. Sally O'Neil, 
Stanley Smith. Jeanette Loff, Russell Gleason. Sarah Pad- 
den. Brooks Benedict, Spec O'Donnell. (L) Talking 6526f. 
(E) Aug. 24. 1929. (TOS) Aug. 24. 

SPEILER, THE (D-T): Alan Hale. Eenee Adoree. (L) 
581fif. (R) Dec. 30. 1928. (TOS) Mar. 9. 1929. 

SQUARE SHOULDERS (M-TME) : Louis Wolheim, Junior 
Coghlan, Philippe De Lacey, Anita Louise, Montague 
Shaw, Johnny Morris. Kewpie Morris. Clarence Geldert. 
(T.) 5477f. (E) Mar. 31, 1929. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. 

STRANGE CARGO (D-AT): Lee Patrick. June Nash. George 
Barraud. Kyrle Bellew, Bussell Gleason. Frank Beicher. 
Claude King, Ned Sparks. Josephine Brown, Charles Hamil- 
ton. Andre Beranger. Otto Matieson. (L) Talking. 7099f: 
silent, 6134f. (R) Mar. 31, 1929. (P) June 1. 



Rayart 



ANNE AGAINST WORLD (D) : Shirley Mason, Jack Mower, 
James Bradbury, Jr., Isabel Keith, Thomas A. Curran. 
Henry Roquemore. Belle Stoddard. Bill Franey. (L) 5732f. 
(E) Apr. 15. 1929. (NP) June 29. 

BLACK PEARL, THE (My-M): Lila Lee. Ray Hallor. Carl- 
ton Stockdale. Thomas Curran. George French. Howard 
Lorenz. Sybil Grove, Baldy Belmont. Adele Watson, Lew 
Short. Art Rowlands. (L) 5261f. (R) Jan. 1, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. 

BROTHERS (D): Bedford. Keefe. (L) 6092f. (R) Feb. 
15. 1929. 

CITY OF PURPLE DREAMS, THE (D) : Bedford, Frazer. 

(L) 5937f. (R) September, 1928. 
DEVIL'S CHAPLAIN. THE (D): C. Keefe, Virginia Brown 

Faire. ID 5451f. (R) Mar. 15. 1929. 
HANDCUFFED (AT-MD) : Virginia Brown Faire. Broderlck 

O'Farrell, Frank Clarke. Charles West. (NP) Sept. 7. 
ISLE OF LOST MEN, THE (D): Santschi, Connor. (L) 

5800f. (R) October. 1928. 
SHANGHAI ROSE: Irene Rich. (L) 6539f. (R) Mar. 1. 

1929. (NP) May 18. 
SHIPS OF THE NIGHT (M) : Jacqueline Logan. Sojin. 

Jack Mower. Andy Clyde. Arthur Rankin, Glen Cavender. 

Thomas A. Curran, Frank Lanning. J. P. McGowan. Frank 

Moran. (L) 5940f. (R) December, 1928. (NP) Mar. 23. 

1929. 

SHOULD A GIRL MARRY? (D-TME) : Foster. Keith. (L) 

6525f. (R) November. 1928. 
SISTERS OF EVE (D) : Mae Busch. (L) 5675f. (R) 

September. 1928. 
SOME MOTHER'S BOY (D) : Mary Carr. Jason Robards. 

Jobyna Ralston. M. A. Dickinson, Henry Barrows. (L) 

690lf. (E) Feb. 15. 1929. 
TWO SISTERS (D): Viola Dana. Bex Lease. Claire Du- 

Brey. Irving Bacon. Boris Karloff. Tom Llngham. Thomas 

A. Curran. Adalyn Asbury. (L) 5161f. (E) Apr. 1. 1929. 

(NP) Mav 25. 1929. 
WHEN DREAMS COME TRUE (D) : Helene Costello. Eex 

Lease Claire McDowell. Ernest Hilliard. Emmett King, 

George Periolat, Danny Hoy. Buddy Brown, Banger. Rags. 

(L) 6242f. (R) Jan. 15, 1929. (NP) Feb. 16. 1929. 



RKO 



AIR LEGION, THE (D) : Ben Lyon. Antonio Moreno, 
Martha Sleeper. John Gough. Colin Chase. (L) 6361f. 
(R) Jan. 6. 1929. (NP) Tan. 12. 1929. 

AMAZING VAGABOND. THE (M) : Bob Steele. Tom Ling- 
ham. Jay Morlev. Perrv Murdock. Lflfe McKee. Thelma 
Daniels. (L) 5081f. (R) Apr. 7. 1929. (NP) Apr. 6. 
1929 

AVENGING RIDER. THE (W): Tom Tyler. Florence Al- 
len. Frankie Darro. Al Ferguson, Bob Fleming. Arthur 
Thalasso. (L) 4808f. (R) Oct. 7. 1928. (NP) Mar. . 
16 1929 

BIG DIAMOND ROBBERY. THE (W) : Tom Mix. (L) 

6114f. (Ti) Mav 13. 1929. 
BLOCKADE (D) : Anna Q. Nilsson, McDonald. (L) 6409f. 
(R) Jan. 30, 1929. 



CHARGE OF THE GAUCHOS (M) : Francis X. Bushman., 

Jacqueline Logan, Uuido Tiento, Paul Ellis. Henry Kotken. 
Charles Hill, Malles, John Hopkins, Charles K. 1 rendu 
Olive Uasbrouck, Mathilde Coinout. Jack Ponder. Llg» 
Conley, Gino Corrado, Frank Hagney. (L) 65484. (B>< 
Sept. 16. 1928. (NP) Sept. 15. 1928. 
COME AND GET IT (W) : Bob Steele, Jimmy Quinn. Jap 
Morley. Betty Welsh. James B. Leong, William Welsh. 
Marian Sais. (R) Feb. 3. (L) 5254f. 
DELIGHTFUL ROGUE, THE (AT): Rod La Rocque, Beb» 

Daniels. (R) Sept. 22, 1929. Serial number, 0203. 
DRIFTER, THE (W) : Tom Mix, Dorothy Dwan, Barney 
Furey, Al Smith. Ernest Wilson, Frank Austin, Joe Itiek- 
son, Wynn Mace. (R) Mar. 18. (L) 5896f. 
FRECKLED RASCAL (W): Buzz Barton. Milburn Morante, 
Tom Liugham, Lotus Thompson, Pat O'Brien, Bill Paton. 
(R) Mar. 31. (L) 4884f. 
FURY OF THE WILD (i_>) : Ranger, Barbara Worth, Robert 
Homans. Pat O'Brien, Al Smith. (It) Jan. 6. (L) 4899f. 
GUN LAW (W): Tom Tyler, Barney Furey. Ethlyne Clair. 
Frankie Darro, Lew Meehan, Tom Brooker, Harry Woods- 
(R) Mar. 3. (L) 4088f. 
HALF MARRIAGE (D-AT) : Olive Borden, Morgan Farley-, 
Ann Greenway, Sally Blaine, Ken Murray, Anderson Lav»- 
lor. Hedda Hopper, Richard Tucker. (L) Talking, 6481*. 
(R) Oct. 13, 1929. 
HARDBOILED (D) : Sally O'Neil, Donald Reed, lilyans 
Tashman. Bob Sinclair, Ole M. Ness, Tom O Grady. Al- 
phonz Ethier. (E) Feb. 3. (L) 5940f. 
JAZZ AGE (T-D) : Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Marceline Day. 
Henry B. Walthall. Myrtle Stedman. E. J. Ratcliffc 
Gertrude Messiuger. Joel McCrea, William Bechtal, Iono 
Holmes and Ed Dealing. (R) February 10. (L) 624Si\ 
IDAHO RED (W): Frankie Darro. Tom Tyler. Patriciai 
Caron, Lew Meehan, Barney Furey. (R) Apr. 21. (L)» 
Sound 4783f. : silent 4769f. With sound effects. 
LAUGHING AT DEATH (D) : Bob Steele, Natalie Joycfc. 
Captain Vic, Kai Schmidt, Ethan Laidlaw. Armand T rlllrm 
Hector V. Sarno. (R) June 2. (L) 5500f. 
LITTLE SAVAGE (W) : Buzz Barton. Milburn Morantev 
Willard Boelner, Patrica Palmer, Sam Nelson, Ethan 
Laidlaw. (R) May 19. (L) 4781f. 
LOVE IN THE DESERT (T-D): Olive Borden, Hugh TreTor. 
Noah Beery, Frank Leigh, William Tooker, Ida Darling, 
Alan Roscoe, Fatty Carr, Charles Brinlcy. Tearl Varnell, 
Gordon Magee. (R) March 17. (L) Sound 5365f.; silent 
6365f. 

ONE MAN DOG (W) : Ranger, Sam Nelson, Edward Hearn, 

Virginia Bradford. William Patton, Henry O'Connor, Art. 

Bobbins. (R) March 3. (L) 4481f. 
OUTLAW (W): Tom Mix. Sally Blane, Frank M. CTarte-- 

Al Smith, Ethan Laidlaw, Al Ferguson, Barney Furey. 

(R) Jan. 21. (L) 6057f. 
PRIDE OF PAWNEE (W) : Tom Tyler, Frankie Darro.. 

Ethlyne Clair, Barney Furey, Jack Hilliard, Lew MPehan.. 

Jimmy Casey. (L) 4750f. (R) June 9. 1929. (NP) June 23, 
RED SWORD. THE (D): Marion Nixon. William Collier;,. 

Jr.. Carmel Myers, Allan Roscoe. (L) 6243f. (R) Feb. If. 

1929. 

RIO RITA (O-ATS): Bebe Daniels, John Boles. (E> Sept. 
15. 1929. Serial number. 0102. 

SIDE STREET (D-AT): Tom. Matt and Owen Moore. 
Kathryn Perry. Emma ;>unn. Frank Sheridan. (L) Talk- 
ing. 6965f. (R) Sept. s. 1929. Serial number. 0202. 

STREET GIRL (CD-ATS) : Jack Oakie, Ned Sparks. John 
Harron, Joseph Cawthorn, Betty Compson. (L) Talking. 
8188f. (R) Aug. 11, 1929. (NP) Sept. 28. (TOSJ 
Sept. 21. 

VERY IDEA. THE (AT): Frank Craven, Hugh Trevor. 

Theodore von Eltz, Olive Tell. Doris Eaton. Adele Watson, 
Oeanne de Bard. Allen Kearns, Sally Blane. (L) Talk- 
ing 6139f. (R) Sept. 1, 1929. Serial number, 0503. 



Tiffany-Stahl 



BROADWAY FEVER (CD): Sally O'Neil Roland Drew. 

Corliss Palmer. (R) Jan. 1. (L) 5412f. 
LUCKY BOY (TS-CD): George Jessel, Margaret Quimby. 
Rosa Rosanova. William Strauss. Gwen Lee, Richard 
Tucker, Gayne Whitman. Mary Doran. (R) Feb. 2. (L> 
Sound 8643f.; silent 65?0r. (NP) Feb. 2. 
MIDSTREAM (D-TME) • Claire Windsor. Montague Lore. 
Larry Kent, Helen Jerome Eddy, Louis Alvarez, Leslie 
Brigham. Genevieve Shrader. (L) 7353f. 
MY LADY'S PAST (D-TME) : Belle Bennett. Joe E. Brows. 
Alma Bennett, Russell Simpson, Joan Standing, BUJJ* 
Bennett. (NP) June 15. (L) Talking. 7948f. 
NEW ORLEANS (D-TME): William Collier. Jr.. Rlcaido 

Cortez. Alma Bennett. (L) 6765f. (R) Aug. 1, 1919. 
TWO MEN AND A MAID (D-T): William Collier. Jr.. 
Alma Bennett. Eddie Gribbon, George E. Stone. (L> 
Talking. 6423f. (R) Aug. 1, 1929. 



United Artists 



ALIBI (M-AT): Chester Morris. Pat O'Malley. Harry Stubiss, 
Mae Busch, Eleanor Griffith, Irma Harrison. Regis Tonmey, 
Al Hill. James Bradbury, Jr., Elmer Ballard. Kerman 
Cripps, Purnell B. Pratt, DeWitt Jennings. Edward Brady. 
(L) Talking. 8167f. (R) Apr. 20, 1929. (NP) June 1. 
(TOS) Sept. 21. 

BULLDOG DRUMMOND (D-AT): Ronald Potman. Joan 
Bennett, Lilyan Tashman, Montagu Love, Lawrence Grant. 
Wilson Benge. Claud Allister. Adolph Millar. Cahrles Sellon, 
Tetsu Komal. (L) Talking. 825fif. 

COQUETTE (D-AT): Mary Pickford. John Mack Brown, 
Matt Moore, John Sainpolls, William Janney, Henry 
Kolker, George Irving, Louise Beavers. (L) Silent. 699ST. 
(E) Apr. 12. 1929. (NP) June 1. 

ETERNAL LOVE (D-ME): John Barrymore. Camilla Horn, 
Victor Varconi, Hobart Bosworth, Bodil Rosing. Mona Ttiay 
Evelyn Selbie. (R) May 11. 1929. (L) 6948L ; silent, 
631 8f (NP) June 15. (TOS) June 1. 

EVANGELINE (D-ME) : Dolores Del Rio. Roland Drew. 
Alec B. Francis, John Holland, James Marcus, Panic 
McAllister, Lawrence Grant, Bobby Mack, George Marion, 
(L) 82fi8f. (NP) June 1. 

IRON MASK, THE (D-TME): Douglas Fairbanks, Bella 
Bennett, Marguerite de la Motte, Dorothy Ravler. Vem 
Lewis, Rolfe Sedan. William Bakewell. Gordon Thorp*. 
Nigel de Brulier. Ulrlch Haupt. Lon Poff. Charles SteTena, 
Henry Otto, Leon Barry. Rtandley J. Sandford. Glno Cor- 
rado. (L) Talking. 8855f; silent. 8659f. (B) Mar. fc 
1929. (NP) June 15. 

LADY OF THE PAVEMENTS (ST-D) : Lupe Velei. WU- 
liam Boyd. Jetta Goudal, George Fawcett, Albert Oontt.. 
Henry Armetta. (R) Feb. 16. (L) Sound 8329f. ; sa«ci 
7495f. 

RESCUE. THE (D-ME): Ronald Colman, Lily Danrttav 

Alfred Hickman. Theodore von Eltz, John Davidson. PMTrte 

Strande, Bernard Slegel, Sojin, Harry Cordlnff. 

Winters. Duke Kahanamoku. Louis Morrison. George Rlgasv 

Christopher Martin. (L) Musical. 7980f; silent. 791W. (KJi 

Jan. 12 1929. (NP) June 15. 
SHE GOES TO WAR (D-TMS) : Eleanor Boardraan. Joka 

Holland. Edmund Burns, Alma Euhens. Al St. John. GJear 

Waters. Margaret Seddon. Tola D'Avril. Everra Rail (i? 

8864f. (E) Tulv 13. 1929. (NP) June 1. (TOSI An*. 1ft. 
THIS IS HEAVEN (D-TME): Vilma Banky. James HaS, 

Fritzie Eidgeway. Lucien Littlefleld. Bichard Tucker. 

7948f (El Tune 22. 1929. (NP) .Tune 1 (TOS> fntr W. 
THREE PASSIONS. THE (D-M) : Alice Terry. Ivan P»tre~ 

vitch. Sbavle Gardner. Leslie Faber. Andrew EngeJman; 

Claire Eames. (L) Talking, 6646f: silent. 7576f. (Rt 

June 1. 1929. 

VENUS (D-DfE) : Constance Tfllmadge. Andre Roanne. Jsasr 
Murat. Max Maxudian Baron Fils and Jean Mercantssu 

(L) Sound 6SS2f. (NP) June 1. 



56 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



Universal 



BEAUTY AND BULLETS (W): Ted Wells. Duane Thomp- 
son, Jack Kenney. Wilbur Mack. (L) 479f. 

BODY PUNCH, THE (D): Jack Dougherty. Virginia Brown 
Faire, George Kotsonaros, Wilbur Mack. Monte Montague. 
(L) 4786f. (ID July 14. 1929. (IMP) July 27. 

BORDER WILCAT, THE (W): Ted Wells. Kathryn Me- 
Guire. (ID May 12. (L) 4259f. 

BORN TO THE SADDLE (W): Ted Wells, Duane Thomp- 
son, Leo White. Merrill McCormick. Bryon Douglas, Nelson 
McDowell. (ID Mar. 10. (L) 4126C. 

BROADWAY (AT-D) : Glen Tryon. Merna Kennedy. Evelyn 
Brent. Thomas Jackson, Robert EUis, Otis Harlan, Paul 
Porcasi, Marion Lord, Fritz Field. Leslie Fenton, Arthur 
Housman. George Davis, Betty Francisco, Edythe Flynn. 
Florence Dudley, Ruby McCoy. (L) 9330f. 

BURNING THE WIND (W): Hoot Gibson. Cesare Gravine. 
Virginia Brown Falre. Boris Karloff. Robert Holmes. Re- 
leased Feb. 10. (L) 5202C 

CHARLATAN, THE (T-D): Holmes Herbert. Rocltcliffe Fel- 
lows. Margaret Livingston. (ID Apr. 14. (L) Silent. 
6972f. Sound 05ll6f. 

CLEAR THE DECKS (T-CD) : Reginald Denny. Olive Has- 
brouck. Otis Harlan. Colette Merton. Lucien Littlefleld. 
Brooks Benedict, Robert Anderson, Elinor Leslie. (ID 
Mar. 3. (L) Sound, 5792f. Silent. 5740f. 

COHENS AND KELLYS IN ATLANTIC CITY (T-CD): 
George Sidney. Mack Swain. Vera Gordon. Kate Price. 
Cornelius Keefe, Nora Lane, Virginia Sales. Tom Kennedy. 
(R) Mar. 17. (L) Sound. 7400f. Silent. 7752f. 

COLLEGE LOVE (D-AT) : George Lewis. Eddie Phillips. 
Dorothy Gulliver. Churchill Ross, Hayden Stevenson. Sumner 
Getchell. (L) Talking. 6864f. (R) July 7. 1929. <NP) 
July 27. 

COME ACROSS (M-TME) : Lina Basquette. Reed Howes. 
Flora Finch. Craufurd Kent, Gustav von Seyffertitz. Clarissa 
Selwynne. (R) June 30. 1929. (NP) July 27. (L) Talk- 
ing. 5330f; silent. 5593f. 

DRAKE CASE. THE (AT-MD): Gladys Brock-well. (NP) 
Sept. 28. (TOS) Sept. 21. 

EYES OF THE UNDERWORLD (W) : Bill Cody. Sally 
Blane. (ID Apr. 28. (L) 4208f. 

GIRL ON THE BARGE (T-D): Jean Hersholt. Sally O'Neil. 
Malcolm McGregor. Morris Mcintosh. Nancy Kelly. George 
Offerman. Henry West. Rex. (R) Feb. 3. (L) Sound. 
7510f. Silent. 6908f. 

GIRL OVERBOARD (D-T) : Mary Phllbln. Fred Mackaye. 
Otis Harlan. Edmund Breese, Francis McDonald. (L) 
Talking. 7391f; silent. 7531f. (R) July 28. 1929. (NP) 
Sept 21. 

GRIT WINS (W): Ted Wells. Kathleen Collins. Al Ferguson. 

Buck Conners. Nelson McDowell, Edwin Moulton. (R) 

Jan. 27. (L) 4596f. 
HARVEST OF HATE (W) : Rex. Jack Perin. Helen Foster. 

Tom London. (L) 47 -9f. 
HIS LUCKY DAY (CO-TME): Reginald Denny. LoRayne 

Duval. Otis Harlan. Eddie Phillips. Clssie Fitzgerald. 

Harvey Clark, Tom O'Brien. (L) Talking. 6731f; silent. 

5630f. (R) June 30. 1929. (NP) June 22. 
HOOFBEATS OF VENGEANCE (W): Rex. Jack Perrin. 

Helen Foster. Al Ferguson. Starlight. (R) June 16. (L) 

4525f. 

IT CAN BE DONE (ST-CD): Glenn Tryon, Sue Carol. 
Richard Carlyle. Jack Egan. Tom O'Brien. (R) March 
24. (L) Sound C560f. ; silent 6090f. 

KID'S CLEVER (CD): Glenn Tryon. Kathryn Crawford. 
Russell Simpson. Lloyd Whitlock, George Chandler, Vir- 
ginia Sales. Joan Standing. Max Asher. Florence Turner. 
Stephin Fetchlt. (R) Feb. 17. (L) 5729f. 

KING OF THE CAMPUS (T-CD): George Lewis. Dorothy 
Gulliver. Eddie Phillips. Hayden Stevenson, Churchill 
Ross. Collette Merton. 

KING OF THE RODEO (W): Hoot Gibson, Kathryn Craw- 
ford. Slim Summervtlle. Charles K. French. Monty Mon- 
tague. Joseph W. Gerard. (R) Jan. 20. (L) 5509f. 

LARIAT KID, THE (W): Hoot Gibson. Ann Christy. Cap 
Anderson, Mary Foy. Francis Ford. Walter Brennan, Andy 
Waldron, Bud Osborne, Joe Bennett. Jim Corey. (L) 
5247f. (R) June 23. 1929. (NP) June 15. 

LAST WARNING. THE (M-TME): Laura La Plante. 
Montagu Love. John Boles. Itoy D'Arcy. Bert Boach. Mar- 
garet Livingston. Mack Swain. Burr Mcintosh. Carry 
Daumery. George Summerville, Torben Meyer, D'Arcy Cor- 
rigan. Bud Phelps. Charles French, Fred Kelsey. Tom 
O'Brien. Harry Northrup. (L) Talking. 7980f; silent, 7731f. 
(R) Tan. 6, 1929. (NP) June 29. 

LONESOME (T-CD): Glenn Tryon. Barbara Kent. (R) 
Jan. 20. (L) Sound 67filf. : silent 6142f. 

MAN, WOMAN AND WIFE (D-TME) : Norman Kerry. 
Pauline Starke. Marian Nixon, Kenneth Harlan, Craufurd 
Kent. Byron Douglas. (L) 6589f. <R) Jan. 13. 1929. 
(NP) June 29. 

MELODY LANE (ATS): Eddie Leonard. Josephine Dunn. 
Rose Coe. George Stone, Huntley Gordon, (L) Talking. 
6350f. (R) July 21. 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. 

MODERN LOVE (CD-AT) : Charley Chase. Jean Hersholt. 
Kathlyn Crawford. Edward Martlndel. (R) July 14. 1929. 
(NP) June 22. (L) Talking. 6501f: silent. 5730f. 

PLUNGING HOOFS (W) : Jack Perin. Rex. Barbara Worth. 
J. P. McGowan, David Dunbar. (L) Silent. 4344f. (R) 
Apr. 14. (NP) May 18. 

POINTS WEST (W): Hoot Gibson. Alberta Vaughn, Frank 
Campeau, Jack Raymond. Martha Franklin. Milt Brown, 
Jim Corey. (L) 5401f. (NP) Sept. 28. 

RED HOT SPEED (CD-TME): Reginald Denny. Alice Day, 
Charles Byer. Thomas Rioketts. De Witt Jennings. Frltzl 
Ridgeway. Hector V. Sarno. (L) 6621T. (R) Jan. 27. 
1029. (NP) June 29. 

RID1N' DEMON, THE (W) : Ted Wells. Kathleen Collins. 
Lucy Beaumont. Otto Bibber. (L) 4380f. (R) Aug. 18, 
1929. (NP) Auk. 3. 

TIP OFF, THE (W): William Cody. George Hackatfcorne. 
Duane Thompson. L. J. O'Connor. Jack Singleton. Robert 
Bolder. Monte Montague. Walter 8humway. (L) 4109f. 
(R) June 2, 1929. (NP) July 13. 

SCANDAL (TD): Laura LaPlante. John Boles. Jane Win- 
ton. Huntley Gordon. Nancy Dover. Eddie Phillips. Julia 
Swayne Gordon. (R) May 4. (L) Sound. 6G75f.; silent 
R475f. (TOS) June 13. 

SHOW BOAT (D-T): Laura LaPlante. Joseph Schildkraut. 
Emily Fitzroy, Otis Harlan, Helen Morgan. Jane La- 
Verne Alma Rubens. Jack McDonald, Neely Edwards. 
(L) 11.772C. : silent. 10.2!)(lf. 

SMILING TERROR, THE (W) : Ted Wells. Derelys Perdue. 
Al Ferguson. Bed Osborne. (L) 4525f. <R) June 30. 1929. 
(NP) .Tulv 13. 

YOU CAN'T BUY LOVE (T-D): Jean Hersholt. Charley 

Chase. (R) June 9. 
WAGON MASTER, THE (W-TS) : Ken Maynard. Edith 

Roberts, Frederick Dana. Tom Santschi, Al Ferguson. Jack 

Hanlon. Bobby Dunn. White Horse. Frank Rice. (L) 

Sound 6R3Rf. : silent 5R70f. (NP) Sept. 29. 
WINGED HORSEMEN, THE (W) : Hoot Gibson, Ruth Elder, 

Charles N. S^haeffer. Allan Forrest. Herbert Prior. (W 

5544f. (R) June 23, 1929. (NP) July 13. 



Warner Bros. 



ARGYLE CASE, THE (AT-MD): Thomas Meighan. H. B. 

Warner. Gladys Broclrwell. Ltla Lee. Bert Roach. (TOS) 

Aug. 31. (L) 7794f. 
CONQUEST (D-AT): Monte Blue. Lois Wilson. H. B. 

Warner. Tully Marshall. (L) 4706f. (R) Jan. 19. 1929. 

(NP) Aug. 3. 

DESERT SONG. THE (TMS) : John Boles. Charlotte King. 
Louise Fazenda. Edward Martlndel. Jack Pratt. Otto Hoff- 
man, John Mlljan. Del Elliott. Myrna Loy. (L) Talking. 



ll,034f. (R) May 11. 1929. (NP) May 18. (TOS) 
June 8. 

FANCY BAGGAGE (T-D): Audrey Ferris, Myrna Loy 
George Fawcett. Edmund Breese, Hallam Cooley, But". 
Mcintosh. Wallace MacDonald. Eddie Gribbon. Virginia 
Sales. (R) Feb. 23. (L) Sound. G447f. Silent. 5983f. 

FROM HEADQUARTERS (T-D): Monte Blue. Edmund 
Breese. Ethlyne Claire. Guinn Williams. Lionel Belmore, 
Henry B. Walthall. Gladys Brockwell, Eddie Gribbon. Pat 
Hartigan, John Kelly, Otto Lederer. William Irving, Pat 
Somerset. J. Girard. (R) June 0. (L) G323f. 

FROZEN RIVER (T-D): Rin-Tin-Tin, Davey Lee. Lew 
Harvey. Nina Quartaro, Duane Thompson, Joseph Swickard, 
Frank Campeau. (ID May 25. (L) 5482f. 

GAMBLERS, THE (D-AT): Lois Wilson. H. B. Warner, 
Jason Robards, George Fawcett, Johnny Arthur. Frank 
Campeau. Pauline Garon. Charles Sellon. (L) Talking, 
6611f: silent. 4844f. Recorded on disc. (TOS) Aug. 24. 
(ID June 29, 1929. 
GREYHOUND LIMITED (T-D): Monte Blue. Edna Murphy. 
Grant Withers, Lucy Beaumont. Lew Harvey, Ernie Shields. 
(R) Mar. 23. (L) Sound. 0114f. Silent. 4996f. 
HAROBOILED ROSE (T-D): Myrna Loy, William Collier, 
Jr., Lucy Beaumont. Gladys Brockwell. Edward Martlndel, 
John Mllajn. (R) May 4. (L) Sound, 5610f. Silent. 
4875f. 

HONKY TONK (AT-CD) : Sophie Tucker. Lila Lee, Audrey 
Ferris. George Duryea, Mahlon Hamilton. John T. Murray. 
(L) Sound. 6412f. (R) Aug. 3. (TOS) Aug. 31. (NP) 
Sept. 14. 

KID GLOVES (T-D): Conrad Nagel. Lois Wilson. Edna 

Murphy, John Davidson, Tom Dugan and Edward Earle. 

(R) Apr. 13. (L) Sound 6273f. ; silent 5658f. 
LITTLE WILDCAT (T-D): George Fawcett. Robert Edeson. 

Audrey Ferris. (R) Jan. 5. (L) Sound 5644f. ; silent 

5161f. 

MADONNA OF AVENUE A (D-ATM) : Dolores Costello. 
Grant Withers. Louise Dresser. Douglass Gerard. Otto Hoff- 
man. Lee Moran. (L) Talking 6461f; silent. 5294f. (R) 
June 22. 1929. 

MILLION DOLLAR COLLAR (TED): Rin-Tin-Tin, Matty 
Kemp, Evelyn French. Tommy Dugan. Allen Cavln. Phllo 
McCullough. Grover Llggon. (R) Feb. 9. (NP) March 16. 
(L) Sound 5561f. : silent 4878f. 

NOAH'S ARK (TE-D) : Dolores Costello, George O'Brien. 
Noah Beery, Louise Fazenda, Guinn Williams. Paul Mc- 
Allister, Anders Randolf. Nigel de Brulier, Armand Kaliz, 
Mvrna Loy. William Mong. Malcolm White. (L) Sound 
9478f. : silent 7752f. _ 

MY MAN (CD-AT): Fannie Brtce. Guinn Williams. Andre 
de Segurola. Ann Brody. Richard Tucker, Billy Sealy. Edna 
Murphy. Arthur Hoyt. (L) 9247f. Silent. 6136f. (NP) 
June 29. 

NO DEFENSE (D-AT): Monte Blue. May McAvoy. Lee 
Moran. Kathryn Carver. William Tooker. William Desmond. 
Bud Marshall. (L) Talking. 555fif; silent, 4712f. (R) 
Apr. 6. 1929. (NP) July 13. 

ON WITH THE SHOW (ATS-D) : Betty Compson. Sam 
Hardy. Mollv O'Day. Joe E. Brown. Sally O'Neil. Louise 
Fazenda. William Bakewell, Purnell Pratt, Fairbanks 
twins. Wheeler Oakman, Sam Hardy. Thomas Jefferson, 
Lee Moran, Harry Gribbon. Arthur Lake. Josephine Hous- 
ton. Henry Kink, Otto Hoffman. Ethel Walters, Harmoun 
Four. Angelus Babe. (L) Sound 8864f.: silent 8441f. 
(TOS) Aug. 17. 

ONE STOLEN NIGHT (TM-D) : Betty Bronson. Mitchell 
Lewis, Buster Collier, Rose Dlone. Nina Quartaro. Harrv 
Todd. Otto Lederer. Angelo Rossitto. Jack Santaro. Harry 
Shultz. Chashill Mailes. (R) Apr. 6. (L) Sound 6243f. : 
silent 4797f. (NP) March 30. 

REDEEMING SIN (T-D): Dolores Costello. Conrad Nagel. 
Warner Richmond. Phillipe DeLacey. Georgie Stone, Lionel 
Belmore. Nina Quartaro. (R) April 6. (L) 6.921. Silent 

SAP. THE (T-CD): Edward Everett Horton, Patsy Ruth 
Miller. Franklin Pangborn. Edna Murphy. Alan Hale. 
Russell Simpson. Louise Carver. Jerry Mandy. (L) 7,150. 

SAY IT WITH SONGS (D-ATS): Al Jolson. David Lee. 
Marian Nixon. (L) Talking. 8324f. (R) Aug. 24. 1929. 

SKIN DEEP (T-D): Monte Blue. Betty Compson. John 
Davidson. Tully Marshall. (TOS) Oct. 5. 

STOLEN KISSES (C-T): Claude GiUingwater. Hallen Coo- 
ley. May McAvoy. Edna Murphy. Reed Howes. Arthur 
Hoyt. (L) Talking. 6273f; silent. 5683f. (R) Apr. 13. 
1929. 

STARK MAD (M-AT): Louise Fazenda. Claude GiUing- 
water. H. B. Warner. John Mitten. Jacqullne Logan. 
Henry B. Walthall, Andre Beranger, Warner Richmond. 
Lionel Belmore. Floyd Schackelford. (L) Talking. 6681f; 
silent. 4917f. (R) Mar. 2. 1929. 

TIME, PLACE AND GIRL. THE (AT-D): Grant Withers, 
Bettv Compson, James Kirkwood, Bert Roach. (TOS) 
June 22. 

World Wide 

BERLIN AFTER DARK (MD) : Kurt Gerron. Ernst Stahl 
Nachbauer, Fritz Kampers, Grlta Ley. (L) 6553f. (R) 
June. 

BLACK WATERS (AT-D) : James Kirkwood, Lloyd Hamil- 
ton, Mary Brian. John I/Oder, Frank Reicher. Robert Ames. 
Ben Hendricks. Noble Johnson. Hallam Cooley. (L) 7322f. 
(R) Apr. 14. No silent version. 

BONDMAN, THE (D) : Norman Kerry. (R) Mar. 17. 
(L) 70OOf. 

KITTY (T-D): Estelle Brody. John Stuart. Marie Ault. 

Dorothy Cummings. Winter Hall. Olaf Hytten. Charles 

O'Shaughnessy. (R) June 15. (L) 8441f. 
MOULIN ROUGE (ME-D): Olga Chekova. Eve Gray. Jean 

Bradln. (H) January 30. (L) Sound 8312r. 
PAWNS OF PASSION (D) : Olga Chekova. Sidney Suberly 

Henry Baudln. Hans Stever, Lola Josane, Carmine Gallone. 

(R) Feb. 17. (L) 7196f. 
PICCADILLY (AT-MD): Gilda Grey. Anna May Wong. 

Jameson Thomas. (L) SOROf. (R) June 1. (TOS) Aug. 24. 
PRINCE AND THE DANCER (D) : Dlna Graller. Albert 

Paulig. Werner Pittschau. Anna Kalllna. (R) June 29. 
TRIUMPH OF THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL, THE (D): 

Matheson Lang, Margaret Hume. Nelson Keys. Hadden 

Mason, Juliette Compton. Douglass Payne. Harold Ruth. 

(L) 6490f. (R) June 22. 1929. 

Miscellaneous Companies 
Affiliated European 

BEHIND THE ALTAR (D) : Wllhelm Dieterle. Marcella 

Albani. (L) 6200f. Silent film. 
ESCAPE FROM HELL (MD) : Jean Murat. Louis Ralph. 

Countess Agnes von Esterhazy, Paul Heidman. R. Van 
Riel. Leo Penkert, W. Kaiser Hayl. Harry Frank, Lewis 
Brodv. 

PASSION OF JOAN DE ARC (D): Mile. Falconettl, M. 
Silvaln. M. Schutz, Ravet, Andre Berly, Antonin Artaud. 
(L) 7000f. 

RUSSIA (D): Marcella Albani, V. Gaidarov. Wllhelm Die- 
terle. Louis Ralph. (H) May 12. (L) 7.500. 

Aida Films 

KIF TEBBI: Marcello Spade, Donatelle Nerl, Gini Vlotl. 
TJgo Gracclo. Silent film. 



Amer.- Anglo 



BETRAYAL. THE (D) : Jerro 'd Robertshaw. Gerald Pring. 

Charles Emerald. Ellssa Landl. (I.) 7400f. 
LIVINGSTONE IN AMERICA (D) : M. A. WetheraU. Henry 

Walton. Molly Rogers. Reginald Fox. (L) 5799f. 



Ass. Ind. Prod. 

FAR WESTERN TRAILS (W) : Ted Thompson. Bud Os- 
borne. Lew Ames, Betty O'Doan. (ID May 20. (L) 4315f. 

MIDNIGHT ON THE BARBARY COAST (D) : William 
Barrymore. Kala Pasha. Jack Richardson. (R) Feb. 9. 
(L) 4260f. 

Australasian Films 

BLACK CARGOES OF THE SOUTH SEAS (D): Edmund 

Burns, Edith Roberts, Susan Dennis. Silent film. 
FOR THE TERM OF HIS NATURAL LIFE (D) : Bva 

Novak, Arthur McLaglen, George Fisk, Kay Soupen. Matian 
Clark. Dunstan Webb, Susan Dennis. (L) 11,0001. 

Aywon 

BEAUTIFUL BLUE DANUBE (D) : Hans Junkerman. Julius 
Falkenstein. Harry Liedke, Ernest Verebes and Lya Men. 
Silent picture. 

Bell Pictures 

BAD MAN'S MONEY (W) : Yakima Canutt. (L) 48501 
(R) Mar. 31. 

BOHEMIAN DANCER (D) : Lya Mara. Harry Liedtke- 
(L) 5800f. Silent only. 

Bertad Pictures 

BLACK CRUISE (MD) : (L) 9000f. (R) June 1. Silent 

film. 

FIGHTING THE WHITE SLAVE TRAFFIC (T-D): Emll 

Jannings. Werner Kraus. (R) June 15. (L) Sound. 9000f. 

Biltmore Prod. 
Conquest 

REWARD OF FAITH (D) : Andre Carnege. Marcel Charbrie. 

Pierette Lugand. (R) April 1. (L) 5.927. Silent film. 
.uETAOI ETAOIN ETAOIN ETAOIN ETAOIN ETOIN 

release work of July 28. 
PHANTOMS OF THE NORTH (D) : Edith Roberts. Donald 

Keith, Kathleen Key, Borris Karloff. Joe Bonomo. Josef 

Swickard. (R) June 2. (L) 4600f. 

El Dorado Pictures 

ARIZONA DAYS (W): Bob Custer. Peggy Montgomery, 
John Lowell Russell, J. P. McGowan. Mack V. Wright. 
Jack Ponder. Silent picture only. 

FALSE FEATHERS (D) : Noah Beery. Horace B. Car- 
penter. Francis Pomerantz, E. A. Martin. 

Film Arts Guild 

LIFE OF BEETHOVEN (D) : Fritz Kortner. Ernest 
Baumeister, Lilian Gray, Heinz Altringen, Willy Schmeider. 
(L) 7000f. 

Franco-Film 

APASSIONATA: (L) 6800f. Silent fllm. 

Gainsborough 

CONSTANT NYMPH (D): Ivor Novello, Mabel Poulten. 
George Heinrich. Dorothy Boyd. Frances Dable. Silent 
film. 

Michael J. Gourland 

CRIME AND PUNISHMENT (D) : Gregor Chmara. Michael 
Tarshanoff. Maria Germanova, Pavel Payloff, M. Tome. 
Vera Orlova. Ivan Bersennieff. (L) 6000f. 

Capt. C. W. R. Knight 

FILMING OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE: Silent picture. 

Mutual 

LUCRETIA BORGIA (D): Conrad Veldt. Diane Haid. Paul 
Wegener. Luigi Robaccio. (L) 7100f. 

New Era 

BATTLE OF MOMS (D) : Special cast. (L) 5900f. Silent 
fllm only. 

Pole Pictures 

AT THE SOUTH POLE: Special cast. (L) 8000f. Silent 

film only. 

Syndicate 

LAW OF THE MOUNTED (D) : Bob Custer. J. P. McGowan 

MacV. Wright, Frank Ellis. Sally Winters. Cliff Lyons, 
Mary Mabery, Lynn Anderson. (It) Jan. 15. (L) 46941. 

Trinity 

BROKEN HEARTED (D) : Agnes Ayres. Gareth Hughes 

Eddie BroneU. (L) 6000f. Silent only. 
BYE. BYE BUDDY (D): Agnes Ayres. Bud Shaw. Fred 

Shanley, Ben Wilson. John Orlando. Arthur Hotallng Dave 

Henderson. (R) Mar. 25. (L) 5700f. 
CHINA SLAVER (D): Sojin, Albert Valentino. Iris Tamaoaka 

Carl Theobald. Bud Shaw. Ben Wilson. Dick Sutherland 

Jimmy Aubrey, Opal Baker. (R) Jan. 25. (L) 5500f 
GIRLS WHO DARE (D) : Rex Lease. Prlscilla Bonner 

Rosemary Theby. Ben Wilson, Steve Hall, HaU Cline' 

(R) Jan. 1. (L) 5600f. 
LITTLE WILD GIRL (D): Lila Lee. Cullen Landis. Frank 

Merril, Sheldon Lewis, Boris Karloff, Bud Shaw. Cyclone 

Arthur Hotaling. (L) 5300f. 
MUST WE MARRY (D): Pauline Garon, Loralne Eason, 

Bud Shaw. Vivian Rich, Edward Brownell. Louise Carrer. 

Charles Hill, Thomas A. Curran. (L) 5400f. 

UFA 

ELEVEN WHO WERE LOYAL (D): Mary Nolan, Ernst 
Rueckert. Greta Relnwald. Gustav Semmler. Rudolf Melnert. 

(L) 6925f. 

HIS LATEST EXCELLENCY (D): Willy Frlsch. Ernst 
Gronau, Max Hansen. Hermlne Sterler. Lydia Potechlna. 
Olga Tschekova. Fritz Kampers. Hans Junkermann, Truus 
Von Aalten, Max Guekstorf, Julius Falkenstein. 

Unusual Photoplays 

MARIE ANTOINETTE (D): Diana Karenne. Walter 

Schwanneke. (L) 6000f. Unusual photoplays. 

Franklin Warner 

GREAT POWER (T-D): Hirshel Mayall. Minna Gombell. 
Allan Birmingham, Neian Jaap, G. Davidson Clark, John 
Anthony, Helen Shipman, Jack Leslie. Walter Walker, 
Conway Wingfleld. Alfred Swenson, Walter F. Scott, 

Eleanor Martin. 

Worldart Film9 

EAST SIDE SADIE (D): Bertlna Goldin. Jack Ellis. Boris 
Rosenthal. Abe Sinkoff, Lucia Segar, Jack Halllday, Al 
Stanley. 

Zakora 

FACES OF CHILDREN (D) : Rachel Devrys, Victor Viae. 
Henry Duval. Pterrietta Honyez, Arlette Teryon. Jean 
Forest. (L) 8000f. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



57 



CLASSIFIED 

Advertising 

Ten cents per word, payable in advance. Minimum charge, 
$1.00. Copy and checks should be addressed Classified Ad Dept. 
Exhibitors Herald- World, 407 So. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

The Recognized National Classified Advertising Medium 




Theatre for Sale 



CENTRAL NEW YORK CITY, population 200,000. 
Residential theatre, 1000 seats, building included, 
$45,000. Reasonable terms. Business established 16 
years. A real buy for quick sale. Address Box 441, 
Exhibitors Herald-World, 407 South Dearborn street, 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Managers' Schools 



THEATRE EMPLOYEES— Modern Theatre Man- 
agement training will help you to better positions 
Complete training at home. Send for your free Copy 
of catalog H. Address Moring Picture Theatre Man- 
agers Institute, Elmira, New York. 



Position Wanted 



AT LIBERTY: Pianist-Organist. Experienced all 
lines theatrical work. Union, references. Address 
Post Office Box 325, Toledo, Ohio. 



OPPORTUNITY WANTED: Young, married 
man, wishes opportunity to become first class motion 
picture operator. Has considerable experience in 
electricity and seven years in'commercial radio. Would 
like to learn in some theatre as helper and make self 
generally useful about theatre for small wages while 
learning. Any responsible person interested kindly 
write — Emil Schoerner, 27 Spring St., Lewiston, Me. 



MANAGER — Unquestionable record, now with larg- 
est circuit of first class theatres in Canada, desires 
change. Thoroughly experienced, real worker, go- 
getter, high pressure exploiteer. Object of change to 
return to U. S. A. Circuit or Independent. Stand 
thorough investigation. Go anywhere. Address Box 440, 
Exhibitors Herald-World, 407 South Dearborn street, 
Chicago, Illinois. 



ORGANIST — Young lady. Capable soloist. Union. 
References. Address Organist, 914 McKinley Ave., 
N. W., Canton, O. 



FORMER Wisconsin theatre owner wants position 
to manage theatre. Or will manage with privilege of 
buying. Man and wife are capable of taking full 
charge. Address Eugene Pellettiere, 3224 Verdugo 
Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 



CHICAGO YOUNG MAN, age 25, wishes oppor- 
tunity to learn show business. Five years' amusement 
experience. Will consider anything that might lead 
to real future. Address Box 437, Exhibitors Herald- 
World, 407 South Dearborn street, Chicago, Illinois. 



ORGANIST — Graduate organists available at short 
notice. Vermond Knauss School of Theatre Organ 
Playing, 210 North 7th street, Allentown, Pa. 



Equipment for Sale 



TWO TALKIE TURNTABLES and pickups cheap. 
Address Lyric theatre, Madrid, Iowa. 



DRAMAPHONE Talking Equipment, synchronous 
also non-synchronous machine. Practically new, first 
class condition, ideal for 1,000 house. Also Da-Tone-X 
screen (regular Western Electric sound screen). Real 
bargain. Address Nordland theatre, Cincinnati, O. 

BIG BARGAINS in rebuilt Simplex Powers 6-B 
and 6-A motiograph machines, all motor driven, in 
guaranteed condition, as well as used low intensity 
arc reflector lamps, with or without machines at 
reasonable prices. Big stock of rebuilt exhaust and 
oscillating fans for AC and DC current. Generators, 
all makes, ticket selling machines, film containers, all 
at bargain prices for immediate shipment. Write for 
bargain list. Address Illinois Theatre Equipment 
Company, 12-14 East Ninth street, Chicago, Illinois. 

THEATRE EQUIPMENT, new and used. Opera 
chairs, projectors, screens, generators, rectifiers, re- 
flecting arc lamps, etc. Write for bargain list and 
catalogue. Address Movie Supply Co., 844 Wabash, 
Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Reflector Arc Lamps and accessories, 
also guaranteed rebuilt Powers 6-A and 6-B and Sim- 
plex Heads. Best Prices. Write Joseph Spratler, 
12-14 E. Ninth St., Chicago, 111. 



Chairs for Sale 



1,600 HIGH GRADE, spring constructed uphol- 
stered theatre chairs, made by the Heywood- Wake- 
field company. Upholstered in imitation Spanish 
leather, at very reasonable prices. 500 upholstered 
theatre chairs, back and seat covered in broadcloth. 
1,000 upholstered seats covered in Spanish imitation 
leather. Veneered back and squab seats, very reason- 
able. 1,000 heavy S-ply veneer chairs, y 3 in. back. 
1,500 light 5-pIy veneer chairs at very reasonable 
prices. 300 folding chairs in sections of 2. AUo a 
large stock of chair parts to match any style seat. 
In fact, everything for the theatre. We assure you 
great savings. For information, prices and literature 
on our merchandise, write Illinois Theatre Equip- 
ment Company, 12-14 East Ninth street, Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 

BIG BARGAIN in used Opera chairs, 600 uphol- 
stered, 800 Veneer. Address Movie Supply Co., 
844 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

2500 USED 5 PLY VENEERED theatre chairs in 
good condition. $1.00 each. Immediate delivery. 
Address Illinois Theatre Equipment Company, 12-14 
East Ninth street, Chicago, 111. 



For Sale 



OPERA CHAIRS, seats and backs for all makes, 
five ply, at prices that save you money. Jobs in new 
and used chairs. Address Redington Company, 
Scranton, Pa. 



Equipment Wanted 



WANT SEVERAL MERCURY RECTIFIERS, 
good, bad or incomplete, cheap. Address Preddey, 
188 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

WANTED — 2 Peerless or Simplex projectors, also 
Strong reflector arc lamps. State price, condition 
and number of machines. Will pay cash, or one 
third down and balance C.O.D. Address Box 337 
Exhibitors Herald- World, 407 S. Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago, 111. 

HIGHEST PRICES paid for used opera chairs, 
projection machines, etc. Address Movie Supply Co., 
844 Wabash, Chicago. 



Cameras for Sale 



AKELEY: Bell-Howell (professional). Write for 
booklet. Address Wood, 204 Inland Bank, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 



Stationery 



"NEARGRAVURE" ("Neargravuremboso" plate- 
less embossing) processes. Special Neargravure 250 
envelopes, 500 8y 2 x7li" letterheads $3.33, or SyixW 
$4.44, postpaid. Sollidays, EXH-124, Knox, Indiana. 



Projector Repairing 



SKILLED MECHANICS, specialized tools, and a 
shop equipped for but one purpose can offer you 
nothing but the best in repair work. That is what I 
have, and I can offer you the best in the overhauling 
of your motion picture machinery equipment. One 
of the oldest repair men in the territory, and serving 
some of the largest houses. Relief equipment fur- 
nished free. For results bring your work to Joseph 
Spratler, 12-14 E. Ninth St., Chicago, 111. 

BEST SHOP for repairing projection machines. 
Prompt service, reasonable prices. Address Movie 
Supply Co., 844 Wabash, Chicago. 



Miscellaneous 



TEN DIAMOND RINGS, blue white perfect, about 
254 carats, white gold mountings. One beautiful 
dark green velvet velour curtain, 32x17 feet with 
border and track, cost $480, practically new. One 
Garden City spot light with color wheel. Two new 
1000 watt Mazda lamps and other goods, all for $435 
cash. Address Farmers Exchange, 238 Main avenue, 
Clinton, Iowa. 



AUTOGRAPHED PHOTOS OF MOVIE STARS, 
large size. Hot advertising medium. $60 per thou- 
sand. Address Fanfoto, 33 Orange Ave., Long Beach, 
Calif. 



Your Classified Ad Will Do the Work 

Exhibitors Herald- World has helped hundreds of Theatre owners in solving many a problem. The classified advertising 
department has placed organists all over the country, has helped in obtaining equipment, in selling equipment, and in 
solving many another problem that seemed difficult. The rates are but 10c per word payable with order, 10% discount 
if run for 3 insertions. See this week's classified pages. Maybe you are in need of something that is being advertised this 
week. The cost is small, the results are great. 



58 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



W 



THE VOICE OF THE INDUSTRY 

LETTERS FROM READERS 



Makes Sound Pay 

ENCLOSE OKAY FOR SPECIAL TWO- 
year lease on the finest trade paper in the 
industry, so I think. Give that old war 
horse, Dad Jenkins, credit for this, as some- 
one has got to buy gas for that new puddle 
hopper he has adopted. And if they don't 
decide on a name for it pretty soon, 1 would 
suggest "Junk." 

I don't know how long I will need the 
Herald-World, as I installed sound equip- 
ment in May, and Dad says 5,000 of us are 
going out of business. But I think the big 
boys read that and are easing up a bit. I 
had one of the smallest towns in the country 
with sound when I installed, but I have put 
it over so far, and the reason is that I have 
been able to give them good reproduction and 
haye played the best pictures I could buy, 
previewing them, and if recording was not 
good I refused to show them. My Syncro- 
tone equipment, while not an expensive in- 
stallation, certainly delivers the goods, and 
that's what brings in the jack. — Guy S. Ab- 
bott, New Hamline theatre, Estelline, S. D. 



Sound — and Phil Rand 

WHAT'S THE CHANCE TO EXPLAIN 
in your glad rag of freedom a little matter 
that has long been bothering me and may be 
bothering some other exhibitors? Everyone 
else has had their say about the "talkies" or 
"squeakies" but myself. I have been listening 
with my big ears to the ground and the more 
I heard, the more befuddled was I, until a 
day or two ago. 

"Get sound," shouted my patrons ; "get 
sound," howled the belligerent salesmen ; "get 
sound," thundered the trade journals. Sound ! 
Sound ! Sound ! ! Yea, verily, there was so 
much sound that I believed there was no 
good old silence anywhere left in the world. 
Radios blared out when I dropped into the 
drug store for a malted milk (yes, brother 
Jenkins, I do drink milk occasionally — believe 
it or not) ; loudspeakers roared out from 
the transoms of every restaurant, in fact, Tin 
Can Alley jazzed out into the air wherever 
one went, and lately, I have been rushing out 
to the wooded mountains for a breath of 
God's own silence — and even there some pic- 
nicker would swoop in on me with a portable 
music box and befoul the woods. Peace, 
peace, there was no peace ! But now all is 
changed — my mind is at ease again and this 
is why — 

One of my salesmen friends told me, "If 
you do not put in sound you'll soon go out 
of business." 

"Well, how would you go about it?" said I. 

"Rent two Western Electric, the best, for 
$11,600," he replied. 

"But I haven't any $11,600," I retorted. 

"Oh, just borrow it," he said. 

"Oh," said I. "Simple as that?" 

"Sure, there's nothing to it." 

"Is that all the cost?" I asked. 

"Oh, you'll have to pay $10-$15 a run as a 
recording charge. You can't get something 
for nothing you know!" 

"Yes?" I murmured. 

"Then you will have to pay $15 a week for 
a repair and service man and if you use disc 
you will have to hire an extra operator," he 
continued. 

"Anything else?" I faintly inquired. 



"Sure, you must pay $15 a week for a repair 
and service man." 

"What of cost of films?" I suggested. 

"Oh, films are cheap, a $15 picture will cost 
you $37.50 or a $50 picture $125." 

"All right," I said after a recovered con- 
sciousness. "What shall I charge my custom- 
ers?" 

"Seventy-five cents admission, figure it out 
for yourself. You should make $20,000 a year 
profit," he chortled. 

"But my people can't possibly pay seventy- 
five cents for a picture!" 

"Tut, tut ! Educate them up to it," he re- 
torted. "It's very simple." 

"Who is simple?" I asked, not quite getting 

it- 

"I guess you are," he croaked. 

"Amen to that !" said I, "but I only seat 
230 people." 

"Oh, of course, you'll have to build a new 
theatre," he added. "500 seats, anyway." 

"But the town has only 1,000 to 1,200 peo- 
ple," I remonstrated. 

"Oh," he replied nonchalantly, "organize a 
Chamber of Commerce, boost your town and 
double the population in a year. It is all very 
simple, if you go after it." 

"Thanks awfully," said I. "I really didn't 
realize it was so easy." 

Now that that little matter is settled I am 
looking for some pre-war bait and am going 
fishing. Life is very simple after all when it 
is once carefully explained and properly un- 
derstood. Funny how I worried so much 
about poor business and the cost of installing 
sound — hmmm ! Wish I had gone to the ex- 
hibitors' convention so I could have told the 
boys how easy it is to make money. — Philip 
Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. 



On Allied States 

FIND ENCLOSED CHECK FOR $3.00 
for the Herald-World for two years. As 
we get a lot of propaganda from other 
publications as to the M P T OA and a lot 
left out on Allied States Association, it 
looks like some magazine would have the 
nerve to publish the truth, and the Herald- 
World is the ideal magazine to come out 
with it. 

The Hays-Woodhull group has made a 
miserable flop on the uniform contract and 
arbitration. Producers ought not to force 
shorts with feature contracts and a lot of 
other things. One who thinks arbitration 
as practiced by the producers is a big 
hokum would like to hear through your 
magazine the opinions of a lot of exhibitors 
on this. 

Give them a chance to start something. — 
R. S. Wenger, Miami and Grand theatres, 
Union City, Ind. 



Service 

I TAKE HAMMER IN HAND WITH 
great pleasure to take a wallop at T. O. 
Service. 

Of all the half-baked writers that I have 
ever had the disgust of reading, this T. O. 
Service is the worst (or wurst). 

I read the Exhibitors Herald- World from 
cover to cover and have done so for five 
years and could not quit if I wanted to. 

Please, Mr. Managing Editor, give Mr. T. O. 
Service a long vacation so that he can get 



$15,000,000 Value 

Placed on Real Estate 
In Fox-Midland Deal 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

KANSAS CITY, Oct. 8.— The real estate 
value set on the properties affected in the 
Fox-Midland deal is said to be $15,000,000 
and involves 61 theatres, rather than 64 as 
was stated in the September 7 issue of the 
Exhibitors Herald- World. 

The actual money involved amounted to 
nearly $4,000,000, according to M. B. Shan- 
berg, vice-president and general manager of 
the Midland circuit, who made the an- 
nouncement of the transaction some time 
ago. Fox will take the houses as soon as 
an audit can be made which is estimated 
will take about 30 days. 

The Midland Circuit recently has de- 
veloped into one of the most important out- 
lets for motion pictures in the Middle 
West. It has been looked upon jealously 
for the last two years by both Fox and the 
Publix organization. After the recent 
merger of Fox and Loew interests it became 
definite that Fox West Coast would .seek 
to establish a chain of theatres in the 
Kansas City territory, according to Harold 
B. Franklin, president of that organization. 
The Midland theatre of Kansas City, which 
is said to have cost $4,000,000, is not in- 
cluded in the deal. The Midland Company 
owns a half interest in the Midland theatre, 
which has been leased to Loew interests 
for ten years. That lease is a part of the 
Loew interests which eventually will be 
operated by Fox West Coast, however. 
Franklin issued a statement to the effect 
that the personnel of the Midland will re- 
main intact and that all employees will be 
carried on at the posts they now occupy. 

P, W. Gebhart, Pioneer 
Exhibitor, Passes Away 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
DECATUR, ILL., Oct. 8.— P. W. Gebhart, 
pioneer motion picture exhibitor, died at his 
home here October 3. Death came from a 
stroke of paralysis, which he suffered October 
2. Gebhart operated theatres in and around 
Decatur for several years. His theatre career 
started 20 years ago. He leaves a widow and 
five children. 

Harrell New Secretary 
Of S. E, Theatre Owners 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

SPARTANBURG, S. C, Oct. 8.— Love B. 
Harrell, prominent theatre manager of Way- 
cross, Ga., has resigned his position there to 
become executive secretary of the Southeast- 
ern Theatre Owners' Association, with head- 
quarters in Atlanta. 

13 More Theatres Added 
To Fox West Coast Chain 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
SALEM, ORE., Oct. 8.— Thirteen more the- 
atres have been added to the Fox West Coast 
Chain the past week. The Elsinore theatre of 
this city, four houses in Missoula, Montreal 
and 8 houses in Southern Arizona, have all 
been acquired by the chain. 



himself mentally adjusted and that the swell- 
ing in his head has a chance to come down. 

Then, perhaps, maybe he could look at him- 
self in the mirror without throwing out his 
chest in pride. 

Then, perhaps, the title T. O. Service would 
again fit him and he would be of real service 
to us, as he once was. — Leo Guerrein, Jr.. 
Hippodrome theatre, Erie, Pa. 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



59 



WHAT THE PICTURE DID FOR ME 

Verdicts on Films in Language of Exhibitor 



Copyright, 1929 

AT — All Talking; T— Talking Sequences; M— Music (synchronous) ; E— Sound Effects. (Example: ATM, 
means the picture is all-talking and has a synchronized musical score. In the same way all other symbols 

may be combined.) 



Columbia 

SUBMARINE: Jack Holt— One of the best pic- 
tures this year. Sorry we didn't push it more.— 
Jim Simpson, Photo Play theatre, Lovington, III. — 
Country patronage. 

SUBMARINE: Jack Holt— September 6-7. This 
is our third from Columbia, and they were all good. 
Didn't do so much first night, but second was fine. 
One of the very best pictures we have ever run. 
A sure enough special if there ever was one. Good 
print and photography. Nine reels. — Robert K. 
Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — General pat- 
ronage. 

THE YOUNGER GENERATION: Jean 
Hersholt — September 20-21. A very fine picture 
of a Jewish family. Well acted and seemed 
to please our crowd very much. Good print and 
photography. — Robert K. Yancey, Bonny theatre, 
Mansfield, Mo. — General patronage. 

FATHER AND SON (T) : Jack Holt— Very good 
story, well recorded. But it's sold as talking picture 
and has only about 30 per cent talking. When you 
buy talkies, this is a consideration. — J. F. Fleitas, 
Monroe theatre. Key West, Fla. — General patronage. 

THE BACHELOR GIRL: Jacqueline Logan— Sep- 
tember 3-4. Very good. Better than the usual pro- 
gram picture. Seven reels. — P. N. Wilson, Parkview 
theatre, Collierville, Tenn. — General patronage. 

COURT MARTIAL: Jack Holt— Gave general sat- 
isfaction. Seven reels. — Giacoma Brothers, Crystal 
theatre, Tombstone, Ariz. — General patronage. 

SIDE SHOW: Special cast— We haven't run a 
poor Columbia yet. This was well received. — Jim 
Simpson, Photo Play theatre, Lovington, 111. — Country 
patronage. 

First National 

CAREERS: Billie Dove — September 28. I guess 
this one could be called fair, as no one kicked or 
no one praised. Seven reels. — Carl Dunlap, Gem thea- 
tre, Kinmundy, 111. — Small town patronage. 

HOUSE OF HORROR (TME) : Special cast— July 
4-5-6. A very poor picture. Recording not so good. 
— Rae Peacock, Mystic theatre, Stafford, Kan. — Small 
town patronage. 

WEARY RIVER (TME) : Richard Barthelmess— 
Good picture to fair business. — Rae Peacock, Mystic 
theatre, Stafford, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

HOT STUFF (TME): Special cast— Fair.— Rae 
Peacock, Mystic theatre, Stafford, Kan. — Small town 
patronage. 

LITTLE SHEPHERD OF KINGDOM COME: 

Richard Barthelmess — August 17. Very good feature. 
— Frank Sabin, Majestic theatre, Eureka, Mont. — 
Small town patronage. 

THE NIGHT WATCH: Billie Dove— September 
17-18. Good. — C. R. Grimes, Plaza theatre, Ackley, 
la. — Small town patronage. 

SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN: Special cast 
— September 3-4. Stay off this one. — C. R. Grimes, 
Plaza theatre, Ackley, la. — Small town patronage. 

DARK STREETS: Jack Mulhall— Just a fair pro- 
gram picture. — Jim Simpson, Photo Play theatre, 
Lovington, 111. — Country patronage. 

LILAC TIME: Colleen Moore — September 4. Very 
interesting and pleasing feature. You are certain to 
make a hit with "Lilac Time." — Frank Sabin, Majes- 
tic theatre, Eureka, Mont. — Small town patronage. 

SYNTHETIC SIN: Colleen Moore— September 



NAMING J. C. JENKINS' 
NEW CAR 

A single suggestion came in this week 
in the contest to name J. C. Jenkins' new 
car, successor to the retired Nancy. It 
has been placed in the regular list, and 
below is the "letter of nomination." 

Editor: I think Ruf and Reddy should 
be the name of J. C. Jenkins' new car, 
because this description suits Mr. Jen- 
kins himself to a T. He is always ready 
to tell facts regardless of whom they hit 
or how rough his criticisms may be. — 
E. H. Hewitt, Myers theatre, Francesville, 
Ind. 



13-14. We ran this during our fair and of course 
got good crowds. I didn't like this as well as some 
of her former pictures, but it seemed to please the 
crowd. Good print and photography. Seven reels. — - 
Robert K. Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — ■ 
General patronage. 

Fox 

LUCKY STAR (T) : Special cast— Silent part bet- 
ter than the talking, but nevertheless a good picture. 
Possibly made some time ago and release held up, as 
dialog seemed hollow-toned. Newer Fox pictures 
have overcome this. — Harry M. Palmer, Riviera thea- 
tre, Anderson, Ind. — General patronage. 

THE GREAT WHITE NORTH: Special cast— Sep- 
tember 17-18. A fine scenic picture of the far 
North. Educational and entertaining. Good patron- 
age both nights. Very satisfactory. Six reels. — 
P. N. Wilson, Parkview theatre, Collierville, Tenn.— 
General patronage. 

FOUR SONS: Special cast— September 15-16. A 
very excellent picture. Patrons came to box office 
after the performance and complimented us on the 
picture. Print and photography good. We need not 
worry about talkies in the small town as long as 
we can get silents like this. Eleven reels. — C. E. 
Mosher, Orpheum theatre, Rockford, la. — Small town 
patronage. 

TIN HATS: Special cast — Not as funny as was 
expected, but good.— Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Sal- 
mon, Idaho. — General patronage. 

ME, GANGSTER: Special cast— Good of its kind. 
— Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, III. — 
General patronage. 

SALUTE (AT) : George O'Brien— What a darb 
of a picture this one is! Talk very good. Foot- 
ball game a wow. Stepin Fetchit good for a 
laugh every time he opens his mouth. Certainly 
a seasonable production. — Harry M. Palmer, 
Riviera theatre, Anderson, Ind. — General patron- 
age. 

MOTHER KNOWS BEST: Special cast— It's good, 
but I would not call it a special. — Julius W. Schmidt, 
Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

SOFT BOILED: Tom Mix— September 19. The 

poorest Tom Mix I have played. Not a Western, just 
a half-hearted try at comedy. Sure showed its age. 
You need not go back and buy this particular reissue, 
as it failed to please my Saturday night crowd. Six 
reels.— James L. Sears, Liberty theatre, Humansville, 
Mo. — Small town patronage. 



BEHIND THAT CURTAIN (AT) : Warner Baxter 
— The perfect talking melodrama. Thrills that glue 
you to the seats. Dialog that chills you to the bone. 
Bill Fox sure knows how. — Harry M. Palmer, Riviera 
theatre, Anderson, Ind. — General patronage. 

PROTECTION: Special cast — Very good program 
and crook picture. — Jim Simpson, Photo Play thea- 
tre, Lovington, 111. — Country patronage. 

FOX FOLLIES (AT) : Special cast— Pep that's 
fast and furious. A show for the young people 
and the old young people. Worthy of any thea- 
tre's feature spot. — Harry M. Palmer, Riviera 
theatre, Anderson, Ind. — General patronage. 
CAPTAIN LASH: Victor McLaglen— Good.— 
Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — 
General patronage. 

SIN SISTER: Special cast— Didn't see it, but all 
reports from patrons and my folks were to the 
good. Absorbing emotional Alaska story out of the 
usual rut. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. 
— General patronage. 

PREP AND PEP: Special cast — Not much to this. 
— Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, m. — 
General patronage. 

GIRL SHY COWBOY: Rex Bell— Went over good 
and was enjoyed by all. Rex took with the girls. — 
Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. — General 
patronage. 

GIRL SHY COWBOY: Rex Bell— Good. Some- 
thing different for a Western. Five reels. — Julius 
W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — General pat- 
ronage. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

THE LAST OF MRS CHEYNEY: Norma Shearer 
— September 3. Had lots of compliments from the 
ladies on this, and it drew some that seldom come, 
but most of the regulars stayed at home. Didn't 
make expenses on it. Some of her pictures have 
made us money, but guess the title ruined this. 
Good print and photography. Seven reels. — Robert 
K. Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — General 
patronage. 

THE LAST OF MRS. CHEYNEY: Norma Shearer 
— Very interesting picture in spite of fade outs, etc. 
Patrons liked it. — Jim Simpson, Photo Play theatre, 
Lovington, 111. — Country patronage. 

THE LAST OF MRS. CHEYNEY: Norma Shearer 
— September 23-24. A very good picture for the city, 
but not a small town picture. Did not please here 
at all. Seven reels.. — Orris F. Collins, Palace thea- 
tre, Rector, Ark.— Small town patronage. 

THE LAST OF MRS. CHEYNEY: Norma 
Shearer — September 19-20. Very good production. 
Okey silent. Popularity of play seemed to help 
box office. Sorry we can't get more Shearers. 
Seven reels. — H. E. Rehfield, Iowa theatre, 
Bloomfield, la. — Family patronage. 

VOICE OF THE CITY: Special cast— August 12. 
Fair picture which seemed to please. Seven reels. — 
Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. 
—Summer resort patronage. 

VOICE OF THE CITY: Special cast— September 
15-16. Fairly good. — C. R. Grimes, Plaza theatre, 
Ackley, la. — Small town patronage. 

TIDE OF EMPIRE: Special cast — September 
6-7. This went over big, a very fine picture and 
extra good patronage. Wish I had more like this 
one. Ninety-five per cent satisfactory here. Patrons 
were very highly pleased. Got me a new suit after 
showing this one. Step on it, boys, it will stand the 
pressure. Eight reels. — P. N. Wilson, Parkview thea- 
tre, Collierville, Tenn. — General patronage. 



60 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



VOICE OF THE CITY: Willard Mack— Septem- 
ber 23-24. A talkie made silent. Therefore, only 
fair. Some said "good," some said "no good." 
Failed to make any money. I want to thank 
Mr. Service for reading my letter to the 
HERALD-WORLD. I feel all puffed up, as he 
answered it almost word for word, and I will 
continue to read his column, as I might install 
talkies some day and will need everybody's ad- 
vice then, no doubt. Seven reels. — James L. 
Sears, Liberty theatre, Humansville, Mo. — Small 
town patronage. 

TIDE OF EMPIRE: Special cast— Very good 
picture. — Jim Simpson, Photo Play theatre, Loving- 
ton, 111. — Country patronage. 

THE BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY: Special cast- 
Too deep for our patrons. — Jim Simpson, Photo 
Play theatre, Lovington, 111. — Country patronage. 

THE TRAIL OF '98: Special cast— September 
19-20. This is a good program offering, but by no 
means a special. I paid just twice what it is worth 
and advertised it heavily. I did not raise the ad- 
mission price and am glad of it. Do not think it 
would stand it. Some very good shots, and it is 
good from an historical standpoint. Ten reels.. — 
G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre. Wendell, N. C— 
Small town patronage. 

TELLING THE WORLD: William Haines— Sep- 
tember 12. Another dandy from Bill. He's a favorite 
here and always clicks. Good print and photography. 
Eight reels.- — Robert K. Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mans- 
field, Mo. — General patronage. 

DREAM OF LOVE: Special cast— September 20-21. 
Excellent picture, fine entertainment, good patronage 
both nights. Box office results fine. Fine acting and 
well directed. Metro's features and comedies are life 
savers for me. Nine reels. — P. N. Wilson, Parkview 
theatre, Collierville, Tenn. — General patronage. 

WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS: Lon Chaney— A 
corking good underworld melodrama. Plausible, ex- 
citing, dramatic. Chaney fine. Book it. There is a 




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distinct and decided yank at the front door bell at 
the little old Rex when Lon is known to be visiting 
us, and it is very pleasant to be host to such a popu- 
lar guest. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. 
— General patronage. 

WILD ORCHIDS: Greta Garbo— August 21. Not 
much to this one. Eleven reels. — Avard J. Sloat, 
Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer re- 
sort patronage. 

THE CAMERAMAN: Buster Keaton— August 9. 
Excellent comedy. About the best from Buster in 
years. Eight reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland thea- 
tre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

WOMAN OF AFFAIRS: Greta Garbo— September 
19-20. Very good. — C. R. Grimes, Plaza theatre, 
Ackley, la. — Small town patronage. 

BROTHERLY LOVE: Dane-Arthur— August 14. 
Dandy comedy, pleased everyone. Made silent and 
has action. Seven reels.' — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland 
theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patron- 
age. 

MARIANNE: Marion Davies— August 19. This 
being a new picture and having a prominent star, 
drew good audience. Picture seemed to please, al- 
though there was not much action. Seven reels. — 
Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. 
— Summer resort patronage. 

THE DUKE STEPS OUT: William Haines— 
August 5. Here is the best picture I played all 
summer. This pulled the largest house I had and 
pleased all. Perfect print. A few more pictures 
like this, instead of sleep producing silent prints 
of talking pictures, would help remove the red ink 
from the books. Eight reels. — Avard J. Sloat, 
Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer 
resort patronage. 

EXCESS BAGGAGE: William Haines— Failed to 
do excess business. Good. But why, William, did you 
have to go around like a roughneck, slapping the 
girls on — ahem! — places you don't mention in polite 
society ! That may be the familiar style of greet- 
ing in Hollywood, but in Salmon we still prefer to 
be gentlemen. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, 
Idaho. — General patronage. [Editors Note : Prefer — 
or compelled, Phil? Oh, well, it's none of our busi- 
ness.] 

EXCESS BAGGAGE: William Haines— This went 
over very strong. Everybody pleased. Eight reels. — 
Giacoma Brothers, Crystal theatre, Tombstone, Ariz. 
— General patronage. 

THUNDER: Lon Chaney— August 16. This was 
a great picture. Drew a dandy crowd and satisfied 
everybody. Good action. A dandy offering to present 
after a series of those sleep producing talkies. Don't 
be afraid of this one. Metro sure has been treating 
me right in regard to price on pictures and doesn't 
want the earth when it slips in a new one like this. 
Nine reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleas- 
antview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

THUNDER: Lon Chaney— Push this one— very 
good and a different Chaney. — Jim Simpson, Photo 
Play theatre, Lovington, 111. — Country patronage. 

CHINA BOUND: Dane-Arthur— August 2. Dandy 
comedy. Pleased all. Didn't draw for me. Seven 
reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasant- 
view, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

A MAN'S MAN: William Haines — September 
22-23. Just fair, very light, but went over. Eight 
reels. — C. R. Grimes, Plaza theatre, Ackley, la. — 
Small town patronage. 

SIOUX BLOOD: Tim McCoy— July 31. Good 
little Western that didn't draw. Six reels. — Avard 
J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Sum- 
mer resort patronage. 

WHERE EAST IS EAST: Lon Chaney— Septem- 
ber 17-18. Lon Chaney in a different type of role. 
Just a program picture. Will make you money if 
your town likes Lon Chaney. Nine reels. — James L. 
Sears, Liberty theatre, Humansville, Mo.— Small town 
patronage. 

WHERE EAST IS EAST: Lon Chaney— August 7. 
Good picture, satisfied. Seven reels. — Avard J. Sloat, 
Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer re- 
sort patronage. 

RUNAWAY GIRLS: Shirley Mason— Nothing to 
rave over, but it gave satisfaction as a program 
picture. We have seen Shirley in much better. She 
has lots and lots of friends in this camp. Six reels. — 
Giacoma Brothers, Crystal theatre, Tombstone, Ariz. — 
General patronage. 

THE BELLAMY TRIAL: Special cas1^-A very 
fine picture. A special and worthy of big boosting. 
Wonderfully directed. Fine cast. One of year's best. 
Step on it. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, Idaho. 
— General patronage. 

WHITE SHADOWS IN THE SOUTH SEAS: 

Special cast — August 28. Very good picture. Not 
much story, but a lot of interesting South Sea stuff 
that pleased. Drew an average crowd. Nine reels. 
— Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre. Pleasantview, 
R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 



THE DESERT RIDER: Tim McCoy— August 9. 
Good Western with some good comedy. Pleased all. 
Six reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasant- 
view, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

THE SINGLE STANDARD: Greta Garbo— Septem- 
ber 23-24. Very good silent. Only objection is that 
it was too long, as are most Metros. Sorry we can't 
get more Garbos. Eight reels. — H. E. Reh field, Iowa 
theatre, Bloomfield, la. — Family patronage. 



Paramount 



SOMEONE TO LOVE: Charles Buddy Rogers- 
September 24-25. A fine picture that pleased very 
much. Clean entertainment, and I am glad I ran 
it. Seven reels. — P. N. Wilson, Parkview theatre, 
Collierville, Tenn. — General patronage. 

THE WOLF SONG (ME): Special cast— July 18- 
19-20. Pretty good, but there is no talking. — Rae 
Peacock, Mystic theatre, Stafford, Kan. — Small town 
patronage. 

STARK LOVE: Special east — Once in a blue moon 
comes a lucky break ! The high school athletic director, 
new and popular, told all the boys and girls they 
positively had to see this unusual piece of Great 
Smoky Mountain realism, and they forthwith came 
and saw and then made their parents come the next 
night. All of which gave us a splendid house for 
two nights, fattened our starving wallet and enabled 
me to pay the music tax. The play was fine. Book 
it, it's different. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, 
Ida. — General patronage. 

RIVER OF ROMANCE: Buddy Rogers— August 15. 
Fair as silent picture. Seemed to please. Very dark 
print. Eight reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, 
Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

THUNDERBOLT: George Bancroft— August 6. 
Seemed to please, but had no action. Dark prints, 
titles extremely dark. Eight ..eels. — Avard J. Sloat, 
Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer re- 
sort patronage. 

TAKE ME HOME: Bebe Daniels — September 10-11. 
Very good, but not quite up to the standard of Bebe's 
pictures. Six reels. — P. N. Wilson, Parkview theatre, 
Collierville, Tenn. — General patronage. 

TAKE ME HOME: Bebe Daniels— September 20-21. 
Fine. Drew a larger house than usual. — Carl Dun- 
lap, Gem theatre, Kinmundy, 111. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

TAKE ME HOME: Bebe Daniels — More back stage 
story, fed up on it here. Let Bebe do the comedy- 
drama again. — Arno G. Weigang, Community theatre. 
Kenedy, Tex. — Small town patronage. 

BEGGARS OF LIFE: Wallace Beery— September 
21. Drew a fair-sized audience and went over well. 
Personally, I considered it an extra-good show. Nine 
reels. — C. E. Hopkins, The Hopkins theatre, Cotter, 
Ark. — Small town patronage. 

TONG WAR: Wallace Beery— August 27. Pretty 
good picture, but so dark the customers wondered 
what it was all about. Eight reels. — Avard J. Sloat, 
Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer re- 
sort patronage. 

STAIRS OF SAND: Wallace Beery— August 1. 
Fair, not much action. Didn't draw at all. Six 
reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasant- 
view, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

THE WILD PARTY: Clara Bow— July 30. This 
was so dark that the few that did come could hardly 
see it. Seven reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, 
Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

THE WILD PARTY: Clara Bow— Good picture, 
but not well received here. Somehow they expected 
more of her, against some of her previous pictures. 
Seven reels. — Arno G. Weigang, Community theatre, 
Kenedy, Tex. — Small town patronage. 

WHEEL OF LIFE: Richard Dix— August 29. Good 
thing this wasn't more than six reels as it was ter- 
rible stuff. Absolutely dead — no life. Drew a lot of 
kids who expected another "Redskin." Adults not 
so wild about it either. Six reels. — Avard J. Sloat, 
Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer re- 
sort patronage. 

SHOPWORN ANGEL: Gary Cooper— Too much like 
all the present back stage stories. Eight reels. — 
Arno G. Weigang, Community theatre, Kenedy, Tex. 
— Small town patronage. 

SHOPWORN ANGEL: Nancy Carroll— August 22. 
Pulled an extra-good house and pleased. Queer end- 
ing 60on forgotten when comedy, "Pair of Tights," 
came on. Seven reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland 
theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patron- 
age. 

SUNSET PASS: Jack Holt— Not up to the stand- 
ard of his past releases. Pleased only fair. — Arno G. 
Weigang, Community theatre, Kenedy. Tex.— Small 
town patronage. 

ABIE'S IRISH ROSE: Special cast— September 
12-13-14. We ran this three nights and had a full 



Om of the Worlds Most 
Tamous Mineral 
Springs Hesorlsf 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



61 



Believe It or Not! 




Above and to the right are observable two interesting examples of old and modern forms of transit, 
and both being in and about the state of Oregon during the sojourn there of J. C. Jenkins, it is only 
to be expected that such pictures should be presented to the public sooner or later. Of tliat above, 
Jaysee writes, "If the HERALD-WORLD guy don't get that car out of the way, we are going to smash 
right into him. The Oregon Pony, the first locomotive ever used in Oregon, is shown. When it got 
its growth, it was a Ford." And of the other, "The HERALD-WORLD man on the aft turret of the 
battleship Oregon. When he gave the command for the gunners to go into action, the war was all 
over right then." What war? Perhaps the great Colyumnist has access to military information not 
generally knotvn. However, ivhat we started out to say was that those not accustomed to see Jaysee 
in strange places may get a kick out of examining these pictures closely. The rest of us are not 

at all surprised. 




house every night. Everyone was well pleased. Some 
who came the second night came back the next. It's 
a picture that cannot be over-advertised. Twelve 
reels. — Carl Dunlap, Gem theatre, Kinmundy, 111. — 
Small town patronage. 

ABIE'S IRISH ROSE (ME) : Special cast^Good 
picture, pleased all. No talking in this one, but it is 
good, anyhow. — Rae Peacock, Mystic theatre, Stafford, 
Kan. — Small town patronage. 

ABIE'S IRISH ROSE: Special cast— September 
11-12. Brother exhibitors, hei-e's a box office natural. 
We paid a good price for it, but got back with a 
profit. They talked about it for a week afterwards. 
Don't pass it up. It will make you money. Better 
than anything we've played this year. Twelve reels. 
— C. E. Mosher, Orpheum theatre, Rockford, la. — 
Small town patronage. 

ABIE'S IRISH ROSE: Special cast— August 10. 
For a picture with no action, this held the interest 
of the few that came to see it. Drew less than 
average attendance. Twelve reels.- — Avard J. Sloat, 
Rc«eland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer re- 
sort patronage. 

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH (AT): Richard 

Dix — Another good "talkie." Reproduction clear. 

Using film method only. — Carl Veseth, Palace 

theatre, Malta, Mont. — General patronage. 

WE'RE IN THE NAVY NOW: Special cast— Very 
good of its kind. Seven reels. — Julius W. Schmidt, 
Grand theatre, Breese, III. — General patronage. 

SWIM, GIRL, SWIM: Bebe Daniels— Good clean 
fun. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 11. 
— General patronage. 

WARMING UP: Richard Dix— Good baseball pic- 
ture. — Julius Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — 
General patronage. 

ONE WOMAN TO ANOTHER: Special cast— Nice 
little picture. Clean. Seven reels. — Julius W. Schmidt, 
Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

JUST MARRIED: Special cast— September 18. 
Mighty good comedy. Six big reels of continuous 
laughs and titters. A great cast, too, including 
Harrison Ford, Ruth Taylor, Ivy Harris, James Hall, 
Lila Lee, William Austin, and other laugh pro- 
ducers. Ruth Taylor is a good example of why 
gentlemen prefer blondes. Satisfactory print and 
photography, except the ends of several reels had been 
-torn off and not replaced, which lost continuity at the 
-change-over. Business a little better. Six reels. — 
O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small 
town patronage. 

SPORTING GOODS: Richard Dix— Good clean fun. 
— Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — 
General patronage. 

KIT CARSON: Fred Thomson— Good, but he did 
-more business for me when he was with F B O. He 



is the best Western star I ever had. May he rest in 
peace. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. 
— General patronage. 

THE FLEET'S IN: Clara Bow— Best Bow to date. 
Wise-cracking titles. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand the- 
atre, Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

THE FLEET'S IN: Clara Bow— August 24. Clara 
sure brought them in. We had a larger house on 
this one than we had on any program picture since 
the first of the year. We ran one night with no 
raise in admission. Should have run two nights 
with an increase in price. Eight reels. — Carl Dunlap, 
Gem theatre, Kinmundy, 111. — Small town patronage. 

FIGURES DON'T LIE: Esther Ralston— Good clean 
fun. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. 
■ — General patronage. 

WINGS: Special cast; — Very good, can't be beat. — 
Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

KNOCKOUT RILEY: Richard Dix— Very good 
prize fight picture. Eight reels. — Julius W. Schmidt, 
Grand theatre, Breese, HI. — -General patronage. 

SHOOTIN' IRONS: Special cast— Nothing to this 
as a drawing card. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, 
Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

THE DRAG NET: George Bancroft— Very good — 
Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

SUNSET LEGION: Fred Thomson— I have never 
seen a poor Thomson. This is good. Seven reels. — 
Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111.- — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

THE FIRST KISS: Special cast— Not much to 
this one. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 
111. — General patronage. 

HOT NEWS: Bebe Daniels— Good snappy picture. 
— Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. — 
General patronage. 

THE ROUGH RIDERS: Special cast— Very good, 
boys. My 4th of July show. A picture you have never 
seen is just as new as a book you have never read. 
Ten reels. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 
111. — General patronage. 

THE RACKET: Special cast— Pretty fair but no 
draw. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Salmon, Ida. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

THE RACKET: Thomas Meighan— September 14-15. 
Thomas Meighan at his best in a very good under- 
world story. Old but worth playing. Reels in good 
shape for their age. Seven reels. — James L. Sears, 
Liberty theatre, Humansville, Mo. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 



SPEEDY: Harold Lloyd— August 30. After a long 
search for something good for this date, I decided on 
"Speedy." Paramount had to send to the film depot 
to get the print. But it drew the biggest matinee of 
the summer, and also a good evening house, and it 
takes second place, together with "Thunder" and 
"Marianne," for business and satisfaction. Old but 
good. Action from start to finish. Print in ex- 
cellent condition and clear as a bell. Picture stood 
out on screen. If some of you exhibitors are looking 
for a good silent picture that your patrons won't 
sleep through, give "Speedy" a date. I'm glad I did. 
Eight reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, 
Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

THE MAN I LOVE: Richard Arlen— August 26. 
Good program picture. Pleased but did not draw. 
Seven reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, 
Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

THE CANARY MURDER CASE: William Powell 
— August 20. Very interesting murder mystery that 
satisfied. Print extra dark. All Paramount prints 
have been dark. Titles were hardly discernible. Seven 
reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasant- 
view, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

THE CANARY MURDER CASE (AT) : Special cast 
— Enjoyed by all patrons. Talking good, and re- 
production by film method was clear at all times. — 
Carl Veseth, Palace theatre, Malta, Mont. — General 
patronage. 

THREE WEEK ENDS: Clara Bow— September 23. 

One of the best Bow pictures I have ever shown. We 
had good crowds two nights despite a steady downpour 
of rain. Six reels. — G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre, 
Wendell, N. Car. — Small town patronage. 

THREE WEEK ENDS: Clara Bow— This is good. 



OPPORTUNITY ! 

For Men Qualified by Experience in the 

THEATRE BUSINESS 
None Others Need Apply 

One of Wisconsin's most progressive theatre 
operating companies, with deluxe theatres in 
the smaller cities of Wisconsin, has openings 
for men who have had experience as theatre 
managers. 

Unless you can prove that you have the 
ability to show results don't waste your time. 
We Want Producers, Not Talkers 
Call Personally or Write 

Community Theatres, Inc. 

Carpenter Bldg. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



62 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



— Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111.— 
General patronage. 

DIVORCE MADE EASY: Douglas MaeLean— 
August 8. Nothing to this — at least that's what the 
customers told us. Six reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Rose- 
land theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort 
patronage. 

DANGEROUS CURVES: Clara Bow— September 
22. Oy ! Yoy ! Just see what sound has done to 
us again ! "The Wild Party" showed a little falling 
off, but this one was only about 60 per cent of our 
average on a Bow picture. Not much of a story to 
begin with, and Clara seems to have lost some of 
"it" in these silent versions. Once more Paramount 
sends us one of those cussed prints with a blank 
sound track, although it was O. K. otherwise. For 
these several reasons, guess this will be our last Bow 
picture. Oy! Yoy! Eight reels— O. B. Wolfe. 
Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town patron- 
age. 

DANGEROUS CURVES: Clara Bow— September 
25-26. Nice clean entertainment. Everyone well 
pleased. Eight reels. — Orris F. Collins, Palace theatre, 
Rector, Ark. — Small town patronage. 

Pathe 

BIG NEWS (AT) : Robert Armstrong— Pathe pic- 
tures do not draw for us. Many liked this picture 
better than "Gentlemen of the Press." More action. 
Recording perfect. Entire cast splendid. Sunday, yes. 
However any silent picture would have grossed the 
same. Seems that people expect sound, but re- 
ceipts have gone back to silent day standard. — 
William M. Atkinson, Panama theatre, Panama City, 
Fla. — General patronage. 

THE SOPHOMORE (TE) : Eddie Quillan— Here is 
a picture that is entertainment and satisfactory. Had 
many patrons say they enjoyed it more than talking 
pictures they had seen. Not a bit of sex stuff in it. 
Just darn good clean entertainment that the people 
are craving. College story, with football game that 
is the mustard.— H. G. Stettmund. Jr., H. & S. the- 
atre. Chandler, Okla. — General patronage. 

THE SOPHOMORE (AT): Eddie Quillan— Seemed 
to please the few who saw it better than anything 
we have played since "Grandma's Boy." Disc re- 
cording perfect. If you can get them in, it will 
please 100 per cent. Eight reels. — William M. Atkin- 
son, Panama theatre, Panama City, Fla. — General 
patronage. 

POWER: William Boyd— Pretty fair comedy. 
Plenty of wise cracks. Most everyone enjoyed it. — 
Frank Sabin, Majestic theatre, Eureka, Mont. — Small 
town patronage. 

LEATHER NECK: William Boyd— September 8-9. 
Very good.- — C. R. Grimes, Plaza theatre, Ackley, la. 
— Small town patronage. 

HIGH VOLTAGE: William Boyd— No good silent. 
Patrons disappointed. — Jim Simpson, Photo Play the- 
atre, Lovington, 111. — Country patronage. 

THE FLYING FOOL: William Boyd— Here is 
a picture that sure enough passed for a special. 
It is very seldom we have such a thing happen 
nowadays, when pictures and plots are turned out 
enmasse. Eight reels. — Giacoma Brothers, Crystal 
theatre, Tombstone, Ariz. — General patronage. 

THE FLYING FOOL: William Boyd— Good pro- 
gram picture. — Jim Simpson, Photo Play theatre, 
Lovington, 111. — Country patronage. 

RKO 

THE TRAIL OF HORSE THIEVES: Tom Tyler- 
September 11. A good average Tyler. He is a great 
favorite here. Six reels. — G. H. Wright, Jr.,- Star 
theatre, Wendell, N. Car. — Small town patronage. 

THE JAZZ AGE: Special cast— September 12-13. 
This is an exceptionally good picture that drew well 
for me. Some were expecting some pretty rough 
stuff, but the picture is very decent and gives a true 
conception of the youth of today. Has a good plot. 
Seven reels. — G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre, Wen- 
dell, N. Car. — Small town patronage. 

ROUGH RIDING RED: Buzz Barton— September 
21. Very good Western. Buzz is a great favorite 
among the kids, and we did well with this on Satur- 
day. Six reels. — G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre. 
Wendell, N. Car. — Small town patronage. 

.45 CALIBRE WAR: Don Coleman— September 14. 

Pretty good Western that took well for Saturday. 
Five reels. — G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre, Wendell, 
N. Car. — Small town patronage. 

THE AIR LEGION: Special cast— September 9-10. 
Very good picture.- — G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre, 
Wendell, N. Car. — Small town patronage. 

SON OF THE GOLDEN WEST: Tom Mix- 
August 28. Mix is a dead one here. — Frank Sabin, 
Majestic theatre, Eureka, Mont. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 



NAMES FOR 
"JAYSEE'S" CAR 

The following names have been sug- 
gested for J. C. Jenkins' new car, now 
taking the place of Nancy, retired: 
ALICE 

By Mrs. Cres Swails, Clay Center, Neb. 
BETSY 

By Mrs. G. V. Higgins, Crawford, Neb. 
IRENE 
PRUDENCE 
HIRAM 

By Miss Ashby Tibbetts, Bethel, Me. 
PAT 
PILL 
PILGREE 
LADY 
PRISCILLA 
LUCHADOR 
By Miss Orva Worman, Ogden, Utah. 

COLLEEN 
By Mrs. H. C. Mullens, Hettick, 111. 
POLLY 
LUPE 

By Mrs. C. R. Grimes, Ackley, la. 
ELMER 
ELMERITA 
MABEL 

By Mrs. Raymond Robbins, Belt, Mont. 
PRISCILLA 
POLLY 

By Mrs. Frances Estee, Parker, S. D. 
AUSSIE 
JUANITA 
SHEBA 
INA 

By W. E. Dickson, Lemmon, S. D. 
WHIFFLEPOOF 
By Trag, formerly of Neillsville, Wis., 
and now a denizen of New York. 
0' MIN 

By G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre, Wen- 
dell, N. Carolina. 
SLOWGO 

By Ray W. Musselman, Lincoln, Kan. 
LITTLE PAL 
By Mrs. Mabel Hockenberry, Oakland, la. 
CLARA 

By W. H. Russell, Okeechobee, Fla. 

SNIKNEJ 
By F. P. HoUywood, Deering, Me. 

DOUGLAS 
By A. E. Sirica, Waterbury, Conn. 

RUFF AND READY 
By E. H. Hewitt, Francesville, Ind. 

All those caring to submit names are 
invited to do so, provided they are con- 
nected with the motion picture industry 
by either employment or kinship. An 
award of one year's subscription to the 
HERALD-WORLD will be made to the 
person submitting the chosen name. 



THE PERFECT CRIME: Clive Brook— August 24. 
The story was interesting during its portrayal, then 
the end came and spoiled the whole works for every- 
one.- — Frank Sabin, Majestic theatre, Eureka, Mont. 
— Small town patronage. 

THE VERY IDEA (AT) : Special cast— My patrons 
nearly ran me out of town for making them pay to 
see such junk as this. Opens up with a discussion 
of bettering the animal world by breeding to better 
grades of stock. Can you beat that for a show? One 
of the characters gets the idea in his head to see 
what kind of offspring the chauffeur and maid, 
supposedly perfect specimens, would have. Should 
be in a stock show at the county fair, not a movie 
show sold for entertainment. — Carl Veseth, Palace 
theatre, Malta, Mont. — General patronage. 

STOCKS AND BLONDES: Jacqueline Logan— Sep- 
tember 27-28. Very poor entertainment for small 
towns. The kind of pictures that makes people stay 
away. Too bad Jacqueline sold her photo in this 



lemon. Six reels. — P. N. Wilson, Parkview theatre, 
Collierville, Tenn. — General patronage. 

STOCKS AND BLONDES: Special cast— September 
7. Just a picture. Forget it if you haven't bought it. 
— Frank Sabin, Majestic theatre, Eureka, Mont. — 
Small town patronage. 

COME AND GET IT: Bob Steele— September 21. 

Steele is good. Best prize fight I have seen on the 
screen. Six reels. — C. R. Grimes, Plaza theatre, 
Ackley, la. — Small town patronage. 

FANGS OF THE WILD: Special cast— A good dog 
picture, all enjoyed it. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, 
Salmon, Ida. — General patronage. 

LOVE IN THE DESERT: Special cast— September 
21. Say, talk of sheiky pictures, this is one! Very 
interesting throughout, and it's quite new. We played 
this silent and cued the music for it. It went over 
big with the audience. Seven reels. — C. E. Mosher, 
Orpheum theatre, Rockford, la. — Small town patron- 
age. 

HARDBOILED: Sally O'Neil— September 16-17. 

Pretty good picture, but not as good as I have seen, 
though. I thing it will please the average crowd. 
Seven reels. — G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre, Wen- 
dell, N. Car. — Small town patronage. 

HARDBOILED: Sally O'Neil— September 25. Fair. 
Where do they get this title ? Very misleading. Have 
seen thousands of actresses in real life, and if this 
one is hard boiled, I'm soft boiled. Last "gold bond," 
and am mighty happy, as they have been lemons. 
Six reels. — H. E. Rehfield, Iowa theatre, Bloomfield, 
la. — Family patronage. 

Tiffany-Stahl 

THE TOILERS: Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.— August 
21. Very good. Well received. Above the average 
program picture. — Jim Simpson, Photo Play theatre, 
Lovington, 111. — Country patronage. 

MY LADIES PAST (TME) : Special cast — A very 
poor picture. Recording (disc) terrible. — Rae Peacock, 
Mystic theatre, Stafford, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

NEW ORLEANS (M) : Special cast— September 
23-24. Only two reels talking. It's a pretty good 
program picture. Nothing to brag about. Do not 
pay too much money for it. Eight reels. — E. Beren- 
son. State theatre, Bogalusa, La. — General patronage. 

MY LADY'S PAST (T) : Belle Bennett— This is the 
wor6t picture I have ever run. The music on disc 
is terrible. The story is absolutely devoid of enter- 
tainment. No company with any pride in its pictures 
would release such a thing as this. — H. C. Stettmund, 
Jr., H. &. S. theatre, Chandler, Okla. — General pat- 
ronage. 

United Artists 

RAMONA: Dolores Del Rio — September 14. A 
swell show for the ladies. Men didn't fall for it. — 
Frank Sabin, Majestic theatre, Eureka, Mont. — Small 
town patronage. 

THE WINNING OF BARBARA WORTH: Vilma 
Banky — September 18-19. A dandy picture that drew 
well. But we surely got a bum print on it, which 
lessened its value a great deal. Two good stars and 
a nationally read book by a well known author, are 
bound to bring them in. Nine reels. — C. E. Mosher, 
Orpheum theatre, Rockford, la. — Small town patron- 
age. 

Universal 

MODERN LOVE: Special cast— September 24-25. 

I believe this is Charlie Chase's debut into the fea- 
ture field, and it isn't bad, if you can stand him in 
six-reel doses. This one is a sort of cross between a 
Roach comedy and a Universal Jewel — light but 
satisfying. Chase has good support in Kathryn 
Crawford and Jean Hersholt. Hersholt's role is not 
as strong as he usually has. Yes, I'd call it a good 
program number, and the print and photography were 
good, too. Business just fair. Six reels. — O. B. Wolfe, 
Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town patron- 
age. 

GIRL OVERBOARD: Mary Philbin— September 
20-21. A piece of junk, and a big piece at that. 
Slow, solemn, maundering sort of thing that would 
have been too long drawn out in five short reels and 
here they go and make eight big reels of it and 
call it a "Carl Laemmle Special." They speak of 
"the new Mary Philbin." Well, she has a new hair- 
cut and actually smiles once in a while, but is just 
as much poison to our B. O. as ever. Otis Harlan is 
usually funny, but doesn't bring many laughs in this. 
Eight reels. — O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, 
O. — Small town patronage. 

POINTS WEST: Special cast — Not a knockout, 
but average Western. Hoot has made lots better. 

[Reports continued on page following Jaysee] 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



63 




J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 



ROSEBURG, ORE., 

Oct. 1, 1929. 

DEAR HERALD-WORLD: 

Yon have no doubt read and heard a whole lot about the Willam- 
ette valley, eh? Well, we have been in that valley for several days 
but are now in the foothills of the Rogue River valley. The Willam- 
ette valley reminds us in some respects of the Ozark mountains in 
Missouri, except that they don't raise as many gallons to the acre out 
here as they do down there. As an agricultural district, the Willam- 
ette has a delightful climate (and a little scenery), and as a stock 
country, her prunes and a few bands of sheep are marvelous and her 
Nebraska bacon is simply delicious. 

It doesn't seem to matter how well one plans his route, it's bound to 
either go haywire or Democratic. We expected to have spent last 
Sunday in Ashland, Ore., but here we are in Roseburg, and it is all 
due to a lot of Nebraska folks who ought to have had better sense. 
Maybe we are partially to blame ourself. We stopped in Eugene to 
call on Maude Densmore. 

Maude used to sit next to us in the Congregational choir at Neligh 
and sing alto and jab a hatpin into us when we struck the wrong bass 
note, and of course we couldn't pass Maude up. Maude asked us if 
we had called on Robbin Warner, another choir singer, and we told 
her we hadn't, so we had to go and call on Robbin. Robbin asked us if 
we had called on Joe Franzwau, the man who built the Neligh stand- 
pipe and showed his good judgment by grabbing off one of Neligh's 
fair damsels, and we said we hadn't, so we had to visit Joe. Joe asked 
us if we had called on Abe Barnum, the man who used to carry the 
keys to Neligh's bastille and repair her sidewalks, and we said we 
hadn't, so we had to go and call on Abe. Abe asked us if we had 
called on Bill Block, and we told him we didn't know Bill Block lived 
here, so we had to go and call on Bill, and Bill, the durn cuss, is re- 
sponsible for holding us in Eugene until Monday morning. 

Through the sufferance of the Democratic party, aided by a num- 
ber of Republicans, Bill was permitted to act as tax collector and 
treasurer for Antelope county for four years, and he had his office 
right across the hall from the county clerk's office, which might have 
been filled by a better guy but which we were permitted to occupy 
for the same length of time before the public woke up to the fact 
that they should have sent us to Congress instead (parties do some 
fool things sometimes), — so we had to visit Bill of course, and that's 
how it comes we are in Roseburg instead of Ashland at this moment. 

Then Monday morning we drove down to Cottage Grove and, dog- 
gone our wife's poodle's grandmother, if we didn't run onto M. C. 
Bressler who used to fight — shoulder to shoulder — with us in Ne- 
braska politics, and that meant another delay in the onward march 
of progress, and should this thing keep up much longer, we know 
just the kind of wire we will receive from 407 South Dearborn Street, 
Chicago, signed by Eagle Eye Joe. Gosh, but this is a crooel world, 
and it's getting worse every day. And now California is next, and 
then it will be every man for himself — and not a bartender in sight. 




We note by the current issue of the HERALD-WORLD that George 
Schutz of What the Picture Did for Me department, has returned 
to his desk from a two weeks' fishing trip on the lakes in Northern 
Wisconsin. Knowing George, as we do, to be an exemplary young 
man with a bright and promising future before him, it grieves us to 
note the attitude he assumes regarding his trip. He says he didn't 
catch any fish (we didn't expect he would), but for the benefit of the 
readers he should have laid aside what conscientious scruples he had 
regarding truth and given us a story that we could have clipped and 
sent home to the folks. His trip has been very disappointing to the 
fraternity and we are ashamed of him, darned if we ever speak to 
him again. Now, if that had been Gailey of Wayne, Neb., he would 
have shown a picture of a string of bullheads and carp that would 
have been a knock-out advertisement for any fish market in the 
country. 

Carl M. Rueck of the Colonial theatre located near the college 
campus at Eugene, sent out questionnaires asking his patrons to ex- 
press their preference as to sound or silent pictures, and of the 112 
replies, 18 were for sound and the balance were for silent pictures. 
This may mean a whole lot or it may not mean a thing. The price 
of admission may have entered into the matter. The downtown 
houses having sound charge 50 cents, and the Colonial charges 25 
cents, and 25 cents may mean a lot to his student patronage. You 
can figure this out to suit yourself, we are not going to comment 
on it. 

W. M. Morelock of the Arcade theatre at Cottage Grove has West- 
ern Electric equipment. When asked how he liked it, he said he 
liked it fine but asked us what was going to become of the small 
houses with sound equipment if sound prices weren't reduced to 
where they could operate at a profit, and we replied, "Well, you know 
what frost does to a pumpkin vine, don't you?" He said he did, and 
that ended the argument. He gave us a check for a renewal of his 
subscription to the HERALD-WORLD, and we parted good friends. 
We hope we always remain so, for he's a mighty swell fellow. 

* * * 

It won't be long now until we will be down in Hollywood, provided 
the wheels keep turning, and everytime we think of it the cold chills 
grab us and nearly shake our teeth out, and there is a chunk of ice 
slips up and down our spine as big as a washtub, for outside of 
Polly Moran and Louise Fazenda, there isn't a chaperon down there 
we dare trust, not one. 

Hodges of the HERALD- WORLD staff, will have all he can do, and 
more too, to look after himself, and we believe the best thing for us 
to do is to go right down to the Y. M. C. A. and stay there. If Phil 
Rand was going to be there, we would feel better about it. When we 
get there, this Colyum is liable to contain some pretty hot stuff, for 
if those fillum goils don't let us alone and they keep pesterin' us to 
drive 'em around in our car, we are going to tell their maws on 'em, 
you just see if we don't. 

Damages keep piling up against the HERALD-WORLD every issue 
they publish Abe Martin's picture with our Colyum. If that guy looks 
anything like we do, then Crocket Brown looks like a bullfrog, and 
we are not so sure but what he does at that. We've stood for a lot 
of things in our time, but by gosh this is going too strong, there's got 
to be something done about it. HEY THERE, George, whatjamean 
publishing that picture? Can't you give a guy a show? 

J. C. JENKINS, 
The HERALD-WORLD man. 

P. S.— The HERALD-WORLD COVERS THE FIELD like an April 
SHOWER. 



64 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 12, 1929 



{Continued from page 62) 

Hoot still draws well for us, but directors should 
hunt up better stories for him. — Philip Rand, Rex 
theatre, Salmon, Ida. — General patronage. 

POINTS WEST: Hoot Gibson— 0. K. A very good 
Western, and everybody enjoyed it. — Jim Simpson, 
Photo Play theatre, Lovington, III. — Country patron- 
age. 

SHOW BOAT (TME): Laura LaPIante— The 
picture is already sold. Just tell them the dates 
and you will see people you never saw before. 
Picture so good that it will take a week to get 
your regular business back after it has gone. 
This is quite a consideration when you buy and 
agree to a split. Fifteen reels. — William M. Atkin- 
son, Panama theatre, Panama City, Fla. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

THE WAGON MASTER (TME) : Ken Maynard— A 
knockout Western. Gave more satisfaction than any 
Western ever played. Even the women liked it. Ken 
sings twice and puts himself over as a talking star. 
Picture up to First National standard. Pleased 100 
per cent. — William M. Atkinson, Panama theatre, 
Panama City, Fla. — General patronage. 

THE GIRL ON THE BARGE: Special cast— One 
of Uncle Carl's specials that mean nothing at the 
B. O. He has the punkest lot of specials of any 
producer. "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was the one ex- 
ception. This play has action and will please fairly 
well, but will not draw. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, 
Salmon, Ida. — General patronage. 

GIVE AND TAKE: Special cast— August 31. Spe- 
cial price on this. Not even a good program picture. 
Terrible stuff. A few laughs. All Universal prints 
we have had have been more or less poor, but this 
was all shot to pieces. Seven reels. — Avard J. Sloat, 
Roseland theatre. Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer re- 
sort patronage. 

UNCLE TOM'S CABIN: Special cast— August 23- 
24. Big flop for me. Uncle Carl got gyped a million 
and a half, if this cost him two million. Picture is 
pretty good, but it was absolutely no draw here. 
Eleven reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, 
Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage. 

THE MAN WHO LAUGHS: Special cast— August 
13. Gruesome picture that drew below average at- 
tendance and cost double usual rental. Ten reels. — 
Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. 
— Summer resort patronage. 

RED HOT SPEED: Reginald Denny— August 17. 
Nothing "red hot" in this, and absolutely no speed. 
Better than last few Denny pictures. Seven reels. — 
Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre. Pleasantview, R. I. 
— Summer resort patronage. 

THE LAST WARNING: Laura LaPIante— August 
3. Good mystery picture, but not worth the extra 
money you pay for it. Poor prints from Universal. 
Eight reels. — Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, 
Pleasantview, R. I.- — Summer resort patronage. 

A MAN'S PAST: Special cast— Too slow for me 
and my town. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, 
Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

FOUR FLUSHER: Special cast— Just fair. Six 
reels. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. 
— General patronage. 

JAZZ MAD: Special cast^-Just fair.— Julius W. 
Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, III. — General patron- 
age. 

FINDERS KEEPERS: Laura LaPIante— Just a fair 
story. Seven reels. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, 
Breese, 111. — General patronage. 

WILD WEST SHOW: Hoot Gibson— Not much 
Western. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 
111. — General patronage. 

THE COHENS AND KELLYS IN ATLANTIC 
CITY: Special cast — Not near as good as others of 
series. Mack Swain as the Irishman the bunk. Theme 
an old one. Few laughs until the last part. Only 
a program picture. — Philip Rand, Rex theatre, Sal- 
mon, Ida. — General patronage. 

BURNING THE WIND: Hoot Gibson— August 15. 
Excellent little Western. Six reels. — Avard J. Sloat, 
Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer re- 
sort patronage. 

CLEAR THE DECK: Reginald Denny— September 
2-3. Poorest Denny yet and plenty kicks. Few like 
this, and good night, Reggie, Seven reels. — H. E. 
Rehfield. Iowa theatre, Bloomfield, la. — Family pat- 
ronage. 

OUT ALL NIGHT: Reginald Denny— August 31. 
Good comedy-drama. Denny always clicks big. — Frank 
Sabin, Majestic theatre. Eureka, Mont. — Small town 
patronage. 

THE CRIMSON CANYON: Ted Wells— September 
10. A fair Western. It seemed to please. Good print 
and photography. Five reels. — Robert K. Yancey, 
Bonny theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — General patronage. 



Warner Bros. 

FROZEN RIVER: Rin-Tin-Tin— September 13-14. 

Went over just like the average. — C. R. Grimes. 
Plaza theatre, Ackley, la. — Small town patronage. 

THE TERROR (AT) : Special cast— I don't think 
this one so hot. Have seen many silent mystery 
plays that were better. — Rae Peacock, Mystic theatre, 
Stafford, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

LIGHTS OF NEW YORK (AT): Special cast- 
July 11-12-13. Fairly good. Was O. K. for being the 
first all-talkie. — Rae Peacock, Mystic theatre, Staf- 
ford, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

POWDER MY BACK: Special cast— Yes, good 
show. — Julius W. Schmidt, Grand theatre, Breese, 111. 
— General patronage. 

Serials 

THE DIAMOND MASTER (Universal) : Special cast 
— Pretty fair serial, but not in "Tarzan's" class. No 
kicks, and kids talk about it some. — H. E. Rehfield, 
Iowa theatre, Bloomfield, la. — Family patronage. 

VANISHING WEST (Columbia) : Special cast- 
Not so hot. Just closed and did not see much re- 
sults from it. Two reels. — G. H. Wright, Jr., Star 
theatre, Wendell, N. Car. — Small town patronage. 

Short Features 

(SOUND) 
COLUMBIA 

GEM ACT. — "Parlor Pest." Good in every respect. 
Well worth showing. (J. F. Fleitas, Monroe theatre, 
Key West, Fla.— General patronage.) 

A TRIP TO MOVIE LAND Ben Turpin as master 

of introduction. Well worth while showing. (J. F. 
Fleitas, Monroe theatre, Key West, Fla. — General 
patronage.) 

PARAMOUNT 

DEAR VIVIAN, — Not so good. Paramount's disc 
recording not as good as Warners'. (Rae Peacock, 
Mystic theatre, Stafford, Kan. — Small town patron- 
age.) 

THAT PARTY IN PERSON. Eddie Cantor— Good. 
Better than his "Ziegfeld's Midnite Frolic." (Rae 
Peacock, Mystic theatre, Stafford. Kan. — Small town 
patronage.) 

SCHUBERT SERIES. "Schubert's Inspiration."— 
I'll be glad when these are over. "Schurbert's Songs." 
Did not please. (Rae Peacock, Mystic theatre, Staf- 
ford, Kan. — Small town patronage.) 

WARNER BROTHERS 

VITAPHONE No. 545 "The Aristocrats," 1 A 

fine singing and musical act. (Bert Silver, Silver 
Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patron- 
age.) 

VITAPHONE ACT No. 2704 "Arthur Bryon & 
Company." — This is a splendid act. (Bert Silver, 
Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General pat- 
ronage.) 

VITAPHONE ACTS 545, 823, 2253 Very good 

acts. (Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich.— General patronage.) 

(SILENT) 
EDUCATIONAL 

COLLINS-DENT COMEDIES, 2.— "Those Two 
Boys." Yes, we have no laurel wreaths to issue on 
this one. Slapstick stuff with lots of action but not 
much humor. The Laurel-Hardy type of comedy 
seems to be much imitated but seldom equaled. Print 
O. K. (O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. 
— Small town patronage.) 

PERMANENT WAVE RAILROAD, 1.— An exceed- 
ingly interesting subject to me, as it shows the Uinta 
Narrow Gage Railway of Mack, Colo., where I once 
lived. You Colorado exhibitors, book it, as it is local 
stuff and is very good. (James L. Sears, Liberty 
theatre, Humansville, Mo. — Small town patronage.) 

CHARLIE BOWERS COMEDIES, 2.— "Hop Off." 

Fair. The way these Bower's comedies are made, 
they are a whole show. (H. D. Beebe, Rialto theatre, 
Nelson, Neb. — General patronage.) 

COLD SHIVERS: Special cast— September 18-19. 

Exhibitors, if you want to build up a good patronage, 
play these good Educational talking comedies. They 



are a scream from the beginning to the end. (E. 
Berenson, State theatre, Bogalusa, La. — General pat- 
ronage. ) 

SLIPPERY HEAD, 2 Fair. (H. D. Beebe, Rialto 

theatre. Nelson, Neb. — General patronage.) 

FELIX THE CAT CARTOONS, 1 "Japanishy." 

Pretty fair Felix, but have seen better. (H. D. 
Beebe, Rialto theatre, Nelson, Neb. — General pat- 
ronage.) 

GOING PLACES, 2.— A good and timely comedy 
of a camper's experiences. (S. B. Kennedy, Central 
theatre, Selkirk, Man., Canada. — General patronage.) 

LUPINO LANE COMEDIES, 2.— "Buying a Gun." 

A good comedy, but a little high class for country 
towns. (Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — General patronage.) 

SHIPMATES: Special cast— August 28-29. If you 

want to give your patrons a good laugh, book this 
one and advertise it. They will laugh so much that 
they will almost cry, and they will ask you for some 
more Educational comedies. (E. Berenson, State the- 
atre, Bogalusa, La. — General patronage.) 

SPRING HAS COME, 1 — Has many good laughs, 
as in most two-reel comedies. You might guess — 
housecleaning time — which is very good. (James L. 
Sears, Liberty theatre, Humansville, Mo. — Small town 
patronage.) 

WISE WOMEN, 2.— Just fair. Has a few good 
laughs, but is nothing exceptional. (O. B. Wolfe, 
Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town patron- 
age.) 

M G M 

CHARLEY CHASE COMEDIES, 2.— "Off to 
Buffalo." Charley brought out a few good laughs in 
this. Pretty good comedy. (Avard J. Sloat, Rose- 
land theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort pat- 
ronage.) 

GREAT EVENTS, 2.— "Princess of Destiny." Thank 

goodness this winds up great Events. Not so good 
for me. Will stick to comedies for short hereafter. 
(H. E. Rehfield, Iowa theatre, Bloomfield, Ia.^ 
Family patronage.) "Frontier Romance." Pretty to 
look at, but only fair, and no box office value. Prefer 
a comedy at less money. (H. E. Rehfield, Iowa the- 
atre, Bloomfield, la. — Family patronage.) 

LAUREL-HARDY COMEDIES, 2.— "Wrong Again." 

Excellent. This pair is great. I have yet to get one 
of their's that doesn't please. (G. H. Wright, Jr., 
Star theatre, Wendell, N. Car. — Small town patron- 
age.) "Big Business." Very good, as are all Laurel- 
Hardy's. About the best bet on any comedy. (H. E. 
Rehfield, Iowa theatre, Bloomfield, la. — Family pat- 
ronage.) 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER, COMEDIES, 2.— 

Most all their comedies please and are very satis- 
factory. (P. N. Wilson, Parkview theatre, Collier- 
ville, Tenn. — General patronage.) 

OUR GANG COMEDIES, 2.— "Rainy Days." Good 
Gang comedy, plenty of laughs. (Orris F. Collins, 
Palace theatre, Rector, Ark. — Small town patronage.) 

PAIR OF TIGHTS, 2 This was a riot. Brought 

plenty of laughter. (Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, 
Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage.) 

PRINCESS OF DESTINY, 2 While this was 

worth having on the program, do not consider it up 
to the average of this group of Great Events. Tech- 
nicolor not as gorgeous, and story not as well fin- 
ished as the others. (O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, 
Nevada, O. — Small town patronage.) 

LAUREL AND HARDY COMEDIES, 2.— "Leave 
'Em Laughing." Plenty of laughs in this one. 
(Orris F. Collins, Palace theatre, Rector, Ark. — Small 
town patronage.) "That's My Wife." Plenty of 
laughs, but not quite as many as in most of their 
previous ones. (C. A. Swircinsky, Majestic theatre, 
Washington, Kan. — General patronage.) 

OUR GANG COMEDIES, 2. — "Growing Pains." 

Created lots of laughs and pleased everybody. (W. 
W. Graves, Graves theatre, St. Paul, Kan. — Small 
town patronage.) "Little Mother." A good silent 
comedy. (Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — General patronage.) "School Begins." 
When I get a comedy like this, I want to shout 
from the house tops. All praise to the Gang. This 
is getting back to the type of comedies they used 
to make. It's the best we have shown for some 
time. (W. J. Shoup, DeLuxe theatre, Spearville, 
Kan. — General patronage.) A dandy good comedy. 
(W. W. Graves, Graves theatre, St. Paul, Kan. — 
Small town patronage.) 

PARAMOUNT 

BILLY DOOLEY COMEDIES, 2.— "Dizzy Diver." 
This is pretty good. Got the laughs. (Avard J. 
Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Sum- 
mer report patronage.) "Sea Food." The best Billy 



October 12, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



65 



New Pictures 



Dooley to date. Got some laughs, a fairly good com- 
edy. (C. E. Mosher, Orpheum theatre, Rockford, la. 
— Small town patronage.) 

BOBBY VERNON COMEDIES, 2.— "Sock Ex- 
change." Dandy comedy. Audience laughed from 
start to finish. (Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, 
Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage.) 

EDWARD EVERETT HORTON COMEDIES, 2.— 
"Vacation Waves." The worst excuse for a comedy 
I ever screened. Not a laugh in two reels. (Avard 
J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasantviw, R. I. — Sum- 
mer resort patronage.) "Scrambled Weddings." A 
little better than his usual line, but that isn't saying 
very much. Horton's comedies are the bunk here. 
(Arna G. Weigang, Community theatre, Kenedy, Tex. 
— Small town patronage.) 

CHORUS GIRLS SERIES, 2 "Nifty Numbers," 

Very good. Plenty of laughs. (Avard J. Sloat, Rose- 
land theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort pat- 
ronage.) 

JACK DUFFY COMEDIES, 2.— "Long Hose." A 
knock-out of a comedy. I feature my comedy if it's 
a Jack Duffy. (Arno G. Weigang, Community the- 
atre, Kenedy, Tex. — Small town patronage.) 

PARAMOUNT COMEDIES, 2 Usually good and 

satisfy patrons. (P. N. Wilson, Parkview theatre, 
Collierville, Tenn. — General patronage.) 

DANCING TOWN, 2.— Enjoyable comedy of a 
dancing girl that gets the whole town to dancing, 
makes money and gets married to boot. (R. D. 
Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General 
patronage.) 

EDWARD EVERETT HORTON COMEDIES, 2.— 
"Call Again." Not so hot. (H. D. Beebe, Rialto 
theatre. Nelson, Neb. — General patronage.) 

PATHE 

HANDY ANDY COMEDIES, 2.— "Taxi Dolls." Good 
comedy, as are most of Pathe's. (H. E. Rehfield, 
Iowa theatre, Bloomfield, la. — Family patronage.) 

OUR GANG COMEDIES, 2.— "The Smile Wins." 
Our first Pathe comedy for some time, and a good 
one. Pathe surely knows how to make comedies. 
(C. E. Mosher, Orpheum theatre, Rockford, la. — 
Small town patronage.) 

RKO 

R K O COMEDIES, 2.— Very poor entertainment, 
from patrons' comments. (P. N. Wilson, Parkview 
theatre, Collierville, Tenn. — General patronage.) 

TOOTS AND CASPER, Series, 2.— "His Wife's 
Secret." Good for a change in RKO comedies. 
(H. E. Rehfield, Iowa theatre, Bloomfield, la. — 
Family patronage.) 

CURIOSITIES, 1.— Always something interesting in 
these. Good filler anywhere. (C. A. Swircinsky, 
Majestic theatre, Washington, Kan. — General pat- 
ronage.) 

MICKEY McGUIRE COMEDIES, 2.— "Mickey-O- 
Mine." Pleased the kids. They flock in when we 
tell them Mickey is coming. (W. W. Graves, Graves 
theatre, St. Paul, Kan. — Small town patronage.) 
"Mickey's Initiation." Better than most of the 
Mickey's. Not much for the grown-ups, but the kids 
like these Mickey's. (R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, 
Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage.) 

RACING BLOOD SERIES, 2.— "Broadway Ladies." 
Fair. The last one of this series, and I can't say 
I'm sorry. (H. D. Beebe, Rialto theatre. Nelson, Neb. 
— General patronage.) 

THE THREE FAT MEN SERIES, 2.— "Happy 
Trio." The Fat Men always draw well and please. 
(W. W. Graves, Graves theatre, St. Paul, Kan. — 
Small town patronage.) 

TOOTS AND CASPER SERIES, 2.— "Big Hearted 
Toots." Not so good, but better than the usual 
Toots and Casper comedy. (H. D. Beebe, Rialto 
theatre, Nelson, Neb. — General patronage.) 

TIFFANY-STAHL 

IN A PERSIAN MARKET. Very good. (Rae Pea- 
cock, Mystic theatre, Stafford, Kan. — Small town 
patronage.) 

COLOR SYMPHONIES.— Very beautiful. (J. F. 
Fleitas, Monroe theatre. Key West, Fla. — General pat- 
ronage.) 

UNIVERSAL 

THE COLLEGIANS SERIES, 2 "Splashing 

Through." Pretty good but too much sameness. Not 
as good as first series. (H. E. Rehfield, Iowa theatre, 
Bloomfield, la. — Family patronage.) 

HORACE IN HOLLYWOOD SERIES, 1 "At the 

Front." Another of those rotten "Horace in HoIIy- 



In "New Pictures" the EXHIBITORS 
HERALD-WORLD presents in concise 
form information on current and forthcom- 
ing attractions. 

The facts as presented will serve exhib- 
itors in booking and in the preparation of 
their advertising campaign. 

THE SCARLET DAREDEVIL: World Wide war 
drama, with Matheson Lang, Maragaret Hume, 
Nelson Keys, Hadden Mason, Juliette Compton, 
Douglas Payne and Harold Huth. Directed by 
T. Haynes Hunter. 

TYPE AND THEME: Paris in the revolution. 
Sir Blakeney, a bold Englishman, arrives to stop 
the war. He becomes a menace to the plans of 
Robespierre, head of the wild votaries. Blakeney 
escapes all traps Robespierre sets for him. Theresia, 
a beautiful woman, is hired to vamp Blakeney into 
a trap. Blakeney escapes this trap, too, and 
Robespierre is about doomed. Sir Blakeney's wife 
is taken prisoner. Blakeney disguises as an old 
man and rescues her. By this time the reign of 
terror is over. 

• « • 

PICCADILLY: World Wide Talking melodrama, 
with Gilda Gray, Jameson Thomas, Anna May 
Wong, King Ho-Chang, Cyril Ritchard, Hannah 
Jones and Charles Laughton, Directed by E. A. 
Dupont. 

TYPE AND THEME: Two dancers, Mabel and 
Shosho, are both in love with Valentine Wilmot, a 
cafe owner. Mabel pleads with Shosho to give up 
Wilmot, but she refuses. Mabel pulls out a pistol 
but faints. The next day the papers tell about the 
murder of Shosho. Wilmot was seen going into 
the apartment the night of the murder and he is 
accused. Mabel confesses that she was there the 
night of the murder but fainted. Then it is 
learned that Jim, a Chinese sweetheart of Shosho, 
killed himself and left a note saying he killed 
Shosho. This solves the mystery and Mabel wins 
Wilmot. 

» • # 

TWO MEN AND A MAID: Tiffany-Stahl drama, 
with William Collier, Jr., Alma Bennett, Eddie 
Gribbon, George E. Stone and Margaret Quimby. 
Directed by George Archainbaud. 

TYPE AND THEME: Jim Osford, an English 
gentleman, thinks his bride is playing him false. 
He leaves her and enlists in the French army. Jim 
meets Rose and the couple fall in love. Adjutant, 
a brute lover of Rose, warns Jim to stay away 
from the girl. Jim steals away from camp and 
goes to Rose's apartment. Adjutant follows and tries 
to force his way into the house. A gun falls and 
discharges, striking Rose. She tells Jim it is just 
a slight wound and that he should make his escape 
from Adjutant. Later Adjutant meets Jim and 
tells him that Rose died. Jim returns home and 
finds Margaret waiting for him. 

* * # 

MIDNIGHT DADDIES: World Wide Mack Sennett 
long featured comedy with dialog, with Andy Clyde, 
Harry Gribbon, Rosemary Theby, Addie McPhail, 
Alma Bennett, Jack Cooper and Katherine Ward. 
Directed by Mack Sennett. 

TYPE AND THEME: Charley Mason plans 
with his prize model, Camille, to vamp Wilbur 
Louder, a big feed and grain man, so he can get 
enough money for his modiste shop. Charley gets 



wood" thing6. (Avard J. Sloat. Roseland theatre, 
Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patronage.) One 
of the Horace in Hollywood series that is just so-so. 
(0. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — 
Small town patronage.) 

MIKE AND IKE COMEDIES, 2.— "Crushed Hats." 
Mike and Ike try hard but don't get much done in 
this one. (O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, 
0. — Small town patronage.) 

THE NEWLYWEDS SERIES, 2.— "Newlywed's 
Headache." Fair, as are all Newlyweds. Gives me a 
headache to look at them, but they're on complete 
service. (H. E. Rehfield, Iowa theatre, Bloomfield, 
la. — Family patronage.) 

OSWALD CARTOONS, 14.— "Hen Fruit." Oswald 
is a knockout even with the grown-ups. They surely 
worked some clever stuff into this one. (C. E. Mosher, 
Orpheum theatre, Rockford, la. — Small town patron- 
age.) "Poor Papa." The best Oswald we have 
played. "Rock and Socks." It takes an Oswald 
cartoon to offset a "Horace in Hollywood" reel. 
(Avard J. Sloat, Roseland theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. 
— Summer resort patronage.) "The Wicked West." 
This Oswald cartoon falls a little bit shy of the 
average. (O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre. Nevada, 
O. — Small town patronage.) 

LAEMMLE NOVELTIES, 1.— "Rag Doll." ..Ter- 
rible, terrible, terrible. (Avard J. Sloat, Roseland 
theatre, Pleasantview, R. I. — Summer resort patron- 
age.) Why do they make such things. Just a bunch 



Wilbur away from his wife and takes him to a 
night club where he enjoys himself flirting with the 
models. Wilbur's wife appears and chases him 
home. 

» * * 

MIDSTREAM: Tiffany-Stahl talking-singing drama, 
with Ricardo Cortez, Claire Windsor, Montagu Love, 
Larry Kent, Helen Jerome Eddy, Leslie Brigham, 
Louis Alvarez, Genevieve Schrader and Florence 
Foyer. Directed by James Flood. Length 7,353. 

TYE AND THEME: Jim Stanwood is a rich 
Wall street financier. He has everything money 
can buy except youth. Young Helen Craig, a 
neighbor, reminds Jim of his age. On the other 
hand Mary Mason, his secretary for SO years, never 
thinks of his age and loves him truly. Jim goes to 
Berlin and has an operation to restore youth. He 
cables his American office that Jim Stanwood is 
dead and his nephew will inherit the business. Jim 
returns as the nephew -and makes love to Helen. 
He wins her love and the couple are to be married. 
Mary learns that it is Jim but promises to keep 
quiet. At the opera Jim faints and his face re- 
turns as an old man. Helen sees him and returns 
to her former fiance. Mary Mason comes to Jim 
and he realizes that she is the one he needs. 



WISE GIRLS: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer talking drama 
from the story by J. C. Nugent and Elliott Nugent, 
with Elliott Nugent, Norma Lee, Roland Young, 
J. C. Nugent, Clara Blandick. Marion Shilling, 
Leora Spellman and James Donlan. Directed by 
E. Mason Hopper. 

TYPE AND THEME: Pa Bence is worried 03 
to whether the poorhouse ivill claim him before he 
can marry off his two excess daughters, Kate and 
Ruth, who are stUl on his hands. Kate is in love 
with Duke Merrill. Kempy, a dreamy architect- 
plumber, repairs a pipe in the Bence home. He is 
attracted by Ruth. Kate dares Kempy to marry 
her. He does. Merrill, peeved at Kempy's action, 
buys an option on the Bence home and then makes 
the place over to Kempy, thus putting him in hot 
water. At a roadhouse Merrill learns that the 
marriage was illegal because Kempy was under 
age. He rushes to the Bence home. Kate, realizing 
her error, goes to Merrill. Pa Bence rejoices. 



NEW ORLEANS: Tiffany-Stahl drama with dialog 
and musical accompaniment, with Ricardo Cortez, 
William Collier, Jr., Alma Bennett. Directed by 
Reginald Barker. Released August 1. Length, 
6,765. 

TYPE AND THEME: Billy Slade, a jockey, 
and Jim Morley, assistant manager at the race 
track, are buddies; in fact, the two are like 
brothers having lived together since childhood. 
Billy becomes acquainted with Marie and in a 
short time the couple become engaged. Marie also 
meets Jim, who refuses to fall for her lure, know- 
ing his buddy is her boy friend. The wedding day 
comes and Jim falls to Marie's pleas. Billy arrives 
and denounces them both. Jim marries Marie and 
she drives him into debt. Jim takes money from 
the race track safe and gives it to Marie to bet on 
Billy's horse. Billy finds out that Jim has money 
bet on him. The doctor warns Billy to stay off 
the horses, but he refuses knowing Jim needs the 
money. He races and wins. Marie keeps all the 
money and Jim is jailed for robbery. He serves 
his term in jail and then returns to Billy who is 
waiting for him. Both decide to go along in life 
together vrithout Marie. 



of trash. No good as a filler. (C. E. Mosher, 
Orpheum theatre, Rockford, la. — Small town patron- 
age.) "Washline Romance." Another Laemmle 
Novelty. Must be a laundry advertisement. At that 
it is better than most of them. (O. B. Wolfe, Screen- 
land theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town patronage.) 

LANE CHANDLER COMEDIES, 2.— "A Clean 
Sweep." Plain hooey. A Western featurette with a 
slight comedy angle. Poor print. (O. B. Wolfe, 
Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town pat- 
ronage. ) 

MIKE AND IKE COMEDIES, 2 This is good. 

There is a tooth-pulling scene in this that makes 
'em howl. (S. B. Kennedy, Central theatre, Selkirk. 
Man., Canada. — General patronage.) 

OSWALD CARTOON, y 2 — "Alpine Antics." Never 
knew Ossie as Swiss, but he sure is a wow as an 
Alp leaper. You can't beat these cartoons for laughs 
per foot. (0. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, 
O. — Small town patronage.) "Ice Man's Luck." 
Another funny one, although "Alpine Antics" has it 
topped. (O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, 
O. — Small town patronage.) 

MISCELLANEOUS 

NOELANI LOPE'S HAWAIIANS This is a vaude- 
ville act with two reels of Hawaiian scenery. They 
take very well. Vaudeville costs too much for the 
small town. (G. H. Wright, Jr., Star theatre, Wen- 
dell, N. Car. — Small town patronage.) 



66 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD October 12, 1929 




CHICAGO PERSONALITIES 



By JOE FISHER 

A GROUP of a dozen exhibitors with leanings toward Allied States met 
at the Stevens hotel Friday, October 4, at the call of Ed. Brunell of 
the Metropole theatre to join in a booking agency under Brunell, but 
instead the discussion veered toward formation of an independent small thea- 
tre owners' organization. Brunell said he would confer with Jack Miller, presi- 
dent of the Exhibitors' Association of Chicago, before the next meeting of the 
group, to be set this week. 



''THOSE attending the meeting included 
the following: L. Blum, Francis thea- 
tre; A. Caruso, Francis; Charles Stern, Wal- 
lace; M. D. Zimmerman, Eagle; L. R. 
Fleischer, Home and California theatres; 
M. Cooper, Rosette; H. Nepo, Lindy; R. 
Sola, Model; J and F. McCarthy, Lyric and 
Loomis theatres; W. Babitz, Grant at 
Cicero, 111. 

Those announced as having agreed to join 
the booking agency included Caruso, Zim- 
merman, Fleischer, and Jim Best, Blaine 
theatre; Chas. Fidels, Fashion; G. D. Gi- 
onomo, Edwards; Jack Rubin, Harmony; 
C. J. Krafcisin, Cornell Square, and Michael 
Perun, New Lyric. 

* # * 

Essaness Theatres took over another 
house last week. This time it is the 
Hoosier theatre, Whiting, Ind. The 
Hoosier had been operated for several years 
by Mrs. Margaret Bennett, well known on 
the Chicago Film Row. It was owned 
by Roy Green. A. Marta will be manager. 

* * * 

Tom North, special representative of 
Van Beuren Enterprises, is all smoked up 
over the talking Grantland Rice Sportlight 
in which Graham McNamee, of radio an- 
nouncing note, will have the part of master 
of ceremonies. 

Dan Roach, the effervescent Pathe press 
representative, hustled to Indianapolis to 
assist Harry Graham in putting over "Big 
News." 

% % % 

The new Granada at South Bend opened 
last week with "The Cockeyed World." 

* * * 

Gus Kerasotes, owner of the Strand and 
Senate theatres, Springfield, was on the 
Row. 

* * * 

Adam Lang of the Alcyon theatre, High- 
land Park, paid the boys a visit last Friday. 

^ ^ 

The Rialto at Walkertown, Ind., and the 
Palace at Gilman have been equipped with 
Movie-Phone sound apparatus. 

& % % 

Sound has been installed in the Uptown 
theatre, Michigan City. 

* * * 

Charlie Geis, Kinograms and Universal 
newsreel man, made shots of the Stanzak 
and Marlatt baseball teams last week. The 
two teams consist of all brothers. The 
shots were used in Universal's Newspaper 
Newsreel No. 79. 

* =K * 

Frank Ish mael is the big fellow down the 
Row these days. With the sterling co- 
operation of Harry Williard, manager of the 
Symphony theatre, Frank now has six 
tickets for the World Series. Everybody 
loves Frank. 



It sure is an interesting thing to watch 
all the cameramen in the local exchange 
getting ready to take shots of the World 
Series. Gene Cour, Pathe editor, already is 
giving lectures on how to get good pictures. 
Cour bases his talks on the Rockne style. 



One of the largest crowds ever to attend 
a midnight preview turned out for United 
Artists' "Bulldog Drummond" last week. 
Balaban and Katz arranged to have many 
stage stars for the preview. Tickets were 
$1. 



Hank Salkin, who needs no introduction, 
took unto himself the bonds of Hymen last 
week. He also took advantage of a sug- 
gestion and went to New York to give a 
last look at "Liberty." He made no men- 
tion of his two-toned oxfords. Congratula- 
tions, anyway. 

^ ^ 

Gloria Swanson's picture, "The Tres- 
passer," will be given a midnight showing 
at the United Artists October 15. 



The Diversey theatre is now giving pre- 
views for the trade every Wednesday. 

* * * 

The Dearborn theatre on Division street 
had a gala opening October 4 with sound 
pictures. 

* * * 

Tiffany-Stahl has an eye-getter in its 
office this week. In connection with its 
picture, "The Lost Zeppelin," the office has 
a toy zeppelin connected to an electric 
socket, and the novelty spins around in 
whirligig fashion. 

^ sfc 

Henri Ellman, district manager for Tif- 
fany-Stahl, received a telegram from Oscar 



Sam Schaeffer of the Illinois Thea- 
tre Equipment Company is marketing 
an interchangeable upholstered seat 
to be substituted for veneer seats in 
theatre chairs without changing brack- 
ets. A special spring has been de- 
signed to absorb the difference in 
height between the veneered and up- 
holstered chair. Schaeffer has been 
dickering with several spring manu- 
facturers for the right spring to put 
into the new seat. After many 
changes he believes he has the right 
one. Schaeffer is a pioneer in the 
business. When one walks into his 
office you can find a pack of Herald- 
Worlds dating back nearly 12 years. 
"Without the Herald I could not run 
my business," says Sam. 




Sam Schaeffer, of the Illinois Theatre 
Equipment Company, is pictured here 
with his newly designed upholstered seat 
which can be substituted for veneer with- 
out changing the brackets. Sam has ex- 
clusive rights for the new seat through- 
out the United States. (Herald-World 
photo.) 

Hanson last week, stating that big things 
are expected of "The Lost Zeppelin," 
"Women to Women," "Journey's End," 
"Peacock Alley" and "Troupers Three." 
The pictures are just completing produc- 
tion. Hanson is on the Coast for a series 
of franchise meetings. 

* * * 

The Ritz theatre, Berwyn, has been taken 
over by Jacob Lasker and sons. It is be- 
ing redecorated and Western Electric sound 
installed. The Ritz formerly was operated 
by Biba Brothers. Joe Koppel is the new 
manager. 

* * * 

Florence Leighton, United Artists auditor 
from New York, sprained her ankle last 
week in a fall at the Stevens hotel, where 
she was staying. The taxi drivers perked up 
at the news. 

* * * 

Steve Bennis, that "Irish" fellow from 
Lincoln, 111., was down Film Row last week. 
He refused to discuss the street railway 
system in Japan, declaring that because of 
poor acoustics he couldn't tell whether it 
sounded like sound-on-film or sound-on- 
disc when a motorized jinricksha climbed a 
hill. 

* * * 

Grad Sears, district manager of First 
National, was in Chicago last week around 
his old haunts. You recall he formerly was 
branch boss. Grad took in the fights while 
on his visit. 

* ■ ♦ ♦ 

Two theatres were installing Dramaphone 
last week and another theatre opened its 
sound policy with the same device. The 
Grand and Fashion theatres closed for a 
short time while the device was being in- 
stalled. The Harmony theatre on East 
43rd street made its bow to sound when 
it opened October 5 with First National's 
"Drag." Jack Rubin is the manager. 

The Gem theatre is also closing this week 
to make preparations for Western Electric 
installation. 

Ludwig Seigel's Prairie theatre opened 
with a sound policy October 4. It is 
equipped with Powers Cinephone. "The 
Donovan Affair" was the feature picture. 

* ■ a|E $ 

Carl Leserman says there are two things 
that give his fingers cramps — they are 
signing checks and tearing up tickets. 
Figure it out. 



NEW BEAUTY 

for the 

SOUND 
SCREEN 

EaSTMAN SONOCHROME embraces the widest range of 
tinted positive films that has ever been available for the 
screen. And — what is all-important in this new age — the 
sixteen delicate Sonochrome tints are so adjusted as not to 
interfere with the faithful reproduction of sound.... Successors 
to the tints of the silent era, these Eastman films bring new 
color moods — new beauty — to the sound screen. 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



\ 



/ 

and how the audience howled! 



"COLD SHIVERS*' 

Jack White 
Talking Comedy 

The cleverest talkie short . . . 
that has popped up around 
these parts in a long, long 
time. —NEW YORK TELEGRAM 

\ 

"PRINCE GARRY" 

Coronet 
Talking Comedy 

Edward Everett Hortpn again 
delights in this enjoyable 
comedy. —THE BILLBOARD 

TOOK OUT BELOW" 

Jack White 
Talking Comedy 

Chalk up another bull's-eye 
for talking comedies and add 
a personal triumph to Jack 
White's score as a producer of 
laugh makers. "Look Out Be- 
low" is responsible for both. 
—EUGENE (ORE.) REGISTER 



"Look Out Below" ... is one 
of the greatest laugh pro- 
ducers we have used at this 
theatre since the advent of 
talking pictures, so much so 
that I have decided to retain 
it for a second week. 

—THOMAS S. DALY, Manager 
TIVOLI THEATRE, TORONTO 



audiences are 



Everywhere 

howling, critics 
are raving and exhibitors are 
putting extra money in the 
bank — because of Education- 
al ? s Talking Comedies. In New 
York City and on the West 
Coast, in Canada and in Texas, 
and everywhere between, it's 
the same story. No other 
group of short features has 
ever made such a hit with the 
public or pulled in so much 
profit for the exhibitor. 

LUPINO LANE 
TALKING COMEDIES 

Saw a Lupino Lane-Educational Comedy 
the other night at one of the neighborhood 
houses, and how the audience howled. 

— MICHIGAN FILM REVIEW 

EDUCATIONAL 
TALKING COMEDIES 

Have run several and find them to be the 
best on the market — E. N. COLLINS, 

Star Theatre^ Humble, Texas, 
in EXHIBITORS "HERALD-WORLD 




'•THE LUNKHEAD-' 

Mack Sennett 
Talking Comedy 

One of the finest Sennett Com- 
edies to enter the current 
scene is "The Lunkhead," 
starring Harry Gribbon, who 
can apparently lay claim to 
the title of "the screen's 
dumbest man" . . . and Grib- 
bon just wrings every sequence 
dry of laughs so that they're 
popping every minute. It is 
one of those rare comedies 
which is just about flawless. 
It is frankly, unashamedly 
funny, and it won't take long 
for an audience to take it to 
heart and laugh uproariously 
... It is a knock-out number. 

— M. P. NEWS 

TRUSTING WIVES" 

Coronet 
Talking Comedy 

One of the cleverest and wit- 
tiest things shown here. Well 
recorded and really well 
acted. —MONTREAL GAZETTE 

"THE GOLFERS" 

Mack Sennett 
Talking Comedy 

A flock of laughs and some- 
thing that will send most 
golfers into hysterics . . . Get 
your local golfers on this one 
and they'll love you for it. 

-ZIT'S 



EDUCATIONAL FILM EXCHANGES. Inc. 



Member Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America. Inc.. Will H. Hays. President 



E. W. HAMMONS 9 President 

ill H. H 



Industry Joins Fox in Feting Silver Jubilee 

E X H I B ITO RS 

RALD 
WO 








BIRDS IN A GILDED CAGE! 




Entered as second-class matter, August 20, 1917, at the Post Office at Chicauo, III under the act nt March 1 1X70 t>,.hiitU*j • l irk mm 

weekly by Quigley Publishing Co., at 407 South Dearborn St* Chicago. Subscript™, , $3.00 ay el sfngle cop.es, 25 cent! October 19, 1929 



The 
Herald-World 
Bookshop 



More than one thousand theatre owners took 
advantage of the service rendered by the 
Herald-World Bookshop during the first six 
months of 1929 to provide themselves witli 
standard reference books. 

While the Herald-World Bookshop can sup- 
ply any book printed on the subject of motion 
pictures, it limits its recommendations to 
those books which it considers the best avail- 
able on given subjects. 

It recommends the following: 

F. H. Richardson's HANDBOOK OF PROJECTION. Vol- 
umes 1 and 2. Completely covering the entire subject of 
projection with the exception of Sound. Beautifully bound 
in a gold stamped blue Leatherette cover. 

POSTPAID $6.20 

F. H. Richardson's Handbook of Projection. Volume 3. 
Usually referred to as the "Book on Sound." covering every 
phase of this new development. Indispensible to theatre 
owner who has wired his house. 

POSTPAID $5.20 

Special Offer 

The complete set listed above con- 
sisting of three volumes will be sent : 

POSTPAID $10.20 

BUILDING THEATRE PATRONAGE by Barry and Sar- 
gent. Endorsed by the leading theatre owners of the coun- 
try. Dealing with every problem met in the management of 
a theatre from advertising to ventilation and accidents. 
Thirty-six chapters covering different subjects. 
Postpaid $5.20 

MOTION PICTURE TRADE DIRECTORY. 1028 pages. 
Containing the most complete and accurate list of theatres 
vet offered for sale. Classified alphabetically by states 
showing population of town, admission charged, class of 
patronage, seating capacity and name of manager. 
Postpaid $10.00 



MOTION PICTURE ALMANAC— The 1930 edition of the Motion Picture Almanac, now being pre- 
pared by the Quigley Publishing Company, will be published on or about January 1. It will retail 
at $2.00. Advance orders for this book at $1.00 per copy will be accepted from Herald-World sub- 
scribers up to December 1. 



Certified check or money order must accompany nil orders unless you wish books shipped C. O. D 

Herald-World Bookshop 

407 So. Dearborn St., Chicago, Illinois 



"// it pertains to the motion picture industry, we have it" 



October 19, 1929 EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 3 

don't wear 
overalls 
with a 
dress suit! 

fl You can't make a hit when your ensemble doesn't match. They laugh at you 
and turn away, flit's the same when you dress your program. You can't put 
on a fine feature production and then hook inferior talking shorts with it and 
expect to get by. The shoddy shorts will crab the whole show, fl It used to be 
hard to get quality one- and two-reelers in sound. PARAMOUNT'S entrance 
into the field of talking shorts solved that problem. PARAMOUNT, with the 
highest production standard in the business, is releasing talking shorts of the 
same high quality as PARAMOUNT talking features. flYou get the leading 
stars of Broadway in the sparkling featurettes from PARAMOUNT'S Long 
Island studio, where the cream of Gay White Way talent is assembled. You get 
Hollywood's biggest names and brains in the Christie Talking Plays. You get 
the Screen Songs, the most popular one-reel subject on the market. And the 
new Talking Cartoons. You get the ultra-modern PARAMOUNT Sound News, 
fl 168 reels of Quality Talking Shorts in PARAMOUNT'S New Show World line- 
up for 1929-30. Dress your whole show PARAMOUNT and step out ahead. 




wdee worn 




Its the new show worle 

In Talking Short Feature* 
when a producing organiza 
tion comes through so con 
sistently with pictures of sue! 
Originality, Variety, Star-Vahu 
and General Class. 





Recorded by Western Electric System 
at Metropolitan Sound Studios, Inc., Hollywood. 



TIFFANY- 
fT AVAL'S 

FIRH 




W. A. BAIER, 

Fort. Ft. Atkinson. Wis. 
WILLIAM WISKE. 

Community. Red Granite. Wis. 
VERNON R. R1GGLE, 

Auditorium. Laurel, Neb. 
JOHN BILER. 

Dixie. New Madrid. Mo. 

C. H. HORSTMAN. 

Empress. Chaffee. Mo. 
WILLIAM DALKE, 

Strand. Strasburg. Va. ; New. Woodst 

Va., and New Market. New Market. Va 
J. L. RAPPAPORT. 

Lovejoy. Buffalo. 
HENRY THOMAS. 

Liberty. Oakhill. O. 
THOMAS DONNELL, 

Majestic. Stephensville. Tex. 
BOHNE & HUNT, 

Melba. Houston. Tex. 

J. O. ROBERTS. 

Alamo. Granger. Tex. 
JOSE M. MUNOZ, 

Iris. El Paso. Tex. 
MRS. C. C. ALGUIRE, 

Coloma, Coloma. Mich. 

D. R. VANES. 

Tibbits. Cold Water. Mich. 
VERNE S. GORRELL. 

Isis. Winamac. lnd. 
R. W. DAVIS. 

Davis. La Mesa. Calif. 
GEORGE HANES. 

Park. Pasadena. Calif. 

SAM R. PVLET. 

Hollywood. Milwaukee. 
C. W. HUEBNER. 

Strand. Oconomowoc. Wis. 
J. P. ADLER. 

Trio. Marshfield. Wis., and Waui 

Waupaca. Wis. 
JOHN A. LUDW1G, 

Astor, Parkway, and Jackson. Milwai 
W. J. SIMANEK, 

Granada, Racine. Wis. 
R. E. BENSON, 

Princess. Adrian, Minn. 
ROY T. McMINN, 

Capitol, Superior, Wis. 

B. A. BUTLER, 

Elite. Arlington. S. D. 
SIMON MYERS, 

Criterion, Moorestown, N. J. 
JOHN KRAFCISIN, 

Cornell, Chicago. 
CHARLES F. HOUSE, 

Midway. Rockford. III. 
RUBIN FRELS, 

Victoria, Victoria. Tex. 

E. N. COLLINS, 

Star, Humble. Tex. 

C. J. McKENZIE, 

Idle Hour. Hempstead, Tex. 

J. L. SANTOS, 

Texas. New Gulf. Tex. 
E. F. KEITH, 

Liberty. DeLeon, Tex., and Rilz, Cor 

Tex. 
E. M. CARNEY. 

Princess. Deming. N. M. 
MORRIS ROBBINS. 

Echo, Detroit. 
W. C. MAYS, 

Montrose. Montrose, Calif. 
PHIL PECHARICH, 

Lyric, Jerome, Aril. 
GEORGE G. ASEMACOPOULOS, 

Mardi Gras. Coney Island. N. Y. 

A. R. KOPPEL, 

Atlantic. East Rockaway. L. I. 
GUS KERAROTER, 

Senate. Springfield. 111. 
J. M. NISHIOKA, 

Ryan, Fresno. Calif. 

B. A. RIVES, Jr., 

Liberty. Roanoke. Ala. 
R. M. GLADSTONE. 

Crescent, Austin. Tex 
E. C. TRIEB, 

Princess, Roswell, N. M. 
WILLIAM G. CATTANACH, 

St. Clair. St. Clair. Mich. 
H. P. VONDERSCHMITT. 

Von Ritz. Bedford, lnd. 

DANIEL S. MARKOWITZ. 

College, Los Angeles. 

R. J. CONKLIN. 

Empress, Chamberlain. S. D 
L. C. FISH, 

Cozy. Jeffers. Minn. 

HIRAM DUNKIN. 

American. Cushing. Okla. 




ALFRED GLAZER, 

Elliott. Elliott. Pa. 
A. W. THRESHER. 

Wasco. Wasco. Calif. 
FRANK A. GRAHAM, 

Granada. Auburn. Wash. 
GORLANDO DI GIACOMO, 

Edward, Chicago. 
E. TR1NZ, 

Chateau. Chicago. 
S. SPRINGETT. 

Family, Jackson, Mich. 
JAMES W. LEATHY. 

Moneta. Los Angeles. 

A. R. CAVANASS. 

Plaza. Phoenix. Ariz. 
HARRY OLSHAM, 

Strand. Wallingford. Conn. 
ALFRED BAUM. 

Peerless. New York City. 

C. L. SANDLIN, 

Concord. Henrietta. Okla. 
H. S. CORDER, 

Drake Avenue. Cenlerville, la. 
J. W. BLAIR. 

Moon. Spencer. Neb. 
ELMER NOVY. 

American, Pittsburgh. 
V. B. THIEN, 

Palm. St. Louis. 
T. W. COLLISON, 

Rex. Scobey, Mont. 

B. E. GORE, 

Garden. Tampa. Fla. 
J. H. ROE. 

Turn Hall. Syracuse. N. Y. 
JAMES CARDINA. 

Varsity. Buffalo. 

P. C. OSTEEN, 

Egyptian. Anderson, S. C. 
MICHAEL PERUN. 

New Lyric. Chicago. 

D. W. WRIGHT, 

Lawford. Havana. III. 
F. BOHMAN. 

Center, Chicago. 
J PALY, 

Indiana and Rose. Chicago. 
L. M. THREET, 

Texan. Lufkin. Tex. 
J. F. HONDELE. 

Lyric. Ennis. Tex. 

B. A. LAWRENCE. 

Majestic. Hillsboro. Tex. 
H. E. HUFFMAN. 

Bluebird, Denver. 
CHARLES L. STERNS, 

Idle Hour. Rochester, Minn 

C. L. NEWMAN, 

New Strand. Sturgis. Mich. 
M. W. DENNIS, 

Paw Paw. Paw Paw. Mich. 
S. E. MclNTOSH. 

Strand. Paoli. lnd. 
JOHN OCHILTREE, 

Aurora. White Lake. S. D. 
CHARLES J. NOVAK. 

New, Glencoe. Minn. 
J. D. WARNOCK, 

Luna. Battle Creek. la. 

J. F. MOORE. 

Moose. Tremont. Pa. 
C. A. GRON, 

Pelham and Doris. Philadelphia. 
J. McLESKEY. 

Linden Circle, Memphis, Tenn. 
WILLIAM SHAPIRO, 

Ritz, Memphis. Tenn. 
JOSEPH MALM. 

Salano. Fairfield. Calif. 
F. J. FISHBECK, 

Orpheum. Plentywood. Mont. 
JOHN GRIFFIN. 

Orpheum. Chinook. Mont. 
MRS. S. L. YOUNG. 

Rex. Townsend, Mont. 
ARMAND SULLIVAN. 

Strand," White Sulphur Springs. Mont. 
JOHN DI5HMAN. 

Mission, St. Ignatius. Mont., and Caiety. 

Ronon. Mont. 
JOHN B. RITCH, 

New Myrtle. Lewiston. Mont. 
ROLLIN BURFIELD, 

Vashon, Vashon, Wash. 
W. J. BRACKIN, 

Callahan, Bainbridge, Ga., Strand, Tifton, 

Ca. 

WILL PENCE, 

Melba. Coldthwaite. Tex. 
C. F. DILLEMUTH. 

Broadway Lyceum, Buffalo. 




Will Your Name 



SOL BEST, 

Mabel, Chicago. 

M. HARTZMAN, 

Lawndale, Chicago. 
JOHN E. NIEBES, 

Dawn, Detroit. 
J. L. GEEDY. 

Palace, Montpelier. Ind. 
FRANK FORREST, 

Forrest, Booneville. lnd. 
ABE SANDOW, 

Pico. Los Angeles. 
P. C. LARSON, 

Grand. Jordan. Minn. 
HENRY A. WIECKS. 

State. Belle Plain*. Minn. 
ROY C. BERRY. 

Campus. Norman. Okla. 
C. H. SARTORIOUS, 

Capitol. Heartley. la. 
LOUIS LINKER, 

Majestic. Bridgeton, N. J. 
H. E. MILLER. 

Idle Hour. Festus. Mo. 
C. C. GRIFFIN, 

New Piedmont. Oakland. Calif. 
M. ATLAS. 

Capitol, Niagara Falls. 
RALPH AVERSA, 

Hippodrome. Niagara Falls. 

E. C. CURDTZ, 

Majestic, Greenville. S. C. 
J. F. BARRY, 

Vernon. Chicago. 

A. GOFFINET. 

Goffinet. Rittman. O. 
M. SPAYNE, 

Dayton. Akron, O. 
W. F. MAG1NNIS. 

Tivoli. Lorain. O. 
L. L. DUNBAR. 

Cliff Queen. Dallas. Tex. 

E. L. SCHUBECK. 

Palace. El Compo. Tex. 
H. MULKEY, 

Pastime. Clarendon, Tex, 
W. J. WOOTEN, 

Olympia. Canyon, Tex. 
H. A. COLE. 

American, Bonhan. Tex. 

LEO UPCHURCH, 

Grand. Walters, Okla. 
J. E. DAVIS. 

Majestic, Hattiesburg, Miss. 
HAROLD A. HILL, 

Hollywood, Chicago. 
HYMAN L. LUBERTHAL, 

Austin, Chicago. 
WALTER J. FLUEGAL, 

Pekin. Pekin. III. 
L. B. BROWN, 

Regal, Gatesville. Tex. 

H. T. HODGE. 

Hodge Circuit, Tex. 
.'. T. O'HEARN, 

Isis, Lockney. Tex. 
L. C. McNEESE, 

Grand, Kenedy. Tex. 
P. V. WILLIAMS. 

Roxy. Munday. Tex. 

F. W. ZIMMERMAN, 

Palace. San Marcos. Tex. 
R. C. CARBODE,' 

Palace. Shiner, Tex. 
BESSIE RAWLS, 

Mutual. Hamlin. Tex. 
W. E. THORNE, 

Colonial. Alma, Kan. 
EDWARD BUCKLEY, 

Idle Hour, Olivia. Minn. 
F. W. BOLL, 

Majestic. Stillwater. Minn. 
CHARLES D. SILBER, 

State, Eureka, S. D. 
E. S. CUMMINGS, 

Miles Standish, Minneapolis. 
L. R. STACY, 

Mascot, Mobridge, S. D. 
R. L. NEDRY, 

Lyric, Little Falls, Minn. 
M. C. R1GGS, 

Metropolitan, Ow'atonna, Minn. 
W. GILMORE, 

Palace, 'Royalton, Minn. 

B. B. HOLDRIDGE, 

State. Shenandoah, la. 

W. A. COLLIN, 

Regal. Elvins. Mo. 

I. H. DAVIS, 

Gem. Altoft. III. 



S. HENRY, 

Opera House, Ambler. Pa. 
ALBERT B. PACE, 

Crest, Creston, la. 
A. E. JONES, JR. 

Lyric. Galatia. III. 
L. R. MARKUM, 

Rex, Indianapolis. 
C. FISCHER, 

Milwaukee and National, Milwaukee, and 

Allis. West Aliis. Wis. 
CHARLES WASH1CHECK. 

Layton Park. Pearl and Grace. Milwaukee. 
W. N. ROOB, 

Ozaukee or Strand. Port Washington. Wis. 
FRANK HOLLISTER. 

Opera House. Girardsville. Pa. 
C. FENYVESSY, 

Madison. West Rochester. N. Y. 
M. M. FEDERHAR, 

Cameo or Regent. Akron. O. 
FRANK BORCHERT. 

Door. Sturgeon Bay. Wis. 
WILLIAM KENHOLTZ, 

Strand. Buffalo. Minn. 
L. GOODMAN, 

Suburban. Binghamton, N. Y. 
FRANK J. UJKA. 

Grand. Larrimore, N. D. 
A. C. GUTENBERG, 

Grand, Milwaukee. 
J. WARDA. 

Cazenovia. Buffalo. N. Y. 

A. J. HANZE, 

Arcade. Akron, O 

B. HIRSH, 

Century, Philadelphia. 

M. L. FINEMAN. 

Admiral. Philadelphia. 
JACK DAUSES. 

Crystal. Washington. D. C. 
JOHN FENYVESSY, 

Lyndy, Rochester. N. Y. 
HARRY HART, 

Cranada and Fern. Milwaukee. 
GEORGE RAUENHORST. 

Crystal. Fulda. Minn. 
JOSEPH PRICE, 

Howard and Eagle. ^Philadelphia. 
HENRY GOLDBERG, 

Lincoln Hippodrome. Chicago. 
E. E. ALGER, 

Capitol. Morrison: Princess. Urbana; Park. 

Champaign; Rexy. Lasalle and Peru. Peru. 

III. 

J. SCHIEFERECKE, 

Opera House. Lenora. Kan., and Electric. 

Jennings. Kan. 
HARRY R. LUSH. 

P. & A.. Plymouth. Mich., and P. & A.. 

Northville. Mich. 
NAT KAUFMAN. 

Cozy. Detroit. 

G. BOWS, 

Biltmore. New York City 
S. RODENOK. 

Lehigh, Oakmont. Pa. 

H. D. TALLEY, 

Majestic. Devine. Tex. 
WALTER JENSEN, 

Rex, Currie, Minn. 
R. M. FULLER, 

Palace. Grandview. Tex. 
C. C. JOHNSON, 

Pictureland. Metropolis, III. 
H. McCORMICK, 

State. Woodbridge. N. J. 
J. C. BROWN, 

Roosevelt, Jamestown. N. Y. 
A. TSCHEMACHER, 

Casino, Buffalo, N. Y. 
AL FILBEY, 

Triangle. Howard Lake. Minn. 
LYDIA BEHLING, 

Ellen Terry. Buffalo. N. Y. 
M. E. MITCHELL, 

Regent. Prarie Du Chien. Wis. 
C. L. ADAMS, 

Welcome. China Crove, N. C. 
C. M. PHILLIPS, 

Schiller Park, Syracuse, N. Y. 
CARL JOHNSON, 

Arcadia, Floresville. Tex. 
MRS. ESLE LARSON, 

Cecile. Cokato. Minn. 
CARL SOTHER, 

Grand. Annandale. Minn. 
T. B. LEWIS. 

Capitol. Eaton Rapids. Mich. 
RAY PEACOCK, 

Majestic. Stafford, Kan. 
J. J. HARWOOD, 

Lexington, Cleveland. 
H. H. STURCHE, 

Palace, Seguin. Tex. 



T I F FA NY I— c/>T A U L 

7 2 9 SEVENTH AVE. 



CHISE HOLDERS 

Appear Here Next Week? Vatch For Our Ad f 



JAMES C. R1TTER, 

RivoU. Detroit: 

J. E. STOCKER, 

Myrtle. Detroit. 

JOSEPH ROSZKOSKI, 

Fulton, Detroit. 
A. B. MOMAND, 

Momand Circuit. Okla. 

A. E. MUNROE. 

Munroe. Rolla. N. D. 

D. J. LARSON, 

Grand. Wallock. Minn. 

J. C. ARNOLD, 

Arna, Rolette. N. D. 
JULIUS OVERMOE, 

Gem. Hillsboro. N. D. 
C. H. TOLAN, 

Delchar, Mayville, N. D. 
W. H. GOODROAD, 

Strand. Warren. Minn. 
M. B. QUIRE, 

Star, Kanawah, la. 
S. A. HAYMAN, 

Lyde. Crand Island, Neb. 
HARRY FLEISHMAN, 

Brighton, Pittsburgh 
C. E. HERMAN, 

New Carnegie. Carnegie. Pa. 
JULIUS GOODMAN, 

Astor, Baltimore. 

E. A. CRANE, 

Park. Tampa. Fla. 

B. J. COONEY, 

Cooney Circuit. Chicago. 

F. N. KENNEY, 

Star. Watseka. III. 

J. A. PHILLIPS. 

Palace. Freeport. Tex. 

C. L. WILLER. 

Our. Grand Rapids. 
HERMAN A. BIRD, 

Rivoli. Grand Rapids. 
J. KULMS. 

Burton, Grand Rapids. 
J. C. CHERVENKA, 

Fairmont. Grand Rapids. 

A. RUTTENBERG, 

Oliver. Detroit. 

C. A. FERRY, 

Granada, Alhambra. Calif. 

B. K. FISCHER, 

Alamo, Milwaukee. 

D. C. SCOTT, 

Royal, LeMars, [a. 

FRED KOCH, 

Grand, Remsen. la. 
A. M. HERMAN, 

Rivoli. West Point. Neb. 
O. WESLEY, 

Wilsonville. Wilsonville. 111. 
SAM DU BOIS, 

Dos Palos, Dos Palos. Calif. 
G. W. KENDALL, 

Arc, Delphia. Ind. 

CHARLES PERR1ZO, 

Lyceum, Deer River, and Lyric. 
Minn. 

A. H. RECORDS, 

Empress, Deshler, and Majestic 
Neb. 

SHOREWOOD THEATRES, INC. 

Shorewood. Shorewood. Wis. 
CIRCUIT THEATRES, INC., 

New Cudahy. Cudahy. Wis. 
LEO PAUL, 

Lyric, Philadelphia, and Lyric, C 
CHARLES H. GEORGE. 

Capitol. Port Angeles. Wash. 

WILLIAM A. LEUCHT, Jr., 

Savoy, St. Joseph, Mo. 
GLEN D. THOMPSON, 

Thompson, Healdton. Okla. 
CHARLES E. GUCKER, 

Dawn, Hartford City. Ind. 
FRANCES PEART, 

Colonial or Peart, Cillispie. III. 
CHARLES TRIFON, 

New Gulf, Goose Creek. Tex. 

FERRIS M. THOMPSON, 

Thompson. Wilson. Okla. 
HARRY FINKEL, 

Arcade or Colonial, Pittsburgh. 
A. W. BECKER, 

Becker and Castle. Philadelphia 
JOHN M. CAMPBELL, 

Wonderland. Minneapolis. 
FERRIN & JOSSLYN, 

Liberty. Mantorville. Minn. 
ELI RESNICK, 

Grant. Philadelphia. 
JOSEPH BRODIE, 

Brodie. Baltimore. 



R. MICHEL, 

Larkin. San Francisco. 
J. F. MOORE, 

Majestic. Pottsville. Pa. 
SIDNEY H. SELIG. 

Gem. Chicago. 
A. ROSEN, 

Model. Pittsburgh.. 
H. D. CARBIENER, 

Honeymoon. South Bend. Ind. 
JOSEPH PORTELL. 

Greenwood and Virginia Park. Detroit. 

L. L. LEWIS, 

Lyric, Lebanon. Mo., Lyric, Salem. Mo 

and Lyric. Rollo, Mo. 
JOSEPH CAUDELL, 

Wanoca. Wallace. N. C. and Pastim. 

Lumberton, N. C. 
SHERMAN WIGGINS. 

Golden Bell. Ellsworth. Kan. 

G. G. SHIPLEY, 

Community. Harbor Beach, Mich. 
GEORGE L. BLAKESLEE. 

Grand, Lander. Wyo. 
GEORGE HANIOT1S, 

Yale, Okmulgee, Okla. 
GEORGE PASSEN, 

Amuzu, Jasonville, Ind. 

MRS. LEE MOTE, 

Acme. Riverton. Wyo. 
A. C. DIPPO. 

Rialto. Oakland. Calif. 
R. L. BAILEY. 

Bailey. Bunkie. La. 
N. SPAYNE, 

Gem, Akron, O. 

R. B. CAMPBELlT 

Majestic. Waynoka. Okla. 

A. L. WHITE, 

Parkview. San Francisco. 
THOMAS BOULDEN, 

Lyric. St. Charles. Mich. 
W. T. MORTON, 

Park. Huntington Park. Calif. 

H. J. LUDCKE, 

Opera House. Saint Peter. Minn. 

MRS. H. H. CHASE, 

Diamond. Lake Odessa, Mich. 
MARY M. COSTIGAN, 

New Orpheum, Flagstaff, Ariz. 
L. V. BERGTOLD, 

Ideal. Hayfield. Minn., and Opera Hous 

Dodge Center, Minn. 
WILLIAM OSTENBERG, 

Orpheum. Scotts Bluff. Neb. 

LOUIS B. CHRIST, 

Columbus or Audion, Green Bay, Wis. 
S. J. DAVIDSON. 

Ritz, Cordell. Okla . and Ritz. Cheroke 

Okla. 
F. C. LYON, 

Jewel, Anthon, la. 

T. J. HICKES, 

Liberty, Saxton. Pa. 
L. A. LEBER, 

Royal. St. Louis, Mo. 
H. F. STROWIG, 

Lyric. Abilene. Kan. 
W. J. CLARK. 

Clark. Vacaville. Calif. 
L. R. STACY, 

Unique. Mobridge, S. D. 
P. C. SCHRAM, 

Strand. Hastings. Mich. 
A. L. MERRITT, 

Princess, Oconto. Wis. 
J. E. WHITLEY, 

Colonial, Kokomo, Ind. 
WALDO NEAL, 

Limberlost. Geneva, Ind. 
JAMES LYNCH, 

Granada, Bridgeville, Pa. 
M. D. LEDBETTER, 

Little. Elizabethtown. III. 
DON THORNBURG, 

New Marshalltown. la. 
J. C. SELLERS, 

Dunbar and Willis. Detroit. 
WALTER HOHLFELD. 

Elite. Creenleaf. Kan. 

JOSEPH OLSCHEFSKV, 

Fredro, Detroit. 
CHARLES KERBY. 

Elks. Worland. Wyo 
GEORGE W. LUCE, 

Ideal. Morrill, Neb. 

E. A. RHOADES, 

Grand, Story City, la. 
WILLIAM COX, 

Palace. Royalton, III 
T. J. GUTHRIE, 

Liberty. Maiden. Mo. 

F. M. SATKAUSKAS, 

Milda, Chicago. 



H. THORPE. 

Peoples. Crosby, Minn. 
W. P. LOWELL, 

Lowell, Canton, S. D. 
CHRIS EFTHIN, 

Star. St. Louis. 
LOUIS J. MENCES, 

State, East St. Louis. 
ROBERT SHEN, 

Lakeville, Lakeville. Minn. 
FRANK MILLER, 

Whitewoy. Marlow. Okla. 
J. M. ANDERSON, 

Princess. Boone, la. 
H. H1ERSTEINER, 

Family, Des Moines. 

B. SCHINDLER. 

Opera House, Dover, Del. 
H. STEINBERG, 

Madison, Madison. III. 
EDWARD BRUNELL. 

Metropole. Chicago. 
M. RUBIN, 

Uptown, Michigan City, Ind. 

C. GLENN FLESER, 

Liberty, Grand Rapids. 

G. MACPHERSON. 

Vox. Klamath Falls. Ore. 

H. T. REYNOLDS, 

Family. Grand Rapids. 
W. H. ARTHUR. 

Garden. Marshall. Mich. 

C. F. SEERS, 

Ostego. Ostego. Mich. 
E. C. OATLEY, 

Star, Rockfo'rd, Mich. 

0. E. VARNEAU, 

Wealthy. Crand Rapids. 

E. L. DALE, 

Park, Newaygo, Mich. 

H. C. COLLIER, 

Strand, Lowell. Mich. 

N. L. McCARTY, 

Galewood, Grand Rapids. 

1. W. MAPLE, 

Cozy, Bethany. Mo. 
L. E. MAPLE, 

Maple, Albany. Mo. 
A. B. MOMAND, 

Deireck, Maud. Okla. 

R. C. WILSON, 

Palace, Staples, Minn. 
FREDERICK HOYT, 

Strand, Newton, la. 

T. GARRETT1, 

Casino, Melcher. Ia. 
THOMAS BARNETT, 

Royal. Danville. Ind. 

A. C. MILLER. 

Lark, Brazil, Ind. 
JOE BROKAW, 

Opera House, Angola, Ind. 
C. H. SPEARMAN, 

Gem. Edmond, Okla. 

O. A. WEICKERT, 

Lux, Perham. Minn. 

W. E. LYON, 

Broadway, Crosby. Minn. 
M. MILTENBERG, 

Opera House. Ely. Minn. 

H. F. ANKRUM, 

Gem, Balston, Minn. 

F. J. BOGUMILL, 

Rialto, Thorp, Wis. 

C. C. DUNSMORE, 

Capitol. Marshalltown, la. 
R. O. GOLDEN, 

Palace, St. Louis. 
DON NICHOLS, 

Carolina, Durham, N. C. 

H. P. VONDERSCHMITT 

Circuit. Indiana. 

D. E. HECKMAN, 

Royal. Nazareth. Pa. 
DAVID S. NELSON. 

King Bee. St. Louis. 
J. L. SCHARLEY, 

Keiths. Baltimore. 
O. C. LEHR, 

Lehr Circuit, St. Louis. 
LOUIS W. VICK, 

Ashland, St. Louis. 
FRED KORB, 

Strand. Knightstown, Ind. 

I. E. ROBINSON, 

Empire, Sellersburg, Ind. 
H. N. TURNER, 

Family, Pine City. Minn. 

G. N. TURNER, 

Family. North Branch. Minn. 



H. F. HIGGINS, 

Princess. St. Marys, Kan. 

A. D. CANTWELL, 

Cantwell, Marceline. Mo. 
HOWARD ARMSTRONG, 

Dream. Indianapolis. 
CHARLES E. LYONS, 

Moveum. Aitkin. Minn. 

F. H. YOUNG, 

Masonic, New Washington. Ind. 

D. W. BUCKLEY, 

New Topic, Fairfax, Minn. 

L. J. LANGLOIS, 

Alamo, New Roads, La. 

B. BERGER, 

Berger Circuit. N. and S. Dakota. 
W. W. DURAM, 

Red Eagle. Eagle Bend. Minn. 
EDWARD SMITH, 

Cozy. Minneapolis, Kan. 
ROBERT STEMPLE, 

Strand. St. Charles, Mo. 
J. R. ELLIOTT, 

Lakeland, Dassel. Minn. 
W. M. MILLER, 

Lib. Cloquet, Minn. 
W. E. DICKSON. 

Aristo. Lemmon. S. D. 
DON L. TRACEY. 

Grand, Carrington. N. D. 
J. C. SNYDER, 

Grand. Willeston. N. D. 

E. R. SCHUTTE. 

Savoy. New Prague. Minn. 
L. E. DAWSON, 

Gem. Shakopee. Minn. 

B. BERGER. 

Elko. Bemidji. Minn. 
JOHN DE MARCE, 

Viking. Benson. Minn. 

G. O. TERRY. 

Bijou. Minneapolis. 
OTTO N. RATHS, 

Ideal, South St. Paul. Minn. 

C. W. BURKEY, 

Summit. Kansas City. 
W. A. ROGERS, 

Columbian, Wamego. Kan. 

H. M. DRYER. 

Savoy, Minneapolis. 

O. A. LEE, 

Leola. Minneapolis. 
MRS. D. F. ESLIN, 

lone, Minneapolis. 
M. STAHL, 

Wellston. St. Louis. 
JAMES T. LAWSON. 

Grand. Mt. Olive, III. 

HARRY MARKUM, 

Belmont. Talbot and Sheldon, Indianapolis 
CHARLES R. METZGER, 

Mecca and Two Johns. Indianapolis. 
H. G. STETTMUND, Jr., 

H. S. and Odeon, Chandler. Okla. 
A. C. GORTATOWSKY, 

Albany and Liberty, Albany, Ca. 
H. PERELMAN. 

Lehigh and West Alleghany, Philadelphia 
FRED WEHRENBERG, 

Wehrenberg Circuit, St. Louis. 
JAMES J. BODEN, 

Grand or Garden, South Milwaukee. 
CHARLES F. VONDRA, 

Rainbow. Mahnomen, Minn. 
E. E. HOLMQUIST, 

New Broadway. Centerville, S. D. 
BEN E. MURPHY. 

Heights. Muskegon Heights, Mich. 
W. ZIMMERMAN. 

New Warrenton. Warrenton. Mo. 
CHARLES PERRIZO, 

Grand, Grand Rapids, Minn. 
ALEX S. MOORE, 

Hilltop or Capitol, Pittsburgh. 
E. A. SCHLUETER, 

Community, Arlington. Minn. 
BEN & MORRIS FLAKS, 

New Lincoln, Baltimore. 
R. C. HARPER, 

Blackstone. New Rockford, N. D. 
CHARLES M. WALKER, 

Irving. Indianapolis. 
H. E. WESTER. 

Lyric, Le Seur Center. Minn. 
C. W. THAMPE, 

Thampe Circuit. Milwaukee. 
C. E. WILLIAMS. 

Victoria and Park. Omaha. 
ALFRED G. WERTIN, 

Wertin. Albany. Minn. 



PRODU C T I O N ✓> IN C. A 

H E W Y O R K C I TV jfl 



8 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 19, 1929 



$CUtH DEI 

OFVAUOEVIL 
GREATEST STAfc 

IN A DPAMA OF 
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Dhvckdby OMGE ARCHAINBAUD 



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October 19, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 




Footloo^ 



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# 0 





MARY 



ANEW star is born! And what a star! Beautiful, 
alluring, BOX-OFFICE! With JAMES MUR- 
RAY, Wheeler Oakman, Anders Randolph, 
Lydia Yeamans Titus. A John Robertson Production. 
100% TALKING; also silent. Presented by CARL 
LAEMMLE. 





in another flaming drama 
from the pen of John Col- 
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and flaming drama. 



LADY 



FORWARD MARCH with UNIVERSAL 



Member Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, Inc. — Will H. Hays, President 



10 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 19, 1929 




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SUBSIDIARY OK KA IH O VA)U Pt) U ATI Q N QE AM KRTTTA 

4ll FIFTH AVENUE - NEW YORK CITY 



ATLANTA: IOI MARIETTA STREET CHICAGO: IOO W. MON ROE STR E ET KANSAS CITY, MO: DAVI DSOK BLDC. DENVER: SI7-I7TH STREET SAN FRAN CISCO : 235 MONTGOMERY STREET 



AGAIN THE 

CROWNING 





^he ^Program 



OPENING NUMBER 

"Bones and Tambourines," by M-G-M-Ensemble. 
Written by Fred Fisher. 

"MINSTREL DAYS" 

Sung by Gus Edwards and M-G-M Ensemble. Written by Gus Edwards. Dave 
Snell and Joe Goodwin, with June Purcell singing "LOW-DOWN RYTHM," 
written by Raymond Klages and Jesse Greer. 



"GOTTA FEELIN' FOR YOU" 

Joan Crawford, assisted by Biltmore Quartette. 
Written by Louis Alter and Jo Trent. 



"YOUR MOTHER AND MINE" 

CHARLES KING. Written by Gus Edwards and Joe Goodwin. 



"YOU WERE MEANT FOR ME" 

Sung by Conrad Nagel with Anita Page. 
Written by Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed. 



"NOBODY BUT YOU" 

Sung by Cliff Edwards and M-G-M Ensemble. 
Written by Gus Edwards and Joe Goodwin. 



"THE CUT UP" 
Wm. Haines. 



"I NEVER KNEW I COULD DO A THING LIKE THAT" 
BESSIE LOVE and male chorus. 
Written by Gus Edwards and Joe Goodwin. 



"FOR I'M THE QUEEN" 

MARIE DRESSLER and M-G-M Ensemble. 
Written by Martin Broones and Andy Rice. 



"MAGICIANS" 
Laurel-Hardy. 





"> 




TOMMY ATKINS ON PARADE" 
MARION DAVIES and male chorus. 
Written by Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed. 



'STRIKE UP THE BAND" 

BROX SISTERS and M-G-M Ensemble. 
Written by Fred Fisher. 



INTERMISSION 



'TABLEAU OF JEWELS" 
Sung by James Burroughs. 
Written by Fred Fisher. 



"DANCE OF THE SEA" 

BUSTER KEATON. Music arrangement by Arthur Lange. 



"LON CHANEY WILL GET YOU IF YOU DON'T WATCH OUT" 
GUS EDWARDS and M-G-M Ensemble. 
Music by Gus Edwards and John T. Murray. 



ADAGIO 

NATACHA NATTOVA. Music arrangement by Arthur Lange. 



"ROMEO AND JULIET BY COMPARISON" 

By Joe Farnham, with JACK GILBERT, NORMA SHEARER 
and LIONEL BARRYMORE. 



"SINGIN' IN THE RAIN- 
CLIFF EDWARDS, BROX SISTERS, THE ROUNDERS, and M-G-M 
Ensemble. Written by Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed. 

COMEDY NOVELTY and 

"STROLLING THRU THE PARK ONE DAY" 

Sextette with Charles King, Ukelele Ike and Gus Edwards — Marie Dressier, 
Polly Moran and Bessie Love. Written by Gus Edwards and Joe Goodwin. 

FINALE— "ORANGE BLOSSOM TIME" 

CHARLES KING, M-G-M Ensemble and ALBERTINA RASCH BALLET. 
Written by Gus Edwards and Joe Goodwin 



THE STUNT OF 
THE CENTURY! 

Metro - Qoldwyn - Mayer 
Showmanship in New 
York, Los Angeles and 
other cities is^ke talk of 
the industry* 





Beautiful show 
girls in costume 
sing and dance atop 
the worlds greatest 
theatre electric sign 
at the Astor, N. Y. 
Broadway has 
never seen so amaz- 
ing a spectacle. 
Police hold back 
thousands along 
the Great White 
Way as crowds 
watch Hollywood 
Revue promotion 
stunt* Newspapers, 
newsreels and word 
of mouth carry the 
wonders of "Holly* 
woodRevue across 
America. $6.60 
worth of entertain- 
ment advertised in 
M-G-M's million 
dollar manner! 





HOLLYWOOD REVUE 
BOX-OFFICE WHOOP 




THE legit couldn't hope to 
approach an entertainment 
of the magnitude of "Holly- 
wood Revue." There's $6.60 
worth of value — and more! — 
in its sketches and song hits 
and spectacular wonders, 
Twenty-five stars, each one a 
headliner, take part in it. They 
sing and dance and act. Two 
hundred chorus beauties do 
their stuff! When did you ever 
offer your patrons such a show? 
Never! And perhaps never 
again! It's an attraction that 
has demonstrated its drawing 
power at $2 in cities in every 
part of the country. Now it's 
proving to be the biggest sen- 
sation of years at popular 
prices. Your patrons want 
"Hollywood Revue." Get it 
quick — and get behind it for a 
clean-up! 



NEW YORK — Third month of capacity business 
at $2. Crowds returning to New York from out-of-town 
give this wonder attraction standee sales Matinee, Eve- 
ning and Midnight. 

LOS ANGELES — Grauman's Chinese sets grand 
new totals for attendance and receipts during 3 big 
months. M-G-M's Miracle Entertainment at $2 makes 
West Coast sit up and take notice! 

BOSTON — Unique in Boston show history is 
reception accorded "Hollywood Revue" in its $2.50 
engagement at Tremont. Second month and going 
strong. 

PHILADELPHIA ~ AU Previous totals fade 
away before M-G-M's gala $2 smash hit at Aldine- 
Marvelous promotion puts "Hollywood Revue" on 
the Philadelphia map and the cash customers keep 
coming. 

SAN FRANCISCO -"Hollywood Revue" at 
$2 at Columbia Theatre is Frisco's favorite. West Coast 
public keen for the fun and frolic of the screen's first 
star-studded musical revue. 



Norma 
Shearer 



Lionel 
Barrymore 




^9 1 



Charles 
King 



Ukelele 
Ike 



a Revue 




MAKES 
EE! 



ler hit 8flc - 
Points 



FIRST POPULAR 
PRICED RUNS 
SET NEW AMAZING 
RECORDS DAILY! 

These Engagements Continue 
Strong as We Go To Press! 

CLEVELAND — Stillman ending first month 
with house packed as on opening day. All records 
held by Jolson in "Singing Fool" smashed! 

COLUMBUS — 2nd Week continues capacity. 
Forced to put on midnight shows! Smashed every mark 
in history of house! Looks like indefinite run! 

INDIANAPOLIS — Palace in 2nd week stand- 
ing them out. Sensational hit. 

LOUISVILLE — State chalks up new records 
with season's biggest draw. 2nd week and big at first! 

RICHMOND — Midnight show added. Biggest 
in history of Richmond. 

DAYTON, ST. LOUIS, KANSAS CITY— Extended 
runs going strong. NASHVILLE, NEW ORLEANS, 
BUFFALO, ATLANTA, DETROIT, CANTON— 

Record-breaking openings point to money -winning 
engagements! 




ABOVE : A window display of songs and 
records from ''Hollywood Revue" in Boston. 
Tremont tells the town about the Big Show 
and they come in droves ! BELOW : Get 
the campaign book on "Hollywood 
Revue." It's for showmen! 




THE PRIZE WINNERS! 

Two such Giant Attractions in 
One Season establish the theatre 
which shows them and the 
company which produces them 
as the unquestioned leaders 






ETRO-GO0WTYN-MAYER 

Takes the Trophies I 



WILLIAM FOX presents 
C^rhe Jirst (Viennese 

ALL SINGING DANCING and TALKING 
SONG ROMANCE 



A 




arried in 
Hollywood 

J. HAROLD Ml) WAY 
d NORMA TERMS 




Fox Movietone's 
perfect blending 
of stage singers and 
screen technique into 
the most colorful, tuneful 
and entertaining romantic 
musical extravaganza ever produced. 



SINGING CHORUS OF TOO 
DANCING ENSEMBLE OF 60 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA OF 60 
r HOLLYWOOD SEQUENCES IN MULTICOLOR 
4 OF BROADWAY'S GREATEST STARS 
LAVISH SETTINGS UNEQUALLED ON ANY STAGE 

MUSIC BY OSCAR STRAUS 




And 



a 



HAROLD MURRAY 

>tar of "Rio Rita" for its Broad- 
way run of 2 years. 

/V ALTER CATLETT 

itar of a dozen musicals and one 
if the greatest of Broadway's 
©medians. 

rOM PATRICOLA 

Greatest eccentric dancer in 
America, for two seasons the 
lutstanding star of George 
Vhite's "Scandals." 



Story, Dialog 
and Lyrics by 

Harlan Thompson 

Directed by 
MARCEL 
SILVER 





NORMA TERRIS 

Formorethan ayearsangthe star- 
ring role of "Magnolia" in "Show 
Boat" original stage production. 

IRENE PALASTY 

Famous Hungarian prima donna 
sensation of Berlin and Vienna 
in "No, No, Nanette." 

LENNOX PAWL E 

Played important roles in England 
with Henry Irving and Forbes- 
Robertson as well as in this 
country under the direction of 
David Belasco. 



JOHN GARRICK 

Australia's leading musical com- 
edy ace. Made sensational hit 
there in "Rose Marie" and "The 
Desert Song." 



"'Married in Hollywood ' worth anybody's cash. A gorgeous and 

amusing musical COmedy." — New York Daily Mirror 

The week's best film — the music is the most mellowing stuff that 
has made its way into the movies." — New York Sun 

One of the loveliest of all the melody films, and certainly the most 
exalted score yet to be sung in the audible pictures. Audiences are 
going to find it a thing of joy ... a success.*' — New York World 



Has the distinction of being the first screen translation of a superior 
type of musical composition that has been presented in this country 

— New York Times 



"Has just about everything to commend it . . . 
a beautiful job in its direction." 

— New York American 





October 19, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



Good Silent Pictures 

Are keeping thousands of unwired theatres 
running as successfully today as they were be- 
fore the advent of sound. Now, as never before, 
theatre owners depending upon the silent pic- 
tures need every scrap of information they can 
obtain as to which are the best ones. 

As a result, unusual interest attaches to the 
semi-annual number of the 

Box Office Record 

which will be incorporated in the NOVEMBER 
NINTH ISSUE of the EXHIBITORS HERALD- 
WORLD. 



DISTRIBUTORS 

If you are interested in the continuance of the 
smaller theatres and are in a position to furnish 
good silent pictures to them, this section should 
carry an informative message from you. We 
will be pleased to assist you in its preparation. 




THE 




1 



earness 



of 



a 



Stradivarius ! 




Stradivarius is the outstanding name in clear tone and perfect 
reproduction among violins . . . These scenes from "Rubeville 
Night Club" show you the sow of sound problems RCA Photo- 
phone solved in producing the Stradivarius of talking comedies. 



AN OPEN LETTER 
TO EXPERTS AND 
EXHIBITORS a a a a 

RCA Ptotopk one achieves 
absolute perfection in tke new 
Golden Rooster Patke com- 
edy, "Rubeville Nigkt Club." 
Expert engineers acclaim tbis 
comedy riot tke last word in 
clear, lifelike sound record- 
ing. Patke is proud to praise 
tke amazing performance of 
RCA Pkotopkone equipment, 
in giving you every beat of 
tke drum, note of tke clari- 
net, tap of tke dancers, tone 
of tke quartet as clearly as 
wken tke film was originally 
made. You owe yourself a 
kearing of tkese comedies! 



HEAR "RUBEVILLE 



The G A R D E N 
OF E A T I N ' 

with 

The GLEASONS 

.FAIRWAYS 
•'AND FOUL 

with 

The GLEASONS 

RUBEVILLE 

with HARRY WATSON, 
REG MERVILLE, Jere 
Delaney, Josephine Fontaine 

50 MILES from 
BROADWAY 

with HARRY WATSON, REG 
MERVILLE, Olga Woods 

CROSBY'S 

CORNERS 

with REG MERVILLE, 
FELIX RUSH, Josephine 
Fontaine and George Patten 

RUBEVILLE 
NIGHT CLUB 

with HARRY WATSON, REG 
MERVILLE, Josephine 
Fontaine, Olga Woods 



en 



6 Gold 

R ooster 



COMEDIES 

Rubeville ▲ 50 JW-iles from Broadway ▲ Crosby's Corners 
Rubeville ^figbt Out ▲ produced by -B. M_addock 



11 



music 



sound a dialogue 



PATHE 



CLUB" AT YOUR LOCAL PATHE EXCHANGE 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 19, 1929 




STEEL PIER, Atlantic City, N. J. 




Embassy, North Bergen, N. J. 






NER 

i ^ mam ■% 



(Below) Cine Teresa, one 
of Mexico City's best 
known houses. 




(Below, lower left) 
The Globe, on 
the Boardwalk, 
Atlantic City, N.J. 



SYNCHRONOUS DISC 
AND SOUND ON FILM 



2MDAF $3,500 

PACEIMT REPRODUCER 



for houses up to 
2,000 seats 



October 19, 1929 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



15 




Junior Models 

for houses up to 
500 seats 

$1,500 

Synchronous disc 

$2,500 

disc and film track 




mm. m 
mm:mm,/-^ 





When houses like Hiese 



Install PacenhSl 



Houses like those illustrated buy 
sound equipment on its performance and on its 
dollar for dollar value as essential equipment 
which must give unfailing service and satisfaction 
week in and week out. Today there are over 6O0 
theatres throughout the world using Pacent Repro- 
ducer Systems. There performance has established 
new high standards of quality! 

You can pay more for sound equipment than the 
price of the Pacent System for your house. But— 
will you get more, or even as much, in results as 
Pacent offers? Guess work is eliminated when you 
sign a contract for Pacent. Every feature essential 
to best quality reproduction on both disc and film 
track is yours with Pacent equipment. 



TYPE £ m mf\f\ for houses up to 

MDAF 4,000 seats 



CORPORATION FILM CENTER BUILDING, NEW YORK, N. Y. 




Learnce joy 

Walter Pidgeon, 
Sidney Blackmer 



The 
GIRL from 

W00LW0RTH5 

with 

Alice 
wnite 



FORWARD 
PASS 

with 

Douglas Fairbanks k, 
Loretta Young 



HARD 
TO GET 

with 

Dorortiy Mackaill 

Louise Fazenda, 
Chas. Deianey 
Jack oaKie 



CfuAt a FEW of* the MANY hiq ones fvom 

IWI ATI! ©MAIL 








E X H 1 BITORS 






The 
Film Trade 


u F C A 1 

n L l\ /A L 




Home 

UJ/LCC . 

407 So. Dearborn St. 


Paper 


WORL 


D 


Chicago 



IN THIS ISSUE — 



FOX SILVER JUBILEE 

William Fox Plans to Lease the Embassy 
Theatre in New York for Exclusive Showing 
of Newsreels as Part of Silver Jubilee Pro- 
gram to Extend Influence of Screen to Hu- 
manitarian Field — Sound Film of Operation 
Is Shown to American College of Surgeons. 



M P T 0 A CONVENTION 

Action to Settle Exhibitors' Minds in Period 
of Raped Changes in Industry is Big Aim of 
M P T O A Convention at Memphis, October 
29 to 31 — Governor of Tennessee Will Wel- 
come Theatre Owners — Exhibits Are Expected 
to Occupy Entire Mezzanine Floor. 



COMPLETE INDEX TO CONTENTS 



NEWS 

Allied States leaders explain franchise to independent exhibitors 
at Los Angeles meeting — Hungarian court dismisses suit against 
Western Electric. 

Crabtree is elected president of S M P E — Plan to limit trade 
press to transcripts of papers is questioned by F. H. Richardson 
— New journal is proposed by Society. 

German public calls for more sound pictures while exhibitors 
ask for more silents — Warners will make operetta written es- 
pecially for screen. 

Colleen Moore says most effective sequence in her new picture 
was made possible by sound — Paramount nets S'4,600,000 in third 



quarter. 

FEATURES 

The Voice of the Industry (Letters from Readers) 60 

Motion Picture Finance 26 

Service Talks 45 

Los Angeles by Douglas Hodges 38 

Broadway 22 

Sound Pictures 33 

Pictorial Section 27 

Sound Act Releases 41 

J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 63 



DEPARTMENTS 



The Studio 37 

Short Features 40 

Music and Talent 46 

The Theatre 42 

Classified Advertising 59 

Quick Reference Picture Chart 53 

What the Picture Did for Me 61 

New Pictures 58 

Chicago Personalities by J. F 66 



ADVERTISEMENTS 

FILM, SOUND AND EQUIPMENT — Paramount, Eastman Ko- 
dak, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Fox, Christie, Tiffany-Stahl, Colum- 
bia, Universal, RCA Photophone, Pathe, Western Electric, Pa- 
cent Reproducers, First National, Mellaphone, Automatic Ticket 
Register. 

MUSIC AND TALENT— De Sylva, Brown and Henderson, Wit- 
mark and Sons, Robbins Music Corporation, Don Cordon, Ben 
Ross, Johnny Payne, Bill Meeder, Brooks Costumes, Laura Lane, 
Ferrel and Dewees, Anita La Pierre, Roy Sedley. 



CHICAGO 

407 South Dearborn St. Telephone Harrison 0036-37-38 

Cable Address: Quigpubco 
EDWIN S. CLIFFORD, General Manager 
JAY M. SHRECK, Managing Editor 
GEORGE CLIFFORD, Business Manager 
ERNEST A, ROVELSTAD, Neuis Editor 
BOLLYWOOD 

1605 North Cahuenga St. Telephone Gladstone 2118-2119 
DOUGLAS HODGES 
West Coast Manager 



EDITORIAL 
AND 
ADVERTISING 
OFFICES 



565 Fifth Avenue 



NEW YORK 

Telephone Wickersham 2366-2367 



PETER VISCHER, New York Editor 
JAMES BEECROFT, New York Advertising Manager 

LONDON 
THE BIOSCOPE 
Faraday House 
8-10 Charing Cross Rd., W. C. 2 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: United States and its possessions, Canada and all countries of the Americas— S3.00 per year; Great Britain and its colonies.— £l per year. 
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The HERALD-WORLD assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts. No manuscripts are returned unless authors so request. 



18 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



October 19, 1929 



EX H I B ITO RS 

HERALD 
WORLD 

Martin J. Quigley, Publisher & Editor 

Incorporating Exhibitors Herald, founded in 1915 : Moving Pic- 
ture World, founded in 1907; Motography, founded in 1909; and 
The Film Index, founded in 1909 

Published Every Wednesday by 
Quigley Publishing Company 

Publication Office: 407 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 

Martin J. Quigley, President 
Edwin S. Clifford, Secretary George Clifford, Asst. Treasurer 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
Copyright, 1929, by Quigley Publishing Company 

All editorial and business correspondence 
should be addressed to the Chicago office 

Other publications: Better Theatres, devoted to construction, equipment and 
operation of theatres; published every fourth week in conjunction with Exhibitors 
Herald- World; The Motion Picture Almanac, Pictures and Personalities, pub- 
lished annually; The Chicagoan and Polo, Class publications. 



Vol. 97, No. 3 October 19, 1929 



Enemy or Ally? 

PERSONS in the amusement business whose pet worry 
is television are invited to give careful attention to the 
observations of Mr. William S. Paley, president of the 
Columbia Broadcasting System. Mr. Paley's thought on 
the matter, briefly, is that neither television nor anything 
else is going to change the home into a playhouse. 

The head of a great broadcasting company is naturally 
in a position to have much information on the develop- 
ments that are taking place in connection with television; 
and having such information he is excellently equipped 
to offer an expert opinion on what results are likely to 
occur when television comes into practical use. 

Mr. Paley's statement on the subject will be particularly 
interesting to exhibitors, both that television is not likely 
to be a force in opposition to theatre attendance and also 
that television, when it arrives as a practicality, will be- 
come a valuable aid and attraction asset to the theatres. 

"When television comes," said Mr. Paley, "whether it 
be in five years or a score it will play a large part in the 
operation of the very theatres which some feel it 
threatens." 

Mr. Paley's opinion being just about the most expert 
available on the subject, it may therefore be taken that 
television instead of being an enemy to be feared may be 
regarded as a friend who may be welcomed. 

Echoes of "Applause" 

PARAMOUNT'S courage and enterprise in getting 
Rouben Mamoulian "fresh from his triumphs with the 
Theatre Guild," as we are told, is to be admired. But, 
after all, Theatre Guild productions and productions for 
the millions who attend motion picture theatres are two 
very different matters, with different possibilities and 
different limitations. Mr. Mamoulian in directing "Ap- 
plause" seems to have been so steeped in Theatre Guild 
traditions that he lost sight of the various restrictions 
as to subject matter and treatment which cannot be suc- 
cessfully avoided in the making of a motion picture. 
The enthusiasm of the artistic and arty concerning "Ap- 
plause" will probably be boundless. The adverse criticism 
of the rank and file of motion picture patrons will prob- 
ably be similarly unmeasured. 

The motion picture, obviously, cannot be the same old 



thing done in the same old way. Creative genius such as 
that exhibited by Mr. Mamoulian must be drafted to the 
studio if there is to be advancement and progress. But 
such genius when it is new to motion picture production, 
or when it is too rebellious against existing conventions, 
must be tactfully restrained under supervision which is in- 
telligently and adequately informed concerning what is 
and what is not acceptable subject matter and treatment 
in a motion picture which is not intended for limited class 
and adult entertainment, such as a Theatre Guild produc- 
tion, but is intended for widespread distribution among all 
ages and classes of people. 

Mrs. Winter Comes 

AT a recent conference in New York of clubwomen and 
il educators Mrs. T. G. Winter, former president of the 
National Federation of Women's